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Country Peach Preserves

How to make peach preserves - just 3 ingredients: peaches, sugar, lemon juice! No pectin required in this peach jam recipe! Make your own peach preserves.

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My mom makes the most amazing fruit preserves. We enjoy her garden fruit all year long this way. This peach preserves recipe takes a couple days; a longer process than most of the peach preserve recipes I’ve seen online but its worth the wait. It’s not watery like most of the recipes that rush the process.

This isn’t speed dating. You’ll get to know your peaches over a couple days and and be rewarded with some mighty fine preserves. If you are thinking about Christmas already (as I am), you can make preserves now, slap a label on in December and give them away as gifts to neighbors, co-workers, nursing directors (wink, wink) – I guess this means I can’t eat all of them myself.

Ingredients for Peach Preserves:

11 lbs peaches, rinsed
4 cups white sugar
Juice of 1 medium lemon

What you will need:

How to make peach preserves - just 3 ingredients: peaches, sugar, lemon juice! No pectin required in this peach jam recipe! Make your own peach preserves.

How to Make Peach Preserves / Peach Jam:

To blanch the peaches:

1.  Fill 2/3 of a large soup pot with water. Bring to a boil. Add peaches for 30 -45 seconds, then remove with slotted spoon or this OXO strainer which I used to transfer them in and out of the boiling water and drain the pot. Remove peaches immediately to a large bowl of cold water. This process is known as blanching the peaches and makes removal of the fuzzy skins really easy.

How to make peach preserves - just 3 ingredients: peaches, sugar, lemon juice! No pectin required in this peach jam recipe! Make your own peach preserves.

2. Peel the skin (most of them peeled easily by hand, but there were a stubborn few that required a knife), cut the peaches into quarters and remove pits.

How to make peach preserves - just 3 ingredients: peaches, sugar, lemon juice! No pectin required in this peach jam recipe! Make your own peach preserves.

Cooking the Preserves:

1. Place all peeled peaches in a large soup pot and squeeze in juice of 1 lemon. Drizzle well with 2 cups sugar, toss and drizzle again with the remaining 1.5-2 cups so the sugar reaches all the peaches. Here’s where you need to use your judgement.

If your peaches are very sweet, you may only need 3 1/2 cups of sugar total. You can add more sugar to taste while its cooking, so don’t panic at this step. You’ll do great!

2. Let peaches sit at room temp with the sugar for about 30min -1 hour, or until sugar is dissolved.

3. Place the pot over the stove uncovered and bring to a light boil, stirring to prevent scorching. Make sure if you see a light boil to stir because the whole pot may not be boiling, just the center. If it stops boiling after you stir it, continue boiling.

Once the whole pot is at a light boil, simmer for 10 minutes and turn off the heat. Let the pot stand uncovered until it is just warm to the touch or reaches room temp.

4. As soon as it cools, repeat step 3. You will bring it to a light boil a total of 5 times.   This is why it takes 2 days to make. It’s really easy though. Definitely not rocket science to bring a pot to a boil and give it a few stirs :D.

You can go to work and come home then return it to a boil; there’s no “set” time that you need to be reboiling it. If 2 days doesn’t work for you, by all means, take 3 days. Preserves have plenty of sugar so they won’t spoil at room temp if you leave it on the counter overnight. If you want the preserves to have an even thicker consistency, you can boil it 6 times if you wish.

(Note: the fifth time you boil, bring it to a boil over a little lower heat and stir a few extra times to prevent scorching. Also, it thickens more as it cools.)

5. The last time you bring it to a boil you will want to transfer it to sterilized jars while it’s boiling hot.

How to make peach preserves - just 3 ingredients: peaches, sugar, lemon juice! No pectin required in this peach jam recipe! Make your own peach preserves.

To sterilize the jars:

  1. To sterilize your clean jars:  wash them and let them dry in the oven at 215 for about 20 min or until completely dry. Boil the lids 5 min.

How to make peach preserves - just 3 ingredients: peaches, sugar, lemon juice! No pectin required in this peach jam recipe! Make your own peach preserves.

2. Transfer your boiling hot preserves to the jars using a glass measuring cup and a funnel (least messy method) leaving about 1/2″ space.

3. Screw the lids on enough to keep a tight seal in place but don’t over-tighten them since air bubbles need to be able to escape.

4. Place packed cans into the canning pot and cover with 1-2 inches of water. Bring to a boil and process 15 minutes. Remove from the pot with jar lifter and leave at room temperature undisturbed for 12-24 hours. You may hear a pop when the jars fully seal. After 24 hours, check that the seal has formed by pushing down on the center of the lid – it should not move at all. If the seal does not form, refrigerate preserves and enjoy within 3 months.

How to make peach preserves - just 3 ingredients: peaches, sugar, lemon juice! No pectin required in this peach jam recipe! Make your own peach preserves.

Tada!! You’ll make it and think “hey that wasn’t so bad.” Well, that’s what I thought the first time I made them.

How to make peach preserves - just 3 ingredients: peaches, sugar, lemon juice! No pectin required in this peach jam recipe! Make your own peach preserves.

Current Canning Guidelines:

Recipe updated in 2019 to reflect new canning standards. Previously we used the oven method. You can get up to date on the most recent canning guidelines here. It’s a great resource to answer frequently asked canning questions.

How to make peach preserves - just 3 ingredients: peaches, sugar, lemon juice! No pectin required in this peach jam recipe! Make your own peach preserves.

Country Peach Preserves

4.83 from 99 votes
Prep Time: 40 minutes
Cook Time: 1 day
Total Time: 1 day 40 minutes
How to make peach preserves - just 3 ingredients: peaches, sugar, lemon juice! No pectin required in this peach jam recipe! Make your own peach preserves.
Author: Natasha of NatashasKitchen.com
Skill Level: Easy
Cost to Make: Varies
Servings: 5 1/2 (1 pint/16oz) sized jars

Ingredients

Peach Preserves Ingredients:

  • 11 lbs peaches rinsed
  • 4 cups white sugar
  • Juice of 1 medium lemon

What you will need:

  • 5-6 pint-sized jars with lids.

Instructions

To blanch the peaches:

  1. Fill 2/3 of a large soup pot with water. Bring to a boil. Add peaches for 30 -45 seconds, then remove with slotted spoon and drain the pot. Remove peaches immediately to a large bowl of cold water.
  2. Peel the skin, cut the peaches into quarters and remove pits.

Cooking the Preserves:

  1. Place all peeled peaches in a large soup pot and squeeze in juice of 1 lemon. Drizzle well with 2 cups sugar, toss and drizzle again with the remaining 1.5-2 cups so the sugar reaches all the peaches. If peaches are very sweet, you may only need 3 1/2 cups of sugar total. Add more sugar to taste while its cooking.
  2. Let peaches sit at room temp with the sugar for about 30 min -1 hour, or until sugar is dissolved.
  3. Place the pot over the stove uncovered and bring to a light boil, stirring to prevent scorching. Once the whole pot is at a light boil, simmer for 10 minutes and turn off the heat. Let the pot stand uncovered until it is just warm to the touch or reaches room temp.
  4. As soon as it cools, repeat step 3. You will bring it to a light boil a total of 5 times. Preserves have plenty of sugar so they won't spoil at room temp if you leave it on the counter overnight. If you want the preserves to have an even thicker consistency, you can boil it 6 times if you wish. (Note: the fifth time you boil, bring it to a boil over a little lower heat and stir a few extra times to prevent scorching. Also, it thickens more as it cools.)
  5. The last time you bring it to a boil you will want to transfer it to sterilized jars while it's boiling hot.

To sterilize the jars: wash them and let them dry in the oven at 215 for about 20 min or until completely dry. Boil the lids 5 min.

  1. Transfer your boiling hot preserves to the jars using a glass measuring cup and a funnel (least messy method) leaving about 1/2″ space.
  2. Screw the lids on enough to keep a tight seal in place but don't over-tighten them since air bubbles need to be able to escape. 

  3. Place packed cans into the canning pot and cover with 1-2 inches of water. Bring to a boil and process 15 minutes. Remove from the pot with jar lifter and leave at room temperature undisturbed for 12-24 hours. You may hear a pop when the jars fully seal. After 24 hours, check that the seal has formed by pushing down on the center of the lid - it should not move at all. If the seal does not form, refrigerate preserves and enjoy within 3 months.

