Farmers Cheese Tvorog Recipe

This is my mom's method of making farmers cheese. Grandma made this cheese in Ukraine. Steps are easy and the results are wonderful!

This is my mom’s method of making farmer’s cheese. Grandma made this cheese in Ukraine. It takes a few days, but the steps are easy and the results are wonderful. Not to mention you will feel like a ninja after you’ve made your own cheese.

You end up with a good amount of farmers cheese and whey. Use organic milk for the best tasting cheese (I buy discounted organic milk that is about to expire just for this!). You can use the cheese to make syrniki  or cheese crepes (nalesniki). Keep the whey (yellowish juice) to make bread.

Substitute water for whey and your bread will always taste better and it will be healthier since whey contains protein that is easy to digest. Are you a cheese ninja? How do you make your farmer’s cheese?

Ingredients for Farmers Cheese:

1 gallon whole milk (get the best quality you can; organic is best), At room temperature.
1/2 gallon Cultured low fat buttermilk, at room temp

What you will need:

4 layers of cheese cloth

Time to make:

3 days

Day 1:

1. Allow the milk gallon and buttermilk to come to room temperature on the counter (about 7 hours).

2. Pour milk and buttermilk into a large soup pot. Cover and place in a warm (100 ˚ F) oven for 1 hour or until mixture feels luke warm.

3. Remove from oven and place in a warm room (I put mine on the floor next to the heating vent in the laundry room)  and let it sit for 24 hours. When it’s done, it should become the consistency of sweetened condensed milk. It pulls when you lift it up with a spoon and should not really stick to your spoon if you insert it vertically and remove it straight out. Do not stir.

Day 2:

4. Place on the stove again over LOW HEAT, UNCOVERED for 40 minutes or until it is WARM. Do Not Stir. You have to heat it up slowly, since high temperatures destroy the nutritious protein.

5. Remove from stove and place in a warm room for another 24 hours (again, next to the heating vent on the floor).

Day 3:

6. Place on the stove over medium/low heat UNCOVERED for 40 minutes or until hot (do not boil). The cheese will separate from the whey. Turn off the heat and let it sit covered for an hour (this helps for the curds to separate as well).

7. Place 4 layers of cheesecloth over a large colander set inside a large bowl.

8. Pour cheese mixture over the cheesecloth.

Here’s the Leftover whey. Refrigerate this stuff and use it for bread. There will be some settling on the bottom

9. You can tie a knot with your cheesecloth and hang it over your kitchen faucet for 8-10 hours OR place a cutting board either in a baking dish or in the sink. Put bag of cheese on top. Cover with another cutting board and place a heavy weight over the top (i.e. dutch oven filled with water or a large jug of water).

10. Remove cheese after 10 hours and make something tasty or refrigerate. You can let it sit longer if you want a drier cheese.

This is my mom's method of making farmers cheese. Grandma made this cheese in Ukraine. Steps are easy and the results are wonderful!

So, how do you make your cheese?

Farmer's Cheese Tvorog Recipe

4.94 from 15 votes
Prep Time: 2 days 8 hours
Cook Time: 2 hours 2 minutes
Total Time: 2 days 10 hours 2 minutes
This is my mom's method of making farmers cheese. Grandma made this cheese in Ukraine. Steps are easy and the results are wonderful!
Buy organic milk that is nearly expired and deeply discounted. I've found that organic milk tastes best.
Author: Natasha of NatashasKitchen.com
Skill Level: Medium
Cost to Make: $5-$6
Servings: 2 1/2 to 3 lbs of cheese and about 3 Liters of whey

Ingredients

  • 1 gal whole milk at room temperature organic is best
  • 1/2 gallon Cultured lowfat buttermilk

What you will need:

  • 4 layers of cheese cloth

Instructions

Time to make: 3 days

Day 1:

  1. Allow the milk gallon and buttermilk to come to room temperature on the counter (about 7 hours).
  2. Pour milk and buttermilk into a large soup pot. Cover and place in a warm (100˚ F) oven for 1 hour or until mixture feels luke warm.
  3. Remove from oven and place in a warm room and let it sit for 24 hours. When it's done, it should become the consistency of sweetened condensed milk. It pulls when you lift it up with a spoon and should not really stick to your spoon if you insert it vertically and remove it straight out. Do not stir.

Day 2:

  1. Place on the stove again over low heat, uncovered for 40 minutes or until it is warm. Do Not Stir. You have to heat it up slowly, since high temperatures destroy the nutritious protein.
  2. Remove from stove and place in a warm room for another 24 hours (again, next to the heating vent on the floor).

Day 3:

  1. Place on the stove over medium/low heat for 40 minutes or until hot (do not boil). The cheese will separate from the whey. Turn off the heat and let it sit covered for an hour (this helps for the curds to separate as well).
  2. Place 4 layers of cheesecloth over a large colander inside a large bowl.
  3. Pour cheese mixture over the cheesecloth. Tie the top of the cheesecloth and hang it over your kitchen faucet for 8-10 hours OR place a cutting board either in a baking dish or in the sink. Put bag of cheese on top. Cover with another cutting board and place a heavy weight over the top.
  4. Remove cheese after 12 hours and make something tasty or refrigerate. You can let it sit longer if you want a drier cheese.

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natashaskitchen

Welcome to my kitchen! I am Natasha, the blogger behind Natasha's Kitchen (since 2009). My husband and I run this blog together and share only our best, family approved recipes with YOU. Thanks for stopping by! We are so happy you're here.

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  • Sandria
    October 14, 2018

    Hi, I make this cheese often, but came across your method while searching. My method was simply putting everything in a pot cold, and allowing three days, then strain. Worked for a while till recently. Had to throw all that beautiful product away. I think I prefer your method. It worked well, and I assume it always will. I don’t like waste. So thank you for instructions and recipe. Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      October 14, 2018

      You’re so welcome, Sandria! I’m so happy our method worked for you! Reply

  • Ruth Ann
    September 23, 2018

    How long can this be stored in the refrigerator? Are there long-term storage methods? Reply

    • Natasha
      September 23, 2018

      Hi Ruth, I haven’t tested it’s limits just because we always consume it within 3-5 days. I would say at least a week and longer if you keep it in an airtight container with as little air as possible (since, as with all cheeses, air will cause it to spoil faster). Reply

  • Olya
    May 14, 2018

    I grew up in a Ukranian home, we always had farmers cheese from Broadway Market in Buffalo, my mother used it for pirohi. I’m going to try this recipe, thank you. Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      May 15, 2018

      My pleasure Olya, I hope you enjoy the recipe! Please let me know what you think. Reply

  • lana
    May 9, 2018

    I make tvorog by mixing milk and buttermilk without any waiting or warming up. The mixture takes 2-3 days to sour. I am wondering how warming up the milk before mixing changes the outcome. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 9, 2018

      Hi Lana, I haven’t tried your method so I can’t compare them but heating does help the curds to form. Reply

  • Vira
    April 29, 2018

    I’m adding sour cream to slightly warm whole milk, and then place it in the warm oven. Next day warm oven again, leave there pot with milk for another day, and, finally, heat it on low until curds start forming. Strain cheese right away, when it is still hot, or do it later, when it is cold.
    Will try buttermilk today.
    Thank you for sharing your method! Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      April 30, 2018

      You’re welcome Vira! Thanks for sharing your tips with other readers! Reply

  • Tim
    April 10, 2018

    Hi Natasha, can you please tell me why you use fat free butermilk and not the 3.25 % buttermilk? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 10, 2018

      Hi Tim, you can use a buttermilk with a higher fat content. It will still work well 🙂 Reply

  • Valentina
    March 28, 2018

    Hi Natasha, I can’t really understand it says it takes 38 total hours to make it, how is that possible if you need to set it for 24 hrs and then again for 24 hrs, and then 10 hours, that’s already more then 50 hours…? Please reply ASAP! Thank you. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 28, 2018

      Hi Valentina, you are correct! It does come to a total of 56 hours or just shy of 3 days. We are switching to a different print-friendly format soon which will have a spot for “waiting” time and will be much more clear on recipes like this. I updated the print-friendly to reflect what is in the instructions above. Reply

  • Anna
    March 17, 2018

    Natasha,
    Hello again. I am doing Tvorog (again). I am confused about this process (again) but I am determined to figure this out. Left Milk and Buttermilk unopened on counter for 7 hours. Then opened both and mixed it in a pot and left for 24 hours. Then heated it up for 40 minutes on med-low heat. At thsi point the mixture looked done. Tvorog was separating from the whey. I still waited 24 hours and am now heating it up again for 40 minutes. Could I have eaten it after the 24 hours and not waited another 24? What are your thoughts? It feels like I am doing something wrong. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 17, 2018

      Hi Anna, it sounds like you are heating at too high of heat the first time – it should just get to a warm temperature (not hot) after it sits for the first 24 hours. Since different stove tops may vary, I changed the instructions there to just say “low” heat rather than medium/low. If you over heat it, the cheese will form and it could have been drained at that point – it won’t hurt to continue with the process until the end though 🙂 Oh and one more thing – warm on the stove uncovered or you trap heat in the pot and it heats up too quickly. Reply

