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Russian Rugelach i.e. Mom’s famous Rogaliki

These mom's famous rugelach are really simple and quick to make! You will love these flaky, soft and perfect little Russian pastries.

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Blackcurrant Rugelach; it doesn’t get any better than this folks. My mom whips these up all the time; family dinners, church potlucks, parties, just for the heck of it. Making Rogaliki (Rugelach) was one of those things that seemed intimidating until I asked my mom how she does it. Happy News! They are really simple and quick to make! You don’t even have to wait for butter to soften; you melt it. Score!

I love these flaky, soft and perfect little Russian pastries. You can use any kind of preserves for the filling; Mom makes her own blackcurrant preserves and oh goodness if I could just let you lick the spoon (keep in mind I’ve probably licked it first).

There is a secret to making these; it’s the Canadian flour. Trust me. I tried twice with regular unbleached all-purpose and both attempts were sub-par. The Canadian flour makes them soft instead of cookie-like. I finally bit the bullet and bought 44 lbs of the stuff.

Everyone keeps saying it makes everything better! In this case, it proved to be true. I wonder if better for bread flour would have the same effect since they have a similar protein content?

Ingredients for Rugelach:

2 sticks unsalted butter (113g each), melted (not hot)
1 cup warm milk (1% or 2% milk will work)
4 cups CANADIAN all-purpose flour *measured correctly
3/4 Tbsp active dry yeast (Red Star Brand)
Sugar
Black current preserves OR your favorite preserves (raspberry, blackberry, etc).

Here’s the Canadian flour that we purchased at Cash & Carry. It’s wasn’t as pricey as I thought it would be.

Russian Rugelach-2

How to Make the Best Russian Rugelasch/Rogaliki:

Preheat Oven to 360°F. (That’s right; 360°).
1. Melt your butter over low heat. Once it’s melted, transfer it to the bowl of your electric mixer. You want it to be warm, not hot.

2. In the bowl of an electric mixer using the whisk attachment on medium speed, combine 2 sticks of melted butter & 1 cup warm milk (I heated the milk in the micro for 45 seconds).

3. In a medium bowl, mix together the 4 cups flour and 3/4 Tbsp yeast.

4. Switch to the paddle attachment and add flour mixture to the milk/butter mixture about 1/2 cup at a time and mix until it is an even consistency and no longer sticking to the walls of the bowl, scraping down the bowl as necessary. It only takes 3-5 minutes to get the flour mixed well. The dough should be soft and won’t stick to your hands.

5. Divide the dough into five even portions and cover them loosely  on the counter with some plastic wrap until you are ready to use them.

6. On a smooth non-stick surface, roll a portion of the dough out into about a 11-inch circle. No need to flour the surface if it’s a good, smooth cutting board.

7. Sprinkle the top of the dough with sugar (this is important not to miss since the dough doesn’t have any sugar in it. And you wouldn’t want to disappoint your sweet tooth. I put this step in bold because I’ve missed it before.

8. Cut 6 strips through the center to make 12 cute ‘lil triangles. Add about a marble size amount of your favorite preserves to the center of the wide part of the triangles. I recommend using preserves instead of jam; you don’t want the filling to be too juicy and leak out.

Mom says the fastest way to apply the preserves is to fill a teaspoon and push off about a pea size amount onto each triangle. I haven’t discovered an easier way, but if you know, please share! Anyways, start rolling your rugelach toward the center. Push down the edges slightly after the first roll so the jam is less likely to sneak out.

9. Place the rolled rogaliki onto the prepared baking sheet with the end part facing down. Space them about 1/2 – inches  apart. My mom has a fantastic baking sheet that fits all of these rogaliki. I need one! But it is ok to bake in 2 batches.

10. Let them rise in a warm oven (100˚F for 30-45 minutes). Or let them rise in a warm room till they are about 50% larger (could take as long as 2 hours or more at room temp).

11. Bake at 360°F for 20 minutes or until golden. Transfer to a bowl while they are still hot and sprinkle each layer generously with powdered sugar.

Russian Rugelach i.e. Mom's famous Rogaliki

4.92 from 25 votes
Prep Time: 1 hour
Cook Time: 20 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour 20 minutes
These mom's famous rugelach are really simple and quick to make! You will love these flaky, soft and perfect little Russian pastries.
Author: Natasha of NatashasKitchen.com
Skill Level: Medium
Cost to Make: $6-$7
Servings: 60 rugelachs

Ingredients

  • 2 sticks unsalted butter melted (not hot)
  • 1 cup warm milk 1% or 2% milk will work
  • 4 cups CANADIAN all-purpose flour
  • 3/4 tbsp active dry yeast
  • Black current preserves

Instructions

Preheat Oven to 360°F

  1. Melt your butter over low heat. Once it's melted, transfer it to the bowl of your electric mixer. You want it to be warm, not hot.
  2. In the bowl of an electric mixer using the whisk attachment on medium speed, combine 2 sticks of melted butter & 1 cup warm milk.
  3. In a medium bowl, mix together the 4 cups flour and 3/4 tbsp yeast. Switch to the paddle attachment and add flour mixture to the milk/butter mixture about 1/2 cup at a time, and mix until it is an even consistency and no longer sticking to the walls of the bowl, scraping down the bowl as necessary. It only takes 3-5 minutes to get the flour mixed well. The dough should be soft and won't stick to your hands.
  4. Divide the dough into five even portions and cover them loosely on the counter with some plastic wrap until you are ready to use them.
  5. On a smooth non-stick surface, roll a portion of the dough out into about a 11-inch circle. No need to flour the surface if it's a good, smooth cutting board.
  6. Sprinkle the top of the dough with sugar and cut 6 strips through the center to make 12 triangles.
  7. Add about a marble size amount of your favorite preserves to the center of the wide part of the triangles. Anyways, start rolling your rugelach toward the center. Push down the edges slightly after the first roll so the jam is less likely to sneak out.
  8. Place the rolled rogaliki onto the prepared baking sheet with the end part facing down. Space them about 1/2 - inches apart.
  9. Let them rise in a warm oven (100 degrees for 30-45 minutes). Or let them rise in a warm room till they are about 50% larger (could take as long as 2 hours or more at room temp). Bake at 360° F for 20 minutes or until golden. Transfer to a bowl while they are still hot and sprinkle each layer generously with powdered sugar.