Signs of Spoiled Canned Food:

With any type of canning, we follow this advice: “When in doubt, throw it out”
Discard and do not eat or taste any canned food if you notice any of the following:

  • the jar is leaking, bulging, or swollen
  • the jar looks damaged, cracked, or abnormal
  • the jar spurts foam or liquid upon opening
  • the canned food is discolored, moldy, mushy, slimy, or smells bad

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natashaskitchen

Welcome to my kitchen! I am Natasha, the blogger behind Natasha's Kitchen (since 2009). My husband and I run this blog together and share only our best, family approved recipes with YOU. Thanks for stopping by! We are so happy you're here.

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Read comments/reviewsAdd comment/review

  • Olive Gray
    October 8, 2019

    Hi Gloria, I have all my peaches prepared, come to find out I only have limes in the house. Can I use a lime instead? Sure hope so!!!! Thank you, looks like a great recipe. Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      October 8, 2019

      Hi Olive, I haven’t tested that to advise, it may alter the flavor to a more bitter taste but I think it could work. If you experiment, let me know how you liked the recipe Reply

  • Gloria
    September 26, 2019

    Hi,
    Can you tell me if the final product will be thick enough to use as a cake filling? Its hard to tell from the pictures how thick it is and I need it pretty thick so there’s not much moisture going into the cake layers making them soggy. Thanks! It looks delicious! Reply

    • Natasha
      September 26, 2019

      Hi Gloria, I would suggest pureeing it and bringing to a light boil an extra time, stirring frequently to get it just a little thicker for a cake filling and it should work well. Reply

  • Gina Briggs
    September 23, 2019

    I added a couple sprigs of rosemary to a batch of the preserves, removing it before canning. Very yummy!

    I’ve also played with reducing the sugar as my peaches were very ripe. Have had no issues. Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      September 24, 2019

      Thank you so much for sharing that with me. Reply

  • Wubble Gubble
    September 23, 2019

    I ran a batch fresh picked from a volunteer peach tree, 24 pounds total.

    I used 6.5 cups of sugar total.

    It was my goal to boil/ simmer the batch 6 times prior to canning however my timing was off which forced me to boil/ simmer for a seventh time.

    Overall, I noticed roughly a 50% reduction in overall preserves volume from start to finish of the boil/ simmer process.

    In the end. the preserves came out very well, I have 16 12 ounce jars full of preserves. Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      September 23, 2019

      Thank you so much for sharing that with us! Reply

  • Nina
    September 22, 2019

    It’s a great recipe do you think I can use apples for the same recipe??thanks Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      September 23, 2019

      Hi Nina, I haven’t tested that to advise but here is what one of our readers wrote “Ok, so I had my aunt help me to make apple spread(jam/jelly?), and we did it in one afternoon, due to the fact that she said since the apples didn’t produce much juice at all and we put them through the food processor, so they were like pea sized before cooking them. And because my aunt was kinda in charge of the cooking and I was the observer, she cooked the apples first until there was no juice left at all and they were beginning to thicken (about 1.5-2 hours, stirring often), it was only then she put in the lemon juice and the sugar. She measured about 1qt of sugar (unfortunately I can’t tell you to how much apples, it was total of 3 qt of jam we got to can). So it’s not exactly following your recipe, but I’m just letting you know what we did with our apples. Next year I hope you can get enough apples to post recipe of that too. I’m totally new at canning, but really enjoyed canning fruit this summer.” Reply

  • Sue
    September 21, 2019

    Can you tell me how many cups of pitted peaches 11 lbs is? I am assuming that you weigh the peaches before they are pitted? Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      September 21, 2019

      Hi Sue, I wish I measured it that way. Once they are pitted, peeled and sliced, it’s about 20-22 cups of peaches. I filled my pot and measured for you. (This is what google tells me: 1 lb peaches = 3 cups sliced) Hope that helps! Reply

  • Steezus Christ
    September 21, 2019

    I made this with 60 peaches and 4 cups and it is amazing! i have it a little mashing at the last boil but other than it broke up into a great jam on its own. very easy very good recipe Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      September 21, 2019

      I’m so happy you enjoyed that. Thank you for sharing that with us! Reply

  • Janno
    September 21, 2019

    Hi — I have a batch of this on the stove… When I do the boils 2-5, should I be simmering it 10 minutes each time, or just bringing it to a boil and then taking off the heat? Reply

    • Natasha
      September 21, 2019

      Hi Janno, each time, I let it simmer for 10 minutes and then turn off the heat. It helps it thicken up better as the steam evaporates with the simmer. Reply

  • Chelsea Villalba
    September 21, 2019

    I used this recipe to can my homegrown nectarines, and they turned out great! The process was exactly the same, except I only had seven (7) lbs to process, so I used two (2) cups of sugar. I boiled my fruit / sugar mixture six (6) times to get a thicker consistency, and its just perfect for me. Thanks for sharing! Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      September 21, 2019

      I’m so happy you enjoyed that. Thank you for sharing that with us, Chelsea! Reply

    • lisa
      September 22, 2019

      Yours are so bright and peachy! Mine not so much. Did I need more lemon? I also used the peaches that weren’t my “A” canning, just riper. Woukd that make a diff?Thanks so much! Reply

      • Natashas Kitchen
        September 23, 2019

        Hi Lisa, following the instructions here, the fruit does not lose color or flavor. If you cook it for too long at too high of the preserves will get darker, however it won’t really affect the flavor unless they get burn Reply

  • Steezus Christ
    September 18, 2019

    Making this now with 60 homegrown peaches! and its coming out so well!
    Just a few questions- What is the consistency? does the boiling and stirring mash the peaches, or is it more of a chunk preserve? Can I mash them to have a smoother texture? Or will that just make it all very watery?
    On boil #3, my house smells amazing Reply

    • Natasha
      September 18, 2019

      Hi, it does have a chunkier texture that breaks down more and more with each boil down but yes you can use an immersion blender (or a regular blender in batches), to puree it further to your desired consistency. Reply

  • Kirsten
    September 17, 2019

    I made the peach jam a couple of days ago. I cut the sugar back as the peaches were very ripe. What a mistake as my jam is just wet mush and more like a fruit stew.
    I learned my lesson to add the sugar recommended. I did follow the directions completely. Reply

    • Natasha
      September 17, 2019

      Thank you for sharing those valuable insights! Reply

    • Judy Morris
      September 17, 2019

      I don’t know if your “mush” would be safe if canned., However if you like the taste, use it as refrigerator jam. I have done a quick fruit topping that ends up like this and use it on french toast, sandwiches, yogurt, ricotta, cottage cheese,…. Since i am diabetic and the amount of jam I like is too many carbs, but artificial sugar causes digestive issues for me, this works well for me. Reply

  • Kirsten
    September 13, 2019

    Hello from Ontario, picked up lovely peaches for canning at Niagara Vineland. Made the recipe as per recommendation and I have wonderful peach jam for the winter and Christmas gifts.
    Thank you for this great method. It now in my own recipe book to be handed down! Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      September 14, 2019

      Hi Kirsten, I’m so glad you enjoyed it and I bet these would make the best Christmas gifts! Thank you for the wonderful review! Reply

  • September 13, 2019

    I stumbled upon your article on Peach Preserves … it just so happens that I have two peach trees with buku fruit and I am enthused by your recipe/ process, so I have asked my wife to pick up jars today and this weekend I will be making peach preserves!

    I will return to post a review of the process and the outcome as well.

    thank you Reply

  • Diane T
    September 12, 2019

    I’ve used this recipe 2 yrs in a row and it’s the best for sure! It does take longer to make but it’s worth the wait. I can’t make enough to keep up with the demand! Thanks for sharing Reply

    • Diane T
      September 12, 2019

      so sorry – forgot to give it a rating. 5 Stars! Reply

      • Natasha
        September 12, 2019

        Awww thank you Diane! You’re so nice. Thanks for the thoughtful review. Reply

        • Jenny stewart
          September 14, 2019

          I have peach fruit tree in yard with LOTS of fruit…new to area…how long canned jam last once finished and sealed. Reply

          • Natasha
            September 14, 2019

            Hi Jenny, if processed correctly, preserves will keep up to 2 years. Once they are opened, keep them in the refrigerator up to 3 months.

