Ukrainian Aspic Recipe (Kholodets)

Want to impress your parents with the Ukrainian Aspic recipe? LOL

My husband made this aspic or holodets recipe; mostly because I wouldn’t go near pigs feat with a 10 foot pole. That’s what Ukrainian people use to make the gelatin firm; pigs feet.Β I fought him hard on this recipe, but he insisted. He secretly purchased the ingredients and I rolled my eyes when I saw them in the freezer. He wasn’t going to let me stop him.

Before you turn up your nose and run off, here are some fun facts I learned about Aspics (kholodets) from Wikipedia:

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* Meat Aspics came before Jello (I guess that means we owe aspics a debt of gratitude)
* Cooks used to show off their creativity and skills with inventive aspics (you can too!) lol
* Aspics became popular in the US and were a dinner staple in the 1950’s (now on the verge of extinction in the US, but not in Ukraine).
* Ukrainian people refer to Aspic as Holodets.

You know, in the end, I’m glad my husband made this. It preserves the recipe and helps us remember our roots. (I wasn’t kidding when I said Ukrainian food can be bizarre). This tasted exactly like the one my Mom made years ago. We brought this to my parents house on Sunday and they were so impressed; even my sister ate it and had seconds! Thanks honey for being persistent. I’m just floored that you actually made Holodets. That’s right ladies; my man made holodets. And, he works out. πŸ˜‰

Ingredients for Aspic/Holodets:

2 lb pork legs, soaked in cold water and refrigerated 3 hours to overnight
5-8 large chicken drumsticks (or any meat with the bone in)
2 medium onions
1 large carrot
1 stick of celery
2 bay leaves
5-10 peppercorns
2 tsp salt + more to taste
Red Horseradish sause/Hren or Russian mustard to serve

Kholodets (1)

How to make Aspic – Kholodets:

1. Make sure you soak the pork legs in cold water (we put them in the fridge overnight which is also a good way to thaw them if you want to make it the next day).

2. In a large pot, Add pork legs, and chicken drum sticks. Add enough water to cover all of the meat. Set over high heat, cover and bring to a boil. As soon as it starts boiling, remove from heat and drain off the water.

Kholodets (2)

Rinse the meat, refill with fresh water (enough water to cover all of the meat, plus an extra 1/2-inch over the meat); Don’t add too much water or it won’t be “gelatiney” enough later.

Kholodets (3)

Cover and bring to a boil again.Reduce heat to a light boil/simmer and set a timer for 5 hours :-O. (I have a much greater appreciation for my mom’s efforts in making holodets after watching my husband make this).

Kholodets (4)

3. After cooking for 5 hours, Add 1 large carrot, 2 medium onions (both ends removed), 1 celery stick, 2 bay leaves, 5-8 peppercorns and 2 tsp salt into the pot and continue boiling Β on low heat 1 more hour. It should start to look like a nice chicken broth.Β Now it’s important that you keep the broth (do not discard the broth!) and do not add more water.

Kholodets (5)

4. Remove the drumsticks and carrot from the broth and let them cool. Discard pork legs, onion and bay leaves. Use a fine mesh sieve with 3 bounty paper towels in theΒ colanderΒ and filter the broth through the paper towels. You will be left with a clean broth.

5. Peel and press 4 garlic cloves into the broth and do a taste test to see if more salt is needed.

6. Once the meat has cooled, use a fork to separate meat from the bones. Keep the good meat; discard the rest. Thinly slice the carrot. You can make one big holodets in a rectangular pyrex dish or you can make smaller bowls.

7. Start by placing carrots on the bottom and top with some dill if you wish. Next add the meat in an even layer and pour broth over the meat. You need enough broth to cover the meat and add a little extra over the top. Refrigerate 3 hours to overnight or until firm. Serve with red horseradish/hren or Russian mustard. Once it’s set, set the bowl in hot water for a few seconds, then use a slim spatula to release theΒ gelatinΒ from the dish.

Note:

If using varying types or amounts of meat/bones, reader Lena shared a great tip: “An easy way to find out if your liquid is going to freeze or if you need to add gelatin, is to put a table spoon of it into a bowl and put it in the fridge. If it stiffens then you’re safe, but if not, then to add gelatin.”

Ukrainian Aspic Recipe (Kholodets)

4.67 from 27 votes
Prep Time: 30 minutes
Cook Time: 6 hours 30 minutes
Total Time: 7 hours
Author: Natasha of NatashasKitchen.com
Skill Level: Medium
Cost to Make: $9-$11
Servings: 8 -12

Ingredients

  • 2 lb pork legs soaked in cold water and refrigerated 3 hours to overnight
  • 5-8 large chicken drumsticks or any meat with the bone in
  • 2 medium onions
  • 1 large carrot
  • 1 stick of celery
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 5-10 peppercorns
  • 2 tsp salt + more to taste
  • Red horseradish/hren sause or mustard to serve

Instructions

  1. Make sure you soak the pork legs in cold wate (3 hours to overnight - it's also a good way to thaw the pork)
  2. In a large pot, add pork legs, and chicken drum sticks. Add enough water to cover all of the meat. Set over high heat, cover and bring to a boil. As soon as it starts boiling, remove from heat and drain off the water. Rinse the meat, refill with fresh water (enough water to cover all of the meat, plus an extra 1/2-inch over the meat); Don't add too much water or it won't be "gelatiney" enough later. Cover and bring to a boil again. Reduce heat to a light boil/simmer and set a timer for 5 hours.
  3. After cooking for 5 hours, Add 1 large carrot, 2 medium onions (both ends removed), 1 celery stick, 2 bay leaves, 5-8 peppercorns and 2 tsp salt into the pot and continue boiling on low heat 1 more hour. It should look like a nice chicken broth. Now it's important that you do not discard the broth and do not add more water to the pot!
  4. Remove the drumsticks and carrot from the broth and let them cool. Discard pork legs, onion and bay leaves. Use a fine mesh sieve with 3 bounty paper towels over the sieve and filter the broth through the paper towels. You will be left with a clean broth.
  5. Peel and press 4 garlic cloves into the broth and do a taste test to see if more salt is needed.
  6. Once the meat has cooled, use a fork to separate meat from the bones. Keep the good meat; discard the bones. Thinly slice the carrot. You can make one big holodets in a rectangular pyrex dish or you can make smaller serving bowls.
  7. Start by placing carrots on the bottom and top with some dill if you wish. Next add the meat in an even layer and pour broth over the meat; enough to cover the meat and a little extra over the top. Refrigerate 3 hours to overnight, or until firm. Serve with red horseradish/hren (recipe on NatashasKitchen.com) or Russian mustard. Once it's set, set the bowl in hot water for a few seconds, then use a slim spatula to release the gelatin from the dish. Or you can just serve it out of the dish and save yourself a step.

 

If you are still reading this, do you do anything fancy with your aspics (holodets)? Do you even make aspics??