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natashaskitchen

Welcome to my kitchen! I am Natasha, the blogger behind Natasha's Kitchen (since 2009). My husband and I run this blog together and share only our best, family approved recipes with YOU. Thanks for stopping by! We are so happy you're here.

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  • frances reiter
    May 30, 2019

    hi natasha…my family background is from poland…so our ruggies are a bit different. my dough is made with butter and cream cheese…just a little note for those who might have missed the sugar on the dough…when i make mine i always use and egg wash on the top and sprinkle with sanding sugar just before baking instead. Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      May 30, 2019

      Thank you so much for sharing that with me, Frances! Reply

  • Victoria Zhovkly
    May 6, 2019

    Hi, Natasha what happens if you accidentally skipped the step with the sugar. Reply

    • Natasha
      May 6, 2019

      Hi Victoria, I’ve done that before :-O and the cookies won’t be very sweet. They are still edible and good if you douse them in powdered sugar. I would roll in powdered sugar until they are fully coated to compensate for the more savory interior. Reply

  • Anna David
    December 15, 2018

    Hi Natasha, how long do these last? Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      December 15, 2018

      Hi Anna. ours disappear within a few days at our house so I haven’t stored that any longer. Reply

  • Faye
    October 24, 2018

    Hi Natasha! I made these a while ago and they were good. Next time I’ll use fresh jam instead of canned, I think it would taste better. My favorite part was rolling each one up 🙂 Thanks for the recipe <3 Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      October 24, 2018

      You’re welcome! I’m so happy you enjoyed it Reply

  • Irina
    September 24, 2018

    Hi Natasha. Is there a way to make these dairy free? Thanks in advance 😊 Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      September 24, 2018

      This should still work well with water, Almond or Coconut milk is a wonderful substitute for Dairy milk as well. Reply

  • Bob
    July 26, 2018

    Is it possible to use puff pastry in place of the dough portion of the recipe? Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      July 26, 2018

      Hi Bob. I honestly have not tried that. But it may work, you you try that please let me know how you like it! Reply

  • Diana
    July 3, 2018

    Hi Natasha. Thanks for this great recipe. I made these with frozen/ defrosted cranberries and they are amazing. You should give it a try! Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      July 3, 2018

      Thanks for the tip Diana! I’m so glad you enjoyed it! & Thank you for the wonderful review! Reply

  • Angela
    June 28, 2018

    For the first time, I am trying the Rogaliki and I don’t know if I should put egg wash on them, but it doesn’t look like you did. Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      June 28, 2018

      Hi Angela, We did not cover them in egg wash 🙂 Reply

  • Alicja
    March 27, 2018

    Hi Natasha
    I will be using my Kitchenaid for the first time with this recipe. When you add the flour to the butter mixture do you change the whisk attachment to the paddle attachment since the mixture will thicken quite a bit? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 27, 2018

      Hi Alicja, I can’t believe I missed that step! Yes definitely switch to the paddle attachment before adding the flour. Thank you so much for pointing that out. I have updated the recipe. Reply

  • Anshel
    December 18, 2017

    Great recipe, thank you. One note, if Rugelach are Russian then I am a Chinese Emperor. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 18, 2017

      Hi Anshel, they are called by a different name in Russian; rogaliki and made slightly differently but most people know them as “rugelach,” so yes, this is the Russian/Ukrainian version. Reply

    • Elena
      December 18, 2017

      Anshel:
      I am half-Romanian and half-Ukrainian living in Canada. Both sides of my family make these paistries and they have local names. To my knowledge, these paistries exist throughout Eastern Europe and Russia and each culture has their own twist on them. Sometimes it is the filling, sometimes it is about the dough ( my grandma insisted that “cornisori”, i. e. The Romanian version, must use lard in the dough. In reality, everyon’s got theiropinion!)
      Please don’t be offended, many dishes are common to many cultures, especially in Europe where there was so much cross-cultural interaction. Reply

    • Elena
      December 18, 2017

      Anshel:
      I am half-Romanian and half-Ukrainian living in Canada. Both sides of my family make these paistries and they have local names. To my knowledge, these paistries exist throughout Eastern Europe and Russia and each culture has their own twist on them. Sometimes it is the filling, sometimes it is about the dough ( my grandma insisted that “cornisori”, i. e. The Romanian version, must use lard in the dough. In reality, everyone’s got their opinion!)
      Please don’t be offended, many dishes are common to many cultures, especially in Europe where there was so much cross-cultural interaction. Reply

  • Robert
    December 15, 2017

    Hi Natasha,
    Incredible recipe that even I was able to bake a honest to goodness delicious rogaliki. I like how you can control the sweetness and how simple the ingredients. One question about sour cream, I see on many other recipes. What is the difference in taste? Thanks! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 16, 2017

      I’m so glad it was a success for you!! Thank you for the great review! We have always made these without sour cream and used milk instead so I’m not sure hot that would affect the overall consistency and flavor of the rugelach. We love the consistency and final product without the sour cream so have never thought to substitute. My Mom has made them this way ever since I can remember 🙂 Reply

  • Susanna
    February 17, 2017

    Natasha so I made the dough as the derections say but my yeast didn’t mix into the dough. I’m dumbfounded don’t understand what I did wrong. U could literally see it in the dough tiny specks of yeast. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 18, 2017

      Huh, that is interesting and odd. What kind and what brand of yeast did you use? Was it fresh? How did the overall rugelach come out after it was baked? Did it rise properly? Reply

  • Alina
    November 2, 2016

    hi. can i use any kind of flour? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 2, 2016

      Hi Alina, please see the second paragraph at the top for my notes on flour 🙂 Reply

  • Vicki
    September 26, 2016

    Hi Natasha I’m planning on making those. And I was wondering will cherry filling work as well? The cherry filling that is being used for pies. I made those 2 days ago with shredded apples and honey. It tasted great especially the dough. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 26, 2016

      Hi Vicki, cherries are tough because you would probably only fit 1 cherry in each one before it was leaking out. You don’t want to overfill these because they are fairly small. I do have an excellent cherry recipe I could recommend to you and I think the cherry pie filing would work great for these (or fresh or frozen/thawed cherries). Reply

  • Mira
    September 18, 2016

    Hi Natasha , I made these today and I’m just wondering are they supposed to be more soft like pastry or more like a dry cookie . Mine are more like a cookie , kinda hard Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 18, 2016

      Hi Mira, they are somewhere in between; they aren’t cake soft and neither are they supposed to be hard. I wonder if maybe you used too much flour or baked them too long – they should be barely changing color when you pull them out of the oven. Also, what kind of flour did you use? Reply

