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Country Peach Preserves

How to make peach preserves - just 3 ingredients: peaches, sugar, lemon juice! No pectin required in this peach jam recipe! Make your own peach preserves.

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My mom makes the most amazing fruit preserves. We enjoy her garden fruit all year long this way. This peach preserves recipe takes a couple days; a longer process than most of the peach preserve recipes I’ve seen online but its worth the wait. It’s not watery like most of the recipes that rush the process.

This isn’t speed dating. You’ll get to know your peaches over a couple days and and be rewarded with some mighty fine preserves. If you are thinking about Christmas already (as I am), you can make preserves now, slap a label on in December and give them away as gifts to neighbors, co-workers, nursing directors (wink, wink) – I guess this means I can’t eat all of them myself.

Ingredients for Peach Preserves:

11 lbs peaches, rinsed
4 cups white sugar
Juice of 1 medium lemon

What you will need:

How to make peach preserves - just 3 ingredients: peaches, sugar, lemon juice! No pectin required in this peach jam recipe! Make your own peach preserves.

How to Make Peach Preserves / Peach Jam:

To blanch the peaches:

1. Fill 2/3 of a large soup pot with water. Bring to a boil. Add peaches for 30 -45 seconds, then remove with slotted spoon or this OXO strainer which I used to transfer them in and out of the boiling water and drain the pot. Remove peaches immediately to a large bowl of cold water. This process is known as blanching the peaches and makes removal of the fuzzy skins really easy.

How to make peach preserves - just 3 ingredients: peaches, sugar, lemon juice! No pectin required in this peach jam recipe! Make your own peach preserves.Peaches in a bowl filled with water

2. Peel the skin (most of them peeled easily by hand, but there were a stubborn few that required a knife), cut the peaches into quarters and remove pits.

How to make peach preserves - just 3 ingredients: peaches, sugar, lemon juice! No pectin required in this peach jam recipe! Make your own peach preserves.A peach on a cutting board being cut into fourths

Cooking the Preserves:

1. Place all peeled peaches in a large soup pot and squeeze in juice of 1 lemon. Drizzle well with 2 cups sugar, toss and drizzle again with the remaining 1.5-2 cups so the sugar reaches all the peaches. Here’s where you need to use your judgement.

If your peaches are very sweet, you may only need 3 1/2 cups of sugar total. You can add more sugar to taste while its cooking, so don’t panic at this step. You’ll do great!

Peaches cut into fourth and peeled in a bowl A bowl of peeled and cut up peaches with sugar on topA lemon being pressed for juice

2. Let peaches sit at room temp with the sugar for about 30min -1 hour, or until sugar is dissolved.

A bowl with country peach preserves

3. Place the pot over the stove uncovered and bring to a light boil, stirring to prevent scorching. Make sure if you see a light boil to stir because the whole pot may not be boiling, just the center. If it stops boiling after you stir it, continue boiling.

Once the whole pot is at a light boil, simmer for 10 minutes and turn off the heat. Let the pot stand uncovered until it is just warm to the touch or reaches room temp.

A bowl of soup, with Peach and Sugar

4. As soon as it cools, repeat step 3. You will bring it to a light boil a total of 5 times. This is why it takes 2 days to make. It’s really easy though. Definitely not rocket science to bring a pot to a boil and give it a few stirs :D.

You can go to work and come home then return it to a boil; there’s no “set” time that you need to be reboiling it. If 2 days doesn’t work for you, by all means, take 3 days. Preserves have plenty of sugar so they won’t spoil at room temp if you leave it on the counter overnight. If you want the preserves to have an even thicker consistency, you can boil it 6 times if you wish.

(Note: the fifth time you boil, bring it to a boil over a little lower heat and stir a few extra times to prevent scorching. Also, it thickens more as it cools.)

5. The last time you bring it to a boil you will want to transfer it to sterilized jars while it’s boiling hot.

How to make peach preserves - just 3 ingredients: peaches, sugar, lemon juice! No pectin required in this peach jam recipe! Make your own peach preserves.

To sterilize the jars:

  1. To sterilize your clean jars:  wash them and let them dry in the oven at 215 for about 20 min or until completely dry. Boil the lids 5 min.

How to make peach preserves - just 3 ingredients: peaches, sugar, lemon juice! No pectin required in this peach jam recipe! Make your own peach preserves.

2. Transfer your boiling hot preserves to the jars using a glass measuring cup and a funnel (least messy method) leaving about 1/2″ space.

3. Screw the lids on enough to keep a tight seal in place but don’t over-tighten them since air bubbles need to be able to escape.

4. Place packed cans into the canning pot and cover with 1-2 inches of water. Bring to a boil and process 15 minutes. Remove from the pot with jar lifter and leave at room temperature undisturbed for 12-24 hours. You may hear a pop when the jars fully seal. After 24 hours, check that the seal has formed by pushing down on the center of the lid – it should not move at all. If the seal does not form, refrigerate preserves and enjoy within 3 months.

How to make peach preserves - just 3 ingredients: peaches, sugar, lemon juice! No pectin required in this peach jam recipe! Make your own peach preserves.

Tada!! You’ll make it and think “hey that wasn’t so bad.” Well, that’s what I thought the first time I made them.

How to make peach preserves - just 3 ingredients: peaches, sugar, lemon juice! No pectin required in this peach jam recipe! Make your own peach preserves.

Current Canning Guidelines:

Recipe updated in 2019 to reflect new canning standards. Previously we used the oven method. You can get up to date on the most recent canning guidelines here. It’s a great resource to answer frequently asked canning questions.

How to make peach preserves - just 3 ingredients: peaches, sugar, lemon juice! No pectin required in this peach jam recipe! Make your own peach preserves.

Country Peach Preserves

4.85 from 115 votes
Prep Time: 40 minutes
Cook Time: 1 day
Total Time: 1 day 40 minutes
How to make peach preserves - just 3 ingredients: peaches, sugar, lemon juice! No pectin required in this peach jam recipe! Make your own peach preserves.
Author: Natasha of NatashasKitchen.com
Skill Level: Easy
Cost to Make: Varies
Keyword: Country Peach Preserves
Cuisine: American
Course: Condiments, Dessert
Servings: 5 1/2 (1 pint/16oz) sized jars

Ingredients

Peach Preserves Ingredients:

  • 11 lbs peaches rinsed
  • 4 cups white sugar
  • Juice of 1 medium lemon

What you will need:

  • 5-6 pint-sized jars with lids.

Instructions

To blanch the peaches:

  1. Fill 2/3 of a large soup pot with water. Bring to a boil. Add peaches for 30 -45 seconds, then remove with slotted spoon and drain the pot. Remove peaches immediately to a large bowl of cold water.
  2. Peel the skin, cut the peaches into quarters and remove pits.