  • Anna
    March 10, 2018

    Natasha,
    Hi. I am here to bother you about TVOROG. I think I bothered you before. I poured Butter Milk and Milk into a pot last nigh. This morning I had no place to put this milk pot so I put it into an oven after I finised baking popovers. Oven was still very warm. Now I look at it (3 PM) and the top has a thick layer and underneath is water. Am I done? Should I wait 24 more hours and then heat it one final time or should I heat it up tonight, wait 24 then heat again. Or did I mess this up. Thanks! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 10, 2018

      Hi Anna, it sounds like you sped the process up by heating on too high of heat for a long period of time. If you see the cheese is well separated from the whey, you can proceed to the end of the recipe and squeeze it with the cheesecloth. Reply

  • Alisha
    March 1, 2018

    I’ve read some recipes that say tvorog can be made in 25 minutes. And they use vinegar instead of buttermilk.
    Do you know anything about this method and if it tastes the same?
    I’ve made the three day recipe once, and it was delicious. But making it in 25 minutes would be nice and fast. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 1, 2018

      Hi Alisha, there are quick methods like you are describing but we always use the long method. Allowing the cheese to form slowly, rather than speeding through the process, makes for a sweeter cheese. The flavor is better when you given more time 🙂 Reply

  • Ann
    February 22, 2018

    I did some tests with milk to buttermilk ratio and found that I only need 1 cup for 1/2 gallon of milk. Increasing quantity of milk does not make a lot more cheese. You’ll get more cheese if you make two 1/2 gallon pots of milk rather than 1 whole gallon at a time. I make mine a little differently. I let it sit on the counter for ~ 48 hrs after adding milk and buttermilk . The longer it stays the more sour it is, instead of bland flavor. Afterwards I cook it on low setting (electric stove setting 2) for 3 hrs. Here too the longer it cooks, the drier the cheese. This also depends on the brand of buttermilk. Some cause the milk to sour into thicker consistency, some thinner. So you can adjust cooking to your preferred result ( spreadable or thicker cheese) by increasing time by 1/2 hour intervals or slight temperatures increase. Afterwards leave the cheese to cool to room temperature ( leave in the pot). After the cooling time elapsed I use a pot with colander ( small steamer pot works great), place cheesecloth into colander and drain the cheese. Once most of the whey drains and is discarded, you can place the pot into the fridge to continue to drain and cool overnight. Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      February 22, 2018

      Great tips Ann! Thanks for sharing them with other readers! Reply

  • Inna
    February 8, 2018

    Natasha if you use the left over whey for any othet recipes other than the bread can you please share them with us? 🙂

    Thanks! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 8, 2018

      Hi Inna, I have only used it in bread. It might be a good liquid for workout smoothies since it’s packed with protein. There are loads of resources online though, like this one for example which will give you some great ideas. Reply

    • Lina
      March 3, 2018

      I use leftover whey for “buttermilk pancakes” and just substitute the buttermilk with it. Sooo delicious!! Make sure you let your batter sit at room temp for 20 min before you fry. Best pancakes ever♡ Reply

      • Natasha's Kitchen
        March 3, 2018

        Great tips Lina, thanks for sharing! Reply

  • Rita
    February 2, 2018

    Natasha,

    For how long can it be stored in refrigerator? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 2, 2018

      Hi Rita, I haven’t tested it’s limits just because we always consume it within 3-5 days. I would say at least a week and longer if you keep it in an airtight container with as little air as possible (since, as with all cheeses, air will cause it to spoil faster). Reply

  • Nicole
    August 24, 2017

    We have a Ukrainian exchange student for the year so this recipe is very important to us. As the first day is ending, it looks like milk with a layer on top but not the consistency of condensed milk. Should we wait another 24 hours or proceed to the next step? We did have room temperature ingredients at the start. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 24, 2017

      Hi Nicole, did you warm it at the temp and time stated in the recipe? How is the texture right now? Does it pull when you lift it up with a spoon and when you put a spoon into it vertically and remove it straight out does it stick to the spoon or slide right off? That is the consistency you should get. If it’s close to the way I described, it should be safe to proceed 🙂 Reply

      • Nicole Alioto
        August 25, 2017

        Yes we warmed it up and then let it rest. Right now, when I stick in a spoon, there is a decent layer of thickness on the surface but under is still liquid. Should I just proceed with the warming of it as listed on day 2? Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          August 25, 2017

          Hi Nicole, you should proceed as listed for day 2 🙂 Reply

  • Mariya
    August 18, 2017

    Help!! I started making this recipe yesterday and, today (Day 2), accidentally let the mixture get to boiling after getting distracted. Who knows how long it’s been simmering?! I basically plan on treating this as if it were Day 3, where you bring the mixture to “hot” lol. Do you think I still have a chance of salvaging this, or is it, “Kaput”? 🙂 Reply

    • Mariya
      August 18, 2017

      *First name! ugh; sorry! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 18, 2017

      Hi Mariya, I think you could treat it like it was day 2 unless it was really strongly boiling and changed color. That happened to us once after forgetting about it (we have a second stove top in the garage so it’s easy to forget!), and it changed to an orangy color and was kaput at that point. If it looks white and separates well from the whey, it is still salvageable and useable. Reply

      • Mariya
        August 20, 2017

        It definitely separated and turned out pretty well for the first try! Thank you for sharing this and I will certainly try it again, and this time with the leftover whey instead of butttermilk. I hope that it works! Thank you again. 🙂 Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          August 20, 2017

          Hi Mariya, I’m so glad to hear that! I have never tried it with leftover whey – not sure if that will have the correct properties to help form the cheese though. Have you seen anyone else try with success? I just haven’t seen it before. Reply

          • Olga
            August 20, 2017

            I have tried it on someone else’s advise, and I used the outside method since I live in AZ too. It works! I saved 1/2 gal of whey in the buttermilk container and keep reusing it! (Sort of)

          • Mariya
            August 25, 2017

            It worked with the whey, like Olga said! I thought it wouldn’t, since it was coming out much more liquid-y (but still separated), but that’s only because I’d messed it up the first time and this was a big contrast to the drier curds from that batch. Since I thought the curds were too loose, I ended up throwing away the whey in frustration, but then it strained great overnight. I will start again with the buttermilk, but then will keep on re-using the whey from the subsequent batches. 🙂 Same 2-to-1 milk-to-whey ratio. 🙂

          • Natasha
            natashaskitchen
            August 26, 2017

            Thank you for sharing!!

  • July 26, 2017

    Hi Natasha,

    My way of making tvorog is very simple because I’m fortunate to live in Arizona)) With our summer heat I just place my pot with the milk on the patio for 2 days! (Of course, it is properly sealed with the plastic wrap). When I take it out, I just need to use a simple mesh strainer (the thickness of cheese is good enough for not using a cheese cloth). If I want my tvorog to be more tender I only have it outside for 1 day (24 hrs), and I do 72 hrs if I want it to be more sour and hard. Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      July 26, 2017

      Oh wow! That’s a great benefit of living in extreme heat! Thanks for sharing your tips/suggestions with other readers! Reply

      • Olga
        July 30, 2017

        Masha, do you mix the milk with the buttermilk or just leave the milk itself outside without it? I have found before that “American” milk spoils and smells bad rather than becomes the way it used to be when we were little (the whey separating from the rest), and I don’t know if its because it was homogenized? Any thoughts? Thank you! Reply

        • July 31, 2017

          Olga, yes, for the very first batch I do use buttermilk, but when I already have the milk whey separated from tvorog, I use some of this whey to run a new batch instead of buttermilk. And yes, I agree, “American” milk do smells and tastes different from “Russian” milk (and not only when it spoils). I’m not sure if it is because it was homogenized or if it’s because the cows were fed differently… Reply

    • Olga
      July 30, 2017

      wow, i live in AZ too! I need to try this since its summer now Reply

  • Kristina
    July 12, 2017

    Hey Natasha! I am excited to try out this recipe, but before I do, you mention using the leftover whey for bread. Do you have a recipe for this type of bread? Just curious because I wouldn’t want to waste anything 🙂 Thank you in advance! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 12, 2017

      You can use it in my no knead or my Dutch oven bread. You simply replace the water with the whey and it works great! You can use whey in many different bread recipes replacing water equally. Reply

      • Kristina
        July 12, 2017

        Thank you Natasha! Really appreciate you getting back to me so quickly! Excited to try both recipes out! Thanks again!! Reply

        • Natasha's Kitchen
          July 13, 2017

          My pleasure Kristina! Reply

  • Marilyn
    March 25, 2017

    If it is difficult to find a warm spot to let the cheese sit, would placing it in the oven with the oven light left on work? I used this method to make yogurt and it worked well.
    I made your blueberry cake with the bluberries in the centre and on top. It was wonderful–nice and moist. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 25, 2017

      Hi Marilyn, yes that would work fine to leave it in the oven with the light on. I’m so glad you enjoyed the blueberry cake! It’s quickly become one of the most popular desserts on my blog 🙂 Reply

  • Lori FM
    February 23, 2017

    Hi, Natasha, Thank you so much for posting your clear directions for farmer’s cheese; the photos are very helpful!