  • Yelena
    September 4, 2016

    Hi Natasha! Any idea of store-bought preserves to use that shouldn’t leak out during baking? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 4, 2016

      Hi Yelena, look for thick preserves – definitely nothing loose and the best way to keep it from leaking out is not to overfill with preserves (it really only needs a little bit) and slightly push down the edges as you can see I’ve done in step 7 after folding the first bit of dough over the preserves. Reply

      • Yelena
        September 5, 2016

        I used organic strawberry preserves from Trader Joe’s. Surprisingly didn’t leak out! Thank you so much for your detailed reply. Reply

  • Irina
    September 3, 2016

    Natasha, do you know how to get these to turn out soft rather than on the crunchy side? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 3, 2016

      Hi Irina, the type of flour you use with these makes all the difference. I’ve tested out so many different kinds and the Canadian one has just the right amount of gluten to make them work best. Also, even if you are using all-purpose American flour, bake them just until they are lightly golden. Overbaking can dry them out. They should normally be a soft cookie 🙂 Reply

  • Lisa L
    August 1, 2016

    Hi, I was just wondering how long do these keep for? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 1, 2016

      Hi Lisa, we haven’t tested the limits with these since they always get eaten within a couple of days. They are best and softest within the first couple of days, but I think they would be fine for 4 or 5 days. Reply

  • Anzhela
    June 18, 2016

    I want to make these today (Saturday) and bring them to church tomorrow (Sunday). How should I store them until then? Thanks! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      June 18, 2016

      Let them come to room temp then dust generously with powdered sugar. Place in a bowl, cover with plastic wrap and keep in a cool dry place (room temp, away from humidity) until ready to serve the next day. Reply

      • Anzhela
        June 18, 2016

        Thanks! The directions said to sprinkle with powdered sugar while they are still hot, or maybe I misunderstood.. Is it ok that I did that? Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          June 18, 2016

          HI Anzhela, the powdered sugar sticks much better to the cookies if you put it on right away, but don’t put a cover over the cookies while still warm with the powdered sugar or it will turn sticky. Reply

          • Anzhela
            June 20, 2016

            Thanks!

  • Carla
    May 27, 2016

    Hello Natasha
    Thank you for these great recipes!
    I was wondering if we can fill this dough with cheese or chocolate
    Thank you Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 27, 2016

      Hi Carla, I think it would be really good with chocolate and possibly cheese although I haven’t tried with cheese and if you’re making them savory, you probably want to omit the sugar. Reply

  • Alicja
    May 27, 2016

    Just made these using special biscuit/pastry flour and turned out beautiful. I did 2 batches and 1 was coated in powdered sugar and second was with a lemon glaze. The glaze really lifted the flavour. Only improvement I would make for next time would be trying to put more jam in the rogaliki. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 27, 2016

      Thank you for sharing your great review! Reply

  • Alicja Abela
    May 22, 2016

    Hi Natasha,

    I live in Australia. What flour would you recommend I use? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 22, 2016

      Hi Alicja, I wish I had a good answer for you but I don’t know how your flour compares. I think I’ll give this recipe a few more experiments with more different kinds of flour. I’m hoping to find something as good as Canadian and something that is more accessible! Reply

  • Svetlana
    April 2, 2016

    Natasha, what is CANADIAN all-purpose flour? how is it different from American all-purpose flour? where do you buy your flower?
    Thank you,
    Svetlana Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 2, 2016

      Hi Svetlana, Canadian flour is just flour made in Canada. It is sold in Cash and Carry and Winco and some European markets. From what I know, Canadian flour has a higher gluten content and therefore performs better in baking. I hate using specialty products and don’t use them unless we’ve tried other options and found that nothing else works better. In this case, that is definitely true. Some Walmarts even carry it but it varies by location: http://www.walmart.ca/en/ip/five-roses-never-bleached-all-purpose-flour/6000016945063&nbsp;Reply

  • Lina
    March 25, 2016

    Very good and easy recepie. Thanks Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 25, 2016

      I’m so happy you enjoyed that. Thank you for sharing that with us! Reply

  • Diana
    March 3, 2016

    I think 5 stars is not enough! I want to put 10⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ Reply

  • Diana
    March 3, 2016

    I absolutely loved it!! This recipe is so easy!! Thank you thank you thank you!! My favorite!!😋😋 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 4, 2016

      Diana, that’s just awesome!! Thank you for sharing your wonderful review 😁 Reply

  • Diana
    March 3, 2016

    I know sounds stupid but 2 sticks small or big? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 3, 2016

      Diana, recipe uses two small sticks of butter (113g each). I also updated the recipe. I hope you love them 😀 Reply

      • March 3, 2016

        Ok. Thank you so much:) Reply

  • Lena
    December 19, 2015

    I made these rogaliki today, turned out pretty yummy. I will save this recipe for sure. Very easy and fast to make. Thank you! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 20, 2015

      I’m so happy you enjoyed my Mom’s recipe :). Thanks Lena! Reply

  • Victoria
    December 10, 2015

    Hello Natasha! Your website is very inspiring. I never had time to do much outside of my full-time job in a corporate world. I just recently left my job to take care of my twin girls. I recently found your food blog and have to say it’s very impressive. I tried rogaliki recipe today. It’s a very easy recipe. I yeild about 50 rogaliki not 60. Perhaps mine are bigger. I will send you a pic. What else can you make out of this dough? I never though you could make a full -time career out of a blog. Wish you all the best! Good job! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 10, 2015

      I’m so happy you find my site inspiring. Thank you! 🙂 Did you cut less triangles with each round or make less balls of dough? It’s very likely yours were a little larger if you got 50, but as long as you loved them, it doesn’t really matter 🙂 Reply

  • Irina
    October 11, 2015

    Natasha…do you think I can try making these with pie dough??? Is it similar to the dough in your recipe. Just trying to find a shortcut:))) Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 11, 2015

      It probably won’t work with pie dough – they are very different than pie dough. Have you tried making this dough? It’s actually pretty simple to make and work with. I think pie dough would be more difficult to make and roll out. I hope you love it 🙂 I can’t really think of a good substitute for the dough. Reply

  • Gloria
    June 2, 2015

    Hi Natasha..two questions, I am from Vancouver, Canada and we have traditional yeast that needs to be proofed and instant yeast that can be added to dry ingredients. Which yeast should I use? Also, can I freeze these and then add the powdered sugar when I want to serve them?

