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Country Peach Preserves

How to make peach preserves - just 3 ingredients: peaches, sugar, lemon juice! No pectin required in this peach jam recipe! Make your own peach preserves.

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My mom makes the most amazing fruit preserves. We enjoy her garden fruit all year long this way. This peach preserves recipe takes a couple days; a longer process than most of the peach preserve recipes I’ve seen online but its worth the wait. It’s not watery like most of the recipes that rush the process.

This isn’t speed dating. You’ll get to know your peaches over a couple days and and be rewarded with some mighty fine preserves. If you are thinking about Christmas already (as I am), you can make preserves now, slap a label on in December and give them away as gifts to neighbors, co-workers, nursing directors (wink, wink) – I guess this means I can’t eat all of them myself.

Ingredients for Peach Preserves:

11 lbs peaches, rinsed
4 cups white sugar
Juice of 1 medium lemon

What you will need:

How to make peach preserves - just 3 ingredients: peaches, sugar, lemon juice! No pectin required in this peach jam recipe! Make your own peach preserves.

How to Make Peach Preserves / Peach Jam:

To blanch the peaches:

1. Fill 2/3 of a large soup pot with water. Bring to a boil. Add peaches for 30 -45 seconds, then remove with slotted spoon or this OXO strainer which I used to transfer them in and out of the boiling water and drain the pot. Remove peaches immediately to a large bowl of cold water. This process is known as blanching the peaches and makes removal of the fuzzy skins really easy.

How to make peach preserves - just 3 ingredients: peaches, sugar, lemon juice! No pectin required in this peach jam recipe! Make your own peach preserves.Peaches in a bowl filled with water

2. Peel the skin (most of them peeled easily by hand, but there were a stubborn few that required a knife), cut the peaches into quarters and remove pits.

How to make peach preserves - just 3 ingredients: peaches, sugar, lemon juice! No pectin required in this peach jam recipe! Make your own peach preserves.A peach on a cutting board being cut into fourths

Cooking the Preserves:

1. Place all peeled peaches in a large soup pot and squeeze in juice of 1 lemon. Drizzle well with 2 cups sugar, toss and drizzle again with the remaining 1.5-2 cups so the sugar reaches all the peaches. Here’s where you need to use your judgement.

If your peaches are very sweet, you may only need 3 1/2 cups of sugar total. You can add more sugar to taste while its cooking, so don’t panic at this step. You’ll do great!

Peaches cut into fourth and peeled in a bowl A bowl of peeled and cut up peaches with sugar on topA lemon being pressed for juice

2. Let peaches sit at room temp with the sugar for about 30min -1 hour, or until sugar is dissolved.

A bowl with country peach preserves

3. Place the pot over the stove uncovered and bring to a light boil, stirring to prevent scorching. Make sure if you see a light boil to stir because the whole pot may not be boiling, just the center. If it stops boiling after you stir it, continue boiling.

Once the whole pot is at a light boil, simmer for 10 minutes and turn off the heat. Let the pot stand uncovered until it is just warm to the touch or reaches room temp.

A bowl of soup, with Peach and Sugar

4. As soon as it cools, repeat step 3. You will bring it to a light boil a total of 5 times. This is why it takes 2 days to make. It’s really easy though. Definitely not rocket science to bring a pot to a boil and give it a few stirs :D.

You can go to work and come home then return it to a boil; there’s no “set” time that you need to be reboiling it. If 2 days doesn’t work for you, by all means, take 3 days. Preserves have plenty of sugar so they won’t spoil at room temp if you leave it on the counter overnight. If you want the preserves to have an even thicker consistency, you can boil it 6 times if you wish.

(Note: the fifth time you boil, bring it to a boil over a little lower heat and stir a few extra times to prevent scorching. Also, it thickens more as it cools.)

5. The last time you bring it to a boil you will want to transfer it to sterilized jars while it’s boiling hot.

How to make peach preserves - just 3 ingredients: peaches, sugar, lemon juice! No pectin required in this peach jam recipe! Make your own peach preserves.

To sterilize the jars:

  1. To sterilize your clean jars:  wash them and let them dry in the oven at 215 for about 20 min or until completely dry. Boil the lids 5 min.

How to make peach preserves - just 3 ingredients: peaches, sugar, lemon juice! No pectin required in this peach jam recipe! Make your own peach preserves.

2. Transfer your boiling hot preserves to the jars using a glass measuring cup and a funnel (least messy method) leaving about 1/2″ space.

3. Screw the lids on enough to keep a tight seal in place but don’t over-tighten them since air bubbles need to be able to escape.

4. Place packed cans into the canning pot and cover with 1-2 inches of water. Bring to a boil and process 15 minutes. Remove from the pot with jar lifter and leave at room temperature undisturbed for 12-24 hours. You may hear a pop when the jars fully seal. After 24 hours, check that the seal has formed by pushing down on the center of the lid – it should not move at all. If the seal does not form, refrigerate preserves and enjoy within 3 months.

How to make peach preserves - just 3 ingredients: peaches, sugar, lemon juice! No pectin required in this peach jam recipe! Make your own peach preserves.

Tada!! You’ll make it and think “hey that wasn’t so bad.” Well, that’s what I thought the first time I made them.

How to make peach preserves - just 3 ingredients: peaches, sugar, lemon juice! No pectin required in this peach jam recipe! Make your own peach preserves.

Current Canning Guidelines:

Recipe updated in 2019 to reflect new canning standards. Previously we used the oven method. You can get up to date on the most recent canning guidelines here. It’s a great resource to answer frequently asked canning questions.

How to make peach preserves - just 3 ingredients: peaches, sugar, lemon juice! No pectin required in this peach jam recipe! Make your own peach preserves.

Country Peach Preserves

4.9 from 189 votes
Prep Time: 40 minutes
Cook Time: 1 day
Total Time: 1 day 40 minutes
How to make peach preserves - just 3 ingredients: peaches, sugar, lemon juice! No pectin required in this peach jam recipe! Make your own peach preserves.
Author: Natasha of NatashasKitchen.com
Skill Level: Easy
Cost to Make: Varies
Keyword: Country Peach Preserves
Cuisine: American
Course: Condiments, Dessert
Servings: 5 1/2 (1 pint/16oz) sized jars

Ingredients

Peach Preserves Ingredients:

  • 11 lbs peaches, rinsed
  • 4 cups white sugar
  • Juice of 1 medium lemon

What you will need:

  • 5-6 pint-sized jars with lids.