    A question – I have noticed that your recipe differs from the many others I have seen online by your Step 2, where after the milk has cultured, you warm it again and leave it for an Additional 24 hours. If you have any insight as to the difference the extra day makes, I would appreciate learning about it. Thanks very much!!! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 24, 2017

      Hi Lori, allowing the cheese to form slowly, rather than speeding through the process, makes for a sweeter cheese. The flavor is better when you given more time 🙂 Reply

  • Ksenia
    January 10, 2017

    Hi Natasha,
    I am in the process of making the tvorog using organic milk and kefir (I didn’t have buttermilk). I have done the 1st heating in the oven and it has sat for almost 24 hours in a warm room. It is already sepating and looks nothing like your picture or sweetened condensed milk. Should I continue? Do you have any thoughts on what I did wrong? Thanks! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 10, 2017

      Were your two ingredients at room temperature? If not, you may just need to let it sit a little longer until it reaches the right consistency. It won’t hurt to let it rest longer until it reaches the consistency I described in the recipe. Reply

      • Ksenia
        January 11, 2017

        Thank you for responding! Yes, I did have the 2 ingredients at room temperature. I didn’t stir them together when I first poured them into the pot though. Should I have? Perhaps that is where I went wrong? Also, I should have waited for your response before I did anything, but I was afraid that the tvorog would go bad, so I went ahead and heated it for 40 minutes last night. It’s resting again now, but still looks about the same. Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          January 11, 2017

          It should still be ok to continue, even if you left the cheese an extra day, it would still be fine :). Reply

  • Wendy
    January 7, 2017

    Amazon sells Nut Milk bags for making almond milk etc. They are a very fine mesh fabric that works much better than muslin, cheese cloth, pillowcases or even jelly bags used for home canning. Nut Milk bags are durable, don’t stain and are really easy to clean. I don’t work for the company, I just wanted to share a really good product. Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      January 7, 2017

      Good to know Wendy, thank you for sharing! Reply

  • biljana
    January 3, 2017

    What else can i use instead of buttermilk because in Macedonia we don’t have that product? Reply

  • karolina
    November 23, 2016

    hi, I was wondering which one of the tvorag do you like better, I do see you have 2 . which one is your favorite? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 23, 2016

      Hi Karolina, they are equally good and I make whichever one I have ingredients for when I need it. The one with buttermilk is less expensive to make which is always nice 🙂 Reply

      • karolina
        November 29, 2016

        I have buttermilk that is 3.5 milkfat…will it work? I’m in a process of making it now Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          November 29, 2016

          Hi Karolina, that should work fine 🙂 Reply

          • karolina
            December 2, 2016

            it turned out!! thanks so much for the recipe 😘

          • Natasha
            natashaskitchen
            December 2, 2016

            Awesome!! I’m so happy to hear that 🙂

  • Lydia
    October 18, 2016

    Hi Natasha, I made this cheese and now I would like to add it to my crepes. How would I go about sweeting the cheese. My mother used to add one egg I belive, some vanilla extract and sugur. But I don’t know the exact recipe, I wouldnt want to mess it up. Please help. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 18, 2016

      Hi Lydia, yes you would add egg, sugar and vanilla to make it work for crepes :). I don’t have an exact recipe written down for this because I usually make my crepes with cottage cheese and cream cheese. I would suggest adding sugar to taste followed by a splash of vanilla and finally the egg so you don’t have to taste it once the egg is in. Reply

    • Anton
      November 2, 2016

      I use Eagle brand sweetened condensed milk and mix it with the cheese, when serving. Taste great with some berries in it. Yum! Reply

      • Natasha
        natashaskitchen
        November 3, 2016

        Yum! Thanks for sharing! 🙂 Reply

  • Erica
    October 9, 2016

    Hi Natasha, should the milk be expired for this? Or can it be expired to make it? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 10, 2016

      Hi Erica, I wouldn’t risk using expired milk for food safety reasons, especially if it has an off odor or consistency to it before you start. Reply

  • Oksana
    August 22, 2016

    Natasha, thanks s lot for such a good tvorog receipe. My tvorog came out too dry (not moist as you may buy at farmer’s markets back to Ukraine or Russia). Have I done something wrong? Also, you mentioned to heat on day 3 over medium heat. I tried to keep that but it almodt bolied, so I reduced temp. Thanks. Oksana Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 22, 2016

      Hi Oksana, you do have to watch it on the third heating and turn it off before it boils. It’s ready when the curd separates from the whey as shown in the photo. I updated that step to clarify that. Part of why it may be dry is you may have squeezed out too much moisture (i.e. having too heavy of a press for too long). I sure hope that helps for next time! 🙂 Reply

  • Sonia Collins
    August 15, 2016

    So excited I found this! When I was a kid, we made tvorog allll the time, but since prices have gone up for milk my family had to stop.

    Now that I’m married I’m trying to re-create recipes I grew up with. Can’t wait to make this!

    We used to mix garlic, dill, and salt in with the tvorog and use it as a spread on bread. SO delicious! And when toasted it melts divinely 🙂 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 15, 2016

      I just love how food can bring back some great memories from the childhood 😄. I never used tvorog as a spread before but I’m curious now. Reply

  • Natasha
    August 12, 2016

    Hi Natasha.
    How do you use whey for making bread?
    Thank you. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 12, 2016

      You just use whey instead of water. I replace it in equal amounts. So if a recipe calls for 2 cups water, I use 2 cups whey instead.  Reply

  • Alona
    August 9, 2016

    Hey Natasha thank you for the tvorog instructions mine turned out wonderful. I just have a question. The whey liquid you Said we can use it for bread, does that mean when making bread instead of water you can use that stuff? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 9, 2016

      Yes, just use the whey instead of water in equal parts. 🙂 Reply

  • Svetlana Kon
    June 2, 2016

    I make tvorog exactly the same way except it takes me only 2 days (or 1 night and 1 day). Pour milk and buttermilk in a pot (I use the one from my slow cooker) and leave it overnight at room temperature. When the consistency changes next morning I turn the slow cooker on for 1 hour. After pour it on cheese cloth and the rest is the same. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      June 2, 2016

      Svetlana, thank you for sharing your version with us 😀. Reply

  • Ellie
    May 8, 2016

    Hi Natasha,

    Can I use kefir instead of buttermilk? I make my own kefir (from organic non-homogenized milk and kefir grains) and I know it subs for buttermilk in a lot of recipes so I was wondering if it would be good here, especially because I know there are some tvorog recipes that use sour cream instead of buttermilk to culture the milk. If so, would it still be the same amount of kefir? Thanks! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 8, 2016

      Hi Ellie, I haven’t tried it with kefir but I think it would work well with kefir. It might taste even better than buttermilk! I’ve also made this with Greek yogurt and sour cream with great results. Reply

  • Amber
    May 1, 2016

    Our family loves farmers cheese, I’m just wondering how long will this typically keep in the fridge? Thanks from your Canadian-Ukranian fans. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 1, 2016

      Hi Amber, I haven’t tested it’s limits just because we always consume it within 3-5 days. I would say at least a week and longer if you keep it in an airtight container with as little air as possible (since, as with all cheeses, air will cause it to spoil faster). Reply

  • April 26, 2016

    Will try your method next time, I got a recipe from a lady who makes cottage cheese (tvorog) for over 30-40 years now. Her method is much simpler. You just have to mix 1 gallon organic (or not) whole milk with 1 quart whole buttermilk and 2 tablespoonful sour cream. Place it inside the oven or the warmest place in your house for 2 days. On the 2nd day just give it a gentle stir – i guess to get the air/bubbles out. On the 3rd day turn on the oven to 350C and warm your cheese for 30 minutes. Turn off the oven and let the cheese sit in the oven for another 10-20 minutes so you wont drain a very hot cheese. Drain, hang and let it drip overnight. I have a small white pillow case for this. It drains really well, much easier to tie (gives you a clearer whey) then hang on the kitchen cabinet knob. I make it once a week, use it for everthing – salads, crepe filling, pancake topping (with sour cream and jam) cottage cheesecake and use it to make hard n soft cheese. Nothing beats the real thing! 🙂 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 26, 2016

      Thank you for sharing! I love the idea of using a clean pillow case. I’ve used a fine mesh laundry bag that zips (one that I only use for food ofcourse ;)) and it worked wonderfully well 🙂 Reply