Cooking the Preserves:

  1. Place all peeled peaches in a large soup pot and squeeze in juice of 1 lemon. Drizzle well with 2 cups sugar, toss and drizzle again with the remaining 1.5-2 cups so the sugar reaches all the peaches. If peaches are very sweet, you may only need 3 1/2 cups of sugar total. Add more sugar to taste while its cooking.
  2. Let peaches sit at room temp with the sugar for about 30 min -1 hour, or until sugar is dissolved.
  3. Place the pot over the stove uncovered and bring to a light boil, stirring to prevent scorching. Once the whole pot is at a light boil, simmer for 10 minutes and turn off the heat. Let the pot stand uncovered until it is just warm to the touch or reaches room temp.
  4. As soon as it cools, repeat step 3. You will bring it to a light boil a total of 5 times. Preserves have plenty of sugar so they won't spoil at room temp if you leave it on the counter overnight. If you want the preserves to have an even thicker consistency, you can boil it 6 times if you wish. (Note: the fifth time you boil, bring it to a boil over a little lower heat and stir a few extra times to prevent scorching. Also, it thickens more as it cools.)
  5. The last time you bring it to a boil you will want to transfer it to sterilized jars while it's boiling hot.

To sterilize the jars: wash them and let them dry in the oven at 215 for about 20 min or until completely dry. Boil the lids 5 min.

  1. Transfer your boiling hot preserves to the jars using a glass measuring cup and a funnel (least messy method) leaving about 1/2″ space.
  2. Screw the lids on enough to keep a tight seal in place but don't over-tighten them since air bubbles need to be able to escape. 

  3. Place packed cans into the canning pot and cover with 1-2 inches of water. Bring to a boil and process 15 minutes. Remove from the pot with jar lifter and leave at room temperature undisturbed for 12-24 hours. You may hear a pop when the jars fully seal. After 24 hours, check that the seal has formed by pushing down on the center of the lid - it should not move at all. If the seal does not form, refrigerate preserves and enjoy within 3 months.

Signs of Spoiled Canned Food:

With any type of canning, we follow this advice: “When in doubt, throw it out”
Discard and do not eat or taste any canned food if you notice any of the following:

  • the jar is leaking, bulging, or swollen
  • the jar looks damaged, cracked, or abnormal
  • the jar spurts foam or liquid upon opening
  • the canned food is discolored, moldy, mushy, slimy, or smells bad

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Natasha Kravchuk

Welcome to my kitchen! I am Natasha, the blogger behind Natasha's Kitchen (since 2009). My husband and I run this blog together and share only our best, family approved and tested recipes with YOU. Thanks for stopping by! We are so happy you're here.

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Read comments/reviewsAdd comment/review

  • Susan Potoczak
    October 21, 2020

    Can you used frozen peaches? Any modifications?

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      October 21, 2020

      I haven’t tried it that way but I think it’s worth experimenting with. Frozen peaches might make the preserves a little darker but it should still work fine.

      Reply

  • Susan Potoczak
    October 20, 2020

    Can you use frozen peaches for this recipe? I missed the in season fresh peaches. Any adjustments to the recipe?

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      October 20, 2020

      Hi Susan, I haven’t tried it that way but I think it’s worth experimenting with. Frozen peaches might make the preserves a little darker but it should still work fine.

      Reply

  • June
    October 13, 2020

    Do the peach preserves have to be refrigerated?

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      October 13, 2020

      Hi June, there is no need to refrigerate them, because the sugar will keep them from spoiling. They have a shelf life of about a year and maybe longer if they are canned and tightly sealed. You can keep them in the pantry and refrigerate after opening

      Reply

  • Shan B
    September 25, 2020

    Could I use peaches that I have in the freezer already? How many cups would I use (they are already halved and pit removed)?

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      September 25, 2020

      Hi Shan, I haven’t tried it that way but I think it’s worth experimenting. Frozen peaches might make the preserves a little darker but it should still work fine.

      Reply

  • Julie
    September 14, 2020

    We love the flavor and I loved the ease of not having to get it all done in one day. I could work on it after work until I finished it. I’ll definitely make it again.

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      September 15, 2020

      Thanks for your wonderful comment and feedback, Julie. We appreciate it!

      Reply

  • James E Johnson Jr
    September 8, 2020

    Wow just WOW. How can you not try a recipe that has a 5 star rating with more than 720 reviews? This recipe deserves each and every star and then some. Peaches are my favorite fruit and this recipe make the preserves which peaches ask to be made into. Thanks for making this recipe available to us

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      September 8, 2020

      Hi James, I’m so glad you chose to try this recipe! Thank you for your wonderful review and I hope you love all the other recipes that you will try.

      Reply

  • Cheryl Wilson
    September 3, 2020

    I made this peach jam recipe and love it. So now I’ve got friends coming in from Niagara with another bushel of peaches. This was so easy to do. I would recommend using the 250 ml jars that way you can give out more to family and friends. The jam takes on very nice texture and great flavour. I did cut back on the sugar just a little over 3 cups. Thanks sooo much for posting this recipe. We love it.

    Reply

    • Cheryl W.
      September 3, 2020

      How long will these last on the shelf. All jars have been sealed properly. Also once opened how long will that last.

      Reply

      • Natasha's Kitchen
        September 3, 2020

        You can enjoy this preserves within 3 months

        Reply

        • Cheryl
          September 4, 2020

          Hi Natasha you said 3 months is that after it’s been open.

          Reply

          • Natashas Kitchen
            September 4, 2020

            Hi Cheryl, if processed correctly, preserves will keep up to 2 years. Once they are opened, keep them in the refrigerator up to 3 months.

    • Natashas Kitchen
      September 3, 2020

      I’m so happy you enjoyed that. Thank you for sharing that with us!

      Reply

  • Julie L
    August 30, 2020

    Love this recipe! I’ve used it several times successfully and applied the concept to other fruits as well. One idea to hurry up the process is to use ice to cool quicker between simmerings: I have set three canning rings inside a rimmed baking sheet, filled the bottom of the sheet with ice and water, and set the pot on top of the three rings. Occasionally stir the peaches. Add/replace more ice as necessary.

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      August 30, 2020

      That is awesome, love your feedback! Thank you so much for sharing some tips with us, that is some helpful information.

      Reply

  • Patricia Shumate
    August 30, 2020

    When I put my jars in the canner, do I bring up the pressure or just boil without the lid?

    Reply

    • Natasha
      August 31, 2020

      Hi Patricia, It sounds like maybe you have a pressure canner. I don’t have one so I am not familiar with how they are used. I use the method I described – just putting the cans in the pot and covering with 1 to 2 inches of water. I boil without the lid since they are covered with water – they don’t need to be covered with the lid.

      Reply

    • Sher B.
      October 13, 2020

      Look up water bath canning. Fruits with sugar are not pressure canned but water bathed. You want to always use the jar seals and rings when processing canned foods of any types. Hope this helps.