Instructions

To blanch the peaches:

  1. Fill 2/3 of a large soup pot with water. Bring to a boil. Add peaches for 30 -45 seconds, then remove with slotted spoon and drain the pot. Remove peaches immediately to a large bowl of cold water.
  2. Peel the skin, cut the peaches into quarters and remove pits.

Cooking the Preserves:

  1. Place all peeled peaches in a large soup pot and squeeze in juice of 1 lemon. Drizzle well with 2 cups sugar, toss and drizzle again with the remaining 1.5-2 cups so the sugar reaches all the peaches. If peaches are very sweet, you may only need 3 1/2 cups of sugar total. Add more sugar to taste while its cooking.
  2. Let peaches sit at room temp with the sugar for about 30 min -1 hour, or until sugar is dissolved.
  3. Place the pot over the stove uncovered and bring to a light boil, stirring to prevent scorching. Once the whole pot is at a light boil, simmer for 10 minutes and turn off the heat. Let the pot stand uncovered until it is just warm to the touch or reaches room temp.
  4. As soon as it cools, repeat step 3. You will bring it to a light boil a total of 5 times. Preserves have plenty of sugar so they won't spoil at room temp if you leave it on the counter overnight. If you want the preserves to have an even thicker consistency, you can boil it 6 times if you wish. (Note: the fifth time you boil, bring it to a boil over a little lower heat and stir a few extra times to prevent scorching. Also, it thickens more as it cools.)
  5. The last time you bring it to a boil you will want to transfer it to sterilized jars while it's boiling hot.

To sterilize the jars: wash them and let them dry in the oven at 215 for about 20 min or until completely dry. Boil the lids 5 min.

  1. Transfer your boiling hot preserves to the jars using a glass measuring cup and a funnel (least messy method) leaving about 1/2″ space.
  2. Screw the lids on enough to keep a tight seal in place but don't over-tighten them since air bubbles need to be able to escape. 

  3. Place packed cans into the canning pot and cover with 1-2 inches of water. Bring to a boil and process 15 minutes. Remove from the pot with jar lifter and leave at room temperature undisturbed for 12-24 hours. You may hear a pop when the jars fully seal. After 24 hours, check that the seal has formed by pushing down on the center of the lid - it should not move at all. If the seal does not form, refrigerate preserves and enjoy within 3 months.

Signs of Spoiled Canned Food:

With any type of canning, we follow this advice: “When in doubt, throw it out”
Discard and do not eat or taste any canned food if you notice any of the following:

  • the jar is leaking, bulging, or swollen
  • the jar looks damaged, cracked, or abnormal
  • the jar spurts foam or liquid upon opening
  • the canned food is discolored, moldy, mushy, slimy, or smells bad

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Natasha Kravchuk

Welcome to my kitchen! I am Natasha, the blogger behind Natasha's Kitchen (since 2009). My husband and I run this blog together and share only our best, family approved and tested recipes with YOU. Thanks for stopping by! We are so happy you're here.

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Read comments/reviewsAdd comment/review

  • Badge3214
    November 13, 2022

    Your recipe is wonderful and easy to follow. I made it twice. First, just as suggested, the second time, I added habanero peppers that I halved, seeded, and added during the cooking step. I did remove the peppers after the cooking step as I was hoping to impart just enough heat for flavor but not for the peach flavor to be overwhelmed. It was a delicious sweet heat hit. I’ve found my go-to gift for those holiday hostess gifts one never knows what to bring. P.S. it was FANTASTIC over a brick of cream cheese served with crackers.

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      November 13, 2022

      Thank you for sharing, we appreciate it!

      Reply

  • Dorina Onoya
    October 26, 2022

    This my first try at preserving/ canning peaches. The recipe was easy to follow and turned out great!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      October 26, 2022

      I’m so glad it was easy to follow Dorina! Thank you for sharing your great review with me!

      Reply

  • Carolyn Friesz
    September 28, 2022

    I am in the process of doing this; I have gone according to directions and the color has turned more amber . . . not too worried, but wish it had retained the bright orange! I am going to take my stick blender and break down a bit – I don’t like the large chunks!

    Reply

    • NatashasKitchen.com
      September 28, 2022

      Hi Carolyn, did you make any substitutions or do anything differently? It could be the type of peaches used. The addition of lemon juice helps to preserve its bright color. The method that we use for the multiple boils versus an extended boil is supposed to help keep its color as well. I’m sure it will still taste great. Also, if you used a different sugar that could cause it to be darker.

      Reply

  • Vickie Hamner
    September 28, 2022

    HI Natasha,
    your peach preserve recipe turned out fantastic! Have you tried this same recipe using strawberries?

    Reply

    • NatashasKitchen.com
      September 28, 2022

      That’s great, Vickie. No, I have not tested this with strawberries.

      Reply

  • Ashley
    September 3, 2022

    Hi Natasha! Can I make this ahead of time and can it within a couple days?

    Reply

    • NatashasKitchen.com
      September 3, 2022

      Hi Ashley. I have not tested any other way of making this preserve to know what the results would be.

      Reply

  • Jennifer
    August 31, 2022

    Is it normal to have small chunks of peaches after 5-6 of the cooking sessions? Many thanks!

    Reply

    • NatashasKitchen.com
      August 31, 2022

      Hi Jennifer. Yes, this could still have chunks in it.

      Reply

  • Jen
    August 31, 2022

    Hi there Natasha, trying your recipe for the first time and am super excited. Question – you suggest 1 lemon, but I see there’s a number of recipe developers that suggest bottled lemon juice to ensure the acidity meets canning specs. Thoughts?

    Second, is there a quantity you’re aiming for for the lemon juice (i.e. 4 Tbsps)?

    Reply

    • Natasha
      September 1, 2022

      Hi Jen, I’ve never used bottled lemon juice for canning but also keep in mind that sugar is a preservative. Also, yes, 1 medium lemon is about 4-5 Tbsp of juice.

      Reply

      • Jenn
        September 1, 2022

        Thank you! The recipe was fantastic. So much so, I made a second huge batch today. Great gift for the holidays. 👍

        Reply

        • NatashasKitchen.com
          September 1, 2022

          Absolutely! This is a great gift idea! So glad you enjoy this recipe, Jenn! Thank you so much.