  • Dave
    April 18, 2016

    Hello Natasha, in the first step on day 2 you use the term “warm”, and in the first step on day 3 you use the term “hot”. Could you be more specific about these temperatures? I want to use my oven for these steps rather than my gas stove top to get even heat and to avoid scorching the bottom of the culture, and I’m concerned that if I don’t get it hot enough the recipe won’t work, and if I get it too hot, I’ll kill the milk cultures and again it won’t work. I’m sure with a little experience I’ll be able to wing it, but this will be my first try at it.
    Thanks! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 18, 2016

      Hi Dave, just warm is about 90 degrees but not more than 100 degrees F. Hot is when it’s too hot to touch – you’ll see steam start to rise but you don’t want it to boil. It needs to be hot for the cheese to separate from the whey and you will see it separate as in the photo where you can see the border of whey around the outer edges of the cheese. Reply

      • Dave
        April 19, 2016

        Thank you Natasha – that’s what I needed to know. I finished it this afternoon and, according to my wife Vika who’s from Ukraine, it turned out great. Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          April 19, 2016

          That’s wonderful! I’m so happy to hear that 🙂 Thanks for sharing your great review! 🙂 Reply

  • Inna
    April 15, 2016

    Hi Natasha, can I offer another tip here and save you an extra 24 hrs? After your milk and buttermilk gets thick after the first 24 hrs I usually use the oven method instead of cook top. I take a spoon and cut the curd by making a Plus sign all the way down the pot carefully with out disturbing the mixture.. Then I place it in a 250F oven for 2.5 hrs with no lid on. Done. Let cool then proceed as usual with the draining process. May I recommend a muslin cloth instead of a cheese cloth also. I also use about 2 c worth of buttermilk or sour cream, no need to use as much as half a gallon. Good luck. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 16, 2016

      Thanks for sharing your method! I was surprised that the cheese cloth I ordered was almost like muslin – it was so easy to work with. My former cheese cloth was cheap and needed 4 layers to do the job and even that wasn’t amazing but this one is awesome with just 2 layers! Reply

  • Rita
    April 8, 2016

    Have you tried using raw milk? Do you think it’s safe to eat for children?
    Thanks! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 8, 2016

      From what I understand, raw milk is not recommended for children for food safety reasons. My mom used raw milk when she made this cheese in Ukraine and she said that it sours quickly and you don’t even need any buttermilk if using raw milk. Reply

    • Adrienne
      April 28, 2016

      my all family have been using raw milk for 2 years for absolutely everything . my nephew now 4 so he grow up on raw milk . more natural nutrition . I make my own yogurt from raw milk and it is amazing !!! if you drank and you were fine from that raw milk it is very good for your kids !!! we searched for raw milk for 12 years since we came to US . finally thank God we founded . I thought my all family was lactose intolerant but no we were just BS intolerant !!! Reply

      • Natasha
        natashaskitchen
        April 28, 2016

        That’s so interesting and thank you for sharing! Did your family have digestive issues with regular store-bought milk which cleared up with raw milk? Reply

  • Sean
    March 16, 2016

    Hi Natasha,

    Does it matter if the organic whole milk is homogenized or not?

    Thanks! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 16, 2016

      Hi Sean, I asked my Mom and she said non-homogenized will work even better and will turn sour even faster for the cheese. She also said if you use fresh non-homogenized milk, you don’t need the buttermilk and it will turn sour in 1 day. Let me know how it goes! 🙂 Reply

  • Yulia
    February 27, 2016

    Hi, Natasha, could you help me out here? I used to make tvorog by simply souring the milk and heating it then. Got really curious about your method and decided to try. Got to the point of heating it up after first 24 hours( after the oven step). It smells pretty sour and is very thick and bubbly. Thinking about cooking it right now, because I would not want it to be very sour the next day. What would you recommend? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 27, 2016

      Yulia, I haven’t tried that so can’t really recommend it before testing it myself. Cooking it over several days produces a less sour cheese than the quick cooking methods I’ve seen online. I think the flavor is better when you cook it over several days. Reply

  • Sarah
    December 9, 2015

    Hi! I am hoping you can help me with a question/problem I encountered mid-way through making this cheese…

    Some background: I started making the cheese using another recipe that said to put the milk in a warm place until it becomes thick, which could take up to 2 days. After 2 days, my milk was not thick, so I found your recipe and tried warming it up on the stove. I waited another 24 hours, then dipped in a spoon, but there was just a thick, cream-like layer on top with a runny liquid under. I should note that I had stirred the milk a couple of times for those 2 days before I read in your recipe that I shouldn’t have done this! It may have caused the issue… Maybe also that I just do not have any really warm places in my kitchen (I live in MA and it’s already winter up here).

    My question: Do you think I should wait longer and hope that it will thicken? OR just go for it and heat it up to make the cheese and hope for the best? I’m nervous that if I keep waiting, the milk will turn too sour.

    Thanks in advance for your help! I love your blog – my husband is Ukrainian and I lived in Ukraine for a couple years, so it’s wonderful to see others sharing the amazing food from this country/region of the world. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 9, 2015

      Hmmm that is a very good question! My best guess would be to just heat it up and make the cheese. Let me know how it turns out! 🙂 Reply

    • January 20, 2016

      When you’re only starting to make tvorog it’s always a good idea to sour a little bit of milk and to see how it will turn, then to do a whole gallon or even two. Plus, even if you were doing tvorog for years, just switch to another brand of buttermilk and everything can go wrong. Though, for my opinion to use multi-strain probiotic is far more superior way to sour milk for tvorog. Reply

  • Anna
    November 1, 2015

    Natasha!
    Thank you very much for answering all of my questions!!! This is an awesome recipe. It totally worked. I only used a 1/2 gallon of milk because I have ruined so much expensive organic milk in the past I did not want to risk it. Now I am sorry that I did not use a gallon of milk. I would have had more cheese. This farmer’s cheese is delicious! I don’t like farmer’s cheese at all. I was trying to make it for my kid and I cannot stop eating it. It tastes amazing. Thank you and please thank your mom for me:-) Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 2, 2015

      You are very welcome Anna, awesome job! I will pass it on to my mom 😀 . Reply

  • Anna
    October 31, 2015

    Hi Natasha,
    I have one more. You can just email me. You do not have to post all these. All the Russian grandmothers I know just leave the milk buttermilk combo on the counter for about 48 hours and then heat it up on low on the stove. Then they strain it. Is there a reason why you do heat the milk and buttermilk 3 times? Do you know? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 1, 2015

      Anna, using the slower process creates a sweeter cheese. Thank you for sharing that 🙂 . Reply

  • Anna
    October 31, 2015

    Natasha,
    Thank you very much for all of your replies to my post. I have another questions. How come the first step is to place in 100 F oven and the next two is to heat up on the stove. Is there a difference? I am just curious. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 31, 2015

      I had to call my mom to confirm this, but it is because you don’t want to overheat the mixture to begin with. You don’t want it hot at this point, just warm. You can do it on the stove but over very low heat and be sure not to boil. Reply

  • Anna
    October 27, 2015

    Natasha,
    Do I leave the milk and buttermilk on the counter for 7 hours opened or unopened. This may seem like a silly question but I am thinking if I leave it unopened it may blow up? Also does the composition of the container affect the outcome of the product in any way? I was told by someone not to use metal. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 27, 2015

      7 hours is not long enough for any explosions :). I use a stainless steel pot. They may have been referring to aluminum. I haven’t tested it in aluminum but after reading your comment, I probably wouldn’t. 🙂 Reply

  • Jakub Przedzienkowski
    October 11, 2015

    My ingred.
    1 gal pasteurized whole milk (do not use ultrapasteurized milk)
    1/2 gal buttermilk
    2 tablespoon white vinegar
    1 1/2 teaspoons salt or to taste
    In a heavy-bottomed pot, over low heat, slowly heat up the milk, stirring often, until it is just about to simmer (180 degrees).
    Stir buttermilk into heated milk. Then stir in the vinegar.
    Turn off the heat and, very slowly, stir until the milk begins to separate into curds (solids) and whey (liquid). Leave undisturbed for 10 minutes. Meanwhile, wet the butter muslin or two layers of cheesecloth that is large enough to line a colander and hang over the sides. Place the muslin-lined colander over a bowl to catch any whey.
    After the milk-buttermilk-vinegar mixture has sat undisturbed for 10 minutes, use a skimmer or slotted spoon to ladle the curds into the cheesecloth. Allow the curds to drain for 10 minutes.
    Gather up the edges of the cheesecloth to form a bundle in order to drain as much whey as possible from the farmer’s cheese.
    Use a length of butcher’s twine to tie the cheesecloth containing the curds into a neat bundle, pressing on the cheesecloth a bit to help the whey drain off.
    Tie the string to a wooden spoon or dowel, and hang the cheese curds over a pot or container to collect any remaining whey and continue draining for 30 minutes.
    After draining, remove the cheese from the cheesecloth, and transfer it to a nonmetallic bowl or container. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 11, 2015