      Reply

  • MKT
    August 27, 2020

    My preserves turned out perfectly, using this recipe. The only thing I see wrong with the recipe is “11 pounds of peaches” (Is that 11 lbs before or after dicing them?) with a yield of 5-6 half pint jars.

    I removed the skins from my very large peaches -each weighed one pound more or less. I removed the skins and pits, chopped into medium-small pieces, weighed them on a gram scale. By the time I weighed out 4 pounds and put them in a 5 qt enameled Dutch oven, I decided that was plenty. Final yield was five half pint jars and one 10 ounce and one 12 jars.

    Reply

    • Natasha
      August 28, 2020

      Hi, it is 11 lbs of peaches before peeling and pitting. It should yield 5-6 pint jars, and not half-pint.

      Reply

  • JoAnn
    August 26, 2020

    I don’t use a pressure cooker or canning pot, I just wash the jars good , turn my oven on 200 and lay the jars down wet, let them in about half hr. And proceed canning with the hot jars, works every time. My grandmother did it this way, no boiling jars! Take one jar out at a time!

    Reply

  • Heather G
    August 25, 2020

    Well, I must say…I never thought this would work but…IT WORKED OUT GREAT!!

    I’ve used traditional recipes before & my grandmas Slow cooked preserve recipe have been okay but I’ve never achieved that sticky & thick texture with heavenly flavor until now!

    I only did 3 times. I worked my gentle boil up SLOWLY, on med/low heat, similar to working with fudge. I used a digital thermometer each time to ensure at the end of 10 minutes of the simmer time I had reached between 220-225 for the right consistency. After my first 10 minute cook & then slow cool, I’d already achieved a much thickened syrupy mix. I still had bright peach slices at this time. However, after the subsequent (and necessary) cook/cool sessions, I ended up with a dark brown thick jam. Tasty but ugly!

    After looking things online, I think the trick for me will be to try doing the 1st cook/cool then straining out the fruit. Then cooking only the syrup as described (cook/cool method) for the next 2 sessions & ending with adding in the bright cooked fruit to the hot thickened syrup at the end while it’s still boiling. Depending on thickness of the syrup I may do an additional cook/cool session to get that thick jammy texture I like (tighter than most store bought).

    I hope to end up with a lighter color final product with juicy bigger pieces of peach that I can cut down if needed before jarring up!

    Mine is in the fridge now & I’ve got some homemade yogurt waiting for the perfect topping!! Thanks so much!!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      August 25, 2020

      YOu’re welcome, Heather! Also, thank you so much for sharing this with us!

      Reply

    • Lize
      September 9, 2020

      Hi Heather, mine turned out a brown colour too. I accidentally scorched it during the third boil, so I thought maybe that was why. I’ve been bringing it to a boil and simmering on pretty high heat so I wonder if lowering the heat like you did would make a difference.

      Reply

  • Kim clark
    August 23, 2020

    Instead of canning preserves can you freeze it once its cooled?

    Reply

  • Irene Carmichael
    August 22, 2020

    I love your country peach preserve recipe. I’ve already adapted it adding allspice, nutmeg and cinnamon for a spicy jam to use as filling for baking. Now I want to adapt again to make it hot by adding peppers. But I’m not sure when to add the heat, at the beginning of the cook or should I wait to reheat 5 or 6. What do you think?

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      August 22, 2020

      Hi Irene, I honestly have never tested that so I can’t make a recommendation on that.

      Reply

  • Leanne
    August 20, 2020

    Hello! Do you use this as jam, or a dessert? I’m on the fourth boil and it looks great so far!
    Thanks!

    Reply

    • Natasha
      August 20, 2020

      Hi Leanne, I use it as a jam, but it would be great as a topping for ice cream!

      Reply

  • Aidan Torres
    August 18, 2020

    Planning to make this in the next day or two. How come it doesn’t need pectin?

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      August 18, 2020

      Hi Aidan, varying fruits have varying amounts of pectin naturally so some you may not have to cook as many times. You might google the difference between different fruits before starting.

      Reply

  • Robin
    August 15, 2020

    Thanks for sharing! Looking forward to tasting the end result. I’m wondering, is it feasible or is there any reason not to double this recipe?

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      August 15, 2020

      You’re welcome! I imagine that should work fine.

      Reply

  • Sara
    August 11, 2020

    Can I make the peach jam or preserves in the slow cooker?

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      August 12, 2020

      Hi Sara, I haven’t tried this in a slow cooker so I can’t say for sure. Without testing it in the slow cooker, I can’t say for sure how that would work or how long you would need to keep it in the slow cooker to get a thick enough consistency.

      Reply

  • JoAnn
    August 11, 2020

    I’m a bit weird, I can my mom peach preserves and then I put them in the freezer, jar and all, they come out fantastic ! But I guess I’m just being cautious!

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      August 11, 2020

      Thanks for sharing that with us!

      Reply

  • Ewa
    August 11, 2020

    Can you freeze instead of canning?

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      August 11, 2020

      Hi Ewa, we have always canned it but I think this would freeze really well.

      Reply

  • Gina
    August 7, 2020

    I have approx 3 lbs of pitted peaches that were too ripe to freeze and thought I would make a couple jars of preserves. I figure this is probably 8 -9 cups of peaches. What amount of sugar would you recommend? Will too little sugar increase the chance of spoilage?

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      August 8, 2020

      Hi Gina, I recommend using the recipe slider on the printable recipe card. There you can slide the slider to the amount of peaches you have. I hope that helps.

      Reply

  • Brenda Beebe
    August 4, 2020

    I’ve followed this recipe twice now (with the usual variations). For peach jam I used a potato masher once the peaches were soft (2nd boil) and continued with boils to the final set. It is so much easier for old folk like me to be able to rest in between boils!!

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      August 4, 2020

      So great to hear that, Barbara. Thanks for sharing that with us!

      Reply

  • Kathleen
    August 4, 2020

    Hello, Could you make this from frozen peaches? All of my peaches are ripe, but I do not have time to make this jam soon. I was thinking of peeling and cutting my peaches, then freezing and making this later. Any thoughts?

    Reply

    • Natasha
      August 4, 2020

      Hi Kathleen, freezing peaches might discolor them, but otherwise it would work if the color isn’t an issue.

      Reply

      • Daisy
        August 26, 2020

        I don’t have a canning pot or pressure canner, but my peach tree is breaking from all the fruit on it! Is there an oven method i can do to can these?

        Reply

        • Natasha
          August 26, 2020

          Hi Daisy, you might have to do a google search for that. It is, however, not recommended by the USDA.

          Reply

  • Steph
    July 31, 2020

    Best peach preserves ever! Wondering if other fruit could be substituted using this cook and cook method. Would love to try strawberries!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      July 31, 2020

      I’m so happy you enjoyed this recipe Steph! I haven’t tried this many other types of fruit but I think it’s worth trying! Varying fruits have varying amounts of pectin naturally so some you may not have to cook as many times. You might google the difference between different fruits before starting. If you experiment, let me know how you like it!