    I am Ukrainian and love your recipes. I hope all is going well with the new baby. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      June 2, 2015

      Thank you Gloria :). Our baby girl is so sweet and we are just enjoying every moment with her :). Use the traditional yeast that needs to be proofed. I use the traditional one in all of my recipes. I haven’t tried freezing these because they always get eaten within a couple of days, but I think it’s worth a try. I would put the powdered sugar on after they are thawed or it might get gummy after the freezer. Reply

    • LAURI ZAKER
      December 30, 2015

      Hi, I just made these rugelach yesterday and they taste divine. I was able to find some nice flour from shepherdsgrain.com at my local Cash and Carry store. I now have 50’# of it,but I will sell it to friends.In the recipe, it says to put 4 C. flour in a med. bowl with the yeast. Then it says to add 4 C. flour in and I did not add 4 C. flour to make it 8 C. flour.That’s what it sounds like needs to be done though. I just made it with 4 C. flour. Is it just the wording that makes it sound like 8 C. flour total? I used almond milk instead because I don’t have reg. milk at my house. I wasn’t sure if the casein in milk is needed, so I sprinkled a little dried milk into it in case. The walnut filling I used was:
      1/2 lb. finely ground walnuts
      1/2 C.white sugar
      1/2 C. brown sugar
      1/4 C. boiled milk of your choice(I used almond)
      1/8 C. melted butter
      Mix all together for a nice filling Reply

      • Natasha
        natashaskitchen
        December 30, 2015

        You’re right, that wasn’t written very clearly. I have updated the recipe to fix it. It is only 4 cups flour. Thank you so much for sharing your nut filling! I’ll have to try that 🙂 Reply

  • Tamara
    April 11, 2015

    Hi Natasha thanks for the wonderful recipe and illustrations. You had asked for an easier technique to fill jam. I just put mine in a zip lock bag and cut the corner and squeeze out as I need it. You can also use a pastry bag too but I don’t always have those laying around. I actually use this technique for the meat filling when I make pelmeni. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 11, 2015

      That is brilliant! I love the idea of using a ziploc bag for these and for pelmeni! That’s so much cleaner. Thanks for sharing your great tip! Reply

  • Janice
    March 26, 2015

    These look wonderful, funny that I found your site from Pinterest. My oldest daughter and I were speaking aboutRussian food. I’m part Russian from my Mom side. Andbecausemy mom married and changed religions I feel I lost on a lot of heritage so I don’t know how to cook a lot of Russian food. So I’m glad to find this recipe can’t wait to try it. Thanks for sharing with love Janice Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 27, 2015

      Welcome to the site Janice, I hope that you’ll find many new favorites :). Reply

  • Inna
    March 18, 2015

    Hi Natasha!
    I was reading through some of the comments here and just had to research to find the next best equivalent to Canadian flour. Apparently bread flour because both have about 13% gluten content. Have you tried that way? I will be teaching my high school classes tomorrow and that was the best alternative I could order through Sysco. Hoping for the best! Btw, congrats on a healthy delivery 🙂 I love following you on IG. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 18, 2015

      Thank you Inna :). I actually haven’t tested this recipe with bread flour but I am so curious. If you try it, do let me know how it works out. Reply

      • ana
        March 21, 2015

        Natasha there is no salt in this recipe, i thought may be salted butter will work, i felt like they definitely need salt? Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          March 21, 2015

          Ana, you can add a pinch of salt, it wouldn’t hurt. But neither me or my mom have used it in this recipe. Reply

  • Lena
    February 11, 2015

    Hi Natasha, I’m hoping to make these later today but all out of preserves. Will a poppy seed filling work instead? Without getting too dry? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 11, 2015

      Yes, a poppy seed filling should work just fine. I do like the tiny bit of tang that preserves add though, but poppyseed filling would taste great too. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 11, 2015

      Yes, a poppy seed filling should work just fine. I do like the tiny bit of tang that preserves add though, but poppyseed filling would taste great too. Reply

  • Olga
    December 29, 2014

    Hi Natasha,
    Do u think I can make these with dulce de lache? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 30, 2014

      I haven’t tried that but I think it would work. I like using some kind of thick jam because it adds a little tartness to the cookies. Reply

  • Trudy Hergel
    December 14, 2014

    I come from a german/ukrainian background, love baking. Saw your recipe tried it, followed it to a tea. Unfortunately was very disappointed. I think the yeast should of been proofed first. As I was rolling the saw all the yeast , it did not dissolve.. Milk was warm/butter. Did not rise.tell me please what I was doing wrong. Want to try them again. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 15, 2014

      Was your yeast fresh? Also, was it regular yeast or instant yeast? I’ve never had to proof the yeast and have made these countless times so I don’t know what else it could have been? Did you let them rise after you rolled them in a warm room or in a 100 degree oven? Reply

  • Sofiya
    October 17, 2014

    Hi Natasha can I ise all purpose flour? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 17, 2014

      Hi Sofiya, make sure to read the second paragraph at the top about using various kinds of flour. It would work, but they wouldn’t be as good. I’ve tested different flours. Reply

  • Julia
    April 15, 2014

    I was looking for rogaliki recipe and want to give these a try. So before I add flour, do I need to change my whisk attachment for a dough attachment or mix the dough with hands? Thanks 🙂 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 15, 2014

      Yes, sorry I missed that in the instructions. You’ll need to switch to the dough hook. You can also mix it in by hand since it doesn’t take long 🙂 Reply

  • Galina
    February 3, 2014

    Made these rogaliki yeasterday with cake flour (I just had to adjust flour amount). Turned out great! I had 6 of them with a glass of ice cold milk at 11 pm! Yes, they are THAT good! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 3, 2014

      Thank you for the good report Galina :). We just had some yesterday at mom’s house, I never get tired of eating them :). Reply

  • Yana M
    February 2, 2014

    What’s the reason the recipe requires “Canadian” flour? How is it different from regular flour? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 3, 2014

      I’ve tested with all purpose and Canadian and the Canadian yielded much nicer results. I think it has to do with a higher gluten and protein content. You might have better results with Better for bread flour if you don’t have access to Canadian. Reply

  • clare
    February 2, 2014

    Love all of your recipes ,but would it be possible to have the ingredients in grams too please?
    Thanks xxxx Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 2, 2014

      I don’t have anything to convert that easily. I’ll keep it in mind if I come across a good tool for that. Reply

