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Garlic Pampushki (Garlic Dinner Rolls)

Bake your own delicious, golden garlic pampushki. These garlic pampushki are crisp on the outside and so so soft on the inside. You'll love them!

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We LOVE bread. There were two things we asked our wedding caterer to stock up on; potatoes and BREAD! What kind of Ukrainian wedding runs out of bread? After all, Ukraine is known as the breadbasket of Europe.

Guess who was born in Ukraine? Meeee!! Ignore me, please. I think it’s these garlic pampushki (pahm-poosh-kee)ย going to my head. Thanks for sharing in the excitement with me. I would pass you a pampushka if you were right here in front of me (extra garlicky).

Before we serve up the bread recipe, I want to spend a little time with a lesson on bread and why it’s good for you. Bread has taken too much flak over the years especially with all the newfangled diets out there. I want you to see beyond the “carbs”.

Lesson 1: Which grains should I eat? Choose whole grains when possible and buy organic if you can. This includes whole wheat bread, whole grain bread, quinoa, brown rice, buckwheat. Which ones should I avoid? I was going to say white bread, but I don’t think I could ever say no to Costco’s artisan bread, so lets just call it moderation. According to the USDA, try to make at least half of your grains whole grains.

Lesson 2: Grains are Good and tasty: Food pyramid anyone? According the the USDA , grains should make up 1/4 of your diet because they are good for you. The important thing is to choose ย the right grains (see point #3). Whole grains have many of the essential nutrients our bodies need including vitamins, minerals, fiber and antioxidants. Don’t worry, we won’t have the fiber discussion again (but know that I am always happy to talk about the importance of fiber for digestion and “regulation” (I’m doing it again; It’s the Nurse in me!).

Lesson 3: Your brain needs grains: What? Your brain needs carbohydrates?? Did you know carbs turn into glucose to give your brain energy? So, choosing a low/no carb diet can starve your brain of the energy it needs. Not to mention grains have B vitamins that are important for your brain to function at its best and stay healthy over time. Check out this site: GrainsForYourBrain.org. It features videos from Dr’s, Professors and Researchers. Oh and I spotted some great recipes posted there by chefs and moms.

Lesson 4: Eat grains smartly:ย In the end, eat your grains responsibly and share all this good info with the people you love ๐Ÿ™‚

Onto the Recipe…

Ingredients for Garlic Pampushki:

2 1/4 cups luke warm water
1/2 Tbsp salt
1 1/2 Tbsp sugarย 
2 tsp active dry yeast (Red Star brand)
3/4 cup whole wheat flour *measured correctly
3/4 cup rye flour (if you don’t have rye, sub with whole wheat flour) *measured correctly
3/4 cup better for bread flour
plus 2 1/2 cups better for bread flour
2 Tbsp canola oil plus more to grease the counter and pan

*Watch our easy video tutorial on how to measure correctly

Ingredients for the topping:

4 cloves of garlic, pressed
1 tsp salt
2 Tbsp water
6-8 oz bacon into small strips
4 Tbsp olive oil

Garlic PampushkiGarlic Pampushki-11

How To Make Garlic Pampushki (Dinner Rolls):

1. In a large kitchen aid mixer bowl, combine 2 1/4 cups warm water (about 100หšF), 1 1/2 Tbsp sugar and 1/2 Tbsp salt; stir to dissolve.

Rye and Whole Wheat Bread Recipe-1

2. Sift the 3/4 cup wheat flour, 3/4 cup rye flour and 3/4 cup better for bread flour with 2 tsp yeast into the salted water. Do not discard anything left in the sifter (it’s the good stuff!); toss it into the batter.ย Whisk together until well blended. Let it rise in a warm room uncovered for 2 hours,ย stirringย the batter about once every hour. It will be bubbly.

Rye and Whole Wheat Bread Recipe-2

3. Using the dough hook attachment add 1/2 cup all-purpose flour until well blended, scraping down the bowl if needed. Blend in the rest of your flour (2 cups) a heaping Tbsp at a time, letting the dough dissolve the flour in between each spoon (this takes about 20 min).

Rye and Whole Wheat Bread Recipe-3

4. Once all the flour is incorporated, add 2 Tbsp canola oil. Let mix for an additional 20 more minutes or until dough is no longer sticking to your bowl. Note: after you add the oil it will look like it’s coming off the walls and then it will appear to get stickier, then towards the end of your 20 minutes, it will actually stop sticking to the walls as it mixes.