      Reply

  • JoAnn
    July 27, 2020

    I find if you don’t cut the peaches too small I get nice chunks in mine but I also don’t reboil mine so much only
    2 times But then let it cook a lot longer until it’s nice and golden, but you need to watch it and stir!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      July 27, 2020

      Thank you so much for sharing that with me JoAnn!

      Reply

  • Bonnie J Kincannon
    July 27, 2020

    I am currently on my second batch of peach preserves. The taste is amazing. This recipe is so easy.

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      July 27, 2020

      I’m so glad you’re enjoying this recipe Bonnie!

      Reply

  • Bonnie Kincannon
    July 26, 2020

    Made the Peach Preserves yesterday and today. Followed the directions exactly. Peaches came out good and orange but mostly mush like apple sauce. Great taste. How can I get more fruit to stay together?

    Reply

    • Natasha
      July 27, 2020

      Hi Bonnie, it could be due to overboiling or boiling for too long. Also, it could be the variety of peaches – ones that are overripe will taste great but tend to be mushier.

      Reply

      • Mary Ann Smith
        August 11, 2020

        Maybe cut the slices thicker?

        Reply

  • Heidi
    July 23, 2020

    I started with 11 lbs. of peaches, peeled and cut in quarters. The peaches were super sweet so only added 3 cups of sugar to start. I have boiled and cooled off 5 times now. I am on the 3rd day. What I have is peach mush. Tastes really good, but there is not thickness to it, just sort of reduced mush. I added some cinnamon and nutmeg as well, so again, great taste, but this is not preserves. I am in the middle of trying my 6th time boiling it for 10 minutes. I put it in the refrigerator last night so it would not go bad since we are well beyond 2 days. :-/ Any advice as to what happened would be great!

    Reply

    • Natasha
      July 24, 2020

      Hi Heidi, it could be due to reducing the sugar. Also, I’m not sure if this is the case with you, but do not add water.

      Reply

  • Patricia Haynes
    July 20, 2020

    I am in the process of using your Country Peach Jam recipe today. It looks & smells as if it will be delicious. I have a question, my two pear trees are loaded with pears. I make pear relish every year, but want to try pear jam too. It looks as if this peach jam recipe would work well with pears. Do you think it may work?

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      July 20, 2020

      Hi Patricia! I Hope you love this recipe! I honestly haven’t tried this with pears so I’m not sure if it would work the same way. Maybe someone else has tried and can share their insights? Thanks in advance!

      Reply

  • Rebbeca
    July 18, 2020

    Natasha: Thanks for sharing this recipe. I am using white peaches which are sweeter and more “peachy” than yellows. This will make an awesome spread! I added 4 sticks of cinnamon, 1 tsp of allspice and a pinch of gr. cloves. I am drooling just thinking of homemade biscuits and spiced peach preserves for Christmas breakfast! I have no idea how much I am making but I’m pretty sure its more than what the recipe calls for. I had a bunch of jars left over from another project and now they will be full of yummy peach spread!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      July 18, 2020

      You’re welcome Rebbeca! I hope you enjoy this recipe!

      Reply

  • Nancy
    July 17, 2020

    This made a lovely jam. I didn’t weigh my peaches and also had to trim off a lot of bruises and bad spots from my homegrown peaches, so I don’t know how many lbs I ended up with. I had 9 cups of chopped peaches and added 3-1/2 cups sugar. It tastes delicious, but I wonder if my proportions of peaches to sugar was anywhere near right. I would love to see the amount of peaches listed as cups of actual chopped peaches. Could I have used less sugar and still had it thicken? I only had to simmer mine 4 times and it was thick enough. Thanks for a great recipe!!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      July 17, 2020

      Hi Nancy, I wish I measured it that way. Once they are pitted, peeled and sliced, it’s about 20-22 cups of peaches. I filled my pot and measured for you. (This is what google tells me: 1 lb peaches = 3 cups sliced) Hope that helps!

      Reply

  • Jackey
    July 17, 2020

    Am trying your peach preserves without pectin…what about the foam that forms each time? Do I skim it off or do I leave it?

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      July 17, 2020

      Hi Jackey, The cooking takes care of it. No need to skim any foam.

      Reply

  • Jess
    July 15, 2020

    Hello, say I wanted to add vanilla and bourbon flavours to my preserve. Would I be better suited to use extracts for bourbon or the real deal? In my mind I’m using vanilla bean paste and the extract to dial down the amount of liquid alcohol that needs to be reduced and I’m thinking they should be added nearer the end of cooking to retain a stronger flavour… thoughts/suggestions? Thanks

    Reply

    • Natasha
      July 16, 2020

      Hi Jess, I haven’t tried those add-ins so I can’t speak to that. One reader reported putting a vanilla bean in with great results but didn’t mention at what point in the process it was added. If anyone else has tried, please let us know.

      Reply

  • Janice Vranicar
    July 14, 2020

    I’m on my 4th boil….but my preserves look so dark in color. Not like yours at all. Did I do something wrong? I started last night…..doing 2 boils and they seemed ok, then the 3rd boil and now this one it seems to be getting dark. I’m so sad! Wondering what I did wrong. On a side note, I took a taste and they tasted really good, though. Thoughts? Thank you!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      July 14, 2020

      Hi Janice, it can start to darken if it is boiled too vigorously over too high of heat.

      Reply

  • Kristen H.
    July 14, 2020

    I am so excited to make this! I have made strawberry preserves the past few years. For this recipe, is the water bath/processing necessary? For my strawberry preserves, I do not use a water bath as the heat of the preserves seals the jars itself. After talking with my mother, (who has canned jams/jellies/preserves for 30+ years), there are very few items she processes in water baths anymore. Just curious . . .

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      July 14, 2020

      That’s what works on our end however you can use the process that you’re comfortable with. You can try without the water bath and please let us know and share with us how it goes.

      Reply

      • Judy Morris
        July 15, 2020

        Food safety experts say to can them, but they also say that after canning to check if it sealed properly by letting cool and then doing the push test (when the lid is pushed on it does not move). I guess maybe the answer is how much of a risk you want to take of getting botulism.

        Reply

        • Judy Morris
          August 31, 2020

          Since I wrote the above reply to Kristen’s question, I saw a post elsewhere that said that doing the old fashioned method of letting the heat of the jam seal the jars may not create enough of a vacuum to get the air out and will put you at higher risk of botulism.

          Reply

    • Tymothi
      August 31, 2020

      Hi Kristen H, I’m fairly new to canning (2 years), so I am curious if you could please share some of the items your mother processes in water baths and some of the items she DOESN’T process in water baths. Thank you very much in advance!

      Reply

  • Angela
    July 10, 2020

    Hi my peach preserves turned out great. Can I do this with blackberries? I am concerned that there will be too many seeds. Any suggestions
    Thanks

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      July 10, 2020

      Hi Angela, I have not tested this with blackberries to advise. I’m curious how that would work! If you experiment please let me know how you like that.