          Reply

  • Sally
    August 29, 2022

    Awful. This recipe did not work and was a huge waste of time, energy, and beautiful fruit.

    Reply

    • Natasha
      August 30, 2022

      Hi Sally, this has been a very popular recipe for us over the years and our go-to for making peach preserves. Can you provide more details on what happened and I will do my best to troubleshoot.

      Reply

  • Mandy Brown
    August 29, 2022

    I made these last year – first time ever making Peach Preserves of any kind – and it was DELICIOUS! The recipe was simple to follow too. Thank you for this recipe and all your others. We watch your Youtube channel often to get more recipes and ideas! Thanks again!!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      August 29, 2022

      You’re welcome! I’m so happy you enjoyed it, Mandy! Peaches are in the perfect season right now to make preserves!

      Reply

  • Hope
    August 29, 2022

    These peach preserves turned out amazing! Thank you for sharing recipe.

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      August 29, 2022

      So glad you loved it!

      Reply

  • LL
    August 28, 2022

    Hi, love all your recipes! Can I use jam jars (250 mL/1 cup) instead of pint jars?

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      August 28, 2022

      Hi there, I’m sure that’s fine!

      Reply

  • noniB
    August 26, 2022

    Was a tad short on peaches so added in ripe pears (and a touch of fresh finely grated ginger). Perfect with roast pork, or anything else you can think up!

    Reply

    • NatashasKitchen.com
      August 26, 2022

      That’s great! Thank you for the review. 🙂

      Reply

  • Kathy Schaefer
    August 25, 2022

    Made this peach recipe it was awesome. Did all the steps and it was so worth it. Didn’t have enough peaches so I added apple. Delish just had it on fresh bread. I am such a fan. Again one of your recipe’s did’t disappoint.

    Reply

    • NatashasKitchen.com
      August 25, 2022

      Hi Kathy! Apple/Peach combo sounds amazing! I’m so glad you enjoyed this recipe. Thank you so much for the wonderful feedback. 🙂

      Reply

  • Kathy Schaefer
    August 25, 2022

    Natasha this peach recipe is awesome. It is so worth all the steps. Thank You I am such a fan

    Reply

    • NatashasKitchen.com
      August 25, 2022

      Thank you very much, Kathy! 🙂

      Reply

  • Sue
    August 23, 2022

    I am currently making half of this recipe and would like to know if I can put the finished preserves in a steam canner in lieu of water bath. I believe they are both the same but want to check to make sure. Thanks for your time.

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      August 23, 2022

      Hi Sue, I haven’t tried that in a steam canner to advise. If you experiment, let me know how you liked the recipe.

      Reply

  • Kelly
    August 20, 2022

    11# of peaches before or after removing skin and pits? Seems like a silly question but first time and don’t want to mess it up!

    Reply

    • NatashasKitchen.com
      August 22, 2022

      Hi Kelly! 11 lbs of peaches prior to removing their skins. 🙂

      Reply

  • Danielle
    August 10, 2022

    Hi! My grandmother said she misses her mothers Peach Preserve, so I’m going to try this recipe. I wanted to ask if I do not have a canning pot, what else can I use? Also, when canning, am I covering the jars completely in water?

    Reply

    • Natasha
      August 11, 2022

      HI Danielle, you can use a large pot but it’s best if you can put a rack in the bottom (you can even use the rack from the bottom of your instant pot in a large stock pot). Also, yes, it is recommended now to cover the jars with water.

      Reply

      • Badge3214
        November 13, 2022

        I have a canning pot but actually prefer to use a folded kitchen towel on the bottom of my pot to increase stability when adding and remove the jars and also keeps the jars stable during the water bath boil. A silicone hot pad also works.

        Reply

  • Linda VQ
    August 9, 2022

    So many reviews already but think it is worth noting that Sure-Jell recipe calls for 3 lb peaches which makes 4 cups peaches but then adds 5 1/2 cups of sugar. I used 12lb of fruit (some was not perfect) but used 4 cups of sugar for the whole batch. I’m guessing this might not be too much sugar for a diabetic. (Would have been 22 cups for that much with sure-jell recipe)

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      August 9, 2022

      Thanks for sharing that with us, Linda.

      Reply

    • Kim
      August 22, 2022

      The Sure-Jell recipe is for jam, not preserves. The consistency is completely different.

      Reply

  • Rich Peterson
    August 7, 2022

    I discovered your no pectin no rush plum recipe a few years back. I continue to direct others to these recipes every year. Thanks for sharing.

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      August 7, 2022

      Nice, that is kind of you, thank you for sharing my recipes!

      Reply

    • Martha
      August 30, 2022

      I’ve made peach preserves for 3 yrs, using other recipes, since we moved to the PNW. I’d never made any preserves or jam in my life and while they’ve all been tasty, they’ve been too runny for my liking. I prefer no pectin but unless I added pectin, or more sugar, it remained too runny. But currently in the process of following your recipe. While it’s a longer process, the extra wait times make perfect sense for thicker preserves. I’m on my first slow boil and so excited for the finish! I’ve been trusting your recipes for 2 yrs now and none have steered me wrong!

      Reply

      • Natashas Kitchen
        August 30, 2022

        Thank you so much for sharing that with me, Martha! I’m so happy you enjoyed that, and it all worked out!

        Reply

  • Sherry
    August 3, 2022

    Is there a way to convert the weight of the peaches to amount of cups?

    Reply

    • NatashasKitchen.com
      August 3, 2022

      Hi Sherry, I’m sorry this does not work to convert that way. I did not measure the recipe in cups. Weighing the peaches was the most efficient and productive way to do it. A quick google search suggests that 1 pound of peaches is (4 medium) = 3 cups sliced. I hope that helps.

      Reply

  • Jean
    July 28, 2022

    Can the peaches sit on the counter for two days without being boiled and be okay? I will boil for the 5th time just before canning.

    Reply

    • NatashasKitchen.com
      July 28, 2022

      Hi Jean, there’s no “set” time that you need to be reboiling it. If over 2 days doesn’t work for you, you can take 3 days. Preserves have plenty of sugar so they won’t spoil at room temp if you leave them on the counter overnight so I assume 2 days would be fine as well.

      Reply

  • Maureen
    July 26, 2022

    Can you use bottles lemon juice or does it need to be fresh lemon?