      Thank you so much for sharing your recipe and method! 🙂 Reply

    • Terri
      January 14, 2016

      At which point do we add the salt? Reply

  • Nata
    October 8, 2015

    Hi Natasha,

    I was born in Ukraine, last 20 years am in NZ.
    My recipe is very similar to yours, but more simple in use.
    4l of any milk( high % of fat is better)
    1/2 pack of butter milk.
    All mix, does not matter temperature of these products. Leave in kitchen somewhere (table/cabinet) for 1 or 2 days till spoon will stay in (depends which temperature in kitchen). After put in stone, set up 180 degree, when temperature gets 180 degree keep more in stone for 30-35 min after switch off stone and leave pot in stone till it will be not hot (about 12 hours) Usually I do that at the evening, switch off and go to sleep. At the morning you can do your steps 3&4 from day3.
    Thanks, Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 9, 2015

      Hi! 🙂 Thank you so much for sharing your method with me :). I will have to try it! Reply

  • Angie
    September 20, 2015

    Where do you find reduced price almost expired organic milk? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 20, 2015

      I always take a look every time I’m at my local Fred Meyer. That’s the only place I have found it. Reply

  • Anna
    July 15, 2015

    Hello Natasha,
    Thank you for this recipe. I have been planning to do this for a while but was not sure 100% how this is done until I found your site. I have two questions. One is how come the milk and buttermilk have to sit on the counter for 7 hours separately before being combined? The second one is I saw a recipe where someone just left the milk buttermilk combination on the counter for 5-7 days and made tvorog. Is this a valid recipe? Everyone I ask have said that in 5-7 days everything will spoil. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 15, 2015

      I’m not sure about 5-7 days, but this recipe takes 3 days and it is the way we have always done it in my family. It does not spoil. There are quicker methods of making it but the cheese doesn’t turn out the same – the flavor isn’t as good as this 3 day method. Reply

  • Kim
    June 7, 2015

    On day 3 when you hear on stovetop for 40 mins, should you stir? This is when the whey is supposed to separate out. I know not to stir on other warnings but wasn’t sure about this final one. Thanks. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      June 7, 2015

      There is no need to stir; it will separate on its own 🙂 Reply

  • valentina (petrenko) mashaw
    April 4, 2015

    Exited to try this! Papa from Ukraine, mama from Russia, husband, Polish. Grew up with this wonderful comfort food.
    Haven’t been able to duplicate this dish from my childhood. Thanks for sharing… Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 4, 2015

      Valentina you have quite a family tree :). You are welcome and I hope you’ll like it. Reply

  • Vika
    March 24, 2015

    Natasha,
    Love your website! My tvorog is hanging out, literally, in the cheese cloth as we speak. So excited to try! You mentioned I can use the whey for bread. Do you have a particular recipe or just use it in place of water?
    Thank you and congratulations on your little blessing! Vika Reply

  • Alexandra
    February 10, 2015

    Hello, just a couple of questions. I want to add salt to this recipe, when do you suggest that I add it in? In the beginning when its all still liquid? Also, if I were to half this recipe, would it effect the results? If I don’t half the recipe, am I able to freeze the remaining cheese? Thanks! I’m excited to try making homemade varenyky for the first time, I hope to impress my un-impressible grandfather! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 10, 2015

      We’ve never added salt because it isn’t really necessary. You can add the salt when it is all still liquid. We haven’t tried freezing the cheese so I’m not sure. I think it would be ok. Yes, you can halve the recipe :). Reply

  • alyona
    January 27, 2015

    Hi, I’m trying to make tvorog, but don’t have cheese cloth, do you know what store sells them? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 27, 2015

      I’ve purchased it at Winco before. You can also buy it online. You know what I use now? A clean laundry bag – like what you would use for lingerie. it lets liquid pass through but keeps all the cheese in even better than cheesecloth, plus it’s re-useable! Ofcourse I can’t use it for laundry though 😉 Reply

  • Tee
    June 4, 2014

    OMG this looks so amazing Natasha! I will be trying this…leaving it hanging (in the summer especially) all those hours outside refrigeration is ok? It won’t spoil?

    I hope you respond. Thank you for posting!:-) Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      June 4, 2014

      Yes it is perfectly ok as long as you are leaving it at room temp (about 75˚F or cooler). If your house is too warm, you could get creative and put it in the fridge over a wire rack set in a rimmed baking dish with a press over the top (that’s the best I could come up with) ;). Reply

      • Irena
        August 6, 2014

        You can use fresh (better organic) yogurt to sour the milk. It has cultures other then in buttermilk. Do not overheat the mix- it should not go over 60C. Cool and drain. Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          August 7, 2014

          That’s great to know. Thank you for sharing! 🙂 Reply

  • Tina
    May 1, 2014

    Hi there! Part of my family if from Russia and don’t use buttermilk. They use this little live bacteria. It looks sort of like kefir grains, but smaller. It stores the same, but is a different organism. Does anyone know the name of it? I have searched like crazy for it but am having no luck. Also, the elderly just drink the liquid that is drained and their health is amazing! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 2, 2014

      I don’t know where you would find it, but search kefir culture starter and you should get some good results on google. I’m not sure if health food stores carry it? Reply

    • Sergej
      January 10, 2015

      CulturesForHealth.com
      has a cultured buttermilk starter for making your own buttermilk. They have 2 types; one of their cultures produces a reusable culture so that you use your previous batch for creating a new on. Reply

      • Natasha
        natashaskitchen
        January 10, 2015

        Thanks so much for sharing! My Mom makes her own from a culture. It’s wonderful stuff! 🙂 Reply

  • Iryna
    November 17, 2013

    This is a great recipe for farmer’s cheese. Excellent! I use pretty much the same recipe,however I add the cup of plain yogurt( fage)with live bacteria (acidophilus), this makes the process faster, I have delicious farmer cheese as a result! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 17, 2013

      I will have to give it a try with Greek yogurt. Thank you for sharing! Reply

  • Vika
    October 29, 2013

    How long can farmers cheese sit in the fridge? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 29, 2013

      I’ve had it in there at least a week and it was great. I imagine up to 2 weeks. But we’ve always eaten it sooner! 🙂 Reply

  • MarinA
    October 27, 2013

    Can you buy farmers cheese or is it homemade only? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 27, 2013

      Yes, you can buy it at grocery stores, but it’s less expensive to make your own 😉 Reply

  • Olya
    October 13, 2013

    Also, you can make several yummy spreads with the farmers cheese if you want to preserve the good bacteria in it that actual baking kinda destroys Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 13, 2013

      Oh please share your spreads too! I can’t wait to try the other recipe you shared. Sounds delicious! Reply

  • Olya
    October 13, 2013

    This recipe is like a chocolate & farmers cheese lovers dream! 🙂
    Mix:
    2.5 Cups Flour
    2 TBSP Cocoa
    1 TBSP Baking Soda

    ..& add to already mixed:
    250g Butter
    1 Egg Yolk
    3 TBSP Milk

    Mash dough with hand till fully combined.
    Divide into 2 equal balls.
    Stick in freezer for an hour.
    Before hr is up…

    Mix together with hand, or on very low speed:
    1.5-2LB Farmers Cheese (I usually to 2lb)
    1.5 Cups Sugar
    4 Eggs + the 1 leftover Egg white
    1-2 TBSP Starch

    In a 13×9, or 15×10 size lined & sprayed pan:
    Grate one ball of dough for the bottom layer
    Spread cheese layer for middle.
    Grate second ball of dough for top layer.
    Bake at 375 for 30 min.(I used a 13×9 pan)
    When you take out the cake the middle will still be jiggly.
    Let it cool COMPLETELY

    For the top Chocolate Glaze Combine & melt till one consistency:
    1 Stick Butter
    1Cup Sugar
    1TBSP Cocoa
    4TBSP water

    Pour over cooled cake & let it set & cool completely. Enjoy! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 13, 2013

      I’ve printed out your instructions. Thank you so much for sharing! you are awesome!! Reply

  • Olya
    October 13, 2013

    For those that are wondering if you can make the cheese with 2% milk, you can. My mother in law always does.
    The reason why you should use whole milk is bc it was least processed/tampered with… When they process the milk they first take out all the fat & then for skim they don’t put much back in, for 1% put back more & so on for 2% a little more… Food wasn’t meant to be eaten this way & you need fat to absorb many vitamins. Stick to foods that are closest to their natural state. You don’t get fat from eating whole milk.
    Oh, & I have a great great recipe I can share to make with the Farmers cheese!!!! I do a separate post with it… Reply

  • Olya
    October 11, 2013

    The vinegar method is just a fast way. But then it’s not as nutritious. The whole point is to let it stand longer so the good bacterias grow.
    I make mine in a little over 24 hrs. You don’t have to have it stand for another 24 hrs after you put it on the heat. Save & refrigerate like 2 cups of the chunky milk, in a jar, before you boil it, & you can use that (“nachunka”) for your next time you make the cheese instead of the buttermilk.
    All I do is pour a gallon of organic milk in a pot, add the 2 cups of “razhenka” or chunky milk from the last time. Let it stand on the stove for 24 hrs. Save 2 cups of that for next time. Heat it on low heat till it separates. Then strain it & you’re done! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 11, 2013