    • Natasha
      September 12, 2019

      I’m so happy to hear that! Thank you Diane! Reply

  • Holly
    September 11, 2019

    I think by day 3 these are unsafe. Opened the lid to start the last boil today and voila, see slight mold on the edge of my pan. They would have been perfect yesterday. 😩. Reply

    • Natasha
      September 12, 2019

      Hi Holly, oh no! That’s definitely unusual and sorry to hear that. In all the years we’ve made these, I have never seen that before. These have ample amounts of sugar to prevent any kind of spoilage over the course of three days with boiling them down each day. I would highly suggest following the proportions in the recipe for sugar to fruit. Reply

  • Iryna Hayes
    September 10, 2019

    Natasha, thank you so much for your responses and what you are doing! So far your recipes are awesome! I am looking for recipes for jams of strawberries, raspberries, currant, cherries, apricots and dogwood (kyzyl). It would be so great if you know them and would post them on your wonderful site! Thank you very much again! Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      September 10, 2019

      I’m so glad you’re enjoying our site, Iryna! We have Apricot preserves here, our plum jam here is pretty popular too! Thank you for those other suggestions! Reply

    • Jenny stewart
      September 15, 2019

      Help!! Tastes acidy..sat over night as still needs 3 more heat and cool sessions. Tested good last night. Reply

  • Iryna
    September 9, 2019

    Natasha, what size of pan you recommend to use processing jams, adjika, etc? Not for boiling jars, I understand that it’s typical canning pan, 20 qts. My question is about capacity of a pan for cooking that stuff in. Will 9 qts be enough or more? Thank you Reply

    • Natasha
      September 9, 2019

      Hi Iryna, 9 quarts is definitely plenty. I believe the one I had in the photos was a 7 quart. Reply

  • Christa Cranston
    September 9, 2019

    First time canning- very easy recipe to follow, thank you! We buy preserves now that do not have any added sugar. Is it possible to make this recipe sugarless or add less sugar or will that alter the outcome? Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      September 9, 2019

      Hi Christa, that is a great question. I recommend reading through a few of the comments there are a few discussions on sugar there. But, I haven’t tried wiht out sugar but one of my readers, CJ reported the following using a substitution: “Shirley asked about using Splenda for preserves. I’ve used it many times with great success and taste. You must water bath the filled jars as there is no sugar protection to prevent bacterial/mold growth. For others, adding a few drops of almond extract makes nectarine preserves taste more strongly, like peach.” Hope this is helpful! Reply

  • Iryna
    September 9, 2019

    Natasha, how large should be the cooking pot? Will 6 quarts be enough? How thick? Dutch oven or stainless steel to prevent from burning? Thank you! Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      September 9, 2019

      Great question, Iryna, I recommend reading the “What you will need” section in the recipe blog post. We mention needing “Large Stock Pot (20Qt+) with Rack (or purchase a canner)” Reply

  • Vickie Sizemore
    September 6, 2019

    I have a glass top stove. The water bath canner I bought yesterday said not to use on a glass top stove because it won’t get hot enough. Is this true? Should I take the canner back? Reply

    • Natasha
      September 6, 2019

      Hi Vickie, I haven’t heard that before – how odd, but if the caner say so then maybe better to play it safe and exchange it. Boiling water is boiling water – I really am not sure why it would say that. Reply

    • Michele
      September 15, 2019

      We have a glass top and we do our bath on the side burner of our bbq. My brother in law did his on a glass top and it cracked so we weren’t going to take that chance Reply

  • Samuel
    September 4, 2019

    I live at 6800 feet do I need to pressure can or water bath it’s not clear with your recipe?
    Sam
    Ps the jam is amazing! Reply

    • Natasha
      September 4, 2019

      Hi Sam, I am not aware of different canning recommendations for high elevation areas. If you have a method that you are comfortable with, I would suggest sticking to it. I water can and I live at 2700 feet. Reply

      • kathryn thurman
        September 9, 2019

        i think he is speaking of a pressure cooker Reply

  • Mary
    September 4, 2019

    Hi, I was excited to try this recipe. I cooked it the 5 times, but in the end it was brownish looking. Is the picture on the website your actual jam? Reply

    • Natasha
      September 4, 2019

      Hi Mary, it can start to darken if it is boiled too vigorously over too high of heat. Reply

  • Gina Briggs
    September 1, 2019

    I have followed your recipe for Country Peach Preserves and have just finished the third boil. My peaches have become much darker as they cook compared to your pictures-yours are brighter, more yellow. I left them in the sugar and lemon juice overnight and they were still bright yellow when I started the cooking process. Thoughts as to why mine would be darkening? Reply

    • Natasha
      September 2, 2019

      Hi Gina, the mixture tends to darken if the peaches are boiled more rapidly. Reply

      • Gina Briggs
        September 4, 2019

        Thanks Natasha. I have more peaches and going to try again. Reply

  • JoAnn
    August 31, 2019

    I have a question,I didn’t read your instructions correctly, I put a lid on and let it boil pretty fast , what will happen now? I shut it off but did I ruin it? What should I do? Reply

    • Natasha
      September 1, 2019

      As long as it did not scorch on the bottom, it should be just fine. Reply

  • Meggie
    August 30, 2019

    Thanks for sharing your knowledge. I appreciated this method of naturally thickening the jam! This was my first time canning- Can’t wait to do this again. I appreciate the tender method of low and slow but it is impatient at times. Just had to make sure I was on top of stirring it and using low heat to bring it to a simmer. But was easy to come to and from it over a course of a couple days. I used the boiling water method to can the jam and it worked out well. Added in some warming spices and it turned out delicious. Also used my immersion blender to blend it up a bit. Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      August 31, 2019

      I’m so glad that was helpful Meggie! Thank you so much for sharing that with me. Reply

  • Deborah
    August 28, 2019

    In the process of making these preserves, I was wondering if I should skim the foam?
    I was also wondering at what point would you recommend adding a spice sachet. Reply

    • Natasha
      August 29, 2019

      Hi Deborah, skimming is not necessary here. I haven’t tried adding a spice sachet so I don’t have a good answer for you. If you experiment with that, please let me know how it goes and what spices you use. Reply

  • Oany
    August 23, 2019

    Has anyone tried this recipe, or this way to make preserves with any other fruit? I wonder if it would work and get as thick as this recipe using any other fruit? Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      August 23, 2019

      Hi Oany, I haven’t tried this many other types of fruit but I think it’s worth trying! Varying fruits have varying amounts of pectin naturally so some you may not have to cook as many times. You might google the difference between different fruits before starting. If you experiment, let me now how you like it! Reply

      • oany
        August 27, 2019

        I sure will! Thank you so much for sharing this recipe, it delicious! and my family love it!! Reply

        • Natashas Kitchen
          August 27, 2019

          You’re welcome! Reply

  • GLORIA
    August 23, 2019

    CAN YOU FREEZE THIS INSTEAD OF CAN? Reply

    • Natasha
      August 23, 2019

      Hi Gloria, we have always canned it but I think this would freeze really well. Reply

  • Rebecca
    August 22, 2019

    Just made this today (and yesterday. I wanted to add another dimension, so I sliced two jalapeños in half and put them in so simmer with the boils. I took one out at the end, and used my immersion blender to mix it in. Oh, my! It’s Sunshine & Fire! Sooo good! I’ll use it to put in plain yogurt, or to top a lovely Brie en Croute for a gathering (hello, Thanksgiving!) or, just on toast or an English muffin. Cheese pastryy? Yes, please! Thank you for this recipe, Natasha; good job! Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      August 22, 2019

      I’m so glad you enjoyed that. Thank you for that amazing feedback! Reply

  • Mary
    August 20, 2019

    Hi, this is the first time I have tried making jam. if I leave on the counter overnight is it okay to cover. Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      August 20, 2019

      Hi Mary, Yes, once the preserves are at room temperature, you can leave them covered on the counter overnight Reply

  • Mary
    August 20, 2019

    Hi, when I leave the pot on the counter overnight, can I cover it? Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      August 20, 2019

      Hi Mary, yes that should work. Reply

  • Patty Rech
    August 20, 2019

    Love that you use this so-much-easier method-than-“canning”! Also like that it is just as I make mine – fruit, sugar, lemon. No pectin have I ever found necessary for preserves. THANK YOU!!! Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      August 20, 2019

      You’re welcome! I’m so happy you enjoyed it Patty! Reply

  • Massie
    August 18, 2019

    Can you substitute the sugar in this recipe for natural honey? Reply

    • Natasha
      August 19, 2019

      Hi Massie, I haven’t tried canning with honey to be honest so I’m not sure if it works the same way for preserving. If anyone here has any insights on that please share. I’m not sure what canning standards are with using honey as a substitute. Reply