  • Anya Braginski
    January 8, 2014

    Hi Natasha,
    I am unable to find any Canadian flour where I live. We don’t have a Sam’s Club and I can’t find any in the stores… Do you have a suitable substitute flour? Thanks. 🙂 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 8, 2014

      I have tried it with all-purpose flour and it just isn’t the same texture. It will still work, but it won’t be quite the same texture. I would say to just get the best quality flour you can if you aren’t able to find Canadian. Let me know what you end up trying! 🙂 Reply

  • Lena
    January 2, 2014

    Has anyone tried to make this with Gluten-Free flour? I usually use a rice flour for my pies but I usually don’t make the crust. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 2, 2014

      I haven’t tried. Anyone else? Reply

  • Julie
    December 18, 2013

    Hi,

    I’ve got a question for you about this whole CANADIAN flour business as I see it quite often in your recipes.
    I happen to live in Canada and I’ve never really seen flour being sold here that specifically states that it’s Canadian. Do you think all flour that I see in the stores here is Canadian? How could I tell?

    Thanks,

    Julie. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 18, 2013

      Hi Julie. It won’t specifically say “Canadian” but it will say made in Canada. I have a friend who travels to Canada and buys tons of flour (she’s a baker). Your flour is just the best! Reply

  • Lilith
    November 26, 2013

    hey Natasha. can I freeze the dough? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 26, 2013

      To be honest, I haven’t tried freezing the dough so I can’t really recommend it. I’ve always just made them and ate them 😉 Reply

  • Natasha
    September 5, 2013

    Just made rogalah, it’s good. This is the first recepie that worked for me. I could not find Canadian floor so made it with cake floor, like I sad really good and easy. Thank you. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 5, 2013

      You are welcome Natasha, good job :). Reply

  • Tammy
    August 22, 2013

    Hi Natasha
    Was wondering if I could make these 2 days ahead of my event? If so how can I keep them fresh and where? Thank you Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 22, 2013

      You can keep them in a large bowl and cover with plastic wrap, just make sure they are fully cooled to room temp before covering them. We took these on a 4 day camping trip and they lasted the whole trip 🙂 Reply

  • ptichka73
    August 12, 2013

    I love all the attention Canadian flour is getting here. We do have lovely flour. As mentioned, Five Roses is a good brand but also Robin Hood or Elison Mills. I believe Five Roses has a little citric acid added to it which makes things rise higher. My cousin even makes her pastry crust with Five Roses 100% whole wheat and says it works beautifully. I was recently in France and read the same rave reviews in a cooking magazine. Thanks for this recipe. I have never made Rugelach with a yeast dough, always more like a cookie so I am anxious to try. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 12, 2013

      With Canadian flour, these seriously are the BEST! They are soft and flaky at the same time. When I tried with all-purpose, it turned out more cookie-like, but Canadian worked so much better. Reply

  • Oksana
    July 4, 2013

    Made those last night. They are so light and crunchy. You’re right about Canadian flour. My mom bakes a lot, and she uses that flour all the time. Lucky in WA we have cash and carry, winco and russian stores. Most time russian stores are overpriced, so we buy at the other stores.
    Personally I don’t care about flour being bleached, as long as my baking turns out good. I don’t think I’d be happier going through life trying to find everything organic, and healthy, no colors added etc. We just are wiser shoppers and get good quality products. I just do my own cooking and baking most of the time, and not have frozen, or boxed dinners, that’s good enough for me. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 4, 2013

      I’d have to agree with you there. It’s always best to do your own cooking and baking. It’s amazing what kind of junk they add to store-bought baked goods (even bread!). I still use the Canadian flour which is always bleached. It just works best for specific recipes. If it calls for regular all-purpose flour, It’s easy enough to buy the unbleached. I don’t get to crazy about those things either, but I have been trying to make healthier choices in general and be more aware of the things I buy (some things just aren’t real food anymore!). Reply

  • Oksana
    May 27, 2013

    Made these twice! Both times they were delicious! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 27, 2013

      I’m so glad you enjoyed the recipe 🙂 Thanks for sharing that with me! Reply

  • Mariana
    April 26, 2013

    I love this recipe…I’v made it twice now and there is nothing left after each event. I don’t have the canadian flour and used regular all purpose and they are still so good. Also tried using canned cherries( drained)as filling and sprinkled a lot of sugar so wouldn’t be sour and it was so delicious 🙂 Thank You Natasha for your awesome step by step directions and delicious recipes. Anytime i want to try something new i come to your site. Thank you for inspiring me to bake and cook 🙂 May God Bless you and your Family. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 26, 2013

      Mariana, thank you and God bless you and your family!! I’m so glad you find the site useful and that you loved the recipe. If you come across the Canadian flour, try it! if you loved these, you’ll really really really love it with flour made in Canada. I think it’s because it has a higher gluten level so it’s softer. It blesses me to know that you enjoy the blog 🙂 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 13, 2013

      Yep! Any flour made in Canada will work great. Reply

  • Tanya
    April 12, 2013

    Hi Natasha! I really want to find a kind of same rogaliki but with pesochnoe testo, if u find it or have it plz share with us!!! I love ur website!!! God bless u and family!! Thank for sharing!!! Reply

  • inna
    March 11, 2013

    skawute powalysta, a mowna eti rogaliku z tvorogom delat’? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 12, 2013

      Personally I won’t use tvorog, just because they will be too small to fit it. You can try cutting them in to larger slices and see if that will work. Reply

  • Tanya
    February 12, 2013

    Thank you, these turned out delish! Two questions.. How do you make the preserves? And you mix the milk & butter with the mixer, but when adding in the flour you use your hands, right? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 12, 2013

      start mixing it in using the whisk and then switch to the dough hook; you can do it by hand; it’s just more work by hand 🙂 Reply

  • Jennifer
    December 25, 2012

    Hi, Natasha. I would just like to let you know that I have tried many recipes from your site and they have all been amazing. Thank you so much for sharing these with us!
    I am planning on making these soon and I was wondering why you sprinkle the sugar on the dough instead of mixing it right in with it? I guess I’m a little worried they won’t be sweet enough. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 25, 2012

      It’s the way the original recipe was written; someone must have tested it at some point. It turns out perfect and has ample sweetness especially with the powdered sugar on top 🙂 Reply