Just let it do it’s thing and everything will work out ;). If it’s still really sticking to the bowl around the 20 min mark, add another heaping Tbsp of better for bread flour. Remove dough hook and Let it rise in the bowl, uncovered, until double in volume (45 min)

Rye and Whole Wheat Bread Recipe-4

5. Grease your bread pans, counter and fingers a little with the canola oil and transfer the dough onto the oiled counter. Pinch the dough in the center to form two sections with your hands. Divide each section again and again, and again until you have a total of 30 rolls. Grease your rimmed baking dishes lightly with oil.

Place dough balls onto each pan about 1/2″ apart into each prepared pan and let it rise on the counter or outside if it’s warm until ย 2 1/2 times in volume (about 1 1/2 hours – note: it rises faster if its in a warm place ~100หšF). Bake at 360หšF for 30 minutes or until rolls are golden.

Garlic Pampushki-1-1

Garlic Pampushki-2

6. While the rolls are baking, make your garlic mix: press 4 cloves of garlic into a small bowl and mix with 1 tsp salt and 2 Tbsp water. Chop your bacon into small strips, then saute on a dry skillet until golden brown.

Transfer bacon and the garlic mixture into a large silver bowl, stir in 4 Tbsp olive oilย and toss the rolls with the garlic and bacon until your rolls are shiny. Leave the rolls in the bowl and keep it uncovered until the rolls are cooled down. These are crisp on the outside and so so soft on the inside. You’ll love them! The next day, try making sandwiches out of them.

Garlic Pampushki-3

Bake your own delicious, golden garlic pampushki. These garlic pampushki are crisp on the outside and so so soft on the inside. You'll love them!

Bake your own delicious, golden garlic pampushki. These garlic pampushki are crisp on the outside and so so soft on the inside. You'll love them!ย 

How do you get your family to eat more healthy grains?

Garlic Pampushki, Bread is Good for You

4.74 from 19 votes
Prep Time: 5 hours
Cook Time: 30 minutes
Total Time: 5 hours 30 minutes
This recipe makes 30 rolls.
Author: Natasha of NatashasKitchen.com
Skill Level: Medium/ Easy
Cost to Make: $4-$5
Keyword: Garlic Pampushki
Cuisine: Russian, Ukrainian
Course: Side Dish
Servings: 15

Ingredients

  • 2 1/4 cups luke warm water
  • 1/2 Tbsp salt
  • 1 1/2 Tbsp sugar
  • 2 tsp active dry yeast
  • 3/4 cup whole wheat flour
  • 3/4 cup rye flour if you don't have rye, sub with whole wheat flour
  • 3/4 cup better for bread flour
  • plus 2 1/2 cups better for bread flour
  • 2 Tbsp canola oil plus more to grease the counter and pan

For the Garlic topping:

  • 4 garlic cloves
  • 2 Tbsp water
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 6-8 strips of bacon
  • 4 Tbsp olive oil

Instructions

  1. In a large kitchen aid mixer bowl, combine 2 1/4 cups warm water (about 100หšF), 1 1/2 Tbsp sugar and 1/2 Tbsp salt; stir to dissolve.
  2. Sift the 3/4 cup wheat flour, 3/4 cup rye flour and 3/4 cup better for bread flour with 2 tsp yeast into the salted water. Do not discard anything left in the sifter (it's the good stuff!); toss it into the batter. Whisk together until well blended. Let it rise in a warm room uncovered for 2 hours, stirring the batter about once every hour. It will be bubbly.
  3. Using the dough hook attachment add 1/2 cup all-purpose flour until well blended, scraping down the bowl if needed. Blend in the rest of your flour (2 cups) a heaping Tbsp at a time, letting the dough dissolve the flour in between each spoon (this takes about 20 min).
  4. Once all the flour is incorporated, add 2 Tbsp canola oil. Let mix for an additional 20 more minutes or until dough is no longer sticking to your bowl. Note: after you add the oil it will look like it's coming off the walls and then it will appear to get stickier, then towards the end of your 20 minutes, it will actually stop sticking to the walls as it mixes. Just let it do it's thing and everything will work out ;). If it's still really sticking to the bowl around the 20 min mark, add another heaping Tbsp of better for bread flour. Remove dough hook and Let it rise in the bowl, uncovered, until double in volume (45 min)
  5. Grease your bread pans, counter and fingers a little with the canola oil and transfer the dough onto the oiled counter
  6. Pinch the dough in the center to form two sections with your hands. Divide each section again and again, and again until you have a total of 30 rolls. Grease your rimmed baking dishes lightly with oil. Place dough balls onto each pan about 1/2" apart into each prepared pan and let it rise on the counter or outside if it's warm until 2 1/2 times in volume (about 1 1/2 hours - note: it rises faster if its in a warm place ~100หšF). Bake at 360หšF for 30 minutes or until rolls are golden.
  7. While the rolls are baking, make your garlic mix: press 4 cloves of garlic into a small bowl and mix with 1 tsp salt and 2 Tbsp water. Chop your bacon into small strips, then saute on a dry skillet until golden brown.
  8. Transfer bacon and the garlic mixture into a large silver bowl, stir in 4 Tbsp olive oil and toss the rolls with the garlic and bacon until your rolls are shiny. Leave the rolls in the bowl and keep it uncovered until the rolls are cooled down. These rolls are crisp on the outside and so so soft on the inside. You'll love them! The next day, try making sandwiches out of them.