      • Jacquelyn Ann Yelton
        August 21, 2019

        We have canned with just honey before. They are a little runnier than your standard preserve but sooo good. I think it takes like summertime. We’ve used the Food in Jars blog recipe. Reply

        • Natasha
          August 22, 2019

          Thank you so much for sharing! Are you swapping out the same proportions? Reply

  • Margaret Hoyle
    August 18, 2019

    Would it still work if I do half the recipe. Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      August 18, 2019

      Hi Margaret that should work great, I have made this before and love it. So does everyone I have shared it with. It is so easy. I have even cut the recipe in half due to lack of peaches. Thanks so much for sharing the recipe. Reply

  • Lynda Brooks
    August 17, 2019

    This is my all-time favorite jam recipe. I was doubtful the color would be pleasing after that length of time, but it was still yummy looking and the intensity of the fruit flavor is absolutely amazing. Beats all the conventional recipes by miles. The only change I made was simply to freeze the jam in jars instead of boiling water bath. The biggest problem is restraining myself from pigging out Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      August 18, 2019

      Thank you so much for sharing that with me. Reply

  • Linda Miritello
    August 17, 2019

    I no longer blanch fruit (including tomatoes) to peel them. I bought a serrated vegetable peeler. It is designed for soft fruits and the peel easily peels off without mashing or bruising the fruit. A real time saver! Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      August 17, 2019

      Thank you so much for sharing that with me. Reply

  • Desiree Olson
    August 17, 2019

    Best peach preserve recipe. So easy. Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      August 17, 2019

      I’m so glad you enjoyed that Desiree! Thank you for sharing that amazing review! Reply

  • Tina Bruley
    August 16, 2019

    Hello, I’m currently in the process of making these preserves. The flavor is fabulous (I can’t help but taste during the process). I’ve just completed the 4th boil and I’m not sure it’s going to be thick enough. Should I add something to thicken? Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      August 16, 2019

      Hi Tina, I haven’t tried this but you could add pectin if you wanted it thicker. I like the consistency without it but you can also use pectin to bring it to jam consistency faster. Reply

  • August 15, 2019

    What is the reason you don’t use pectin? I’m noticing a lot of recipes call for that. Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      August 15, 2019

      Hi Wendy, we make is this way since it is a natural way of thickening the preserves rather than adding pectin. The flavors also become concentrated as it thickens and the taste can’t be beat. Reply

      • wendy
        August 15, 2019

        Thanks for the quick reply. I have been nervous about trying a preserve recipe, mostly because of the fear of doing the canning process incorrectly. Reply

  • Karin Anderson
    August 15, 2019

    This is fine for stewed peaches. Which were fab over ice cream. However, if you’re looking for jam or preserves and not *conserves* get you some Pomona’s Universal pectin, and follow the instructions. I should have stuck with my tried and true. After much ado, a mixer, and some Pomona’s, I got the jam/preserves I was after. Reply

    • Natasha
      August 16, 2019

      Hi Karin, after boiling down following the full process, this is not like stewed peaches at all, but has a great concentrated flavor and texture. The idea with this recipe is a method to avoid adding pectin. Reply

  • MARC STEVENS
    August 15, 2019

    Question really. Looking at other no pectin recipes, you seem to be using 3-4 times as much fruit relative to sugar. 11 pounds of peaches is a lot of fruit to put in 5-6 pint jars. Reply

    • Natasha
      August 15, 2019

      Hi Marc, peaches are super juicy and with the entire process of reducing it down, it does become a more concentrated and super flavorful batch. Reply

    • Elizabeth Engel
      August 15, 2019

      Marc,

      I’ve made this recipe twice this summer and 11 lbs of peaches, was about 36 x-large “ripes.” I got 14 half-pint (8oz) jars, but I like my preserves a little more loose, so I cooked over 3 days a total of 4 times. I always sterilize more jars than I think I’ll need so they’re ready if needed. This recipe is WELL worth the wait. Patience pays off! I also add 1 heaping tablespoon of cinnamon at the first cooking and 1 Tablespoon of almond extract after the last boil cools down. SO GOOD. Thanks again, Natasha, for such a great recipe! Reply

      • MARC STEVENS
        August 15, 2019

        Thanks for the comment, however I was asking about the ratio of fruit to sugar. This recipe calls for 11 pounds of peaches and maybe 4 cups of sugar. Most of the other similar recipes called for nearly as much sugar but only 3-4 pounds of fruit – and the recipe suggests the yield is only 5 or so pints, so something does not compute. I’m thinking that 11 pounds of fruit might require almost 3 times as much sugar as the recipe calls for. Reply

        • Mary Liu
          August 21, 2019

          hi marc, the amount of sugar used is individual taste but what changes with it is the period of preservation. this recipe calls for 20% which is on the low side so it may not have a preservation period of 1-2 years as compared to a jam/preserve that uses 50-70% of sugar, even with canning. however, peaches are so sweet on their own it would be unthinkable to add more than 30-40% of sugar, with a little more lemon to add some acidity so as to prolong the preservation period. as for the yield, peaches have high water content so yield is therefore much less than say banana jam lol. hope that helps :)) Reply

  • Marilyn Jennings
    August 13, 2019

    I would like to know why you just don’t let it come to a rolling boil and stir for 10 minutes and then remove? I don’t understand the purpose of doing it 5 times. Thanks Reply

    • Natasha
      August 13, 2019

      Hi Marilyn, it is the natural way of thickening the preserves rather than adding pectin. The flavors also become concentrated as it thickens and the taste can’t be beat. Reply

      • Marilyn Jennings
        August 16, 2019

        Thank you for your reply. It did turn out great. It did take me 3 days but well worth it. Just a trick i picked up a while back. If you have too much froth, just add a tablespoon of butter and stir. It makes it go away. Reply

  • Hikingagain
    August 12, 2019

    I haven’t tasted them yet, I just canned the peaches. So I’ll rate it in a few. I do have a question. My peaches are not as orange as pictured, they are somewhat darker. Should I be concerned? Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      August 12, 2019

      Without being there it is hard to say, as long as they are still fresh and have good flavor they should be good. Reply

  • August 8, 2019

    Hi Natasha. Thank you for the peach preserve recipe. I did it and it took me 3 days to finish the recipe you provided. My grown up kids loved it so much. But they told me, which I expected to be, that the preserve was not thick enough. Even I added more sugar to than the recipe asked for.
    But what I did, also to what your recipe, I filled some of the jars with chunky peachs, then I left some in the pot and I actually puree the rest of the mix. My kids loved it as well and the said that these jars where thicker than the chunky preserves.
    No, I didn’t try any of them yet. I’m afraid if I start eating from them, they’ll be gone fast. Lol.
    Thank you again for the recipe  Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      August 8, 2019

      I’m so happy you enjoyed that. Thank you for sharing that with us! Reply

  • Deborah Younts
    August 7, 2019

    I made a batch of strawberry jam last month. Then i made a batch of peach jam a few days later. I use the liquid pectin recipe. Fast and easy. I do not water bath or oven heat. I simply pour the hot mixture into sterilized jars and seal with hot lids and rings. They seal every time. Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      August 8, 2019

      I’m so glad you enjoyed that, thank you for sharing that with me! Reply

  • Hikingagain
    August 5, 2019

    I’m totally confused. After you place the packed jars in the oven @350, there seems to be a next step. Boiling in water? Should I follow the “current canning guidelines” which are listed next? Reply

    • Natasha
      August 5, 2019

      Hi, we use the oven method. Current guidelines recommend processing the cans in water rather than the oven method. You can choose which processing method you are more comfortable with; either the oven or processing them in water as written out in the “current canning guidelines” section. I hope that makes sense! Reply

  • Katie
    August 2, 2019

    Hi! If properly sterilized/sealed, can these be kept in the pantry? Or do they need to be refrigerated? Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      August 2, 2019

      Hi Katie, if they are canned as instructed, the jars should form a seal and be safe stored at room temperature on the shelf. Reply

  • Daniela
    July 24, 2019

    Hi Natasha! This recipe sounds and looks great! Could I use it for apricot preserves as well? Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      July 24, 2019

      Hi Daniela, I haven’t tried making apricot preserves this way but it should work also. You might add a little more lemon juice or add it to taste. Also, we have this apricot raspberry recipe here you may enjoy. Reply