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      July 26, 2022

      Hi Maureen, we prefer to use fresh lemon! Natural lemon juice helps preserve the color.

      Reply

    • KJ
      August 2, 2022

      This is a great recipe! The only thing I will say about water bath canning is that natural lemons vary in terms of acidity, so in order for it to be 100% safe on the shelf I’d use bottled lemon juice.

      Reply

      • LL
        August 29, 2022

        Hi KJ, I was thinking the same thing. How much bottled lemon juice would you recommend?

        Reply

  • Sam Mitchiner
    July 26, 2022

    This is a great recipe. Making second batch because we gave it all away. Warning that bubbling peach concoction is like molten tar if it splashed on your hand while stirring

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      July 26, 2022

      Thanks for the reminder and that’s awesome that you’re sharing with others!

      Reply

  • Richard Berner
    July 24, 2022

    The peach recipe is presented very well. Ending up with exactly 11 lbs of prepared peaches (shunned and pitted) is not easy to achieve for many folks. Using 4 cups (200 grams a cup) and converting 11 lbs to grams, I calculated the amount of sugar to add is 16%. The percentage works for any amount of peaches and in metric and English units.

    I read with curiosity as to why bring to a low boil and turn off. I do not understand the logic. If this is your moms process, maybe she had a lot going on and could not watch constantly so brought to a boil, turned off, and returned to the preserves when she had time.

    Reply

    • Natasha
      July 25, 2022

      Hi Richard, it has to do more with the color not getting too dark as with extended boiling.

      Reply

  • Sara Gibbs
    July 23, 2022

    My first time making peach preserves and I was a little doubtful about the 2 day method. Everything turned out great! I did add 1/2 teaspoon of cinnamon and nutmeg each.
    I am wondering if this same method can be used for pears?

    Reply

    • NatashasKitchen.com
      July 23, 2022

      Hi Sara! So glad you enjoyed this recipe. The cinnamon and nutmeg additions sound amazing!!! I have not tested this with pears to advise if it would work the same. If you experiment, please let us know how it goes. 🙂

      Reply

  • Annelies Velez
    July 23, 2022

    I’m in my 3rd bill and it doesn’t look as though the peaches are breaking down very much. Also, it’s still very watery. I’m doing a half recipe only because I didn’t have 11lbs of peaches (I used 6lbs and half the sugar) and followed the recipe without any additional deviations. My peaches are very ripe, and large juicy Georgia peaches, could that be the reason why it’s still so watery? Can I add a 6th, 7th boil until I like the consistency? Should I also use a masher to mash up the rest of the peaches?

    Reply

    • Natasha
      July 25, 2022

      HI, it could be the variety of peaches and I think it’s a good idea to break them up manually which might help you get to your desired consistency sooner.

      Reply

  • Lynn Swager
    July 21, 2022

    Natasha…can I substitute Splenda for the sugar? Also…have you ever added corn starch instead of pectic to any of your jam recipes?

    Reply

    • NatashasKitchen.com
      July 21, 2022

      Hi Lynn. No, I have not used cornstarch. I have not tested Splenda in this recipe but one of my other readers stated they’ve used it many times with great success and taste. You must water bath the filled jars as there is no sugar protection to prevent bacterial/mold growth.” I hope that helps.

      Reply

    • Kim
      August 22, 2022

      This is probably too late, but “NO” to the cornstarch. Neither cornstarch nor flour are safe to use in canning. ClearJel is the safe way to go.

      Reply

  • Linda Davolt
    July 20, 2022

    Does this recipe have to be refrigerated or can they be on the shelf

    Reply

    • NatashasKitchen.com
      July 20, 2022

      There is no need to refrigerate them, because the sugar will keep them from spoiling. They have a shelf life of about a year and maybe longer if they are canned and tightly sealed.

      Reply

  • Melvin Beasley
    July 19, 2022

    Made this per recommended receipe, jam doesn’t seem to have set.

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      July 19, 2022

      Hi Melvin, thank you for sharing that with me. Was there anything possibly altered in the process or substitutions made to the recipe?

      Reply

      • Tina
        August 21, 2022

        Is it possible to add a shredded peeled apple to this recipe (for the pectin) without altering the flavor too much? I did this for a no-pectin strawberry jam and couldn’t taste the apple at all in the finished product BUT I think peach is a subtler flavor. What do you think, Natasha?

        Reply

        • Natashas Kitchen
          August 21, 2022

          Hi Tina, I haven’t tried that myself to advise on the outcome. If you experiment, let me know how you liked the recipe.

          Reply

  • Barb H
    July 13, 2022

    i am having a difficult time finding the time to do the *whole* process – can I freeze the preserves after the 4th or 5th heating and then when I am ready to complete the process, do the simmer process 1 or 2 times before canning?

    Reply

    • Natasha
      July 14, 2022

      Hi Barb, I haven’t tested it that way but I think once it’s frozen it probably should remain a freezer jam.

      Reply

  • Jill
    July 10, 2022

    Hi Natasha,
    This is my 5th recipe for making peach preserves & I can finally say this is the one!
    Peaches are quite expensive & difficult to find good ones here in the U.K. (they are normally picked under ripe & shipped in so are either green inside or they go off before they are fully ripe) so I bought approximately 6 pounds & ripened them in full sun. Oh joy at last beautifully ripe, juicy & the perfect recipe which led to perfect peach preserve. Thank you so much for this brilliant recipe. We can’t even buy peach preserve here, the only time I get some is if my friend brings me some from Spain.
    I can tell you if I can get more decent peaches I will be making another batch.
    Thanks again & hello from Liverpool U.K.

    Reply

    • NatashasKitchen.com
      July 11, 2022

      Hi Jill! I’m so happy to hear that this has become your go-to recipe for Peach Preserve. Thank you for the review.

      Reply

  • Peter
    July 7, 2022

    I have pounds of white peaches but few yellow peaches. Will this recipe work for white peaches?

    Reply

    • NatashasKitchen.com
      July 7, 2022

      Yes, I think that would be fine.

      Reply

  • Hannah
    June 21, 2022

    In the process of making these. In between boils I am keeping the lid on because we have 2 black labs and I really really don’t want to take a chance of having dog hair in it. That would be awful. I’m on the 4th boil and it still seems a little watery. Should I add an extra boil or two to the recommended amount?