Read comments/reviewsAdd comment/review

  • Tanya Kahle
    April 10, 2018

    Natasha, why do you discard the water after bringing it to a boil? Whenever I make “stock”, (isn’t it similar?) I throw bones and odds and ends in crockpot & let it cook for 8 hours or so. Why the difference? Is there something “bad” with the water you get from that first boil? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 10, 2018

      Hi Tanya, this is the method I learned for making kholodets and the first boil just gets rid of the impurities for a clearer aspic without losing much in the way of nutrients. The true goodness in aspic is when it has cooked long enough to release the marrow from the bones. Reply

  • Katherine
    April 6, 2018

    Hi Natasha,
    First time visitor. I was looking for a general recipe for Kholodetz and came across your site.
    Adding a new spin on all the recipes I’ve read, there were none that use veal shank, which is what my mother used. Mom was born in Kiev and her mom was a cook who sold her goods at market. Grandma’s specialty was blood noodle cake (YUK, eh?).
    Anyway, I will be using veal shanks and veal shoulder on my first attempt.
    Mom passed away in 2016, so I was looking for some tips. Thanks for some great insights. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 6, 2018

      I hope this brings back memories for you (minus the noodle cake – ewe – I can’t even imagine, and not sure I want to imagine, what that would be like!) Reply

  • Alina Kazak
    March 21, 2018

    Hey Natasha πŸ™‚
    I was wondering what can I replace Pork with? If I use more chicken will it still turn out good? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 21, 2018

      Chicken will taste great as well πŸ˜€ Reply

  • vera bentley
    March 14, 2018

    natasha you have just brought some more of my childhood back. i dont remember how mum did hers but i remember all her hours at the stove. mum made great hullodyets, & id forgotten all about hren! Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      March 15, 2018

      I’m happy to hear the recipe brings back fond memories Vera! πŸ™‚ Reply

  • Vika
    February 15, 2018

    Why do you refer to so many Slavic dishes as “Ukrainian”? Haladets is as Russian as it gets lol. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 15, 2018

      Hi Vika, it’s one of those things that is argued on both sides and this is the method that our Ukrainian family makes. In more recent posts, I have been trying to avoid calling anything specifically Russian or Ukrainian and just default to Slavic to avoid the back and forth so we can all sleep better at night. Ha ha! πŸ™‚ Reply

      • roman
        February 15, 2018

        Hi Vika,

        It’s my view that many similar recipes are shared amongst all the Slavic nations…
        Such as Polish Borstch, Ukrainian Borstch and say Russian Borstch all much the same thing but all slanted in taste and finish according to each national group…say no more! Reply

  • Tina
    January 12, 2018

    Hi Natasha! I’m so happy to see this recipe on your blog! I’m gonna surprise my mom by making it by myself! I love your recipes! A quick note for the people that don’t want to use pork legs my mom used to make kholodets with the rooster instead of chicken. Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      January 12, 2018

      Hello Tina! I’m glad to hear you’re enjoying the recipes, please let me know what you think of this one! Reply

  • Kath
    January 2, 2018

    can a fully prepared chicken aspic be put in freezer for a later time? My neighbour gave me one but would like to save. How long can it be kept in the fridge? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 3, 2018

      Hi Kath, Aspic is basically very condensed bone broth and bone broth is definitely freezable so I would say yes it’s safe to freeze. Reply

      • roman
        January 3, 2018

        As Natasha suggests definitely freezable however no more than 4 days in the fridge… Reply

      • Kath
        January 3, 2018

        Thanks for your speedy reply, what you say makes complete sense. Reply

  • December 3, 2017

    Hi Natasha, good basic recipe for Knolodets. Mom used to call it studenetz. She also used a mix of pork hocks and chicken. She never discarded the hocks, stripped the meat from the fat and bones and added to the broth, with chicken. At the end she would remove the meat, strain the broth, bring to a boil and add 2 packets of gelatin to the broth until dissolved. Shred the meat and pour broth over it. I still make it today and love it. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 3, 2017

      Thank you so much for sharing your Mom’s method! πŸ™‚ Reply

  • nina
    November 10, 2017

    I just made a holodets, and used just pigs feet and 2 pork hocks….simmered for 5 hours, with onion, garlic, salt, celery….tasting for salt is critical, IMO. turned out great! Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      November 10, 2017

      I’m glad to hear that Nina! Thanks for sharing! πŸ™‚ Reply

  • Kat
    August 30, 2017

    Oh my Natasha,this guy just copied your recipes:aranchini,posharski kotlety,your cakes and many many more!!!!!He claims they are his recipes!!!!sorry I am fuming!!! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 30, 2017

      Kat, thank you so much for letting me know! I’ll have to submit this guy for copyright infringement. Unfortunately, this happens all the time with Russian websites – they rip off my recipes and photos and add their own watermark. It’s so crazy!!! Reply

  • Kat
    August 30, 2017

    Hi Natasha!Thank you so much for a great recipe-trying to cook your aspic for the first time!Surely it will come out yummy as all your recipes!Everything I have cooked so far just works!!
    Oh,FYI I found exactly the same recipe with the same photos on another website.Dont known if you are aware of that but looks like someone is copywriting!
    http: //povar. me/vtoroe/myaso-riba/xolodec/ Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 1, 2017

      Kat, thank you so much for letting me know about that! We have filed a complaint about the plagiarism. Its so unfortunate how often this happens – they rip off our recipes, photos and even place their copyright on our photos! Reply

  • Katerina
    August 15, 2017

    Did you by any chance try making kholodets in a Pressure Cooker? I wonder if it work and how much time it would need to cook. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 15, 2017

      Hi Katerina, I don’t have a pressure cooker and I have not tested it in one, so I can’t really say. Sorry I can’t be more helpful. Maybe someone else knows? Reply

  • Katrina
    July 28, 2017

    Why do you soak the pig feet? Does it help the broth to absorb better and be a thicker gelatin? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 28, 2017

      Katrina, soaking pigs feet helps to remove impurities and make the broth more clear. Reply

  • SALLY KORNEYCHU
    March 12, 2017

    I love this recipe, I’ve never used chicken tho’, my mom always used beef shank with the feet. Sometimes when I couldn’t find beef shank, I used beef stew meat….never thought of chicken.
    I was also wondering if you know if I can freeze this. Always make too much….lol

    I love your page….anytime I google something, your page is always there <3 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 13, 2017

      Hi Sally, That’s awesome that my page comes up on Google for you. I’m so happy to hear that! I’m not sure if this would freeze well being a gelatin. my guess is that it’s not freezer friendly. I don’t recall my Mom ever freezing it either. It does refrigerate really well though – the gelatin and thin film of fat that forms over the top when it firms up, helps protect it from spoiling. I hope that helps! πŸ™‚ Reply

      • Sherry Torchinsky
        February 14, 2018

        I know I am a bit late to this party, but I thought I’d add my experience with freezing. My aunt always makes it for us and freezes it for later. Just bring it back to a boil once it’s thawed, add a bit more garlic as it seems to lose potency after freezing and it sets right back up in the fridge. Reply

        • Natasha's Kitchen
          February 14, 2018

          Thanks for sharing your great tips with other readers Sherry! Reply

  • Andrew
    January 1, 2017

    Hi Natasha,
    i made this dish yesterday, but i didnt use pork, just chicken thighs bone-in, i cooked longer about 6 and half hrs. the broth did solidify but not very firm. do you have any recommendations ?
    thanks Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 1, 2017