      Reply

    • Judy Morris
      July 15, 2020

      I haven’t used this recipe with blackberries, but I have made blackberry jam. There are a lot of seeds, but it didn’t bother me. My father couldn’t eat it because of diverticulitis and had been told not to eat seeds and nuts. You could mash it up through a strainer possibly if you don’t want the seeds. Also, its been a long time since I made it, but I think blackberries may be a higher pectin fruit and do seem to be lower moisture than some fruit so it may not take as many boils?

      Reply

      • Natashas Kitchen
        July 15, 2020

        Hi Judy! Thank you so much for sharing this with us! Without testing it with blackberries I cannot say that it will take fewer boils, but that may be the case.

        Reply

    • Kimberly
      July 17, 2020

      Just a fyi in case you may not know and if you do then kindly ignore this lol

      You can make blackberry jam and preserves by removing the seeds…but presonally I think it ruins the taste and texture is different!

      Reply

  • Helen
    July 10, 2020

    I made this exactly as written, except I added a few pinches of cardamom, and it was delicious! The texture is just perfect! Thanks for sharing, Natasha!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      July 10, 2020

      You’re welcome! I’m so happy you enjoyed it, Helen!

      Reply

  • Kim
    July 9, 2020

    This is my first time attempting preserves. I am on my 6th boil and my peaches are still very chunky with little to no juice. Should I add a little water or do a 7th boil or just do a quick run with the immersion blender before I can?

    Reply

    • Natasha
      July 9, 2020

      Hi Kim, that does seem unusual – did you add sugar to the peaches to help them release their juice? Also, make sure to use ripe peaches for this as they break down much easier. I would probably do a quick run with the immersion blender to reach your desired consistency and only add water if absolutely necessary. You have to boil again if adding water before canning.

      Reply

  • Kipper
    July 7, 2020

    Hello so no pectic never tried this my peaches will be ripe by tomorrow 7/8 my concern is it been 90 + degrees and will be, will it hurt letting it set out over night I work third shift so will be cooking during the day? no sure jell either humm. thank you for ur advice!

    Reply

    • Natasha
      July 7, 2020

      Hi Kipper, from my experience, there is enough sugar in these preserves where they won’t spoil if left out for the day before the next boil.

      Reply

  • Tracey W
    July 7, 2020

    I am planning on making the peach preserves and wondered if you used anything to prevent the peaches from turning brown? Your jars have a beautiful peach color but want to know if anything beside the lemon should be added.

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      July 7, 2020

      Hi Tracey, great question, the key is to not boil the peaches at too high of heat which can cause browning.

      Reply

      • Tracey W
        July 7, 2020

        Thank you! Going to get started on these this evening. Looks delicious

        Reply

        • Natashas Kitchen
          July 7, 2020

          You’re welcome! I hope you love this recipe!

          Reply

  • Dana
    July 7, 2020

    I don’t normally comment, but I have now made this recipe 3 years in a row and feel like the rest of the world needs to hear how great these preserves are.

    Thanks for helping us make peach season last longer

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      July 7, 2020

      That’s just awesome! Thank you for sharing that great review with me, Dana!

      Reply

  • carolyn shimabuku
    July 5, 2020

    Hi! I want to try your method of boiling and cooling. It seems like a gentler way, as opposed to constantly boiling, to reduce the liquid and get a preserve thick enough to spread on toast. My question is can I use 8 oz jars instead of 16 oz? Thanks!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      July 6, 2020

      Hi Carolyn, that should work in 8 oz jars. You will need double the jars however unless you plan on halving the recipe.

      Reply

  • Julie
    July 2, 2020

    Do the peaches need to be ripe before attempting this? I had to buy the peaches from the grocery store, so of course they are under ripe. I’ve got them sitting outside in the sun now, but I dont k ow how long I need to let them “soften” up before trying this.

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      July 2, 2020

      Hi Julie, this will work best with them being rip, yes.

      Reply

  • Tangie Weitzman
    June 29, 2020

    Can I use Ball Fruit Fresh to keep the peaches from browning? I’m new to canning and I’ve never used this product before.

    Reply

    • Natasha
      June 29, 2020

      Hi Tangie, I haven’t tried that product before. The key for us is to not boil the peaches at too high of heat which can cause browning. Let me know if you experiment with it.

      Reply

  • Nicole
    June 29, 2020

    Hi! I’m currently making this and just finished my 4th boil and waiting to cool. It’s still very runny (but I’ve never made preserves before so this could be normal haha), do they thicken up in the jar?

    Reply

    • Natasha
      June 29, 2020

      Hi Nicole, it will thicken up a little more as it cools but you can test the thickness by putting some in a shallow bowl to see the consistency once it reaches room temperature. Some peaches can be juicier than others. You may need an additional boil down.

      Reply

  • Julie
    June 28, 2020

    First time I’ve ever made preserves. Simple recipe and my family loved them!

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      June 28, 2020

      Awesome! I am so glad you loved the result.

      Reply

  • Barbara Gross
    June 28, 2020

    Have a peach tree that does not produce good tasting peaches. I made this recipe, and they are great! Wish I would have found this recipe years ago. Thank you.

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      June 28, 2020

      I am so glad that you found this recipe, Barbara!

      Reply

  • Ollie
    June 20, 2020

    Hi. I picked up my case of peaches from the peach truck 4 days ago. Researched preserve recipes and like yours best. I’m a first timer. I’ll let you know the outcome. I’ve got to go buy everything.

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      June 20, 2020

      I hope you love this recipe Ollie!

      Reply

    • Nicole
      June 29, 2020

      I just got mine from the Peach Truck on the 25th and I’m making them. I just finished my 4th boil.

      Reply

  • Jaime
    June 17, 2020

    I am in the boiling and cooling section of the process and was just wondering if the peaches will mash up and be more of a spread or will they keep their shape? Do I need to do any kind of mashing or pureeing to make it into more of a spread?

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      June 17, 2020

      Hi Jaime, no we did not mash them or have to, only stirred occasionally.

      Reply

  • Ivy Tippit
    June 8, 2020

    I did it! I only used 3 cups of sugar and they are perfect.
    I got about 3 1/2 pints of perserves.
    2 of my peaches equaled about 1 pound so I did about 23 peaches.
    Lol, people are wanting to purchase my perserves, but I don’t think my husband will allow it. Wish I could post pic.

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      June 8, 2020

      That’s just awesome! Thank you for sharing that with me!

      Reply

  • Jennifer G Erwin
    June 8, 2020

    I have a question – when you say cover the jars with 1-2 inches – do you mean the water will cover the lids and then measure 1-2 inches? I am on the 4th “boiling now” so getting close to canning the peach jam. thank you

    Reply

    • Natasha
      June 8, 2020

      Hi Jennifer, yes the water should be at least 1″ above the surface of the lids.