    Reply

    • Natasha
      June 23, 2022

      Hi Hannah, if you have a splatter guard (mesh lid), that might work well. It helps to keep the lid open for the steam to escape. I would probably boil another time or two to get the extra steam out. It could also be due to super juicy peaches that it may need a little longer just be careful not to scorch the bottom as it thickens up.

      Reply

  • Kathleen
    May 15, 2022

    Hello, this is more of a comment. Is the 11 lbs. before slicing or 11 lbs. sliced peaches.

    Reply

    • Natasha
      May 16, 2022

      Hi Kathleen, that is 11 lbs before slicing the peaches. I weighed the peaches whole.

      Reply

  • Brigitte
    November 14, 2021

    Looking forward to trying this and handing them out over the holidays.
    In the directions, you mention “If the seal does not form, refrigerate preserves and enjoy within 3 months”. If it does seal, how long do they last?

    Reply

    • Natasha
      November 15, 2021

      Hi Brigitte, it will keep for at least a year if it is sealed correctly and stored in a cool, dry (low light place)

      Reply

  • Dolores L. Padilla-Kairaiuak
    September 16, 2021

    Do you have recipes for baby food? I have apple trees and want to make applesauce and next summer-peaches for a new great-Grandson.

    Reply

  • Rosie
    September 6, 2021

    Can I freeze the jars instead of putting in a water-bath? Will this recipe work as a freezer jam?

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      September 7, 2021

      Hi Rosie, that should work fine to freeze instead of canning.

      Reply

  • Ivonne
    September 6, 2021

    My peach preserve using your recipe tasted wonderful, but turned brown after all that boiling. Its still good to eat, but not for Christmas gifting…

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      September 6, 2021

      Hi Ivonne, the key is to not boil the peaches at too high of heat which can cause browning.

      Reply

  • Angie Shaw
    September 2, 2021

    Hi, I started mine yesterday, I am so excited. I really LOVE that you can take more than a day to make this. I do have one question. When you boil it multiple times does this replace the need for Pectin? I was raised with canning but have never attempted it until now. My most favorite canned item growing up was my neighbors grape juice. Thank you for all of your delicious recipes and your contagious smile.

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      September 2, 2021

      Hi Angie! That’s right! The idea of this recipe is a method to avoid adding pectin.

      Reply

    • Dee
      September 2, 2021

      I make home made pasta sauce every year. I sterilize the jars and lids, pour the prepared sauce in and wait for the pop. I never “can” this. I have done the same years ago with apple, grape, and strawberry jam. Can I do the same for this recipe?

      Reply

      • Dee
        September 2, 2021

        Forgot to ad. I used pectin back then. Don’t want to now, so hoping I can do the same as I do for my sauce.

        Reply

  • Kay Weller
    August 26, 2021

    I’m doing this recipe for first time. Directions say to simmer first boil for 10 minutes. Do the remainder of the boils need to be ten minutes or just brought to a light boil.

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      August 27, 2021

      Hi Kay, that’s right! As soon as it cools, repeat step 3.

      Reply

  • Cindy
    August 25, 2021

    Can I do this with only 4 pounds of peaches? What would I change? Thanks

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      August 26, 2021

      Hi Cindy! you can try it with 4! I recommend clicking “Jump to recipe” at the top of the post, it will take you to our printable recipe where you’ll have the option to change the number of servings. Hover over the number of servings highlighted in red and slide it to how many servings you would like to make. I hope that helps!

      Reply

  • Jennifer Draper
    August 20, 2021

    I’m used to recipes showing the weight of the finished product….so I peeled and chopped all my peaches then went to make and I have no idea the weight of finished chopped peaches I need to do this recipe. Can you let me know. I have 3kg (6.6lbs of the finished product)

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      August 20, 2021

      Hi Jennifer, I didn’t weigh them after. We started with 11 lbs of peaches before peeling and pitting. It should yield 5-6 pint jars and not half-pint.

      Reply

    • Joyce
      August 23, 2021

      I am making the peach preserves now and weighed it: 11 lbs whole peaches came to 9 lbs after pitting and skinning.

      Reply

  • Christine A
    August 19, 2021

    Hi Natasha!
    I just followed your recipe and my peach preserves came out perfectly! Delicious and not runny! I’ve made peach preserves from my Grandma Thora’s recipe from the 1920’s. Although delicious, it was very runny. Also I’m so happy I could make this with 3 simple ingredients & no preservatives!
    Thank you so much – I look forward to following more of your recipes!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      August 19, 2021

      I’m so glad you gave my recipe a try, Christine! I’m happy to hear this was a hit! Thank you for your lovely review!

      Reply

  • Marki
    August 17, 2021

    Not a difficult recipe but I don’t think 4 cups of sugar is close to enough for 11 lbs of sugar… my jam is barely sweeter than peaches by themselves would be! 😭 🙁 After two days of work, I’m so bummed! Did I read the recipe wrong or did anyone else experience this?

    Reply

    • tracy chesney
      September 2, 2021

      I just made this – and I found that it is not like a regular peach jam. You are right in that this is not sweet or set like most jams – the sugar is far less. It is, however, just delicious and really captures the fresh peach taste. It’s more like a conserve, or even a compote imo. However, I’ll not have any problem eating up, or giving away, all my jars (I made small pots). I make lots of jam and this is very different to my regular routine, but am just loving the taste and texture. I did can mine and I think the people I gift it to will really enjoy the freshness with their Sunday brunches – whether on toast or with pancakes. We’re having it on ice cream for tea this evening 🙂

      Reply

  • Emily
    August 16, 2021

    Making this today, but halving the recipe. Quick question, though. My daughters had a cookie baking competition yesterday and used way more sugar than I realized. I have 1.5 cups of cane sugar and a half cup of dark brown sugar left. Thankfully it’s the right quantity for a half-recipe of preserves, but I’m wondering if the change in sugars will affect the cooking time/method?

    Reply

    • Natasha
      August 16, 2021

      Hi Emily, I haven’t tried this with brown sugar so I can’t say for sure. I think it would be darker in color with the added molasses that is in brown sugar.

      Reply

  • Janelle Harris
    August 14, 2021

    is it water bath or pressure canned, sorry I just want to be sure!

    Reply

  • Carolyn
    August 12, 2021

    Is it really 11 lbs. Peaches and only 4 cups sugar

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      August 12, 2021

      That’s right! Peaches, sugar, and lemon juice!