      That’s good to know! I’ve never tried making my own “buttermilk” 🙂 Thanks Olya! P.S. I now have a large batch of farmers cheese and am looking for something new to try with it. Any ideas? 🙂 Reply

  • liliya b
    October 10, 2013

    I always make my own cheese , I cook so much wonderful things from it
    Nalistniki, pirogi, vareniki, syrniki and my boys favorite ponchiki . When you
    Have cheese in your fridge you have endless possibilities to
    That perfect meal and deserts ! I have a base (zakvaska) that my friend broth from
    Russia . And my tvorog always turns out great. And here is a trick
    For whey use it as a rinse for your hair it’s the best treatment you can offer for your hairand also your body . try it you’ll love the way ot makes your hair and face look younger anda alife. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 11, 2013

      Hmmm. Interesting! Do you wash it out afterwards with shampoo and facewash or even water or is the whey the final rinse? Reply

  • Marina
    June 3, 2013

    This is the colander I use to drain the cottage cheese
    http://www.ikea.com/us/en/catalog/products/20027536/#
    it’s so versicle..I use it to drain pasta to wash/drain veggies and fruits..love it! It’s only $6.99 in Ikea, my favorite gadget in the kitchen;) Reply

  • Marina
    June 3, 2013

    This is my version that I have been making for years and I love it..I make lots of thing with it..make it about every 2 weeks..
    2 gallons of whole milk
    1 qt of butter milk (I like to use traders joes one)
    pour into big pot (I don’t wait for milk to come to room temperature)
    first I pour butter milk and then milk and I do have a little milk left over because my pot doesn’t fit it all, cover with lid and leave it on the counter or stove top for about 48hrs until it turns into yogurt consistency (it will become jiggly) then I take off the lid and place in the preheated oven at 250 degrees for 3 hrs and leave it until it cools..pour it into a small hole colander ( I have one from Ikea (stainless steel) and I love it, I don’t loose any curdles and it washes well) so after I transfer all he cottage cheese into the colander I leave it on the pot to drain for an hour and its ready…
    don’t have to put into a cheese cloth or put pressure on it..all the liquid drains well, then I transfer to a storage container and mash it with a potato masher to separate the curdles..and it’s perfect every time:) Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      June 3, 2013

      That sounds pretty straightforward. I’ll have to try your method. Thank you!! Reply

    • Marina
      June 3, 2013

      Sorry that was supposed to be 2 gallons of whole milk not 4..oops Reply

      • Natasha
        natashaskitchen
        June 3, 2013

        Oh, thanks Marina! 🙂 Reply

  • Sonya Elmore
    March 5, 2013

    Natasha,
    I finally finished making tvorog tonight and it’s a bit sour, is it supposed to be? Also, I let it boil both times that it was on the stove (I didn’t realize it was boiling), and it seems that the cheese separated already the first time it was on the stove, so I definitely messed this up but I still think it’s pretty good.

    Thank you so much for all the recipes! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 5, 2013

      It is supposed to taste a little sour, but in a good way, not like a spoiled sour 🙂 Reply

  • Olga
    February 5, 2013

    Hello!

    will 2%milk work well also? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 5, 2013

      I think you really need the fat from whole milk for it to work well. Reply

      • I make mine only with 2% to reduce the calories and it works OK 🙂 but the fattier the milk, the better it tastes 🙂 Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          April 28, 2013

          That’s great to know! Thank you! Reply

        • Marina
          June 3, 2013

          I did both whole milk and 2%, and whole milk does taste better and I think it makes more cottage cheese, because there is more fat.. Reply

          • Natasha
            natashaskitchen
            June 3, 2013

            Thanks for sharing! 🙂

  • Maya
    January 6, 2013

    Natasha, vy molochina. Ya ochen’ rada chto nashla vashu stranichku. Kak vy ostaetes takoy krasivoy i stoynoy pole vseh etix vkusnostey-a? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 6, 2013

      Thanks Maya 🙂 Took me a little while to read your comment, but it was very sweet 🙂 I think I burn a lot of calories at work 🙂 Reply

  • Julia
    December 28, 2012

    Hi! My oven doesn’t go to 100 degrees, should I just cut the time in half? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 28, 2012

      My starts at 170°, so just heat the oven to your lowest setting, turn it off and don’t change the time duration. Hope this helps. Reply

  • Me
    December 20, 2012

    I tried making tvorog by following this recipe and for some reason or another the tvorog has a bitter taste to it. Now I wonder whether I can still use it for baking or anything else. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 20, 2012

      I asked my mom about this, its her recipe, and she doesn’t have a good answer. Every time we made it, haven’t had a bitter taste. The only time she had that happen, was back in Ukraine when old milk was used. It also might be that something was added to the milk before it end up in the store. Cheese is not good to be used in the recipe when its bitter. Cheese should be a little sour not bitter. I’m sorry that it did not turn out. Was milk expired? Reply

      • Actually while reading the recipe, I did think that with milk sitting out for this long (couple days), this might happen, but I guess most of the people didn’t have a problem, so I guess it depends.
        The bitterness comes from milk sitting in a warm room for two long. I found that if I don’t make my tvorog within 24 hours (at most), it will turn into bitter cheese.
        To avoid this, heat the milk, add buttermilk, let sit for 24 hours or until it thickens (sometimes it only needs 12-16 hours), heat it (to warm temp), let cool and drain through a cheesecloth, or a paper towel lined strainer. There really is no reason to leave it for another 24 hours after you heat it.
        May be Natasha knows why it needs to stay at room temp for another 24 hours? Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          April 29, 2013

          That’s interesting! My mom told me that it has more bitterness if it’s rushed. This recipe actually didn’t have any bitterness to it. A slight sourness, but nothing more than what is normal for this kind of cheese. 🙂 Reply

        • Jamie
          November 27, 2013

          Great recipe! Since we’re working with live bacteria, one really needs to just watch the process and adjust. In the Soviet Union, we left unpasteurized milk out overnight, and it curdled thanks to bacteria in the milk and air at around 70 F. Then we heated it the next morning to separate the curds and whey and strained/pressed it as soon as it was cool. In this country, I have occasionally had trouble with bitter results from keeping the milk too warm.

          My recommendation would be high-quality organic buttermilk or kefir to culture the milk. If the house is 69-74 F and the milk is room temperature, then I would skip raising the temperature. I have run into similar problems in baking and brewing. The “sweet spot” for these cultures (mesophilic bacteria) is right around 70 F. All the best! Reply

          • Natasha
            natashaskitchen
            November 27, 2013

            I’ll give the organic kefir a try next time. I imagine it would taste even better! I have found that organic milk does taste a whole lot better than regular milk. I always keep an eye out for the organic milk that is on sale and close to it’s expiration date just to make this cheese 🙂

  • liza
    December 11, 2012

    Is the lid supposed to be on the whole process? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 11, 2012

      Yes I would recommend it. Reply

  • natalie
    October 31, 2012

    HI, quick question, my oven doesnt go as low as 100 F, so how else would i do this? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 31, 2012

      Use the lowest setting possible, most of the ovens start at 170F. Once the oven is preheated, turn it off and place the mixture in. Using oven thermometer might be a good idea. Hope this helps. Reply

  • Lydia
    October 11, 2012

    I love this. I have tried it both ways now and love it.. the quick method ends up getting made more often, bc of busy family life! I was wondering if anyone out there would please share their zapekanka recipe. My dearest friend in Kyiv made it often, and I can’t find the recipe that she gave me so long ago. She is not on the internet at all, so I can’t get it from her! Thanks! Reply

  • Inga
    August 24, 2012

    Natasha, what kind of cheese should I use? Feta or..?

    Thank you Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 24, 2012

      Inga, I’m not sure I understand your question. This is the recipe to make farmers cheese. You just need milk and buttermilk to make it. Reply

  • Kelley Palomino
    July 30, 2012

    Ok- so is this a no cook method?

    I am new to cheese making. (just recently have enough leftover goat milk to play with) It appears you only warm the milk after letting it sit ? this would indeed preserve the nutrients!! if this is the case I will be doing it YOUR way. The last batch of cheese I was sick at the thought of high heat or boiling the milk….what a waste is you dont have to.

    Just learned to add whey to soaking beans to remove the acid….who knew.