  • Jodie Stoddard
    July 24, 2019

    Loved this recipe last year and will probably do again. My tree literally exploded with peaches. So many, it’s hard to keep up with them. I’ve only lost a few, but I’ve picked or have dropped off the tree well over 350 peaches (yes, I’ve counted) and the tree still looks like I haven’t picked anything yet. They all look beautiful, but are still too hard for using, eating, canning, etc. So I leave them there until they are ready or the higher ones fall off. Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      July 24, 2019

      Wow! That’s amazing Jodie!! Thank you so much for sharing that with me. Reply

  • SOPHIE
    July 20, 2019

    wonderful recipe, tastes delicious and the colors are gorgeous. Question: why was my yield less than half the listed yield in the recipe? thanks Reply

    • Natasha
      July 21, 2019

      Hi Sophie, the most likely reason is using less peaches or someone came and ate half because it was just so good! 😉 Reply

  • Jennifer
    July 7, 2019

    Holy cow! I did it. 7 hours later I have produced 11 jars of beautiful peach jam. The lids all made that little point in the middle-that means they are sealed correctly, right?? I’m crossing my fingers! I loved your directions. Thank you! Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      July 8, 2019

      Hi Jennifer, thank you for that awesome feedback! We left notes in the recipe to check the top. You want to be able to press the top on the lids and is should not pop up or down. I hope that helps Reply

    • Jennifer
      July 8, 2019

      Yes, I had that backwards. When I turned them right side up after cooled they were all flat except 1 which you could pop up in down. 10 out of11 were flat. Reply

  • Nancy S Jacob
    July 1, 2019

    Best ever and so easy! Yes, it takes longer but worth it. Love how it doesn’t require additional pectin, too. Just don’t go off and forget about it like I did the first time! After the 3rd heat, I turned it on early Saturday morning BEFORE COFFEE and forgot about it!! Burnt it completely up! Yes, I cried! But I made two more batches! I do have a question though. The first successful batch turned out perfect. The next batch is much more runny. Since there isn’t any added liquid, I’m not sure why this happened. The peaches in that last batch were actually less ripe than the batch that set up better. Thoughts? Still tastes great though! Reply

    • Natasha
      July 1, 2019

      Oh dear, I’m so glad you loved the recipe. I think I would cry too after burning preserves. One way to save it if it does scorch on the bottom is first, do not stir and just pour it into a different pot leaving the scorched/burned part on the bottom. If the rest of the mixture doesn’t smell or taste burnt, it is salvageable. Just do not try to stir if it scorches or the burnt smell and flavor will take over the whole batch. Reply

  • Shaun
    June 28, 2019

    I have made this before and love it. So does everyone I have shared it with. It is so easy. I have even cut the recipe in half due to lack of peaches. Thanks so much for sharing the recipe. Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      June 28, 2019

      That’s just awesome!! Thank you for sharing your wonderful review Shaun! Reply

    • Steve
      July 20, 2019

      Hey Natasha, this appears to be the recipe I was looking for. Any thoughts on added jalapeno or habanero peppers to make a spicy version? When to add to the mash, how much to add, etc.? Reply

      • Natasha
        July 21, 2019

        Hi Steve, I honestly have never tested that so I can’t make a recommendation on that. Reply

  • Lisa M Hall
    June 3, 2019

    Would this work in a crock pot? Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      June 4, 2019

      Hi Lisa, I haven’t tried this in a slow cooker so I can’t say for sure. Without testing it in the slow cooker, I can’t say for sure how that would work or how long you would need to keep it in the slow cooker to get a thick enough consistency. Reply

  • Judy Morris
    May 30, 2019

    I can’t remember the cooking show I saw it on, they did something somewhat similar. She put the chopped up fruit and sugar in the pot, brought it to simmer, took off the heat and let it sit (I forget how long, but long enough to form some juice) Then she drained off the juice into another pot which she cooked until it started to thicken some (like a loose syrup). Then she added the fruit and any further juice that had come out of it to the pot and cooked to a jam. There was lemon juice, but I don’t remember when she put it in. I dont use exact recipes for my jams and I put some lemon in at the beginning and then near the end. The acid in the lemon brings the pectin and the lemon at the end freshens up the taste. Reply

  • Crystalynn Falencik
    May 29, 2019

    What is the texture like? I would like to have a velvety smooth texture to can. Recommendations on when to purée the peaches? After the last boil? Before the first? What do you think? Thanks! Reply

    • Natasha
      May 30, 2019

      Hi Crystalynn, I haven’t tried that but I think they could be pureed even earlier on in the process, that way you could see when they reach the consistency you are looking for. Reply

  • Tay Davignon
    May 26, 2019

    I am looking forward to trying this but I have a question: I have my own peach tree and every year it’s produced peaches many of them end up wasted because I simply can’t eat them all and I’ve wanted to try making something with them. Result: wanting to make jam. Since I’m using my own home grown peaches, and I’m not buying a set LB serving, roughly how many peaches would you guess for this recipe? Knowing will allow me to account for any leftover peaches I may have. Thank you! Reply

    • Natasha
      May 26, 2019

      Hi Tay, I didn’t count the peaches but really the safest and most reliable way would be to weigh the peaches since not all peaches are the same size. Reply

  • Dorothy Walker
    March 30, 2019

    Can this method be used for other fruits? Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      March 30, 2019

      Hi, Dorothy, I haven’t tried this many other types of fruit but I think it’s worth trying! Varying fruits have varying amounts of pectin naturally so some you may not have to cook as many times. You might google the difference between different fruits before starting. If you experiment, let me now how you like it! 🙂 Reply

      • Kathryn Marsh
        July 24, 2019

        Worked beautifully scaled down because my family ate more of the peaches fresh from the tree than I expected. I’ve been doing something similar with strawberries for many years and everyone loves it. No recipe because it depends how juicy the strawberries are – I start with a couple of cups of sugar and add more if it seems to need it. With raspberries it turns out a bit pippy if you use this method – or at least that’s what the family say. Method makes a good green tomato/ginger/apricot jam too -there are a couple of Belgian recipes of this type. And italians make pumpkin jam this way Reply

        • Natashas Kitchen
          July 24, 2019

          I’m so happy you enjoyed that. Thank you for sharing that with us! Reply

          • Jen
            August 4, 2019

            Hello there! One question- I notice that you have in the recipe an oven step and then the more traditional canning instructions with boiling water. Usually I have seen one method or another for canning, so is it necessary to do both? I have not canned peaches before, but I know some fruits can be more finicky than others (i.e. tomatoes).

          • Natasha
            August 5, 2019

            Hi Jen, pick whichever method you prefer. They will both work and only one method is necessary.

  • Pat Prescott
    January 11, 2019

    I bought peach jam that turned to sugar on the top. Why does that happen? Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      January 11, 2019

      Hi Pat, there are several factors that cause that. The crystals form when the liquid evaporates. Was the container sealed properly? Reply

  • Judy
    October 25, 2018

    Looking forward to trying this method. I have read that much of the pectin is in or just under the skin in fruit (don’t remember which) so I try to peel the fruit in large pieces so I can cook them in the jam and then pull them out near the end (candies the peels-Yum!!). Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      October 26, 2018

      Thank you for sharing this with us Judy! Reply

    • Judy Morris
      May 30, 2019

      I do that also. You can look up pectin levels on the internet. If you want to make jam with a low pectin level, you can combine it with a higher pectin level. Reply

  • Elizabeth Engel
    October 8, 2018

    Hello!