      Reply

  • Teresa
    August 10, 2021

    Ready for my 5th boil soon! Question..if I’m using 1/2 pint jars is the canning time still the same (15 mins.)? Thanks!

    Reply

    • Natasha
      August 10, 2021

      Hi Teresa, it might be done a few minutes sooner but you can still process for the same amount of time to be safe.

      Reply

  • Gina
    August 9, 2021

    We prefer a less sweet preserve. Is there any downside to reducing the sugar by half? Does the lack of sugar increase the risk of spoilage?

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      August 10, 2021

      Hi, Gina that is a great question. I recommend reading through a few of the comments. There are a few discussions on sugar there. But, I haven’t tried with less or without sugar, but one of my readers, CJ, reported the following using a substitution: “Shirley asked about using Splenda for preserves. I’ve used it many times with great success and taste. You must water bath the filled jars as there is no sugar protection to prevent bacterial/mold growth. For others, adding a few drops of almond extract makes nectarine preserves taste more strongly, like peach.” I hope this is helpful!

      Reply

  • Olgica Djedovic
    August 8, 2021

    I followed this recipe and my peach preserve turned out great, the color was perfect, consistency, taste is heavenly. I think the key to not browning is to cook it patiently on low to medium heat (somewhere in between), stirring every 20 seconds or so, and just be patient. I sped up the cooling process by putting my pot into a cold ice bath, so I didn’t have to wait for too long between the cooking sessions. My peaches were ripe so I went with 3 1/2 cups of sugar. Truly amazing recipe, deserves all the starts. You mentioned that your mom makes the most amazing preserves, could you please share more preserve recipes?

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      August 8, 2021

      Hello Olgica, glad it turned out great! Thanks for sharing some tips and info with us too. I have another preserve recipe, the Apricot Raspberry preserve that you can try.

      Reply

  • Pat
    August 4, 2021

    Last year, I followed the recipe exactly as written and it came out great!

    Question: Any problem leaving the skins on? The America’s Test Kitchen recipe has way more sugar (2-1/2 cups sugar for 2lbs of peaches!), but they leave the skins on because “they add important flavor, color and texture.” Any concerns?

    Love your website!!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      August 4, 2021

      Hi Pat, I think it would be ok to leave them on. I like the texture without them, but the preserves would still work with skins on.

      Reply

      • Gina
        August 9, 2021

        I never peel the peaches and the preserves turn out just fine.

        Reply

  • Char
    August 4, 2021

    Hello, I found your recipe a few weeks ago, and luckily for me, a friend bought me an entire box of peaches directly from the farm. This was my first time making preserve or canning. However, the recipe was easy to follow and it came out perfect. I made one tweek by adding a small piece of cinnamon stick to the peaches. The taste of your preserve is absolutely amazing and the cinnamon just added to the flavor. I just added the jars to the canning pot, so I am on the home stretch. Thank you for sharing such a delightful recipe.

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      August 4, 2021

      Wow! That’s a really nice friend! Farm fresh peaches sound so perfect! I bet they were delicious!

      Reply

  • Lindsey
    August 4, 2021

    Hi!
    Made a half-batch last week and it was amazing. Tried a full batch this week and it darkened by the 3rd simmer. I did everything the same, so I’m not sure what happened. I canned it despite not being quite as thick as last week’s so hoping it jams up well as it cools. Any ideas or advice?
    Thanks!

    Reply

    • Natasha
      August 6, 2021

      Hi Lindsey, make sure to use a heavy-bottomed pot for uniform heating and bring it just to a simmer/light boil. Vigorous or prolonged boiling can darken it. Also, make sure to use real lemon juice which also helps to preserve the color.

      Reply

  • Casey
    July 28, 2021

    Heylo! I just found your recipe and am trying it for the first time ever canning. I will update you tomorrow evening. I’m excited. I’m doing cook down one tonight and it will sit on the stove until after work tomorrow is that to long?

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      July 29, 2021

      Hi Casey, sounds good. Would love to know how it turns out. I think that should be alright or maybe put it in room temperature after you cook it?

      Reply

  • Conor
    July 25, 2021

    On my third boil, definitely think mine has darkened a bit but tastes great. What would you say your final consistency is like? Trying to decide if I need to add more sugar or just be patient through two more boils.

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      July 26, 2021

      Hi Conor! I would boil it down to your desired consistency but following our steps as closely as you can. I recommend taking a look at our recipe photos and notes to get a better idea 🙂 I hope you love this recipe!

      Reply

  • Jessie
    July 19, 2021

    HI! Could I use peaches that are firm? OR should I just be patient and wait for them to soften?

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      July 19, 2021

      Hi Jessie, Let them sit and soften a bit first. If you can’t wait, you may have to blanch a little longer or take a potato peeler to the greener ones.

      Reply

  • Laura Forsyth
    July 17, 2021

    Batch two to finish up the rest of the peaches. Cut peaches down, added two grated Granny Smith apples, a vanilla bean and half cup of Maker’s Mark.

    Done with the third boil, I siphoned off a co7ple ounces of the liquid, added a couple of ounces of maker’s mark and filled with lemonade.

    OMG!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      July 17, 2021

      It’s a process that is so worth it!!

      Reply

  • Ashley
    July 16, 2021

    I’ve used this as reference for two years now and it’s amazing. Gold Star results. Thanks a lot for the help!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      July 17, 2021

      I’m so glad this recipe is a hit, Ashley! These comments make me so happy! 🙂

      Reply

  • Eliza
    July 14, 2021

    Do you use a potato masher or anything? Or does just cooking it down 5 times so the trick? Thanks!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      July 14, 2021

      Hi Eliza, we just cook it down!

      Reply

  • Josh
    July 11, 2021

    Hi. It’s been almost 10 years since the recipe was posted and it still deserves more stars. I made a half batch, but otherwise followed all directions (5 boils). Got just over 8 cups out of it and it was amazing!! We’ll worth the long process.

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      July 11, 2021

      Wow, thanks for your great comments and review, Josh. Appreciate your kind works!

      Reply

  • Lisa B.
    July 9, 2021

    When you say turn the burner off between simmers, do you take the pot off the burner to cool or do you let it continue to cook on the burner as it cools?

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      July 10, 2021

      Hi Lisa, we turn it off, but since I have a gas stove, I don’t need to move it since the burner is off and doesn’t produce heat. If you have an electric heater, it might be better to move it off the burner since it stays hot for some time. I hope this is helpful!