    Thanks!! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 30, 2012

      You do have to let it get fairly hot at the last step in order for the cheese to separate well from the whey. I agree, I think it’s a bad idea to boil when making this cheese. Reply

  • Elena A
    July 17, 2012

    Hi Natasha, I just discovered you site. This is amazing, so many recipes that I was looking for, for a long time. Thank you for all the hard work. You can also use whey for your cold soup Okroshka instead of water, as well as for a drink (something Scandinavian unfortunately I am not sure about the recipe) Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 17, 2012

      I do have Okroshka posted but never thought to use the whey instead of water. That’s brilliant! Thank you Elena! Reply

  • Margo
    June 17, 2012

    Instead of buttermilk, I use a culture given me by a Russian friend several years ago (called kefir- not to be confused with store-bought kefir drink!). I put it in the milk, leave it anywhere from 12 hours to 2 or 3 days (depending on how hot the house is, and how sour I want the kefir/cheese to be). Once it is thick, I take out the culture (putting it in another jar of milk for the next batch, or into milk and then into the ‘fridge to wait for next time), and then put the jar in a pot of water, bringing it to a boil. As soon as the water boils, but without boiling the milk, I turn off the stove and let the water and milk sit until it is cool. Then I drain in a small strainer for an hour or two until it is as dry as I want it. I have never pressed it- I think I will try that next time!

    I love it served with a little sugar, sour cream and some soaked raisins! Also served plain with a dollop of fruit jam over it. And of course in sirniki 🙂 !

    I have had the same culture for several years, taking it with me whenever I travel. When I do not want to make cheese out of it, or am traveling, I just drink the cultured milk plain, or add fruit to it and make a smoothie. It is very healthy, and I have never gotten sick when I traveled which I attribute to the good bacteria in the culture. The culture grows, so it is fun to share a piece of it with the couchsurfers that I stay with, or with those that stay with us.

    Thanks, Natasha, for all the work you do on this website- I am so happy to see how it has grown! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      June 17, 2012

      Margo thank you so much for sharing! I will have to ask my mom where I can get a hold of kefir. Reply

      • margo
        February 20, 2013

        I did not see your reply last year… have you found kefir start? If not, let me know and I will send you up a start. It is like a plant- it grows, and then I am left having to find people to foist it off on… just can’t bring myself to ‘flush’ it! Email me if you would like a start. I have used kefir as my ‘secret weapon’ to avoid illness in the past few years, and I think I can truthfully attribute my lack of anything more than a 2-day cold to it. Besides, it’s good 🙂 Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          February 20, 2013

          Margo; how does it work? Does it turn milk into buttermilk? I’ll email you! 🙂 Reply

        • May
          March 17, 2013

          I make my Kefir, too! & I was able to share with some friends who grew up with it.
          I’d never buy Tvorog from the store, but tried a farmer cheese (the brand that sell thoese ‘kefir’ drinks), so I don’t know if they are _exactly_ same or not. But the farmer cheese tasted very much like the kefir cheese I made by draining the kefir for a day or so. I think Margo’s method would speed things up if a larger quatity is needed.
          Here is a very comprehensive website about Kefir. (wikipedia is pretty good introduction, too)
          http://users.chariot.net.au/~dna/kefir-faq.html Reply

          • Natasha
            natashaskitchen
            March 17, 2013

            Thank you for sharing May :).

          • Iryna B.
            March 13, 2014

            you can buy Kefir and any cheese dry cultures from any online cheese suppliers or in special farmers shops.

  • Tanya
    June 4, 2012

    Hi Natasha!

    Have you ever tried making tvorog in a crock pot? I assume that it could possibly work, but not really sure. Let me know what you think.

    Thanks! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      June 4, 2012

      It might work but I haven’t tried it. Hmmmm. I guess I don’t see why not since it warms up slowly on the low setting just like it would in the oven or on the stove. I haven’t really tried it though so I’m hesitant to say yes. :-/ Reply

  • Oksana
    May 12, 2012

    Hi Natasha,

    Is there any method of making tvorog with already expired milk? I get lot’s of milk on a WIC program and tvorog sounds like a great idea! The gallon of milk I have is expired and the gallon already bloated…any ideas if it will still work? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 12, 2012

      Hmmm it may still work but I don’t know how long it’s been sour milk or if it makes a difference. Sorry that’s not much of an answer. If its been spoiled more than a day or two I would probably be nervous about using it. Reply

      • oksana
        May 16, 2012

        Alright I agree, better be safe and do it with un-expired milk 🙂 thanks! Reply

        • angelina
          September 1, 2012

          When I worked at daycare i would always get the expired milk and make tvorog, and it always turned out well. Reply

          • Natasha
            natashaskitchen
            September 1, 2012

            Thanks for the tip Angelina, I will be on the lookout for some expired milk 😀

      • Zsuzsa
        August 2, 2013

        If you use expired milk you do not need butter milk. Just put it on the stove and it will be ready. That is how we make this cheese in Hungary. But the vinegar option is just as well, and faster than leaving the milk out for days until it gets sour. Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          August 3, 2013

          Thank you for sharing Zsuzsa :). Reply

  • luda
    April 17, 2012

    I make cheese I would say once a week (my family loves cheese).Here is my recipe.I use1Gal of whole milk(2% just fine)and1 quart of buttermilk,pour it into a large pot,let it sit at room temperature for 24 hrs or until it thickens(became buttermilk).Then i preserve 1 cup of it(put it in the 1quart can, fill it with the milk,let it sit at room temps for another 24 hrs,then refrigerate.This is buttermilk to use next time i make cheese).Back to making cheese.I place my pot on the stove over med/low heat for about 1 hr and cheese is ready.Strain it through the cheese cloth. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 17, 2012

      Luda, thank you so much for sharing! How long does the homemade buttermilk last in the fridge for the next batch of cheese. I think that’s totally brilliant!! Reply

      • luda
        April 24, 2012

        Hi,Natasha.The buttermilk can be kept in the fridge for 2-3 weeks.Maybe even longer,but since i make cheese very often i never tried that.Did you know that you can freeze cheese?My mam does that. Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          April 24, 2012

          Oh, I didn’t know you could freeze it! That will probably come in handy in the future! Thank you for the tip! Reply

    • angelina
      September 1, 2012

      I just started your recipe today….since last night I realized I only purchased one quart of buttermilk. Looking forward how it turns out! Thank you! Reply

      • Natasha
        natashaskitchen
        September 1, 2012

        Let me know the results 🙂 Reply

        • angelina
          September 2, 2012

          Okay….. i MADE IT!!!!! It turned wonderful!!!! I even saved a cup of it just what luda said to make more buttermilk…..and planning on making more of tvorog. We have lots of goats milk…….was not sure how it will turn out so i mixed half goat milk half cows milk!!!!! So excited!!!!! Now its time to do nalisniki!!!! made tvorog before…..years ago and it did not turn out…..I did not give up!!! Thank you for the recipe! Reply

          • Natasha
            natashaskitchen
            September 2, 2012

            Oh I’m so happy to hear about your successful cheese making!! Let me know how it works with the goats milk.

          • kat
            September 20, 2012

            Use whey for nalisniki

          • Natasha
            natashaskitchen
            September 20, 2012

            That’s a great tip! I bet it’s really good. Thank you!!

          • angelina
            October 22, 2012

            thank you kat that is a wonderful idea! i hate poring out the good whey. Now I can put it in good use.

    • Lena
      September 24, 2013

      Luda, I made you recipe twice. So easy and delicious! I used whey to add to my dogs food for extra protein; next time I’ll attempt to make ricotta cheese with it 🙂 Thanks for sharing! Reply

  • Nina
    April 3, 2012

    I make mine the same,like you Natasha, just add sour cream and whipping cream…
    God bless you!! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 3, 2012

      Thank you Nina! God bless you too! Reply

  • Tanya
    March 15, 2012

    Do you use the leftover whey for the bred recipe you have posted here? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 15, 2012

      I didn’t try it for this specific bread, but I plan to next time I make it. Every time I used whey, the bread turned out better. Reply

  • Alina
    February 24, 2012

    Can you use the same process to make farmers cheeses from raw (unpasteurized) milk? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 24, 2012

      Unpasteurized milk is really dangerous for kids, elderly and pregnant women and I wouldn’t recommend it because if it has some kind of creepy bacteria, it will really grow quickly under these conditions. I stay very far away from raw milk. Reply

      • Alina
        February 25, 2012

        Yes, that is what everyone says, but if you do research you are more likely to get sick from foods like spinach or cantaloupe than raw milk. If you visit the farm (and usually those farms are smaller and much cleaner), question the farmer, see that its clean, and feeds the cows grass, then i dont see a problem. The “pasteurized” milk we get is from mass produced farms that are filthy dirty that is why they pasteurize the milk. Raw milk has many benefits. But thats just my opinion, and i guess you didnt answer my question. Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          February 25, 2012

          I can definitely believe that. I usually buy organic milk and organic milk is better for this cheese but I’ve never tried using raw milk so I can’t recommend it. I guess I’ve taken too many classes that discuss bacteria and there’s no way to sterilize the outside of the cow to make sure nothing gets in the milk during the milking process. That’s where my take on it comes from. Just the other day, the state epidemiologist (she studies origin of diseases) came and gave a presentation and was adamant about not using raw milk for kids, pregnant and elderly. I’m sure it is much better for you than pasteurized but it carries too much risk for me to buy it. If you do try it, please let me know how it worked out. Maybe someone else has the same question. Reply

          • Alisha
            March 26, 2012

            I made tvorog once from unpasteurized milk from a farmer and it turned out wonderful.