    I love this recipe and technique so much, I’m trying it with Wild Blueberries. Since I’m using frozen ones, there’s a lot of water that needs to cook off, so I’m hoping the “overnight sit” will make this recipe works just a well as it does for peaches. YUM! Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      October 8, 2018

      Thank you for the wonderful review, Elizabeth! Reply

  • Faye
    October 8, 2018

    Hi Natasha, I have a question, as the first peach is peeled are the remaining peaches left in the iced water until all peaches have been peeled?
    Thank you, Faye Reply

    • Natasha
      October 8, 2018

      Hi Faye, yes, you can leave the rest in the ice water as you are peeling the others. It saves a step not having to drain or transfer them an extra time. Reply

  • Shazia Gulnaaz
    October 4, 2018

    Thanks for the recipes, I will definitely try this Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      October 4, 2018

      I look forward to heading how you like it! Reply

  • Jodie
    September 22, 2018

    I had enough peaches leftover from about a 25-30 pound batch of peaches to make a half recipe. I am just finished the third simmer and boy does it smell and taste amazing. I can’t wait to taste the final product. Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      September 22, 2018

      I love the smell of baked goods in the home! I Would love to hear how you like it! Reply

      • Jodie
        September 25, 2018

        I absolutely love it. Tastes so yummy. I need to go and buy more English muffins as I ate them all eating the preserves. Definitely going to be making some more of this next season. Reply

        • Natashas Kitchen
          September 25, 2018

          I’m so happy you enjoyed this, Jodie! Reply

  • Jill Bryant
    September 21, 2018

    LOVED IT! 1st batch way too sweet. So I hurried up and made a 2nd batch no sugar and combined them for the final boil. Can you use this recipe for other fruits like pears? Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      September 21, 2018

      Hi Jill! I haven’t tried those but I think it’s worth trying! Varying fruits have varying amounts of pectin naturally so some you may not have to cook as many times. You might google the difference between different fruits before starting. If you experiment, let me now how you like it! 🙂 Reply

  • Linda
    September 12, 2018

    Can freshly canned or frozen peaches be used? Thanks.
    Love your site! Reply

    • Natasha
      September 12, 2018

      Hi Linda, I haven’t tried it that way but I think it’s worth experimenting. Frozen peaches might make the preserves a little darker but it should still work fine. Reply

  • Marlow Rahn
    September 6, 2018

    I am looking at making these as a holiday gift for all 4 of my kids teachers (there is a lot of them!) I am hoping to include a few recipes with each jar. If you have one, can you please share? Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      September 6, 2018

      Hi Marlow. I would recommend checking out the print option that comes with these recipes and including that? They’re standard print copies so maybe folding them into pretty envelopes would look aesthetically pleasing? You can also try this Apricot Raspberry Preserves recipe. Enjoy! Reply

      • Marlow Rahn
        September 6, 2018

        I should have clarified that I’m looking for recipes (chicken, etc) that you can use with the preserves:) Reply

  • Jason
    September 3, 2018

    I used 2nds from a local farm as well. 11 lbs of raw unpitted peaches filled 13, 8 oz Mason jars. And 1, 4 oz jar. There is a bit of waste lost in the p tf process, but not enough to worry. Reply

  • Jason
    September 2, 2018

    Just finished up my first batch. Tastes great. Because I live above 4000 ft elevation, I put them in the hot water bath canner for 15 minutes instead of 10. Your recipe filled 13 8 oz. Mason jars. (And 1 4 oz. Mason jar). With a little bit spilled on the floor while transferring to jars. ( the dog was happy to clean that up for me) thank you for the wonderful recipe. I’m going to start a 2nd batch this afternoon. (This one using splenda, I’m diabetic) the real sugar ones I just finished will be Christmas presents. 🤩 Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      September 2, 2018

      I would love to hear your update and how you like it! This will be perfect for Christmas! Thank you for the wonderful review! Reply

  • Terri
    August 29, 2018

    I did not get to read all the comments so you may have already answered this. How many cups of chopped peaches would 11 lbs be?. One place said 2 1/4 cups per lb. So I measured out 25 cups. I think I have way too much. I will give it a try and see what happens. Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      August 29, 2018

      Hi Terri, I never measured them that way so I’m not sure. I did weight them before I cut them so it was 11 lbs with the peel and pit. Reply

      • Lisa
        September 2, 2018

        it would be really helpful to know weight of peeled, pitted peaches. i get ‘seconds’ from a friendly farmer, so never have a whole peach to start. i have 9 lbs of sliced peaches (no pits, skin) waiting to be preserved. Reply

        • Natashas Kitchen
          September 3, 2018

          I wish I measured it that way. Once they are pitted, peeled and sliced, it’s about 20-22 cups of peaches. I filled my pot and measured for you. (This is what google tells me: 1 lb peaches = 3 cups sliced) 🙂 Hope that helps! Reply

  • Amy OBrien
    August 29, 2018

    I just did your recipie. My peach tree produced very well this year. The peach preserves turned out amazing! I just canned them and they are cooling now. I tasted the preserves before putting it into the jars. OMG! So good. So yummy! Thank you from Pennsylvania! Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      August 29, 2018

      Hi Amy! That’s so great! We just got a nice box of peaches from my moms garden as well! I love that they’re home grown! I’m so happy you liked this recipe! Reply

  • Prasanna Adapalli
    August 28, 2018

    Hi Natasha, What is the shelf life for this recipe? I am planning to gift it to my family on my next trip coming in 2 months. Pl. lemme know. Thanks. Reply

    • Natasha
      August 28, 2018

      Hi Prasanna, we have kept it up to a year on the shelf. I hope you and your family love the peach preserves! 🙂 Reply

  • Dee
    August 26, 2018

    Great recipe … I was gifted with 6lbs of peaches and used your recipe with a few tweaks. Added star anise, cardamom and nutmeg.
    It turned out great. thanks Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      August 26, 2018

      What a great gift! I’m so happy you enjoyed it! Reply

  • Cherie
    August 24, 2018

    Could you put the jam in freezer containers and freeze it rather than can it? Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      August 24, 2018

      Hi Cherie, this should be ok for the freezer if you wish to store it that way. Reply

  • Sally
    August 24, 2018

    Your recipe is lovely but I was expecting it to set like jam. Isn’t it supposed to? I have also made a few jars the conventional jam way too but it’s not nearly as nice as yours! Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      August 24, 2018

      Hi Sally. This will be slightly more loose than jam. Reply

  • Jason
    August 23, 2018

    Thanks for the answer regarding the pectin. I’m buying 25 lbs of peaches from a local orchard this weekend. 2 questions before I start. 1. I am diabetic, I plan do do a small batch for myself using splenda (using real sugar on the batches I’m making for family) do you think it will work out ok with the splenda?
    2. I own a hot water bath canner so I will be using that method. Since I live above 4000 feet elevation, should I adjust the time in the hot water bath, or modify any other part of the recipe in any way? Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      August 23, 2018

      Hi Jason,
      1. I haven’t tried but one of my readers, CJ reported the following: “Shirley asked about using Splenda for preserves. I’ve used it many times with great success and taste. You must water bath the filled jars as there is no sugar protection to prevent bacterial/mold growth. For others, adding a few drops of almond extract makes nectarine preserves taste more strongly, like peach. Hope this is helpful!”
      2. I wish I could tell you. I realize there many factors that may alter the recipe. I did a quick google search and a few alterations did come up for 5000+ feet. 🙂 Reply

  • Patty Radwick
    August 23, 2018

    I have been looking for a recipe that doesn’t require pectin….I am going to start a batch tomorrow and will comment again when it’s done. Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      August 23, 2018

      I look forward to your feedback Patty. Reply

  • Jason
    August 22, 2018

    I noticed that your receipe doesn’t call for any pectin. Is it not needed with all the extra boiling? Reply

    • Natasha
      August 22, 2018

      Hi Jason, boiling down the peaches with the multiple boils causes the preserves to thicken without requiring pectin. Reply

  • Allyson
    August 19, 2018

    I always make freezer jam because my experience is cooked jam loses a lot of the fruit flavor and color. With this method does the jam have that fresh fruit flavor I love with my freezer jam, as well as staying more true color? Reply

    • Natasha
      August 20, 2018

      Hi Allyson, following the instructions here, the fruit does not lose color or flavor. If you cook it for too long at too high of the preserves will get darker, however it won’t really affect the flavor unless they get burnt 😉 Reply

      • Allyson
        August 22, 2018

        Perfect. I am doing peaches today! Thanks Reply

  • MG
    August 18, 2018

    I think this must be the most labor intensive jam recipe ever made. haha! It tastes great, but I did two batches (20 lbs total) and only ended up with 12 CUPS of jam. It also took four full days, and hours and hours of constant stirring. I don’t know how people are successfully making this recipe. Each time I brought it to a low boil, it took over 1.5 hours to just get to the simmering point, and it would begin scorching if I did it any faster. I also had to stir almost constantly the entire time. After that, it would take 6-7 hours to return to room temperature, so I only had time to simmer it once or twice a day. I was using really nice pots, not nonstick, which means yes, it does take a little longer to bring things to boil, but not that much longer. My pot was huge, so it has a lot of base surface area, which should have allowed it to come to boil faster and cool faster (a smaller diameter pot that is super deep would take even longer to cool to room temp. I can’t even imagine!)

    So it took 4 days total, about 12 hours of active working hours tied to the kitchen, and I yielded just under 6 pints of jam. $35 for my 20 lbs of peaches makes them about $6 per pint. Good thing it’s freaking delicious! Just definitely, definitely not recommended for a first time jam maker. Next time I think I’ll try a recipe that uses pectin to firm it up to see if I get better yield and less time… I wonder if that woulds sacrifice flavor.