      • Jennifer
        December 29, 2012

        I made these a couple of days ago and they were delicious. You were right, they are perfectly sweet. I had trouble keeping the preserves from leaking out, but still so yummy. They’re almost gone. Thanks so much!!! Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          December 29, 2012

          You are welcome Jennifer. Every time my mom makes them, they go fast :). Reply

  • Tanya
    December 22, 2012

    I made these yesterday with blueberry pie filling and they are so yummy!!!! Thank you for the recipe!!! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 22, 2012

      So glad you enjoyed it! 🙂 The blueberry sounds so nice!! Reply

  • Natalia
    December 7, 2012

    Here is wonderful recipe of almost the same rogaliki: http://www.say7.info/cook/recipe/618-Rogaliki-s.html&nbsp;Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 7, 2012

      Thank you for sharing the link Natalia. Reply

  • Natalia
    December 6, 2012

    It doesn’t matter what kind of all purpose flour u r using to make rogaliki/anything, what is more important that this flour is bleached, so they used bleach while making it. Isn’t it harsh? It’s just an advise, but try to avoid bleached flours…
    As to recipe: thanx a lot! I was looking for it for a long time… My mom’s rogaliki from my childhood. Gonna make double recipe cuz my boys (4 of them) will eat them with speed of light.
    Good job, Natasha! God bless! Reply

  • Olga
    December 4, 2012

    Thank you so much Natasha for your website, I love Rogaliki but never could make them myself. And I just did it and can’t stop eating them! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 5, 2012

      Good job!! I know exactly how you feel 😉 Reply

  • Maria Virginia
    November 23, 2012

    Hi Natasha.
    I’m from Mendoza, Argentina and we used to live in a russian community. My neighbour used to combine both cultures and bake the rugela with quince jam. It was delicious!. I was wondering, do you have a recipe of rugela that the dough is made (among other ingredients) with cream cheese?. Hers had in the dough cream cheese, and I cant find a recipe with that.
    Thank u!!!!!! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 23, 2012

      This is the only one that I have posted. I’ve made one with cream cheese before but it just wasn’t nearly as good. 😉 Reply

      • Maria Virginia
        November 30, 2012

        Hi again…
        Thank you for answering, I really appreciate it…
        🙂 Reply

    • marina
      October 9, 2013

      For cream cheese rugelach try foodnetwork’s yummy recipe http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/ina-garten/rugelach-recipe/index.html the filing is made with apricot preserves and walnuts..pretty delicious! Reply

      • Natasha
        natashaskitchen
        October 9, 2013

        I have tried this but I liked my mom’s dough better, however the filling from Ina’s recipe was very good. I’ll have to try combine the two! 🙂 Reply

  • Lana
    November 7, 2012

    They caught my eye immidiately, but for some reason my dough did not want to stick when i tried to pinch the ends to avoid the preserve to sneak out;(….still came out delicious!!! By any chance, do you have a recipe for another kind of “rogaliki” they’re not from “drozhevoye testo” and they’re smaller – like “palchiki”? It’s very “rassipchatoye” and it’s sooo good but i can’t find the recipe…..and if i will, i will deffinately share it with you:) Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 7, 2012

      The only thing I have like that are the troobochki made with puff pastry, but I’ll ask around; please do share it if you find one first. That would be awesome. Thanks Lana! Reply

    • marina
      October 9, 2013

      Here’s a recipe for “palchiki” my mom makes
      4 margarine sticks room temperature (you can try using butter)
      1/2 cup sour cream
      3 cups of flour
      mix everything, roll out dough in a square about 10×10 inches, put preserves all over in thin layer and cut it into little squares about 2×2 each, and then roll each one from one corner to the other, diagonally, bake at 350 degrees on parchment paper so they won’t stick, take out when golden in color, take off the parchment paper while still hot, once cooled dredge in powdered sugar, enjoy! Reply

      • Natasha
        natashaskitchen
        October 9, 2013

        Oh wow that sounds really good! Does your Mom make them with regular all-purpose flour or Canadian all-purpose? Thanks so much for sharing! Reply

        • marina
          October 10, 2013

          she uses all-purpose flour..but you can experiment with Canadian flour..you just need enough flour for the dough not to be sticky.. Reply

  • Natasha Y
    October 16, 2012

    I’m making these rogaliki right now! Can’t wait to try ’em:) Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 16, 2012

      I just had some of those yesterday :). Let me know what you think. Reply

      • Natasha Y
        October 16, 2012

        These rogaliki are delicious! I made them with poppy seed filling and walnuts, cause I had no jam in my pantry!!!! I like to eat them with a cold glass of milk!!!

        P.S. my kids ate probably a dozen! Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          October 16, 2012

          Poppy seed and walnuts sounds delicious :), I’m glad that you like them. Reply

  • Lena
    September 7, 2012

    I’m making them now 🙂 but I have a question when you said 100 degrees to rise. do u mean C or F. I saw 170 it doesnt go lower. I think I should of left them in the room temp.. but they still taste good. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 7, 2012

      I mean 100 F. My oven is the same way, it doesn’t go lower than 170, so I put a wooden mixing spoon in the oven door to keep it from getting too hot. Also, turn off the oven after it preheats or it will start cooking the rugelach if it’s 170 degrees. It should be just very very warm, not hot. Reply

  • Marina
    August 30, 2012

    Hi Natasha!
    I love your blog, you’re a talented and awesome, easy to read and follow cook.

    I do have a few questions about these Rogaliki.

    I don’t have a measuring spoon for 3/4 tbsp. does it have to be exact? And if yes how can I convert into teaspoons?