      Hi Andrew, I think the bone-in chicken thighs don’t provide enough gelatin for the recipe without a little help from something else, this is why I add the pork. One of my readers reported using only bone-in-chicken thighs but he also added: “I also used Agar powder (1/2 tsp per cup of liquid)” I hope that helps for next time! Reply

    • roman bondaruk
      January 1, 2017

      My mum always says that if the bones you are using to do your thing are not going to provide the natural gelatine then don’t be afraid to use gelatine from other sources…nothing much worse than loose kholodets.
      cheers, Roman Reply

      • Natasha
        natashaskitchen
        January 2, 2017

        Thanks Roman! πŸ™‚ Reply

        • Harrison
          November 29, 2017

          If you were to add extra gelatine, how and when would you do it when making this dish? Reply

          • Natasha
            natashaskitchen
            November 29, 2017

            Hi Harrison, one of my readers, Lena, shared her experience and advice on that: “My mom had a small tip, from her past experiences, that I thought was helpful. She said an easy way to find out if your liquid is going to freeze or if you need to add gelatin, is to put a table spoon of it into a bowl and put it in the fridge. If it stiffens then you’re safe, but if not, then to add gelatin.” I am assuming you would add it towards the end of the cooking if you want it to thicken more and bring it to a boil before turning off the heat.

    • Inna Gavrishchuk
      December 21, 2017

      My mom uses a few packets of gelatin to help solidify when she makes the recipe. Reply

  • Lena
    November 24, 2016

    Hi Natasha, thank you so much for sharing this recipe!!!
    My mom had a small tip, from her past experiences, that I thought was helpful. She said an easy way to find out if your liquid is going to freeze or if you need to add gelatin, is to put a table spoon of it into a bowl and put it in the fridge. If it stiffens then you’re safe, but if not, then to add gelatin. This might be common sense to others already, but to me (lol) I found out mine didn’t stiffen on the next day! OopsπŸ™Š So I redid it:-) Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 24, 2016

      That is really a wonderful tip and thank you so much for sharing that with us. I’ll leave your tip in the recipe above. Have an awesome Thanksgiving!! πŸ™‚ Reply

  • MARCIA ENTZEL
    August 4, 2016

    Oops–i’ts me again,
    Instead of the bay leaves and other spices, we just use a small scoop of pickling spice placed in a stainless-steel tea ball. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 4, 2016

      I will have to try that! Thank you for sharing πŸ™‚ Reply

  • MARCIA ENTZEL
    August 4, 2016

    Hi Natasha,
    Your comments could have been written by me–but my hubby is German.
    I too nearly gagged when I saw the pork feet –and after cleaning them,cooking them, they were discarded.Rather than using chicken, we purchase UNSMOKED (fresh) from our local supermarket.These are a specialty item that they order for us.
    I’m going to try your recipe,though, and my husband’s family serves them with a small amount of apple cider vinegar splashed over them.
    Thank you for a great site–I’ll definitely be back! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 4, 2016

      Ha ha, I hope you all enjoy the aspic! πŸ™‚ Thanks for sharing your tip about the cider vinegar. That sounds great! Reply

  • Olga
    June 2, 2016

    Natasha,

    went to check on the pork legs and found the halves. I bet I can find the whole legs but do you know if there’s a difference between the two? Which ones will do better? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      June 2, 2016

      Hi Olga, I’m not sure what you mean by the halves so I don’t know. As long as they aren’t boneless, they should work. I’ve even had readers report that this worked with bone-in chicken. Reply

  • Julia
    April 29, 2016

    Hello, I live in San Francisco. Who knows where can I buy pork legs here?
    Thanks! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 29, 2016

      I’ve never done any grocery shopping there. I would suggest calling your local grocery stores and maybe your local butcher to see if they carry them, that way you aren’t running all over town looking for it. Maybe someone else might know?… Reply

    • Katia
      January 5, 2017

      Asian markets! Go to clement street, especially out in the Avenues. My mom gets them there. Also, try the russian stores on Geary or on La Playa. Reply

  • Lena
    April 16, 2016

    Hello, thank you so much for this recipe, I love it and so does my family!!!
    My mom gave me a very helpful tip though: she said a good way to test the broth out, if it will stiffen or not, is to put a tablespoon of it into a bowl and refrigerate it. If it stiffens, u can proceed without worrying that it won’t stiffen. And if it doesn’t, then of course to add the gelatine and all. Just thought this might help others out incase they are not sure their broth will freeze or not.:-) Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 17, 2016

      Lena, thank you so much for sharing that tip with me πŸ˜€ and you are welcome. Reply

  • Donna
    March 7, 2016

    Natasha,
    I can’t believe I saw this recipe. My parents made this traditionally around Easter and we kids couldn’t stand it! They called it studdenetz (aplogize for spelling). Pigs feet! OMG! Thanks for sharing and bringing back memories! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 7, 2016

      Donna, you are welcome πŸ˜€. Don’t you just love it when certain food bring back some good memories? Reply

  • Inna
    February 15, 2016

    I like to eat it by dipping into white vinegar, gives a nice flavor☺️ Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 16, 2016

      I should try that ?. Usually I dip Pelmeni in vinegar. Reply

  • Bern
    January 25, 2016

    I remember my father sucking the marrow jelly from the bones in the studenetz. Your recipe includes the meat removed from the bone. Do you know of other recipes where the bones are left in the jelly? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 26, 2016

      Bern, we always removed the bones but the long cooking draws all the nutrients into the finished product. I don’t have a recipe with bones in the jelly. Reply

  • Valentina
    December 31, 2015

    Lol so I’m sitting here squinting at your photos trying to see of you cut off the nails off of the pig feet? I’m making this right now and my mom said you have to cut them off but there is no way in this world that is possible without a husband.. I’ve tried with every tool in the kitchen. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 31, 2015

      Lol. We didn’t remove anything. I just used them the way we bought them and I think they are removed by the butcher ahead of time when you get store-bought. If it’s store-bought, you don’t have to cut anything off. I giggled reading your comment and imagining you trying. I called my Mom to ask her and she said when they butchered their own pig, they scorch it with a torch and then you can cut it off with a knife. Reply

    • roman
      December 31, 2015

      Hi Valentina,

      You need a good Cossack lad to attend to the nail clipping. They are clever enough to cut the sharp off a razor blade…cheers. Reply

  • roman bondaruk
    December 19, 2015

    Hi Natasha,

    I love the recipe and make this food whenever I can. I recently made it with pork hock and chicken wings, a little dill and lots of garlic. Wow how good is that. I also agree with your readers in that I feel blessed to have had the benefit of a Polish mother and Ukraine father.
    I am off to Orange for xmas with mum and will be including these foods into our festive repast. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 19, 2015

      Hi Roman! That does sound like a good combination for aspic! Merry Christmas to you! Reply