    Also, btw, I did scorch it bad once, by making the mistake of going to the bathroom while it was on medium heat, but I was able to take out the burnt flavor by quickly changing pans, so that it didn’t continue to cook with the burnt bits, and I also added a teaspoon of almond extract and you can hardly tell at all. Yay! Reply

    • Natasha
      August 19, 2018

      Hi MG, it does take more time and that is the tradeoff for this pectin free natural method 🙂 and I agree, it sure does taste delicious – can’t be beat! 🙂 Reply

    • nancy essig
      August 19, 2018

      Of course it took too long to boil, there was a huge pot of peaches. Next time divide it into 2 pots. This was the easiest and most delicious preserves I had ever made. And…nothing is cheap these days. Reply

      • Natasha
        August 19, 2018

        I love that idea of dividing it into 2 pots to speed up the process. Brilliant! 🙂 Reply

  • Tina
    August 14, 2018

    I used your method to make Peach Jam last year so decided to apply it to Apricot Jam this year and it worked wonderfully. I used 10lbs of Apricots 3 cups of sugar and about 1/2 cup of lemon juice. 4 Boils total. It did turn pretty dark but tastes amazing. Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      August 14, 2018

      That’s so great Time! Thank you for sharing your wonderful review with us! I’m sure our readers will find this helpful! Reply

  • Angie
    August 13, 2018

    Hi, what would the maximum pounds of peaches you would use for one batch? Are their any negative drawbacks to doing this? Reply

    • Natasha
      August 14, 2018

      Hi Angie, the amounts stated make a typical batch for us and we don’t usually do more than that of peach preserves at a time. Reply

  • Angie
    August 13, 2018

    Hi, I have almost a bushel of peaches. I’m wondering if you would dare do anymore than 11 lbs. of peaches per batch? If so how much more could you do? Reply

    • Natasha
      August 14, 2018

      Hi Angie, I wouldn’t do more than that or it may scorch at the bottom before uniformly heating the pot. I also don’t have an excessively large pot or burner so I don’t do more than 11 lbs in 1 pot. Reply

  • Saul
    August 13, 2018

    It’s a great recipe and it tastes great, if your worried about scorching use a heavy bottom pan which distributes the heat more evenly. I did try the 6x method but could not can right away. My first batch fermented so I am going to try to make peach moonshine. I think it best not to go over 2 days when you live in a warm climate Reply

    • Natasha
      August 13, 2018

      Hi Saul, I haven’t had that occur but we always make the preserves in fairly mild temperatures. Could it be that you reduced the sugar int he recipe? That could possibly cause it to ferment. Reply

  • Daphne
    August 11, 2018

    I made this on a rainy Saturday with my niece. We added 2 cups of mango juice and 1 tablespoon of almond extract. It was so delicious! The following day we had it on pancakes for brunch. I shared with my best friend and now her husband is asking when I am going to make more. Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      August 11, 2018

      That’s so great! I’m so happy you all enjoyed this recipe! Reply

  • CIA Grad 1993
    July 23, 2018

    This past week I made strawberry and blueberry preserves/jams, and this was nigh on the exact recipe I used. I stood over it or within close proximity so it didn’t burn. The trick is lower heat after it comes to a boil. You want a gentle simmer, and if you have to time, like I do, you can get it done in one day. It takes several hours, but SO worth it! Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      July 23, 2018

      It is definitely worth it! Thank you for trying our recipes! Reply

  • Blair
    July 22, 2018

    I’ve made this recipe soo many times and I love it!! I normally use only freestone peaches but my neighbor just brought me a ton of white peaches and was wondering if those would be good to make preserves with? Reply

    • Natasha
      July 22, 2018

      Hi Blair, I haven’t tried that but I think it’s worth experimenting! I imagine they will be lighter in color. Keep me posted on how that works out 🙂 Reply

  • Leslie
    July 14, 2018

    Super easy to make! I only used 1/2 cup of sugar and the preserves are delicious. More like a fruit spread, and you actually taste the peaches rather than the sugar. Try it for a healthier alternative! Reply

    • Natasha
      July 14, 2018

      Hi Leslie, I’m so happy you enjoyed it! I agree, it’s nice when you can taste the fruit more than the sugar which is why homemade is best! 🙂 Reply

  • Meena
    June 25, 2018

    Hi Natasha, this recipe is super easy to make. This year our peach tree had too many fruits for me to handle. I gave away almost half of the crop. Was feeling bad as did not know what to do with the rest, when I came across your recipe.
    I tried with 24lbs of peaches. Balancing wasn’t successful so basically me and my husband peeled off the skin. Followed the instructions as best as I could and the end result…. wow!! I surprised myself. I still have a lot of peaches left and I am going to make another big batch of preserves. Only thing not sure whether the canning process was perfect. When I put the jars upside down, some of the syrup leaked. Is that normal or the seal was not formed properly. Is there a way to check? Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      June 26, 2018

      Hi Meena, as long as the seal has formed on the lid of your jars (it should not be clickable when you press on it), it should be fine to store. Thank you for sharing your great review with us! Reply

  • June 21, 2018

    I have tried this receipe with plums and came out great! I like it because it is so easy to do . Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      June 21, 2018

      I’m so glad you enjoyed it! Reply

  • Roberta Mitchum McCunney
    June 7, 2018

    I made this last summer and absolutely loved it. I was thinking about trying the same recipe/method with strawberries. Has anyone else tried it? Any ideas on how much sugar you need or if it is ok to use big “pieces” or “chunks” of strawberries? Thank you!! Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      June 7, 2018

      Hi, Roberta. I’m so glad you enjoyed it! I haven’t tried this method with strawberries but I think it would work. You may not have to cook it down repeatedly – that is done with this recipe so it doesn’t turn dark which isn’t the concern with strawberry. Cook the strawberry until a small amount of liquid turns to gel on a plate after it cools. Reply

      • Roberta McCunney
        June 8, 2018

        Thank you for your comments! I didn’t realize this the extra steps was due to the color for the peaches. If you used 11 pounds of strawberries, how much sugar would you start with?

        Thank you! Reply

        • Natasha
          June 8, 2018

          It’s also the juice – peaches release a ton of juice. If your strawberries do likewise, you might need to simmer it longer. I could only guess with the sugar since I haven’t tried. From a preliminary search, I’m finding 2 lbs with 1 cup sugar plus lemon juice to taste. I would always start with less than that since I don’t like overly sweet preserves and then add more to taste. Reply

          • Roberta McCunney
            June 15, 2018

            Hi. I made the strawberry jam. I used 7 pounds of strawberries or 12 cups of pureed strawberries. I used about 9 cups of sugar. It was a little bit sweet so I would probably use 8 next time. I did have to cook it five times. And yes, definitely be careful about scorching. I suppose my next search might be about how to clean off the bottom of my dutch oven. It tasted wonderful though and I was quite happy with it. Thank you for your help and for the cooking method. It works perfectly for someone that doesn’t have longs periods of time available to her.

            Roberta

          • Natashas Kitchen
            June 15, 2018

            You’re so welcome, Roberta!

        • Audrey
          July 4, 2019

          Oh my goodness!!!! This stuff is liquid gold!!!! It made exactly 6 pints and came out a beautiful amber color. Not as light colored as yours, but I don’t care, cause the taste is what matters! I did 5 boils in a nonstick pot and let me just say, you can be a little lazy and walk away from you pot on that 1st boil, but on boils 2-5, there ain’t no playing. It’s all babysitting and stirring, but so worth it! I love how it’s an apple butter consistency. I can’t wait to experiment with other fruits. Thanks so much. Reply

          • Natashas Kitchen
            July 4, 2019

            You’re so welcome, Audrey! I’m so happy you enjoyed this recipe!