      Reply

  • Debra
    June 1, 2020

    Hi. I hope you are able to reply fairly quickly. I received my order of peaches from the peach truck and split them with my neighbor. I would like to make peach jam, peach crisp, peach ice cream and peach salsa. I have approximately 40 peaches. I would like to have enough jam for 4 – 5 small jars (not tiny) but I also do not want to can them Because I do not have all the equipment. I want to be able to use them within 6 months. Can I safely do that? How many pounds would you reduce this recipe to in order to achieve this? And do I have enough peaches to do all the recipes I mentioned?

    Reply

    • Natasha
      June 2, 2020

      Hi Debra, if you weren’t canning them for shelf storage, you could keep some in the refrigerator and whatever you aren’t going to eat within a few weeks, I would suggest freezing it for longer storage.

      Reply

  • Adriana
    June 1, 2020

    Hello. Can I use this same exact method but do apricots instead of peaches?

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      June 1, 2020

      Hi Adriana, the same method will work for apricots as well Liya.

      Reply

  • Jill Bryant
    May 7, 2020

    Best recipe ever. We don’t add sugar but the rest is fantastic. The kids loved it. They add it to their oatmeal!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      May 7, 2020

      Yum! So perfect with oatmeal! Thak you for sharing that with me.

      Reply

    • Terri OReilly
      June 24, 2020

      So the recipe worked with no sugar at all? I’m diabetic and looking for a good and trusted recipe. Hopefully this is it.

      Reply

      • Patricia Rodgers
        August 24, 2020

        did this receipe work for the diabetic with no sugar added

        Reply

  • Anette
    February 19, 2020

    Hi Natasha! This sounds great – my question is, can it be made with frozen peaches? I am also in ID and last year stuck a bunch of peaches in the freezer but they really need to be put away now, so I am thinking your preserves recipe might be the ticket. Would I need to boil them longer using frozen peaches (to get rid of possible liquid)? Thanks so much!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      February 19, 2020

      Hi Anette, I haven’t tried it that way but I think it’s worth experimenting. Frozen peaches might make the preserves a little darker but it should still work fine.

      Reply

  • Ashley Harvey
    February 15, 2020

    Hi Natasha,

    As I’ll be buying from the store and don’t have access to abundant volumes of peaches, am I able to half the quantities and safely can in the Ball 4oz jelly jars?

    Thanks in advance

    Ash

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      February 16, 2020

      Hi Ashley, that should work great, I have cut the recipe in half due to lack of peaches.

      Reply

      • Ashley
        February 16, 2020

        Thank you for your prompt reply. Much appreciated 😊

        Reply

    • Morton Kenna
      June 14, 2020

      I don’t quite understand the purpose of the repeated boiling, cooling.

      Reply

  • Nina W
    December 1, 2019

    Hi, do you think this recipe can be used for fuyu persimmons ? They are very sweet and ripped.

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      December 2, 2019

      Hi Nina, that is a great question. I honestly have not tried that to advise. If you experiment, let me know how you liked the recipe

      Reply

  • Olive Gray
    October 8, 2019

    Hi Gloria, I have all my peaches prepared, come to find out I only have limes in the house. Can I use a lime instead? Sure hope so!!!! Thank you, looks like a great recipe.

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      October 8, 2019

      Hi Olive, I haven’t tested that to advise, it may alter the flavor to a more bitter taste but I think it could work. If you experiment, let me know how you liked the recipe

      Reply

  • Gloria
    September 26, 2019

    Hi,
    Can you tell me if the final product will be thick enough to use as a cake filling? Its hard to tell from the pictures how thick it is and I need it pretty thick so there’s not much moisture going into the cake layers making them soggy. Thanks! It looks delicious!

    Reply

    • Natasha
      September 26, 2019

      Hi Gloria, I would suggest pureeing it and bringing to a light boil an extra time, stirring frequently to get it just a little thicker for a cake filling and it should work well.

      Reply

  • Gina Briggs
    September 23, 2019

    I added a couple sprigs of rosemary to a batch of the preserves, removing it before canning. Very yummy!

    I’ve also played with reducing the sugar as my peaches were very ripe. Have had no issues.

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      September 24, 2019

      Thank you so much for sharing that with me.

      Reply

  • Wubble Gubble
    September 23, 2019

    I ran a batch fresh picked from a volunteer peach tree, 24 pounds total.

    I used 6.5 cups of sugar total.

    It was my goal to boil/ simmer the batch 6 times prior to canning however my timing was off which forced me to boil/ simmer for a seventh time.

    Overall, I noticed roughly a 50% reduction in overall preserves volume from start to finish of the boil/ simmer process.

    In the end. the preserves came out very well, I have 16 12 ounce jars full of preserves.

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      September 23, 2019

      Thank you so much for sharing that with us!

      Reply

    • Jess
      April 26, 2020

      Perfect, thank you for sharing! I planned on ordering a 1/2 bushel from The Peach Truck this year (25 lbs.) and was wondering around how many pints I will get – seems like around 14-15

      Reply

  • Nina
    September 22, 2019

    It’s a great recipe do you think I can use apples for the same recipe??thanks

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      September 23, 2019

      Hi Nina, I haven’t tested that to advise but here is what one of our readers wrote “Ok, so I had my aunt help me to make apple spread(jam/jelly?), and we did it in one afternoon, due to the fact that she said since the apples didn’t produce much juice at all and we put them through the food processor, so they were like pea sized before cooking them. And because my aunt was kinda in charge of the cooking and I was the observer, she cooked the apples first until there was no juice left at all and they were beginning to thicken (about 1.5-2 hours, stirring often), it was only then she put in the lemon juice and the sugar. She measured about 1qt of sugar (unfortunately I can’t tell you to how much apples, it was total of 3 qt of jam we got to can). So it’s not exactly following your recipe, but I’m just letting you know what we did with our apples. Next year I hope you can get enough apples to post recipe of that too. I’m totally new at canning, but really enjoyed canning fruit this summer.”

      Reply

  • Sue
    September 21, 2019

    Can you tell me how many cups of pitted peaches 11 lbs is? I am assuming that you weigh the peaches before they are pitted?

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      September 21, 2019

      Hi Sue, I wish I measured it that way. Once they are pitted, peeled and sliced, it’s about 20-22 cups of peaches. I filled my pot and measured for you. (This is what google tells me: 1 lb peaches = 3 cups sliced) Hope that helps!

      Reply

  • Steezus Christ
    September 21, 2019

    I made this with 60 peaches and 4 cups and it is amazing! i have it a little mashing at the last boil but other than it broke up into a great jam on its own. very easy very good recipe

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      September 21, 2019

      I’m so happy you enjoyed that. Thank you for sharing that with us!

      Reply

  • Janno
    September 21, 2019

    Hi — I have a batch of this on the stove… When I do the boils 2-5, should I be simmering it 10 minutes each time, or just bringing it to a boil and then taking off the heat?