  • Natalie Chodan
    November 24, 2015

    Hi Natasha, I am first born Australian with Ukrainian parents, I am so very grateful for my heritage and the food. Friends used to visit for the food my mum cooked and I continue the tradition. Mum used to mix pork, chicken and beef (osso bucco) for holodetch. She was very careful to soak meat in water to remove all blood. I continue to make Schavel soup, when my kids were young they called it “grass soup”. I made it recently as part of my daughter’s 31st birthday dinner…her friends were mind blown at a taste they never knew existed! Vareniki, borsch and cabbage rolls still remain my favourite foods. With cabbage rolls I started to add celery, carrot and red capsicum (finely diced) to mum’s recipe of mince, rice, fried onions and garlic. Pork and sauerkraut , baroboli plaxki, yummy. I love my heritage πŸ™‚ Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 25, 2015

      I’ve really fallen in love with Ukrainian food over the years. I feel like I didn’t appreciate it enough as a child, but it’s such a rich food heritage we share πŸ™‚ Reply

      • bill from lachine
        December 13, 2015

        Natasha,

        I’ll be making this recipe shortly…..the part I don’t understand is why would you discard the pork meat…..just remove the meat and add it with the chicken so as not to waste it. Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          December 13, 2015

          Hi Bill. Great question! The pieces I was using really had hardly any meat at all, but if yours have more meat, it’s perfectly ok and would taste great to keep it in the recipe with the chicken. Reply

    • roman
      January 26, 2016

      Wow I love this site…it is so good to read of others who have the same food experience as me. I am also inclined to experiment a little with the basics. My Oz friends love my cabbage rolls and pirogi. Cheers. Reply

      • Natalie Chodan
        January 27, 2016

        Hi Roman,
        Yes it is wonderful to know traditional cooking is alive!! Mama used to bake the cabbage rolls in a tomato sauce and cream mix, as I still do. We used to eat them either with tomato sauce or heaps of fried onions. A friend of mine makes a mushroom sauce as a dressing, so yummy. One day I did not have fresh mushrooms so I used a tin of creamed mushroom soup, nothing added, just heated and used it as a sauce over the cabbage rolls, a lazy but effective sauce indeed. Our local supermarket now only sells the small drum cabbages and I have used them to make cabbage rolls with success. I use the heart to make a coleslaw so none of the cabbage is wasted. I can still buy a large cabbage elsewhere but it was fun trying the small one. Happy cooking! Reply

  • October 24, 2015

    Natasha, I have a recent friend over in Kyiv, Ukraine, who today mentioned a recipe for Fish-Jelly but didn’t enclose that recipe so I googled it and your website came up (as always) with this recipe of your husband’s. She also mentioned Varenik which I will have to try soon with all the different fillings. I will be sending my friend your website address. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 25, 2015

      That’s great! Thanks for sharing Bill πŸ™‚ Reply

  • alex
    October 8, 2015

    Wil this also work with a pressure cooker? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 8, 2015

      I don’t have a pressure cooker and I have not tested it in one, so I can’t really say. Sorry I can’t be more helpful. Maybe someone else knows? Reply

    • AK
      April 1, 2016

      It will work with pressure cooker even better.. there is nothing special to aspic. you can do any variants as you wish.. keep in mind that for the meat that does not have too much cartilage you will have to add gelatin. Reply

  • Sophie
    August 28, 2015

    Your recipe brought back so many childhood memories. My grandma used to make all the time when I went to visit in Donetsk. But I do remember her only using chicken legs and sometimes drums, but mostly legs. I’ve always thought hers was the best in the world (even my mom can’t make it as delicious). I’m trying your recipe but with organic chicken feet from Whole Foods. Hopefully it comes out as well as my grandma’s. On a side note though, there’s a soup called khash in Armenian cuisine that is made out of either pig or cow feet and stomach and it’s cooked the whole night, so much that everything disentegrates with the broth. We eat it hot usually on a Sunday morning (with garlic and white radish and Armenian bread lavash soaked into the soup), because it makes one very very sleepy afterwards πŸ™‚ yum!!!!! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 28, 2015

      Sophie, I love when a recipe brings memories back from the childhood :). Chicken can be used by itself, by I agree that using pig’s feet makes it tastier. Thank you for sharing some of the Armenian cuisine, it sounds good during cold weather :). Reply

  • Mangla
    August 1, 2015

    Is there any other meat that would suffice in place of Pig’s or Rooster’s legs/feet for the gelatin affect? These animal parts are not always easy to find where I live. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 1, 2015

      I really have not tried with anything else. Maybe someone else has? Reply

      • Katia
        August 28, 2015

        If you don’t feel like messing with pig trotters beef shanks will work just as fine. I Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          August 28, 2015

          Pig trotters… Lol. Great to know! Thanks!! Reply

  • Vita
    July 8, 2015

    Hey Natasha, I’m making this right now…do I use the celery or discard it? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 8, 2015

      Sorry for the late reply. yes, discard the celery. You want to discard everything besides the liquid. Reply

      • Vita
        July 9, 2015

        That’s alright. I did end up discarding the celery…I looked more closely thru the pictures and I didn’t see it in the assembly part. πŸ˜‰ It came out even better than I remember from childhood, so thank you for another wonderful post! This is the first time I ever made kholodets, because I was always intimidated by it, but it was actually fairly simple. Love all your work, thank you so much!! Reply

  • Tania
    April 10, 2015

    Thank you for the recipe Natasha,I want to try making this but only with organic drumsticks..do you think it will work out? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 10, 2015

      I think drumsticks would work well. πŸ™‚ Reply

  • Jim Przedzienkowski
    January 24, 2015

    Never say aspic with chicken and pork. i make pigs feet and add some pork but never chicken. I’ll have to give it a try. Thanks. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 24, 2015

      Let me know how it turns out :). Reply

  • Julia
    December 22, 2014

    Why the recipes called for discarding first water, what is rational of douing that? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 22, 2014

      It helps get rid of impurities from the meat and keeps the gelatin more clear in the end product. Reply

  • Dasha
    November 9, 2014

    Hello!
    Question: I would like to make some holodets, but I cannot use know gelatin as it is derived from an animal (i.e. pig, cattle). Would you happen to know of any gelatin alternatives that would work well?
    Please me know!
    Thank you.
    Dasha

    P.S. I will rate the recipe because it looks delicious! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 9, 2014

      I haven’t tested any alternatives. You might read through the comments. Some readers have reported good results with using chicken, but that is still animal derived ofcourse. Are you vegetarian? Even regular unflavored gelatin powder is animal derived. I’ve never tried anything else like arrowroot which I believe is seaweed derived, so I can’t really vouch for it. Reply

      • Tania
        April 10, 2015

        I’ve heard that a good alternative for gelatin is agar agar,it’s not derived from animals πŸ™‚ (I found some in a local Asian market) Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          April 10, 2015

          Thanks Tania! Have you tried it with Aspic? I wonder how it works without the gelatin from the bones? Reply

  • Olesya
    October 7, 2014

    Hi Natasha! I just want to say how much I love your site and recipes. I am from Crimea and babulya often forgets to tell me her recipes that I crave so much from my childhood. This holodets looks just like hers, pigs feet and all! I recall her using a pig’s head too for the gello-y consistency. Very traditional πŸ™‚ Thank you for posting. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 7, 2014