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Natasha Kravchuk

Welcome to my kitchen! I am Natasha, the blogger behind Natasha's Kitchen (since 2009). My husband and I run this blog together and share only our best, family approved and tested recipes with YOU. Thanks for stopping by! We are so happy you're here.

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Read comments/reviewsAdd comment/review

  • Estera N
    August 29, 2013

    I do the grocery shopping for the family and since I am in charge….I buy the healthy stuff ๐Ÿ™‚

    Reply

  • Yelena
    August 29, 2013

    I buy whole wheat bread with grains all the time.
    I Also cook a lot of Kashi. Oatmeal with milk is our all
    Time favorite, also buckwheat, wheat, barley, corn,
    Brown rice, and cream of wheat!
    I want to try making homemade wheat bread,
    these pampushki looks so delish!

    Reply

  • Lidiya Ervin
    August 29, 2013

    Tweeted! https://mobile.twitter.com/LidiyaLittle/status/373188262153560067

    Reply

  • Jessica To
    August 29, 2013

    I usually get it in one of our breakfast foods like oatmeal or waffles!

    Reply

  • Eve
    August 29, 2013

    Hey Natasha can i still do the giveaway even if i dont have a twitter??
    Also I love your Recipe!!

    Reply

  • Julia
    August 29, 2013

    I try and buy healthier grains such as whole wheat pasta, quinoa, and barley and incorporate them into meals we already love ๐Ÿ™‚

    Reply

  • Vera
    August 29, 2013

    I started making waffles with whole wheat and it just as delicious but healthier ๐Ÿ˜‰

    Reply

  • Mila
    August 29, 2013

    We love brown rice and grechka!!!

    Reply

  • Inna
    August 29, 2013

    My family eats grain when we make sandwiches, rolls, etc. Though I am Ukrainian, my family doesn’t consume a lot of bread. The bread here is so fattening. In addition, bread sold in supermarkets taste like they are just starch and water.

    I really miss the taste of real Ukrainian bread. The aroma of fresh baked bread filling the house. As a kid, my brother and I would grab a piece of bread with butter and just run outside for hours. The good old days!

    Reply

  • Irene
    August 29, 2013

    Thanks for the recipe Natasha!! ๐Ÿ™‚
    Our family tries to buy whole grain english muffins, and breads more often now, and we look for the ones without high fructose corn syrup (because yes there are whole grain things with hfcs in there) wierd, ehh??

    Reply

  • Oksana
    August 29, 2013

    I buy whole grain bread and we consume a lot of buckwheat and quinoa!

    Reply

  • Liz
    August 29, 2013

    We have oatmeal 5 days every week.

    Reply

  • Richard Lain
    August 29, 2013

    I modify my favorite recipes to include unsweetened applesauce to replace a lot of fat; use differing grains and flours instead of just white; include dried fruit i.e. cranberries, cherries, appricots, etc.; and include spices (ginger, cinnamon, nutmeg) to provide extra flavor. For Breads I utilize older grains or mixed grains and flours – again, reducing white sugars with honey and/or molasses and when needed use veg.oil or real butter in moderation.

    Works well and most people enjoy toasted whole grain breads.

    Reply

  • courtney b
    August 29, 2013

    tweet

    https://twitter.com/MeandBells/status/373072969234276352

    Reply

  • courtney b
    August 29, 2013

    we usually mix it, either with chocolate (muffin) or milk ๐Ÿ™‚ like cereal!