    Reply

    • Natasha
      September 21, 2019

      Hi Janno, each time, I let it simmer for 10 minutes and then turn off the heat. It helps it thicken up better as the steam evaporates with the simmer.

      Reply

  • Chelsea Villalba
    September 21, 2019

    I used this recipe to can my homegrown nectarines, and they turned out great! The process was exactly the same, except I only had seven (7) lbs to process, so I used two (2) cups of sugar. I boiled my fruit / sugar mixture six (6) times to get a thicker consistency, and its just perfect for me. Thanks for sharing!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      September 21, 2019

      I’m so happy you enjoyed that. Thank you for sharing that with us, Chelsea!

      Reply

    • lisa
      September 22, 2019

      Yours are so bright and peachy! Mine not so much. Did I need more lemon? I also used the peaches that weren’t my “A” canning, just riper. Woukd that make a diff?Thanks so much!

      Reply

      • Natashas Kitchen
        September 23, 2019

        Hi Lisa, following the instructions here, the fruit does not lose color or flavor. If you cook it for too long at too high of the preserves will get darker, however it won’t really affect the flavor unless they get burn

        Reply

  • Steezus Christ
    September 18, 2019

    Making this now with 60 homegrown peaches! and its coming out so well!
    Just a few questions- What is the consistency? does the boiling and stirring mash the peaches, or is it more of a chunk preserve? Can I mash them to have a smoother texture? Or will that just make it all very watery?
    On boil #3, my house smells amazing

    Reply

    • Natasha
      September 18, 2019

      Hi, it does have a chunkier texture that breaks down more and more with each boil down but yes you can use an immersion blender (or a regular blender in batches), to puree it further to your desired consistency.

      Reply

  • Kirsten
    September 17, 2019

    I made the peach jam a couple of days ago. I cut the sugar back as the peaches were very ripe. What a mistake as my jam is just wet mush and more like a fruit stew.
    I learned my lesson to add the sugar recommended. I did follow the directions completely.

    Reply

    • Natasha
      September 17, 2019

      Thank you for sharing those valuable insights!

      Reply

    • Judy Morris
      September 17, 2019

      I don’t know if your “mush” would be safe if canned., However if you like the taste, use it as refrigerator jam. I have done a quick fruit topping that ends up like this and use it on french toast, sandwiches, yogurt, ricotta, cottage cheese,…. Since i am diabetic and the amount of jam I like is too many carbs, but artificial sugar causes digestive issues for me, this works well for me.

      Reply

  • Kirsten
    September 13, 2019

    Hello from Ontario, picked up lovely peaches for canning at Niagara Vineland. Made the recipe as per recommendation and I have wonderful peach jam for the winter and Christmas gifts.
    Thank you for this great method. It now in my own recipe book to be handed down!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      September 14, 2019

      Hi Kirsten, I’m so glad you enjoyed it and I bet these would make the best Christmas gifts! Thank you for the wonderful review!

      Reply

  • Wubble Gubble
    September 13, 2019

    I stumbled upon your article on Peach Preserves … it just so happens that I have two peach trees with buku fruit and I am enthused by your recipe/ process, so I have asked my wife to pick up jars today and this weekend I will be making peach preserves!

    I will return to post a review of the process and the outcome as well.

    thank you

    Reply

  • Diane T
    September 12, 2019

    I’ve used this recipe 2 yrs in a row and it’s the best for sure! It does take longer to make but it’s worth the wait. I can’t make enough to keep up with the demand! Thanks for sharing

    Reply

    • Diane T
      September 12, 2019

      so sorry – forgot to give it a rating. 5 Stars!

      Reply

      • Natasha
        September 12, 2019

        Awww thank you Diane! You’re so nice. Thanks for the thoughtful review.

        Reply

        • Jenny stewart
          September 14, 2019

          I have peach fruit tree in yard with LOTS of fruit…new to area…how long canned jam last once finished and sealed.

          Reply

          • Natasha
            September 14, 2019

            Hi Jenny, if processed correctly, preserves will keep up to 2 years. Once they are opened, keep them in the refrigerator up to 3 months.

    • Natasha
      September 12, 2019

      I’m so happy to hear that! Thank you Diane!

      Reply

  • Holly
    September 11, 2019

    I think by day 3 these are unsafe. Opened the lid to start the last boil today and voila, see slight mold on the edge of my pan. They would have been perfect yesterday. 😩.

    Reply

    • Natasha
      September 12, 2019

      Hi Holly, oh no! That’s definitely unusual and sorry to hear that. In all the years we’ve made these, I have never seen that before. These have ample amounts of sugar to prevent any kind of spoilage over the course of three days with boiling them down each day. I would highly suggest following the proportions in the recipe for sugar to fruit.

      Reply

  • Iryna Hayes
    September 10, 2019

    Natasha, thank you so much for your responses and what you are doing! So far your recipes are awesome! I am looking for recipes for jams of strawberries, raspberries, currant, cherries, apricots and dogwood (kyzyl). It would be so great if you know them and would post them on your wonderful site! Thank you very much again!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      September 10, 2019

      I’m so glad you’re enjoying our site, Iryna! We have Apricot preserves here, our plum jam here is pretty popular too! Thank you for those other suggestions!

      Reply

    • Jenny stewart
      September 15, 2019

      Help!! Tastes acidy..sat over night as still needs 3 more heat and cool sessions. Tested good last night.

      Reply

  • Iryna
    September 9, 2019

    Natasha, what size of pan you recommend to use processing jams, adjika, etc? Not for boiling jars, I understand that it’s typical canning pan, 20 qts. My question is about capacity of a pan for cooking that stuff in. Will 9 qts be enough or more? Thank you

    Reply

    • Natasha
      September 9, 2019

      Hi Iryna, 9 quarts is definitely plenty. I believe the one I had in the photos was a 7 quart.

      Reply

  • Christa Cranston
    September 9, 2019

    First time canning- very easy recipe to follow, thank you! We buy preserves now that do not have any added sugar. Is it possible to make this recipe sugarless or add less sugar or will that alter the outcome?

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      September 9, 2019

      Hi Christa, that is a great question. I recommend reading through a few of the comments there are a few discussions on sugar there. But, I haven’t tried wiht out sugar but one of my readers, CJ reported the following using a substitution: “Shirley asked about using Splenda for preserves. I’ve used it many times with great success and taste. You must water bath the filled jars as there is no sugar protection to prevent bacterial/mold growth. For others, adding a few drops of almond extract makes nectarine preserves taste more strongly, like peach.” Hope this is helpful!