      Oh man a pigs head? Yeah that would be very brave to post that on the blog. lol. I’m so glad you are enjoying the blog and that it brings back memories for you πŸ™‚ Reply

  • Annemieke Blondeel
    September 3, 2014

    Hi Natasha! I am originally from Belgium, and yes, we make aspics! There are 3 famous ones: Jambon Persille (ham and parsley), pork tongue in a tomatoed aspic, and ‘Hennepot’ with a mix of meats in a clear aspic. Traditionally all of these would have been made with aspic from calf’s feet, but these days we just use shop-bought gelatine.
    We also make fish aspics: skate wings in aspic (the ‘bones’ of the skate wings create the aspic), and eel in aspic. The fish aspics contain quite a bit of lemon or vinegar, and bayleaves….
    Let me know if you would like any recipes!
    Love you recipes!
    Annemieke Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 3, 2014

      Wow I’ve never heard of fish aspics; sounds brave but interesting. I’d love to visit Belgium some day. Thanks so much for sharing and I’m so happy you are enjoying the recipes πŸ™‚ Reply

  • Paul
    May 5, 2014

    That is an Authentic Ukrainian recipe for Kholodets. My father made it this way. My father was an immigrant to the U.S. from Lviv and came to the U.S> after WW2. There was a large Ukrainian community in northern N.J. and I attended St. John’s Ukrainian Catholic School in Newark 60’s & 70’s. There was/is also a Ukrainian church in Hillside which we attended. My father would make this stuff. I hated it with a passion as a kid. It stunk up the garage as that was where he would let it cool and kept batches of it. In our household we called it Sulze and not Kholodets. That may be due to my mom being German. Pigs Feet are definitely used if you want to make it the Authentic Ukrainian way. I am not sure why adults would have a problem with pigs feet. As a kid the entire dish was gross to me, all that gelatinous goo. Give me some pierogies with butter and carmalized onions and sour cream and some holobchi instead, Yum. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 5, 2014

      Thanks for sharing your story with us :). My mom made special ones with very clean meat for the kids. Now I only make it that way myself πŸ˜‰ Reply

  • Randy
    April 22, 2014

    Great recipe, but I only used chicken thighs and no pork (since pork is an unclean food). I also used Agar powder (1/2 tsp per cup of liquid) instead of the Knox gelatin (derived from ground pork/cow hooves, bones, etc). The chicken is done in an hour, shortens up the cooking time. Turned out great! Thanks! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 22, 2014

      You aren’t the first person to mention that Chicken works well. I think I’ll try that next time with the Agar powder like you recommended. I prefer chicken over pork anyway πŸ™‚ Reply

  • Oksana
    February 28, 2014

    Is it ok to add water sometime within those 5 hours? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 28, 2014

      It won’t thicken correctly if you add too much water. Make sure you cover and cook it so it doesn’t evaporate too much. Reply

  • Olga Ade
    January 28, 2014

    My mother always used pork knuckles and pig feet. If she could not find nice pork knuckles then she would use chicken legs and pig feet. I always liked the all pork better. Reply

  • Lyubov
    January 17, 2014

    Ia eshe dobavleaiu kurinie nojki, serdecki I jeludki, pomogaet Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 17, 2014

      I’m afraid I’m just not brave enough. Even as a child, I’d only pick out the most perfect meat parts and wouldn’t go near the other stuff πŸ™‚ Reply

  • Judy K
    December 27, 2013

    I am making my version of this right now. My Polish Grandmother called it Zemina and we had it at Christmas time. I use pig feet and cuts of boneless pork. Oh…it is so good! My Dad and I eat it all up ourselves. We tell everyone it has pig feet in it just so they wont try any and theres more for us. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 27, 2013

      Sneaky sneaky lol. It is strangely tasty πŸ™‚ Reply

  • PETRA
    December 8, 2013

    have not tried to make this but have to wonder if the chicken meat will not be mushy from having cooked so long. This sounds like something I would really like since I love most anything in aspic Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 8, 2013

      If you read through the comments, some of my readers have had good results with chicken (bone-on) πŸ™‚ Reply

  • M. Walker
    October 29, 2013

    Thank you so much for this recipe that has wafted me right back to my childhood. My mother made the Austrian version, but I haven’t a hope of spelling the name right, so I won’t try. Her glass cake pan of the jellied pork aspic was skimmed of the fat that rose to the top and was served with fresh homemade bread. We can’t buy jellied sliced meat at the deli any more, so I’m about to simmer pork hocks using your recipe. Wish me luck! M. W. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 29, 2013

      That’s awesome!!! I hope you love the recipe. Good luck! πŸ™‚ Reply

  • Rosemari Lane
    August 6, 2013

    Hi Natasha
    I am becoming addicted to your recipes!
    They remind me so much of my mom’s cooking.
    I have used the fresh, not smoked, pig hocks instead of the pigs feet.
    You still get the gelatin that way.
    I did try it with the pigs feet last time I made it but I think I’ll stick to the
    fresh hocks. Shanks are also be the same thing. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 6, 2013

      That’s so good to know. Thank you for sharing and I’m so glad you enjoy the recipes πŸ™‚ Reply

  • tonya
    May 24, 2013

    Very delish. My husband loved it, its one of his favorite dishes and since we’ve bin married over 4years now he’s bin asking me to make it. I always thought it was way more complicated than this. First time tried it and it was yummy. Thank u so much for sharing this recipe. I put half un regular bowls and half in a small square pyrex dish. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 24, 2013

      That’s awesome! I’m so glad you and your hubby enjoy the recipe! Reply

  • Z.R
    May 19, 2013

    Hey what’s up all, Natasha how are you, I have a question about the meat, can I use just the chicken because I don’t eat pork, will it be fine if I use just chicken?

    Thank you πŸ™‚ Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 20, 2013

      There were several people that said in the comments of this post that they use chicken with the bones in to make aspic, so yes you can. πŸ™‚ some even left extra details of how they make it! Reply

  • Lana
    April 24, 2013

    Last time mom tryed teaching me and I just bought the ingredient for her and told her ill learn it next time…. Too bed I never got the chance..:( my husband loves holodez! So only for him I would like to try this… All that I got was a whole chicken and 2 big packs of chicken feet….so I am thinking I can use chicken legs instead of pork legs and whole chicken instead of drums … And just folow the rest of ur recepie the same right? U think that would work?! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 24, 2013

      That should work, my mom-in-law makes it with the whole chicken. Let me know how it turns out :). Reply

  • anna
    April 4, 2013

    This was excellent! I did this in the slow cooker, so here are my suggestion for those that might want to use a slow cooker.
    I used 2 whole pigs feet that were cut in half lengthwise by the butcher. For a 9 by 13 pan this was close to 3 pounds.

    I have a 6 quart slow cooker. After pouring hot water on the chicken legs and pigs feet and rinsing them twice I filled up the slow cooker with about 4.5 quarts of water and cooked on LOW for 12 hours. I suggest for a 9by13 pan you use about 15 chicken legs, i used 10 and i needed a bit more meat for the ideal ratio. After the 12 hours ( you can do 10) I added 2 large carrots 1 huge onion and the spices- I used half vegeta and half salt. I cooked for about another 4 hours on slow.