  • VICKIE HEGAR
    May 24, 2018

    Love this. Thank you! One question…why turn upside down? Reply

    • Natasha
      May 24, 2018

      Hi Vickie, turning it upside down, helps to create a seal. Reply

      • Cayla
        July 26, 2018

        Im very excited as I’m finishing up my first batch! This recipe is so easy! As far as storage? After the jars have set should they be dry stored, refrigerated or frozen? Reply

        • Natashas Kitchen
          July 26, 2018

          These can be dry stored. Reply

  • Frances Barrera
    May 10, 2018

    Very accurate directions and outcome. I will add that you must stir almost constantly during the last two simmers to prevent scorching and sticking. This also leads to a purée-like consistency which may not be your preference. The preserve is delicious, however. I would like it better if there were larger pieces of fruit but I don’t know how one would accomplish that without resorting to sure gel. Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      May 10, 2018

      I’m glad to hear how much you enjoy the recipe Frances! Thanks for sharing your great review with other readers! Reply

      • Denise Hayden
        May 29, 2019

        Can you quick cool in cold water between boils or will this ruin it? Reply

        • Natasha
          May 29, 2019

          Hi Denise, I haven’t strayed from this method but I think it helps with the thickening process when you don’t rush through it. Reply

    • Leslie Callaway
      June 12, 2018

      Frances, could you possibly add some more chopped fruit near the fourth boil? I was thinking the same thing about raspberry jam I just made. I thought if I waited until the end and added more fruit, I would get the chunkiness I wanted. What do you think? Reply

  • Sacha
    March 29, 2018

    This was my first attempt at jam and I ended up burning it 🙁 I’m turning it into BBQ sauce and I’m going to try again tomorrow.
    After the 4th boil I thought it seemed thin and watery, so I did another boil and it went all burnt. How watery is is meant to be when it goes into the jars? 🙂 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 29, 2018

      Hi Sacha, this is more of a syrupy consistency and not overly thick preserves as you would find on store shelves because they use pectin whereas this uses the natural pectin from the fruit and boiling it down an extra time can help thicken it but because the mixture thickens up with each boil, you need to be especially careful to stir frequently, stirring from the bottom of the pot. Reply

  • Connie
    November 4, 2017

    I just tried tjis recipe and I just love it!! It has to be the best peach jam I have ever tasted… thanks! Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      November 6, 2017

      Excellent! I’m so glad to hear that Connie! Thank YOU for sharing! 🙂 Reply

  • Mary Saatkamp
    October 31, 2017

    Made these preserves and they turned out absolutely wonderful! Just wondering, if this same method will work for pears? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 1, 2017

      Hi Mary, I’m so glad you loved the recipe! 🙂 I honestly haven’t tried this with pears so I’m not sure if it would work the same way. Maybe someone else has tried and can share their insights? Thanks in advance! Reply

  • TATIANA
    October 31, 2017

    Thanks for the great recipe! It reminds me how my mom used to make it but with apricots. We had tons of them at our dacha 🙂 Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      October 31, 2017

      My pleasure Tatiana! I hope you love the recipe! Reply

  • Tatiana
    October 31, 2017

    Hi Natasha! Any suggestions on how to fix over-sweet preserve? My peaches appeared to be on a sweeter side so it tastes too sweet for me now. Is it OK to add lemon juice and/or water to it? Thank you! Tatiana Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 31, 2017

      Hi Tatiana, yes you can add lemon juice to counter the sweetness. Water would be ok but it would make it more loose. Either way, be sure to bring it to a boil after adding lemon juice or water. Reply

  • Debbie
    October 20, 2017

    Can you cook in a slow cooker instead of the slow boils? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 20, 2017

      Hi Debbie, I haven’t tried this in a slow cooker so I can’t say for sure, but even on the low heat setting in a slow cooker, you will eventually have a consistent boiling. I think you could make it work cooking with the lid off so it can reduce down but the slow cooking process as directed in the recipe above (without the slow cooker) will produce a lighter final color to the preserves. If you continually boil it, it will darken in color. Without testing it in the slow cooker, I can’t say for sure how that would work or how long you would need to keep it in the slow cooker to get a thick enough consistency. Reply

  • Karen Nyby
    September 26, 2017

    This recipe is amazing! During one of the ten minute boils, a burn at the bottom occured.. I changed pans but the flavor was a bit off. I didn’t want to throw out the batch I did a search and found that adding ginger could help mask the faint burnt flavor and accentuate the peach, lemon flavor. So it did. The yield was exact. Thanks. Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      September 26, 2017

      My pleasure! I’m glad you love the recipe Karen! Thanks for sharing your tip and great review with other readers! Reply

      • Leslie Callaway
        June 12, 2018

        I love nutmeg on my peach cobblers. I saw above where Karen added ginger to hers. Do you think I could add some nutmeg to the recipe? How much? This sounds sooo good! Thank you. Reply

        • Natasha
          June 12, 2018

          Hi Leslie, I honestly haven’t experimented with that so providing an exact amount is difficult to guess but I think it’s worth a test! Reply

  • marilynne fowler
    September 26, 2017

    did you do a water bath after also?ty
    marilynne Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 26, 2017

      Hi Marilynne, We did not do a water bath but used the oven method instead. If you are more comfortable with the water bath, you can do that instead of putting them in the oven. Reply

  • Suzy
    September 23, 2017

    I have used this recipe for peach preserves each year for the past 4 years or so and it never fails to come out perfectly 🙂 Its definitely my ‘go-to’ recipe.Thank you for sharing! Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      September 25, 2017

      You’re welcome Suzy! I’m glad you enjoy the recipe as much as I do! Reply

  • Linda
    September 15, 2017

    Hi. I am wondering if , instead of jarring, if I can freeze this recipe? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 15, 2017

      Hi Linda, I think freezing would work great in this recipe 🙂 Reply

      • Linda
        September 15, 2017

        Thank you for writing back ; I feel confident it will work now,too. These peaches are beautiful & from my own tree! I already made a peach pie (yummy, says hubby! 🙂 ) and have too many for pie and don’t want to lose them. I am doing them todaythis evening! Reply

  • Catherine
    September 11, 2017

    First Solo canning experience and it turned out perfect! I had super sweet peaches so cut the sugar a bit and cooked over 3 days. Took two jars to work and they were gone within an hour. I’ve had 4 requests for the recipe and planning a peach jam making day this weekend again. SOOO SOOO good! Thank you for sharing. Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      September 11, 2017

      You’re welcome Catherine! I’m glad to hear how much everyone enjoys the recipe! Thanks for sharing your fantastic review! Reply

  • Sonya
    September 11, 2017

    My peaches are sitting in the sugar right now. I’m excited because the fruit came off my own trees! They’re little and tart, but oh so scrumptious. Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      September 11, 2017

      Please let me know what you think of the recipe Sonya! 🙂 Reply

      • Sonya
        September 12, 2017

        They came out awesome. I have four small tubs for the fridge and freezer. I’m thinking they would be amazing over a cinnamon/nutmeg cheesecake! Reply

        • Natasha's Kitchen
          September 12, 2017

          YUM! That sounds delicious! I’m glad you love the recipe! Thanks for sharing Sonya! Reply

  • Sara
    September 9, 2017

    After you simmer for 10 minutes do you move the pot of the burner or can you keep it sitting on that burner if it’s turned off? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 9, 2017

      Hi Sara, it will cool faster if you take it off the burner but either way it will work 🙂 Reply

    • Mary Saatkamp
      September 25, 2017

      Could you seal the jars with paraffin instead of the hot water bath? Reply

      • M. Terry
        February 24, 2019

        Didn’t see an answer to this question, but the short answer is absolutely not. While the seal may look good initially, there is no way to ensure that the seal will remain that way given that most kitchens and pantries have high swings in temperature such that the seal will loosen. Google USDA site to get the longer explanation. BTW county fair submissions, as an example, haven’t allowed paraffin seals in many decades. Reply

  • Pima
    September 8, 2017

    I am getting ready to use this recipe, do you let the pot simmer for 10 minutes every time you bring the jam back to a light boil? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 8, 2017

      Hi Pima, yes that is correct! I hope you enjoy the process and the preserves! 🙂 Be careful on that last boil not to increase the heat too much so you don’t scorch the bottom since it will be thicker at that point. Reply

  • Janel
    September 4, 2017

    Can I use this same method for other fruit like pears? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 5, 2017

      Hi Janel, I haven’t tried this with pears so I’m not sure if it would work the same way. Maybe someone else has tried and can share their insights? Thanks in advance! 🙂 Reply

  • Kitty
    September 2, 2017

    I decided to use a new recipe and went with this one. Although I only had one day off work, I brought to rolling boil throughout the day and love the end result. Perfect! Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      September 2, 2017

      Awesome! I’m glad you love the recipe! Thanks for sharing Kitty! Reply

    • Nancy Essig
      September 2, 2017

      Made it, loved it, excellent recipe. When tasting after the 3rd boil I found it very sweet. Got 5 more pounds of peaches and added them. Not only did it cut the sweet, it gave ma more whole pieces of peach in the final product. Just wonderful. Thank you Reply

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