    • justyna
      March 2, 2012

      Hi alina, did you even try making farmers cheese from the raw milk? I’m curious because I would like to try but don’t want to waste the milk. I am a newbie to the raw milk movement and would love to get more info from you if you’re willing to teach me a bit 🙂 let me know thank you! 🙂 Reply

      • Nadia
        October 7, 2013

        Raw milk is so much better for you than pasteurized, homogenized milk. My kids have been drinking raw milk for the past 2 years and they are doing great. Store milk is “empty” milk. Anyway, kefir made from raw milk is super delicious and is loaded with good bacteria. And to make farmers cheese from raw milk you would just need raw kefir and raw milk. Combine the two and let it sit in a warm place. Once it starts separating you would heat it up like Natasha showed, drain and there you have your farmers cheese. By the way, you would get more farmers cheese if you use whole milk and it tastes better too. Reply

        • Nadia
          October 7, 2013

          I meant strain the cheese not drain…lol. Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          October 7, 2013

          Maybe one of these days I will brave up and buy raw milk. In the meantime, I have switched over to using only organic milk. I look for whole milk to be on clearance, for example if it’s going to expire in the next few days, and I buy it for making cheese. It works out great! Reply

  • February 16, 2012

    Hi Natasha,
    I just made tvorog last week:)
    I have made mine with a special culture that my mom gave me once, but most of the time I make it with lemon juice. It is SO easy and I love how it tastes too. It literally takes anywhere from 1/2 -1 hour to make. Great recipes! I love your pictures too. Reply

  • Olga M
    February 11, 2012

    Hi Natasha, I have a much simpler recipe with great results each time. Per gallon of milk add one cup of vinegar, let it stand for a few hours, then place it stove at the lowest and cheese will be ready in few hrs. Each time it will be very super sweet and only takes few hrs from milk to cheese 🙂 you can’t ever go wrong with this recipe, trust me. Whey might be a little sour but I love the cheese. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 11, 2012

      I’ll have to try that for nalesniki one of these days. I hear its also good with lemon juice. Have you tried lemon juice? Reply

  • February 10, 2012

    Beautiful. I love tvorog. 🙂 I make mine with sour cream.
    Ps. I enjoy reading your blog 🙂 God bless you!! Reply

  • Rimma
    February 10, 2012

    Farmer’s cheese cheesecake – this is probably Ukrainian or Polish recipe for the “syrnik”, I mean the one that like cake, not zapekanka. There are plenty recipes now over the net. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 10, 2012

      I’ll have to do some googling I guess 🙂 Reply

  • Inna
    February 9, 2012

    I love tvorog. I am totally going to make it the way you do it and that way I can see if it will taste as my moms. Thank you! Reply

  • Viktoriya
    February 8, 2012

    Wow this sounds simple enough…I’ve been wanting to make a farmers cheese cheesecake and it requires a lot of farmers cheese, this is definitely on my to do list;) Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 8, 2012

      Wow a farmer’s cheese cheesecake sounds incredible! Is it a Russian cheesecake? Reply

      • Viktoriya
        February 8, 2012

        I tried it at a wedding once but am not able to get the recipe from the lady (a russian lady) cuz I don’t know her, but I found a recipe on epicurious, the reviews aren’t that great but I’m hoping I can tweak it somehow 😉 Reply

        • February 10, 2012

          I have a great recipe for Farmers cheese, cheese cake from an old Russian cook book. I usually make it for Easter. My husband and family always look forward to it. If you want I can send you it.. just tell me where to send it. 🙂 Lu ur site by the way… I’ve been following it for a while now, but never really left a comment. Reply

          • Natasha
            natashaskitchen
            February 10, 2012

            That would be great; thank you soo much! I’d love to compare our recipes and see if I can improve on mine. My email is: natashaskitchen@yahoo.com P.S. I like your new blog; looking forward to more posts 🙂

          • Mike
            February 9, 2014

            would love the farmers cheese cheesecake recipe as well – please.
            love the site.

            thanks, mike

          • Natasha
            natashaskitchen
            February 9, 2014
  • Marina
    February 8, 2012

    P.S. I am going to give tvorog one more chance – your way (is that putting just a little bit of pressure on you? 😉 Don’t worry, I’m sure I won’t be disappointed, none of your recipes have disappointed me yet:) Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 8, 2012

      Crazy amounts of pressure; not sure how I’ll make it through the day 😉 Ok, really though, putting out a recipe is a little scary; I have to get it right since people will spend their time making it. So, sarcasm aside, yes, a little bit of pressure 🙂 Reply

  • Marina
    February 8, 2012

    Natasha, my mama and mama-in-law save the whey to use it instead of buttermilk to make the cheese next time. My mom even freezes it if she doesn’t plan on making it soon. Have you done that before? I have tried to make tvorog out of their saved whey several times but the results were disappointing. Maybe using buttermilk is a sure way to get the cheese just right..? Although mom says buttermilk and whey are both sour milk, they should both work just as well. Let me know your thoughts. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 8, 2012

      That’s very interesting. The whey does have a sourness to it. I’ve never tried that and I didn’t realize the whey could be frozen. Thanks for the tip! Reply

    • kat
      September 20, 2012

      If you use whey it will be cheese (aka Adugeiskii) not tvorog. I learned it on my own gut. Reply

    • Iryna B.
      March 13, 2014

      they are all different cultures Reply

  • Anna
    February 8, 2012

    I love homemade farmers cheese drizzled with honey to go with my morning coffee. I make mine using a similar method to yours and add a bit of salt during last heating. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 8, 2012

      Mmmmm. Yumm! The salt sounds like a good idea. It probably preserves it longer too. Reply

  • Ira
    February 8, 2012

    This recipe probably destroys the nutrients, but I learned this awhile ago and want to say that I’ve become an express ninja of cheese:

    1 gallon of whole fat milk (with red cap)
    1 carton of half and half (the bigger size… 1 quart? about 4 cups)
    130 ml vingar
    4 cheese cloths

    1. Pour milk and half and half in a large pot
    2. On smal-medium heat warm up the milk to hot but NOT boiling, just so it forms lots of foam on top. Remember to ALWAYS stir the milk while heating b/c you might burn the milk and the bottom of your pot will be ruined! (Not that I’ve done that 😉 )
    3. Pour in the vinegar slowly while stiring the milk and you will see cheese forming right before your eyes!
    4. Do the whole cheese cloth steps like you did. Let it cool and use.

    I think the consistency and texture of the cheese might be different than yours but if you need homemade farmers cheese in about 2 hours then this is a quick recipe… I’ve been using it for 3 years now and love it! And the cheese tastes delicious, in my ninja opinion.

    Just remmeber, stir the milk while heating!!!

    Thank you so much for all the work you put into this website.. I can only imagine how time consuming it can get!!! Love your recipes! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 8, 2012

      Thank you for your expert (express) ninja opinion. You made me laugh. I will absolutely try your method and I may just have to post another version!! Thank you so much for sharing. Reply

    • AC
      February 8, 2012

      Hey, do you use milk straight from the refrigerator or at room temperature? Thanks Reply

      • Natasha
        natashaskitchen
        February 8, 2012

        I left mine on the counter 7 hours (room temperature). I think it would work with cold milk, but it would need more time to warm in the oven the first day. Reply

    • Elizabeth
      January 21, 2014

      This recipe is more for Ricotta chesse, its smoother and not as chunky. Reply

      • Natasha
        natashaskitchen
        January 22, 2014

        The recipe for ricotta is a little different. It uses lemon juice instead of buttermilk. Also, it all depends on how long you let it drain. The longer the better and it will be more chunky and dry 🙂 Reply

  • angelina
    February 8, 2012

    Thank you natasha for this recipe. I am so excited to make it. We have four goats. We make all kinds of things and they turn out great. Made tvorog once but did not turn out that well. So i am looking forward trying out your recipe. thanks! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 8, 2012

      4 goats? Wow! Goat milk is much healthier than cows milk but it’s super pricey. Reply

  • Tanya
    February 7, 2012

    I’ve made farmers cheese once but it was with a 2% gallon of milk. Bring it to boil. Add 4 tbsp of vinegar and turn off. Let stand for 10-15 min. (The less you let it stand, the softer it will be). Strain it through a cheese cloth. Will have to try your method. It’s probably much tastier. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 8, 2012

      That sounds too easy 🙂 looks like I will have lots of cheese experiments in the future 😉 Reply

  • Vikulya
    February 7, 2012

    I make my homemade farmers cheese same way, except I never left the warmed thickened milk for another 24 hours. Do you get more cheese if you do it that way? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 8, 2012

      I will have to experiment and let you know. Reply

  • February 7, 2012

    I was going to post recipe today 🙂 he he I use sour cream in my Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 8, 2012

      Great minds think alike! 🙂 can’t wait to see your post. Reply

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