    This is easier for me as it doesnt require watching anything. I skimmed the broth once but because it never boils it is rather clear. I strained it with a ladle after letting it sit for a while, this left most of the non clear broth on the bottom.

    for a 9 by 13 pan i used 6 cloves of garlic and about 3 cups less than the broth i had- so probably 4 quarts of broth total?

    The flavor is PERFECT. Thank you! This was my first holodets that turned out not runny . It was set around edges at 3 hour mark but fully set next day. It does not cut like jelly , it is perfect for holodets, the right amount of firmness but none of that hard stuff. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 4, 2013

      Thank you so much for sharing the slow cooker version Anna, I’m glad that it turned out great :). Reply

  • Augustina
    March 30, 2013

    Thank you for this amazing recipe!!! But I do have a question, is it really important to soak the pigs feet in cold water for 3 hours? Or can I skip that if I don’t have much time?… What does it do when you soak the pork feet for 3 hours?. The pork feet I am using are not frozen πŸ™‚ Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 30, 2013

      If short on time, than skip the soaking step. Soaking before cooking helps to get rid of some impurities or any blood that’s left. Reply

      • anna
        April 4, 2013

        I soaked overnight and the water was quite gross but mine were cut lengthwise so i assume the water was more gross because of that. The water was kind of red and it jellied a little , gross. lol Reply

  • Tatyana
    March 23, 2013

    Yes, this is an authentic version we always made in Ukraine, for almost every holiday or celebration. These days, my Mom makes holodets with turkey wings and drumsticks because they are sufficient for firming up the holodets, when simmered for several hours. All other ingredients are the same. Try it — you may like it even better. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 23, 2013

      Next time I’m in the mood for this, I’ll definitely give it a whirl πŸ™‚ Thank you Tanya! Reply

  • I love holodets! Did you know that if you don’t cover the pot with a lid, the broth will be clear and not cloudy (this goes for all broth soups, that you want to stay clear as a tear))? that is why I add a little bit more water, so that it can evaporate in the 5 hours it cooks πŸ™‚ Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 22, 2013

      That’s a great tip, I will keep that in mind for the next time Marina :). Reply

  • Lenachka
    March 22, 2013

    I accidently bought pork shanks and decided to just go ahead and try it anyway. And it turned out beautifully. I love holodetz but I was always so afraid to make it and now I have no fear. Big thanks to youa & your hubby. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 22, 2013

      Good to know it works well with pork shanks πŸ™‚ Thank you Lenachka Reply

  • Larysa
    March 20, 2013

    I read this paragraph and thought about Natasha’s post on FB. It can convince our American friends that kholodets isn’t so bad as they imagine.

    #3: Eat Liberal Amounts of Homemade Bone Broth

    Plenty of homemade bone broths in the diet on a regular basis is a dietary strategy that can help tremendously with any phthalate exposure that does occur despite a woman’s best efforts. Bone broth is extremely high in the amino acid glycine via natural gelatin which is essential for the liver to adequately perform its detoxification duties. In fact, the liver is greatly hampered if there isn’t enough glycine in the diet so it makes sense to consume liberal amounts of bone broth which includes glycine in a form that is very easily absorbed.

    Dr. Reuben Ottenberg in 1935 suggested in the Journal of the American Medical Association that patients with jaundice or other liver problems be administered 5-10 grams of gelatin per day as food or via a powdered gelatin supplement to supply additional glycine to the diet in order to encourage normalized hepatic function. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 20, 2013

      Thank you for sharing Larysa :). Reply

    • Lenachka
      March 22, 2013

      wow very cool….thanks for sharing Larysa Reply

  • OLESSA
    March 20, 2013

    hi natasha!!! we love love love holodets!!! always wanted to learn it from my mom but the reply was the same: “na glas”. argh…that wasn’t very helpful. And when I saw your post on holodets I was like “Score” – this is gonna be the one. lol. I’m actually working on it right now. After the 5 hours, I put all the veggies, you mentioned to boil for another hour. Do you mean boil on high or light boil, as in simmer? Just confused right now. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks again and God bless you and your family! You are a life-saver with your blog!!! love it!!! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 20, 2013

      Once you put veggies in, keep boiling lightly, just like the meat. Let me know how it turns out :)…I also updated the recipe.  Reply

      • OLESSA
        March 26, 2013

        Soooo, it was delicious!!! I added 2 packets of gelatin, wanted holodets to get firm faster. But overall, this one’s a keeper! Definitely impressed my parents, lol, though they prefer a lot more garlic. Thank you and God Bless you Natasha! Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          March 26, 2013

          I’m happy to hear they were impressed! πŸ˜‰ I’ll try with more garlic next time; that does sound nice! Reply

  • Lisa
    March 20, 2013

    Thanks for this, Natasha! My husband will love this! I’ve always wanted to try one of Julia Child’s aspic recipes, but I love the step-by-step photos you always include in your instructions! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 20, 2013

      You are welcome Lisa :). I should look in to Julia Child’s aspic recipes. Reply

  • YanaP
    March 19, 2013

    I was going to email you asking for this recipe! THANK YOU to your husband! (and you). =) Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 19, 2013

      It was all the MR. this time πŸ™‚ You’re welcome Reply

  • Oana
    March 19, 2013

    This is exactly like Romanian “piftie” which is traditionally eaten on New Year’s Eve. We also make it with turkey – its deliciousness is beyond words. Thanks for bringing to the forefront such wonderful dishes! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 19, 2013

      This is not your everyday dish for sure :), usually made during holidays. Reply

  • LOL. Natasha, I totally understand your feelings. LOL. I don’t think I can eat this now although I grew up eating it. I just can’t stop laughing as I imagine serving it to my Canadian friends. LOL.
    A+ for effort to Vadim for making it! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 19, 2013

      Thank you Olena ;), I will pass it on to Vadim. Reply

  • lana
    March 18, 2013

    My husband really likes holodets. His dad makes it alot and he uses pigs feet. And he uses the meat off the pigs feet (or whatever you would call it) not exactly meat, it’s rubbery. He grew up eating it that way, so he thinks it’s good. I always inspect my holodets and eat only the chicken. I haven’t made it because of the pigs feet. πŸ™‚ Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 18, 2013

      I totally know how you feel πŸ˜€ haha, that’s why my husband made it. Other readers wrote that they use just the chicken to make it, so there is hope for you Lana :). Reply

  • Estera
    March 18, 2013

    My mom makes this every year for Christmas, she sprinkles salt, pepper and a bit of paprika on top as well. Good stuff !!! πŸ™‚ Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 18, 2013

      Dish like this normally is made during holidays from what I observed :). Seems as everyone have their own variation that they like :). Reply

  • Nadia
    March 18, 2013

    I am so surprised that so many people love holodets/studenets. I grew up eating this with rye bread and vinegar. My mom and I make it with pigs feet and some of the meat from the pig hock. We add veal or turkey or chicken meat and sometimes gelatin. Onion garlic pepper and the vegetables you suggest. This can be very impressive for non ukrainian guests when it is arranged in small molds or ramekins and decorated as aspic. Pigs feet in jello!
    Sometimes we crave it and realize that it requires special ingredients and several hours to make! Thanks Natasha Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 18, 2013