    And do I HAVE to use Canadian flour, or just regular? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 30, 2012

      Thank you Marina 🙂 I just filled a tbsp 3/4 full; doesn’t have to be exact. I’ve tested regular flour and flour made in Canada and by far the Canadian flour was softer and more like a pastry. Regular flour tastes good too but it turns out more cookie like and tastes more buttery. I would definitely say the Canadian flour is best. Once you try Canadian flour you won’t want to go back. The quality of your baked goods will be better 🙂 Reply

      • Marina
        August 31, 2012

        Alright Natasha, thanks so much. Reply

  • Sonia
    August 26, 2012

    Hi Natasha
    Just wanted to say thankyou for this great recipe. I have made them several times and they are a big hit. I have a batch in the oven right now. Can’t wait for them to cool down. I’m from Australia and I’m sure we don’t have Canadian flour so I just used regular all purpose flour and they turned out great. thanks for the easy to follow recipe and fabulous photos also. 🙂 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 26, 2012

      You are welcome Sonia. I bet that Australian all purpose flour is as good as Canadian flour 😀 Reply

  • Karina
    July 29, 2012

    Hi Natasha,

    I was wondering, do you know where i’d be able to purchase Canadian flour? I live in San Francisco bay area and i’ve looked at costco and all other grocery stores and they dont have any out here. We don’t have a Winco’s here. I was wondering if you knew if I’d be able to purchase it online and if so where and which one. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 29, 2012

      Do you have Cash and Carry store near by or Russian stores? They normally carry Canadian flour. Reply

      • Karina
        July 31, 2012

        no cash and carry either. But i will check our local russian store, its pretty small so im not sure if they would carry it, but i hope they do Reply

  • Masha
    July 17, 2012

    We made pizza dough yesterday with Canadian Flour and it turned out very good.. So I guess I will agree with you about Canadian Flour.. it really does makes things better. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 17, 2012

      I’m totally sold on it. And I’m a little torn because I know not everyone uses it, but so far all my recipes with Canadian flour just taste better. Reply

  • Vikulya
    July 15, 2012

    Natasha, thank you soooo much for this recipe. It is melting in the mouth and tastes awesome. You are a blessing from heaven )) Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 15, 2012

      You’re so sweet 🙂 thank you so much! I’m so happy you loved the recipe. Reply

  • vikulya
    July 14, 2012

    I wanna try making these today. But I have makova pasta as a filling. It is pretty sweet to taste. Should I still sprinkle with sugar before putting the filling on the dough? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 14, 2012

      Yes I would still sprinkle lightly with sugar since there is no sugar in the dough itself. Just do a light sprinkling. I did forget once when making it with jam and I had to use loads of powdered sugar for it to taste sweet. Reply

  • Veronika
    July 6, 2012

    How big are your sticks of butter? I buy the ones from Sam’s and they are 450 grams each, and with that size 2 sticks seems a little too much. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 7, 2012

      One box of butter is 1 lb so two sticks would be 1/2 lb. Hope that helps Reply

  • Natalie
    July 4, 2012

    I love these!!! My Mom used to make these a lot when we were kids filled with apricot preserves. Can’t wait to try these with black currant though as I actually have some homemade in my fridge 🙂 I try not to use bleached flour as from what I read it’s bleached with chemicals. Have you looked into this brand to see what their bleaching process is? I was going to try making it with King Arthur cake flour. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 5, 2012

      No I haven’t but thy is a very good point! Is that King Arthur brand good? I haven’t tried it. Reply

      • Irina
        September 11, 2012

        Check out their website. You will love it! I like everything they sell. Reply

  • Rachel
    July 3, 2012

    I never thought to use blackcurrant for rugelach. My Czech grandma always used apricot flavorings, but I think I want to try your version!

    Thanks for sharing! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 3, 2012

      Apricots would probably be fantastic as well. Reply

  • ira
    July 2, 2012

    hi Natasha, i am confused on proportions of flour. Do you need 4 cups all together, or 4c and 3 3/4 of a cup. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 2, 2012

      Oh Thanks for spotting that! It’s 4 cups all together. I will fix that :-O Reply

      • ira
        July 2, 2012

        thank you, i will be making those tonight 🙂 Reply

  • Lilia
    June 28, 2012

    One word – AMAZING! My kids loved them. They were so fun to make together. Thank you for sharing. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      June 28, 2012

      That’s awesome! I’m glad you enjoyed making them together 🙂 Reply

  • Viktoriya
    June 27, 2012

    I’ve never left my rogaliki out to rise extra 30 mins-2 hours, but it seems like common sense now if ya want them fluffy lolvwill def try your recipe, since mine requires refrigeration which can b time consuming Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      June 27, 2012

      Yes it definitely helps and they seem softer if you let them rise before baking. Reply

  • Oksana
    June 22, 2012

    Sorry about all the typos! Rocking baby to sleep while texting with one hand 🙂 Reply

  • Oksana
    June 22, 2012

    Hi Natasha,

    I am putting my baby to sleep right now and gonna go make these! They look wonderful! Reminds me of my childhood 🙂

    Quick question, do you think the Cabadian flour is good for all pastry and cakes? It seems like most people are raving how amazing it is so i wider if it will make good cakes too? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      June 22, 2012

      That’s what u keep hearing too. Slowly but surely I will remake all my cakes with Canadian flour. The measurements might vary slightly. Reply

  • elena
    June 20, 2012

    Natasha, I love your blog! I am on here daily. I just don’t leave comments behind. I love reading your paragraphs before the recipe. (That’s the fun part) and than comes the yummy stuff! Keep up the great job! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      June 20, 2012

      Thank you so much! You’re the third person this week that’s mentioned they like the text portion; It’s nice to know that gets read. 🙂 I guess I better work on my humor skills. Reply

  • Olesya
    June 19, 2012

    As soon as I go buy this flour I will make these. Can’t wait! Reply

  • These look so good! I’m looking forward to trying them out. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      June 20, 2012

      Enjoy! Reply

  • Leascooking
    June 19, 2012

    Natasha, these are so yummy. I love blackcurrants, I remember in Estonia we had a huge ogorod and i just picked em and enjoyed it. Now 25 years in America only few times I’ve seen em here. About Canadian flour its the BEST!!! I bake with it for many years; it makes everything more fluffy.
    http://leascooking.blogspot.com&nbsp;Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      June 20, 2012

      That’s what I keep hearing and I finally gave in 🙂 Reply

  • Emma
    June 19, 2012

    gonna try thanks Natasha Reply

  • tatiana khochay
    June 18, 2012

    shoot i just had some and now want some more….pays to live with the parents 🙂 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      June 18, 2012

      Tanya you are so spoiled! Reply

  • June 18, 2012

    Natasha thanks for sharing this recipe…..my Mom use to make these all the time when we were growing up. Just last week my husband bought a few jars of Blackberry jam that were from Turkey and his hometown so now I have a use for them instead of just on toast.
    Thanks for the plug for Canadian flour…all my life we use Five Roses flour, it’s because of all the good wheat that we have here in Canada because of the first Ukrainian settlers who brought seeds with them from the Ukraine when they settled over a century ago.
    ………thanks again for one of your great recipes and photos. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      June 18, 2012