      Reply

  • Mary Y
    July 8, 2021

    I would assume this process would work for strawberry preserves. Would you recommend keeping the sugar amount the same? One recipe I saw suggested 5 cups of sugars which seems like a lot to me.

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      July 8, 2021

      Hi Mary, I haven’t tried this method with strawberries but I think it would work. You may not have to cook it down repeatedly – that is done with this recipe so it doesn’t turn dark which isn’t the concern with strawberry. Cook the strawberry until a small amount of liquid turns to gel on a plate after it cools.

      Reply

      • Mary Yohon
        July 9, 2021

        Thanks I will try and will let you know how it works.

        Reply

        • Natashas Kitchen
          July 9, 2021

          I hope you love it, Mary!

          Reply

  • Vicki Allen
    June 10, 2021

    going to try this recipe next week when i get my 50 lbs of peaches.lol. i was wondering if they can also be made sugar free? or with stevia? my husband has to watch his sugar and i thought i would make a small batch for him also.

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      June 10, 2021

      Hi Vicki, I honestly haven’t tested that yet to advise. If you do an experiment, please share with us how it goes!

      Reply

  • Alondra Swink
    June 3, 2021

    I have never canned anything before. But i highly recommend this recipe for beginners. It’s super easy and delicious.
    I used 25 peaches, and 2 cups of sugar. (Aprox. halved the recipe). And filled 6 half pint jars.
    I will absolutely be making this again and again. Thank you so much!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      June 3, 2021

      You’re welcome, Alondra! I’m so glad you enjoyed it!

      Reply

  • Emma
    December 18, 2020

    I used frozen peaches, 4 pounds of peaches with 1 1/2 cups of white sugar. Worked out really well. Taste great. I sifted some ground ginger into the peaches after cooking them down and it tastes great.

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      December 18, 2020

      That’s just awesome! Thank you for sharing your wonderful review!

      Reply

      • Laura Forsyth
        July 17, 2021

        Year two using this outstanding recipe. Last year I cooked it all in a calphalon stock pot. Did not realize it would darken the peaches.

        This year, split it between two enameled cast iron pans – huge improvement in color.

        You know the product is good when people return jars empty with a hopeful look on their face!

        Reply

  • Willie Hines
    December 17, 2020

    Hi, when I move the peaches from the boiling water during the blanching process. Can I place them in an ice bath?

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      December 17, 2020

      Hello Willie, This is the process that works on our end however you can use the process that you’re comfortable with. You can try without the ice bath and please let us know and share with us how it goes.

      Reply

  • John
    December 17, 2020

    I made two batches of peach preserves with this recipe back in August. Loved it! I do have a question. Is it normal for the preserves to be discolored over time? They have good seals, but they’ve lost that bright yellow color. Now they look pale and bland.
    Btw…tried your spatchcock chicken….it’s the best!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      December 17, 2020

      Hi John! I’m so happy you’re enjoying our recipes! Following the instructions here, the fruit does not lose color or flavor. If you cook it for too long at too high of the preserves will get darker, however, it won’t really affect the flavor unless they get burn so I would watch for that being the main contributor to color loss.

      Reply

  • Susan Potoczak
    October 21, 2020

    Can you used frozen peaches? Any modifications?

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      October 21, 2020

      I haven’t tried it that way but I think it’s worth experimenting with. Frozen peaches might make the preserves a little darker but it should still work fine.

      Reply

  • Susan Potoczak
    October 20, 2020

    Can you use frozen peaches for this recipe? I missed the in season fresh peaches. Any adjustments to the recipe?

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      October 20, 2020

      Hi Susan, I haven’t tried it that way but I think it’s worth experimenting with. Frozen peaches might make the preserves a little darker but it should still work fine.

      Reply

  • June
    October 13, 2020

    Do the peach preserves have to be refrigerated?

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      October 13, 2020

      Hi June, there is no need to refrigerate them, because the sugar will keep them from spoiling. They have a shelf life of about a year and maybe longer if they are canned and tightly sealed. You can keep them in the pantry and refrigerate after opening

      Reply

  • Shan B
    September 25, 2020

    Could I use peaches that I have in the freezer already? How many cups would I use (they are already halved and pit removed)?

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      September 25, 2020

      Hi Shan, I haven’t tried it that way but I think it’s worth experimenting. Frozen peaches might make the preserves a little darker but it should still work fine.

      Reply

  • Julie
    September 14, 2020

    We love the flavor and I loved the ease of not having to get it all done in one day. I could work on it after work until I finished it. I’ll definitely make it again.

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      September 15, 2020

      Thanks for your wonderful comment and feedback, Julie. We appreciate it!

      Reply

      • Deanna Snarky
        July 16, 2021

        Really easy recipe.
        Word of warning:
        If you’re using an electric stove don’t just turn off the burner and leave it sitting there but actually move the pot to a different burner to cool down,
        I didn’t, & my peaches burned on the bottom.
        I was able to salvage them by adding more lemon juice,
        a little bit more sugar and taking all the burned bits out.
        I also added cinnamon and they don’t taste burned at all!

        Reply

  • James E Johnson Jr
    September 8, 2020

    Wow just WOW. How can you not try a recipe that has a 5 star rating with more than 720 reviews? This recipe deserves each and every star and then some. Peaches are my favorite fruit and this recipe make the preserves which peaches ask to be made into. Thanks for making this recipe available to us

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      September 8, 2020

      Hi James, I’m so glad you chose to try this recipe! Thank you for your wonderful review and I hope you love all the other recipes that you will try.

      Reply

  • Cheryl Wilson
    September 3, 2020

    I made this peach jam recipe and love it. So now I’ve got friends coming in from Niagara with another bushel of peaches. This was so easy to do. I would recommend using the 250 ml jars that way you can give out more to family and friends. The jam takes on very nice texture and great flavour. I did cut back on the sugar just a little over 3 cups. Thanks sooo much for posting this recipe. We love it.

    Reply

    • Cheryl W.
      September 3, 2020

      How long will these last on the shelf. All jars have been sealed properly. Also once opened how long will that last.

      Reply

      • Natasha's Kitchen
        September 3, 2020

        You can enjoy this preserves within 3 months

        Reply

        • Cheryl
          September 4, 2020

          Hi Natasha you said 3 months is that after it’s been open.