      Reply

  • Iryna
    September 9, 2019

    Natasha, how large should be the cooking pot? Will 6 quarts be enough? How thick? Dutch oven or stainless steel to prevent from burning? Thank you!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      September 9, 2019

      Great question, Iryna, I recommend reading the “What you will need” section in the recipe blog post. We mention needing “Large Stock Pot (20Qt+) with Rack (or purchase a canner)”

      Reply

  • Vickie Sizemore
    September 6, 2019

    I have a glass top stove. The water bath canner I bought yesterday said not to use on a glass top stove because it won’t get hot enough. Is this true? Should I take the canner back?

    Reply

    • Natasha
      September 6, 2019

      Hi Vickie, I haven’t heard that before – how odd, but if the caner say so then maybe better to play it safe and exchange it. Boiling water is boiling water – I really am not sure why it would say that.

      Reply

    • Michele
      September 15, 2019

      We have a glass top and we do our bath on the side burner of our bbq. My brother in law did his on a glass top and it cracked so we weren’t going to take that chance

      Reply

  • Samuel
    September 4, 2019

    I live at 6800 feet do I need to pressure can or water bath it’s not clear with your recipe?
    Sam
    Ps the jam is amazing!

    Reply

    • Natasha
      September 4, 2019

      Hi Sam, I am not aware of different canning recommendations for high elevation areas. If you have a method that you are comfortable with, I would suggest sticking to it. I water can and I live at 2700 feet.

      Reply

      • kathryn thurman
        September 9, 2019

        i think he is speaking of a pressure cooker

        Reply

  • Mary
    September 4, 2019

    Hi, I was excited to try this recipe. I cooked it the 5 times, but in the end it was brownish looking. Is the picture on the website your actual jam?

    Reply

    • Natasha
      September 4, 2019

      Hi Mary, it can start to darken if it is boiled too vigorously over too high of heat.

      Reply

  • Gina Briggs
    September 1, 2019

    I have followed your recipe for Country Peach Preserves and have just finished the third boil. My peaches have become much darker as they cook compared to your pictures-yours are brighter, more yellow. I left them in the sugar and lemon juice overnight and they were still bright yellow when I started the cooking process. Thoughts as to why mine would be darkening?

    Reply

    • Natasha
      September 2, 2019

      Hi Gina, the mixture tends to darken if the peaches are boiled more rapidly.

      Reply

      • Gina Briggs
        September 4, 2019

        Thanks Natasha. I have more peaches and going to try again.

        Reply

  • JoAnn
    August 31, 2019

    I have a question,I didn’t read your instructions correctly, I put a lid on and let it boil pretty fast , what will happen now? I shut it off but did I ruin it? What should I do?

    Reply

    • Natasha
      September 1, 2019

      As long as it did not scorch on the bottom, it should be just fine.

      Reply

  • Meggie
    August 30, 2019

    Thanks for sharing your knowledge. I appreciated this method of naturally thickening the jam! This was my first time canning- Can’t wait to do this again. I appreciate the tender method of low and slow but it is impatient at times. Just had to make sure I was on top of stirring it and using low heat to bring it to a simmer. But was easy to come to and from it over a course of a couple days. I used the boiling water method to can the jam and it worked out well. Added in some warming spices and it turned out delicious. Also used my immersion blender to blend it up a bit.

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      August 31, 2019

      I’m so glad that was helpful Meggie! Thank you so much for sharing that with me.

      Reply

  • Deborah
    August 28, 2019

    In the process of making these preserves, I was wondering if I should skim the foam?
    I was also wondering at what point would you recommend adding a spice sachet.

    Reply

    • Natasha
      August 29, 2019

      Hi Deborah, skimming is not necessary here. I haven’t tried adding a spice sachet so I don’t have a good answer for you. If you experiment with that, please let me know how it goes and what spices you use.

      Reply

  • Oany
    August 23, 2019

    Has anyone tried this recipe, or this way to make preserves with any other fruit? I wonder if it would work and get as thick as this recipe using any other fruit?

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      August 23, 2019

      Hi Oany, I haven’t tried this many other types of fruit but I think it’s worth trying! Varying fruits have varying amounts of pectin naturally so some you may not have to cook as many times. You might google the difference between different fruits before starting. If you experiment, let me now how you like it!

      Reply

      • oany
        August 27, 2019

        I sure will! Thank you so much for sharing this recipe, it delicious! and my family love it!!

        Reply

        • Natashas Kitchen
          August 27, 2019

          You’re welcome!

          Reply

  • GLORIA
    August 23, 2019

    CAN YOU FREEZE THIS INSTEAD OF CAN?

    Reply

    • Natasha
      August 23, 2019

      Hi Gloria, we have always canned it but I think this would freeze really well.

      Reply

  • Rebecca
    August 22, 2019

    Just made this today (and yesterday. I wanted to add another dimension, so I sliced two jalapeños in half and put them in so simmer with the boils. I took one out at the end, and used my immersion blender to mix it in. Oh, my! It’s Sunshine & Fire! Sooo good! I’ll use it to put in plain yogurt, or to top a lovely Brie en Croute for a gathering (hello, Thanksgiving!) or, just on toast or an English muffin. Cheese pastryy? Yes, please! Thank you for this recipe, Natasha; good job!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      August 22, 2019

      I’m so glad you enjoyed that. Thank you for that amazing feedback!

      Reply

  • Mary
    August 20, 2019

    Hi, this is the first time I have tried making jam. if I leave on the counter overnight is it okay to cover.

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      August 20, 2019

      Hi Mary, Yes, once the preserves are at room temperature, you can leave them covered on the counter overnight

      Reply

  • Mary
    August 20, 2019

    Hi, when I leave the pot on the counter overnight, can I cover it?

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      August 20, 2019

      Hi Mary, yes that should work.

      Reply

  • Patty Rech
    August 20, 2019

    Love that you use this so-much-easier method-than-“canning”! Also like that it is just as I make mine – fruit, sugar, lemon. No pectin have I ever found necessary for preserves. THANK YOU!!!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      August 20, 2019

      You’re welcome! I’m so happy you enjoyed it Patty!

      Reply

  • Massie
    August 18, 2019

    Can you substitute the sugar in this recipe for natural honey?

    Reply

    • Natasha
      August 19, 2019

      Hi Massie, I haven’t tried canning with honey to be honest so I’m not sure if it works the same way for preserving. If anyone here has any insights on that please share. I’m not sure what canning standards are with using honey as a substitute.

      Reply

      • Jacquelyn Ann Yelton
        August 21, 2019

        We have canned with just honey before. They are a little runnier than your standard preserve but sooo good. I think it takes like summertime. We’ve used the Food in Jars blog recipe.

        Reply

        • Natasha
          August 22, 2019

          Thank you so much for sharing! Are you swapping out the same proportions?

          Reply

  • Margaret Hoyle
    August 18, 2019

    Would it still work if I do half the recipe.

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      August 18, 2019

      Hi Margaret that should work great, I have made this before and love it. So does everyone I have shared it with. It is so easy. I have even cut the recipe in half due to lack of peaches. Thanks so much for sharing the recipe.

      Reply

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