      That is so good to know! I appreciate Canadian flour even more! Reply

      • Heidi
        September 7, 2012

        Hi Natasha
        Thank you for the recipe. I don’t come from a family of bakers but I remember eating Rugelah as a child in Brooklyn. I think the Bakeries also made apricot filled Rugelah. About the flour…I live now in Kansas where they also grow the Russian Wheat. The local mill (Hudson Cream) make nice soft flour. I may try the local flour and hope I maintain the authenticity of your recipe.
        Thank you again
        Heidi Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          September 7, 2012

          You are welcome Heidi, let me know how they will turn out 🙂 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      June 18, 2012

      Where can I get some of that blackberry jam? Sounds wonderful! Reply

      • June 20, 2012

        hi Natasha….you were asking about that Blackberry jam, well I’m not sure where you live….. but if you go to any Middle Eastern store or a Turkish store if you have, they have the best Jams and preserves.I always look to see if it is made in Turkey, they have the best and tatses like the real fruit jams. Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          June 20, 2012

          Thank you! Reply

  • InnaL
    June 18, 2012

    Natasha, love your little comment about giving us a lick (“keep in mind i probably licked it first”).. it made me bust out laughing.. anyways, that recipe looks easy and yummy.. cant wait to try it out.. on a side note, i use almond milk all the time for pancakes and it works just as well 🙂 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      June 18, 2012

      I kept having to get new spoons because I couldn’t resist licking them. Haha! That’s good to know about the almond milk. Thanks darling! Reply

  • Sarah Z.
    June 18, 2012

    Thank you so much Natasha. I will stop by Sam’s club this weekend to get it. Thanks again. Reply

  • Marina
    June 18, 2012

    My MIL makes these using Pillsbury Crescent (butter flake) dough found in the refrigerated section of the store. I don’t know how yours taste, but her results are pretty good, not to mention super easy to whip up if you’ve got unexpected company, since the dough is all ready to use. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      June 18, 2012

      That stuff is handy! I’ve used that dough stuffed with a chicken mix but not for rugelach. Anyway this dough is amazingly easy to make too and i love easy! I always thought they were time consuming until I made them myself. Reply

  • Lina
    June 18, 2012

    4. Divide the dough into five even portions and cover them loosely on the counter with some plastic wrap until you are ready to use them.

    How long do you wait before you use them? Is it matter of minutes or hours?! 🙂
    can’t wait to try these! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      June 18, 2012

      Make them right away. There’s no waiting. Just make them one after another. The only time you have to wait is when the rugelach is all rolled and made and they are rising. Reply

  • Liliya
    June 18, 2012

    I think I will make these with my 9 year old, she is on summer break and loves helping me in the kitchen. They look so cute, can’t wait to make them. I always have raspberry preserves in my fridge, so that’s what I will use. And I love that you don’t need eggs for this I always run out of them (my kids love eggs and bacon in the morning, my hubby too 🙂 And about flour I buy mine at Sam’s Club it’s 25 lbs and 8 or 9 dollars. I bake alot of bread and cakes and it always comes out great. I’m not sure what brand it is but they only have one in either 25 or 50 lbs bags. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      June 18, 2012

      Yes these are fun for kids to make because they are easy to roll. That makes me wish we had a Sam’s Club around, but thank you for sharing. That’s great to know! Someone else asked about where to buy it. Reply

  • Alyona
    June 18, 2012

    I buy this flour at Russian stores it Does makes a big difference in all the baking dishes, also I heard that Winco sells it too they have big bags too in the section of bulk foods. I wanted to ask you Natasha how and where do you store it. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      June 18, 2012

      I use a large plastic lidded container (the large animal cracker tubs work well too) and I just transfer to the small container and keep the rest in the laundry room. 🙂 Maybe eventually I’ll buy a cute jar to hold the flour. I’ve never seen it at Winco, but I’ll definitely scope the place out next time I’m there. Thank you so much! Reply

  • Masha
    June 18, 2012

    Hello,
    I was wondering if I could use something instead of milk.. due to milk allergy..
    water? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      June 18, 2012

      Hi Masha, that must be rough; are you allergic to dairy? I just asked my Mama and she said it should still work well with water. Reply

      • Masha
        June 18, 2012

        No it is my husband so i have to sacrifice for him lol…. Reply

        • Masha
          June 18, 2012

          And yes he is allergic to dairy so i try to substitute things around and still make food taste good. Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          June 18, 2012

          Oh how sad 🙁 But he is blessed to have you 🙂 Reply

          • Val Z.
            June 18, 2012

            Almond or Coconut milk is a wonderful substitute for Dairy milk. You can buy it in any store nowadays.

          • Natasha
            natashaskitchen
            June 19, 2012

            Thanks Val! I’ve never tried cooking with that but I sure drank a lot of rice milk for a few months after I had my son because I thought milk was bothering him.

          • Masha
            June 19, 2012

            I made them yesterday and they turned pretty good and he really liked it them also.. thank you for all your help.

          • Natasha
            natashaskitchen
            June 20, 2012

            Sweet! Thank you for letting me know. I’m glad you liked the recipe 🙂

  • Sarah Z.
    June 18, 2012

    Hi Natasha,
    I looked online where I could buy this flour, but I can’t find it. Would you be able to send a link to the place where you bought it from. By the way, they look amazing. can’t wait to make them. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      June 18, 2012

      This is what I found in amazon by searching Canadian Flour: FIVE ROSES FLOUR 22lbs BAG I don’t think the brand is as important. I hear it’s also sold at korean stores. I’ll pick up some cake flour next time I’m at the store and test with that as well. I’m so curious about it since it does produce a softer product. My bag of flour was from Cash and Carry and I believe it is about $15 there for 44 lbs. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      June 18, 2012

      Sarah, my wonderful readers have told me that it is also in Winco, Sam’s Club (not at Costco; boo) and Russian stores. I guess it’s more common than I thought. It doesn’t say “Canadian flour” it’s just a product of Canada. Reply

      • Katrina Korneychuk
        February 2, 2014

        Cash and Carry has canadian flour, cheaper then Winco or any russian store. Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          February 2, 2014

          That’s where my Mom buys her’s and my last bag was from there! Reply

  • Vikulya
    June 18, 2012

    Thanks for sharing, Natasha.
    Тhey are pretty easy to make! Which is nice.
    P.S. I like reading the first paragraphs before you start the actual recipe description. They are fun to read 🙂 never miss those ) Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      June 18, 2012

      Thank you! I always wonder if that gets read or not. I enjoy writing it 🙂 Reply

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