          Reply

          • Natashas Kitchen
            September 4, 2020

            Hi Cheryl, if processed correctly, preserves will keep up to 2 years. Once they are opened, keep them in the refrigerator up to 3 months.

    • Natashas Kitchen
      September 3, 2020

      I’m so happy you enjoyed that. Thank you for sharing that with us!

      Reply

      • Deanna Snarky
        July 14, 2021

        This is a lovely recipe and very easy.
        (I was happy that it only called for four cups of sugar, lately it seems like I’ve only found recipes that call for five or more.
        I’m going to be canning this,
        And I’m wondering if it will set up enough without added pectin. Also, does adding pectin help preserve them? Or is that with the sugar does?

        Reply

        • Natashas Kitchen
          July 14, 2021

          Thank you so much for sharing that with me, Deanna! The idea of this recipe is a method to avoid adding pectin.

          Reply

  • Julie L
    August 30, 2020

    Love this recipe! I’ve used it several times successfully and applied the concept to other fruits as well. One idea to hurry up the process is to use ice to cool quicker between simmerings: I have set three canning rings inside a rimmed baking sheet, filled the bottom of the sheet with ice and water, and set the pot on top of the three rings. Occasionally stir the peaches. Add/replace more ice as necessary.

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      August 30, 2020

      That is awesome, love your feedback! Thank you so much for sharing some tips with us, that is some helpful information.

      Reply

  • Patricia Shumate
    August 30, 2020

    When I put my jars in the canner, do I bring up the pressure or just boil without the lid?

    Reply

    • Natasha
      August 31, 2020

      Hi Patricia, It sounds like maybe you have a pressure canner. I don’t have one so I am not familiar with how they are used. I use the method I described – just putting the cans in the pot and covering with 1 to 2 inches of water. I boil without the lid since they are covered with water – they don’t need to be covered with the lid.

      Reply

    • Sher B.
      October 13, 2020

      Look up water bath canning. Fruits with sugar are not pressure canned but water bathed. You want to always use the jar seals and rings when processing canned foods of any types. Hope this helps.

      Reply

  • MKT
    August 27, 2020

    My preserves turned out perfectly, using this recipe. The only thing I see wrong with the recipe is “11 pounds of peaches” (Is that 11 lbs before or after dicing them?) with a yield of 5-6 half pint jars.

    I removed the skins from my very large peaches -each weighed one pound more or less. I removed the skins and pits, chopped into medium-small pieces, weighed them on a gram scale. By the time I weighed out 4 pounds and put them in a 5 qt enameled Dutch oven, I decided that was plenty. Final yield was five half pint jars and one 10 ounce and one 12 jars.

    Reply

    • Natasha
      August 28, 2020

      Hi, it is 11 lbs of peaches before peeling and pitting. It should yield 5-6 pint jars, and not half-pint.

      Reply

  • JoAnn
    August 26, 2020

    I don’t use a pressure cooker or canning pot, I just wash the jars good , turn my oven on 200 and lay the jars down wet, let them in about half hr. And proceed canning with the hot jars, works every time. My grandmother did it this way, no boiling jars! Take one jar out at a time!

    Reply

  • Heather G
    August 25, 2020

    Well, I must say…I never thought this would work but…IT WORKED OUT GREAT!!

    I’ve used traditional recipes before & my grandmas Slow cooked preserve recipe have been okay but I’ve never achieved that sticky & thick texture with heavenly flavor until now!

    I only did 3 times. I worked my gentle boil up SLOWLY, on med/low heat, similar to working with fudge. I used a digital thermometer each time to ensure at the end of 10 minutes of the simmer time I had reached between 220-225 for the right consistency. After my first 10 minute cook & then slow cool, I’d already achieved a much thickened syrupy mix. I still had bright peach slices at this time. However, after the subsequent (and necessary) cook/cool sessions, I ended up with a dark brown thick jam. Tasty but ugly!

    After looking things online, I think the trick for me will be to try doing the 1st cook/cool then straining out the fruit. Then cooking only the syrup as described (cook/cool method) for the next 2 sessions & ending with adding in the bright cooked fruit to the hot thickened syrup at the end while it’s still boiling. Depending on thickness of the syrup I may do an additional cook/cool session to get that thick jammy texture I like (tighter than most store bought).

    I hope to end up with a lighter color final product with juicy bigger pieces of peach that I can cut down if needed before jarring up!

    Mine is in the fridge now & I’ve got some homemade yogurt waiting for the perfect topping!! Thanks so much!!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      August 25, 2020

      YOu’re welcome, Heather! Also, thank you so much for sharing this with us!

      Reply

    • Lize
      September 9, 2020

      Hi Heather, mine turned out a brown colour too. I accidentally scorched it during the third boil, so I thought maybe that was why. I’ve been bringing it to a boil and simmering on pretty high heat so I wonder if lowering the heat like you did would make a difference.

      Reply

    • Char
      August 4, 2021

      Hi Heather,
      Thank you for sharing. Mine turned out a little brown as well, however, not too brown and I always cooked on low heat so I had no scorching, so I wondered about that. The ones in the picture are very light and pretty. I followed the recipe exactly. Not sure what I could have done differently.

      Reply

  • Kim clark
    August 23, 2020

    Instead of canning preserves can you freeze it once its cooled?

    Reply

  • Irene Carmichael
    August 22, 2020

    I love your country peach preserve recipe. I’ve already adapted it adding allspice, nutmeg and cinnamon for a spicy jam to use as filling for baking. Now I want to adapt again to make it hot by adding peppers. But I’m not sure when to add the heat, at the beginning of the cook or should I wait to reheat 5 or 6. What do you think?

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      August 22, 2020

      Hi Irene, I honestly have never tested that so I can’t make a recommendation on that.

      Reply

  • Leanne
    August 20, 2020

    Hello! Do you use this as jam, or a dessert? I’m on the fourth boil and it looks great so far!
    Thanks!

    Reply

    • Natasha
      August 20, 2020

      Hi Leanne, I use it as a jam, but it would be great as a topping for ice cream!

      Reply

  • Aidan Torres
    August 18, 2020

    Planning to make this in the next day or two. How come it doesn’t need pectin?

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      August 18, 2020

      Hi Aidan, varying fruits have varying amounts of pectin naturally so some you may not have to cook as many times. You might google the difference between different fruits before starting.

      Reply

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