      You are welcome Nadia. I was very surprised as well how many people love holodets :). Reply

  • Nella
    March 18, 2013

    We still have this every major holiday πŸ˜‰ And while I’ve never seen my mom actually make this…I really don’t think she use pork feet, but probably just gelatin to make firm, I will have to ask now. Thanks for posting this. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 18, 2013

      I’m curious to hear what she will say! πŸ™‚ Reply

  • Lesya
    March 18, 2013

    Thanks for the recipe, Natasha!!! My husband always craves holotets. I will be making it this week! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 18, 2013

      That’s great! I know my husband will say “I told you so” when he reads your comment πŸ˜‰ Reply

  • iryna
    March 18, 2013

    Thanks you for the recipe……I seemed to have misplaced my Mom’s and Family Holodetz recipe. This looks exactly like theirs…….my husband won’t touch it but I love this, I guess because I grew up with it.
    Wonderful photos and thanks for sharing your recipe……I will be making this soon. iryna πŸ™‚ Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 18, 2013

      It’s funny how you either love it or hate it. I’m glad you love it πŸ™‚ Reply

  • Olya
    March 18, 2013

    Yummy! This is my favorite food! Where can you buy pork feet? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 18, 2013

      My husband purchased them at Winco Foods. If you don’t have a Winco; ask your local butcher or the meat department in your supermarket. Reply

      • E
        March 18, 2013

        You might also want to check out Asian Grocery stores (if you have them in your area) , they have lots of different kinds of meat. Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          March 18, 2013

          I totally agree :). Reply

  • margo
    March 18, 2013

    There are very few recipes that I look at and say “I have just GOT to try this”. This one is just so….interesting…. that I will have to figure out a source of pigs feet and try it on some of my friends- I don’t know if I can bribe my husband into eating it)) . Perhaps if I hide the pig-foot aspect of it…

    I think I will use the crockpot. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 18, 2013

      I haven’t tried the crock pot; let me know how it goes. If they ask what kind of meat you used; just tell them chicken πŸ˜‰ Reply

  • Alena
    March 18, 2013

    Hi there, everyone seems to have their own yummy version:) My mom made this pretty often also. I remember her using turkey drums, chicken with bones, beef with bones, but I don’t remember pigs feet. Then when it was cooked and she took all the good meat for the holodets, we kids liked to eat what was left on the bones, because it was so good and falling apart. My mom says that as long as you have enough bones, the holodets should be firm. Have not done holodets myself yet:) Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 18, 2013

      Did she use all 3 meats at the same time? That would make the meat very colorful. I like variety. Turkey drums sound really really good! Reply

  • Aksana
    March 18, 2013

    you can use any meat with good bones to make holodets. I remember my mom used chicken feet to use as the gelatin source. I myself used beef ribs, which is also very good. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 18, 2013

      Hmmm, ribs does sound like a good idea. Thanks Aksana! Reply

  • May
    March 18, 2013

    you sure this is not a chinese dish? πŸ˜‰ cos ingredients are exactly the same. but they would get rid of the bones, cut the pork into small pieces & use that. I think the bones’ where the gelatin came from. like pork feet, chicken feet, etc. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 18, 2013

      It’s actually made in a lot of cultures and there’s disagreement about who figured it out first. This is the Ukrainian version πŸ™‚ Reply

  • alison
    March 18, 2013

    I like holodets. We usually made it with home grown chicken meat. We place the whole chicken in the slowcooker, add veggies and seasoning and cook for about 6 hrs, when it’s cool, we put in the fridge and next day it’s firm. It’s not extremely firm, I don’t like it that way anyways, but it’s pretty firm. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 18, 2013

      A whole chicken in the slow cooker is genius! I’d love to try that. Thank you! Reply

  • March 18, 2013

    Oh, Natasha! All my childhood memories are back! Not sure if my American family would like it, but who cares?! πŸ˜‰ Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 18, 2013

      Lol. I’m glad it brought back memories for you! My husband will be so pleased. Reply

  • Vicky
    March 18, 2013

    My mom never does it with pork feet , she uses whole chicken- cut into pieces and u flavored gelatin. It’s so good πŸ™‚ and so much flavor πŸ™‚ even though my
    Favorite is just the Juice thing – meatless. She always makes me a bowl of the juice hehe it’s so good with Ρ…Ρ€ΠΎΠ½ and bread haha mmmm I want some now lol Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 18, 2013

      I’m so surprised at how many people remember and still eat holodets. I’m so glad my husband pushed me to post this πŸ™‚ Reply

  • Vera Nika
    March 18, 2013

    Natasha, I’m seeing a new project in the near future for you, to re-create a holodets that tastes just as good, but without using pork feet) say you’ll take on the challenge, please )) Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 18, 2013

      Next time I make holodets, I’ll try making it without pork feet, but we have so much of it in the fridge that it won’t be any time soon πŸ˜‰ Reply

    • diana
      June 5, 2013

      My mother in law uses only chicken. I THINK its the wings and adds just a breast of chicken for more meat and she cooked it low uncovered for a few hours… its so clean that u dont even need to drain it and it was amazing and i just found out u can do it with only chicken because i wanted to make this version but they were out of pig feet at local supermarket… she was like i got this and made it… i do want to try this version to so i can compare Reply

      • Natasha
        natashaskitchen
        June 5, 2013

        And I really want to try it with chicken!! I didn’t want to touch the pig feet; it was all my husbands doing, but I think I’d be much braver with chicken. Listen to me, I do all kinds of wild and pretty gross things at work (I’m a Nurse) and I don’t want to go near pigs feet? I should man, I mean woman up! lol Reply

  • March 18, 2013

    I actually saw this pretty version the other day and wanted to repost my recipe also πŸ™‚ great job :))) Reply

  • Manya
    March 18, 2013

    Regarding the vegetable version, the addition of diced avocado was also wonderful. πŸ™‚ Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 18, 2013

      Oh I’ve never heard of adding avocado. You’re very creative! Reply

  • Manya
    March 18, 2013

    Love this! I like aspics, but I grew up in the fifties. We used to do a vegetable one as well, using gelatin, tomato or V8 juice and chopped vegetables (carrots, celery, dill, etc.) You could add chopped chicken to this as well. I liked the addition of some hot sauce πŸ™‚ Really, gelatinized dishes are underrated. And yes, tradition is worth keeping up! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 18, 2013

      I love that you get so creative with your aspic. πŸ™‚ Reply

  • Irena
    March 18, 2013

    Π‘Π»Π°Π³ΠΎΠ΄Π°Ρ€ΡŽ вас – ΠΌΡ‹ с Π΅Π³ΠΎ Π½Π° ΠŸΠ°ΡΡ…Ρƒ с всплСск уксуса
    ….. Π˜Ρ€Π΅Π½Π°

    PS I like to use the “translator” .. I do speak Ukrainian/Russian.. but
    my writing skills are bad……….thanks again, you are bringing me back to my roots and the good memories… Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 18, 2013

      You’re welcome. I like google translator too. It’s a very useful tool! Reply

  • D
    March 18, 2013

    My mom makes this dish! She doesn’t use pork though. I love it with some boiled potatoes, traditional black bread and horseradish paste! It has always been a must have on our table for holidays – like New Year’s Eve and birthdays! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 18, 2013

      Oh I’ve never tried it with potatoes; sounds interesting! It definitely needs bread; I agree and black bread sounds best. Reply

  • I make mine without pork. I use organic chicken and unflavored jalatin.
    I am planning to post my recipe soon.
    But as far as I remember, my grandmother always used to make with pork…
    I guess here in America we kind of adjust πŸ˜‰ Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 18, 2013

      I don’t mind Westernizing recipes; if it works; it works! πŸ™‚ Reply

  • Nelya
    March 18, 2013

    We make it with cow’s feet and we use the meat from it for holodets.The meat tastes good, so need to discard it. For chicken holodets we use wings and chicken feet. My mom never likes to mix pork and chicken together. πŸ™‚ Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 18, 2013

      Nelya, do you have to add unflavored gelatin with the chicken or does it thicken on it’s own? Reply

  • Katy
    March 18, 2013

    Great recipe! My mom uses chicken meat and adds some gelatin at the end. But my mother in law uses pork feet like you do. Both taste great:) I think the addition of gelatin vs the pork feet makes for a cleaner (lighter colored) holodets. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 18, 2013

      Lighter and cleaner sounds good to me! Thanks for sharing. πŸ™‚ Reply

  • Zina P
    March 18, 2013

    Thank you for posting this one. I think the chicken meat is somehow more appetizing than the pig’s feet…I’m the only one in the family who will eat kholodets….maybe if I tell everyone it’s chicken they will try it…chuckle! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 18, 2013

      Zina read Vikulya’s comment below; she mentioned that she used chicken only plus unflavored jelatin? Hmmmm πŸ™‚ Reply

      • Zina P
        March 18, 2013

        I found this info on eHow “Unflavored gelatin is made from animal collagen, a protein derived from cartilage, bones, skin, connective tissues and tendons. The collagen is processed into a yellow, odorless, unflavored material.” There is, however, vegetarian gelatin made from processed seaweed, pectin, arrowroot, or guar gum. I say, use the feet and explain that the gelatin is naturally formed from the cooking process and the meat is chicken…the less they know the better… πŸ˜‰ Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          March 18, 2013

          Ha! I like how you think, but it’s good to know what the unflavored gelatin is really made of. πŸ™‚ Reply

  • March 18, 2013

    I saw you use chicken for the meat what I meant to say is my mom uses chicken legs instead of pork legs for the gelatin, she’s never used pork actually. Now I’m curious as to how it tastes with pork πŸ™‚ Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 18, 2013

      Wow, you’re the second person to say that. Do you also end up adding the unflavored jelatin or does it firm up without it? Reply

      • March 18, 2013

        No she’s doesn’t use that and her holodets is alway firm πŸ™‚ Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          March 18, 2013

          Hmmmm thank you so much! Reply

          • March 18, 2013

            The results are the same with chicken legs.

          • Natasha
            natashaskitchen
            March 18, 2013

            Thanks for sharing your tip! πŸ™‚

          • April 2, 2013

            So I was asking my mom during easter lunch about her holodets and she said she uses rooster for the gelatin πŸ™‚

          • Natasha
            natashaskitchen
            April 2, 2013

            Oooh interesting. Now, where do I find a rooster? lol

          • April 2, 2013

            If you have local farmers that raise roosters you can buy it from them, that’s what my mom does or we have a family at our church that raise them so sometimes she’ll buy it from them, hope that helps πŸ™‚

    • Mangla
      August 1, 2015

      Did your mom use just chicken legs or did she also use any other part of the chicken? I as because I don’t have access to Pig’s feet and want to know exactly how your mom prepared it. Reply

  • March 18, 2013

    Yumm, this is one of my favorite dishes πŸ™‚ my mom usually makes it with homegrown chicken meat, we’re gonna have to try it with pork! Thanks Natasha πŸ™‚ Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 18, 2013

      The meat in the dish is still chicken. The pork is where the gelatin comes from. Does your Mama not use pork? I’m always curious how other people make it? Reply

      • vikulya
        March 18, 2013

        I once used chicken meat only to make holodets. But end up adding unflavored jelatin at the end, cuz it would be runny:( Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          March 18, 2013

          Hmmm now that sounds appealing to me! Did it taste just as good with adding unflavored jelatin? Reply

          • vikulya
            March 18, 2013

            I will be honest, no:( pork feet play an important role in rich creating flavor

          • Natasha
            natashaskitchen
            March 18, 2013

            That’s what my Mama-in-law said that using pork feet tastes best. Well, I’m glad this is “authentic” πŸ™‚

      • Julia
        March 18, 2013

        When using homegrown chicken (live chickens grown and prepared yourself), the only thing you need is the chicken legs and feet! Plus when using a whole homegrown chicken, you can have a variety of meat tastes. But it only works if the chicken is a male. Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          March 18, 2013

          Home grown chicken is probably best; I wonder why it only works with a male. Reply

          • Irina M
            July 25, 2013

            I’ve used chicken drumsticks and feet ONLY store bought, have no idea if they were from chicken male, but it turned out fine. But I did put a lot of feet. From my understanding it just has to to have lots of bones, doesn’t matter which kind. One thing I dont get why some people change the water when boiling meat? Ya prosto sobirau penu… πŸ™‚
            By the way, your holodets looks very fancy πŸ™‚

          • Natasha
            natashaskitchen
            July 25, 2013

            Thank you Irina! πŸ™‚

  • Maria
    March 18, 2013

    Wow! I haven’t seen holodets since my Babusia passed away. Thank you and your husband for keeping the traditions alive! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 18, 2013

      Ok I admit I was wrong to try and stop my husband from making this dish; I guess there are folks out there that still appreciate this dish πŸ˜‰ Reply

  • vikulya
    March 18, 2013

    Oh, wow! Nicely done, Vadim! I like your fancy presentation!..
    Natasha, you are funny about not wanting your hubby to make holodets:-) is it because you had a weird imagination about pork feet ? Lol:)
    Now, question: you mean you just used pork feet to make holodets “jelatiny “?
    And you just discart them afterwards? Well I know, they are pretty fatty to taste but don’t you end up having a bit of meat and more of liquid? Hope it makes sense:)
    Thanks for posting! Blessings! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 18, 2013

      The pork is what adds the gelatin to the broth. You discard the pigs feet at the end. Theres not really any good meat in the pork feet. We added chicken for nice clean meat in the final product. I hope I answered your question. Reply

  • March 18, 2013

    My husband will be glad to see this one!! Just this weekend he was craving holodetz. My American tastebuds are afraid of meat jelly, but I have to admit that the fish holodetz with salmon he made last year was a hit. We’ll have to try this authentic version!! Thanks for sharing πŸ™‚ Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 18, 2013

      I’ve never even tried one with fish! Was it made similar to this one? Do you use fish bones instead of pork? Reply

      • mark
        May 24, 2014

        They featured this on the TV show Hannibal. Season 2 episode 12. Used anchovies. Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          May 24, 2014

          Anchovies? Interesting… πŸ™‚ Reply

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