    Reply

  • Lisa Brown
    August 29, 2013

    tweet – https://twitter.com/LuLu_Brown24/status/373055888610693120
    jslbrown_03 at yahoo dot com

    Reply

  • Lisa Brown
    August 29, 2013

    I don’t have to entice anyone in my family to eat grains: we all love different kinds of whole grain breads, eating cooked grains in the morning for breakfast, adding grains to soups.
    jslbrown_03 at yahoo dot com

    Reply

  • Julia | JuliasAlbum.com
    August 29, 2013

    Oh, and I don’t have to make my family eat healthy grains. My husband loves quinoa out of free will. ๐Ÿ™‚

    Reply

  • Julia | JuliasAlbum.com
    August 29, 2013

    Nobody is taking away my bread from me. ๐Ÿ™‚ Pampushki is such a funny name, I forgot about them completely! They are so cute, I am pinning them of course. By the way, Natasha, I just made Medovik tort with zavarnoi krem and posted it on my blog. I’d be happy if you check it out. ๐Ÿ™‚

    -I just did. It looks amazing!! -Natasha

    Reply

  • Lidiya Ervin
    August 29, 2013

    I get my family to eat whole grains by making pb&js out of whole wheat bread!

    Reply

  • Natalie
    August 29, 2013

    I get the family to eat more grains by baking bread using whole wheat flour.

    Reply

  • Elizabeth
    August 28, 2013

    My son’s favorite breakfast is hot grechka with milk and a little honey. We also eat a lot of rye bread with butter or sour cream on top. Sometimes I make a salad with cold grechka, chopped egg and green onion, dressed with unrefined sunflower oil and maybe a squeeze of lemon. Buckwheat is an awesome grain! My husband says it helped him survive as a hungry college student.

    Reply

  • natasha
    August 28, 2013

    i buy whole wheat flour and do half white half whole wheat when i make bread.

    Reply

  • Alla
    August 28, 2013

    We buy whole wheat stone ground bread as well as WW tortillas. Have tried quinoa, brown rice and WW pasta but not a fan of any of them….Maybe I need some good recipes with them.

    Reply

  • ana
    August 28, 2013

    we buy whole grain bread

    Reply

  • Zorianna
    August 28, 2013

    Def more black bread and my dad loves oats or more organic foods in his soup instead of noodles …..etc..

    Reply

  • Ruslana
    August 28, 2013

    Insted of waffels or pancakes its oatmeal for breakfest …wheat bread insted of white ๐Ÿ™‚

    Reply

  • natasha
    August 28, 2013

    We all eat Oatmeal and use whole grain bread to make sandwiches, My family also loves buckwheat.

    Reply

  • Ana
    August 28, 2013

    I try to buy things like whole grain pastas and noodles and also we also try to buy more whole grain bread. Our rule, the darker the better: most of the time it’s true

    Reply

  • Olena@iFOODreal
    August 28, 2013

    We switched to whole grains 5 years ago and my kids don’t know any other grains, so it’s easy.:) It’s a matter of changing a habit. It took me some time to get used to whole wheat bread and pasta but now I wouldn’t even touch white bread or pasta. I try to buy organic grains if possible. Besides wheat we love quinoa, buckwheat, brown/wild rice. And then go lentils – yum! And of course farro and whole wheat couscous. Oh my, there is so many and so many ways to cook them. Visit my blog.:)

    Reply

  • Inna
    August 28, 2013

    I agree with you r/t bread intake, the key is organic and portion control. I love quinoa, brown rice and buckwheat. Still have hard time eating whole grain pasta…. although I did try substituting whole grain angel hair pasta in the chicken noodle soup and I didn’t notice the difference ๐Ÿ™‚ Thank you for the wonderful recipe, will give it a try ๐Ÿ™‚ Love pampushki with borsch!

    Reply

  • Vera
    August 28, 2013

    I bake whole wheat bread, and try to eat kasha at least twice a week

    Reply

  • Natalia
    August 28, 2013

    I like pampushki,,a lot of memories of childhood…In my family we eat a lot of healthy whole wheat bread, and of course cereal.love it

    Reply

  • Nataly Carbonell
    August 28, 2013

    I make garlic breads and french toasts in the morning

    Reply

  • Ekaterina
    August 28, 2013

    I think adding grains into anything that requires flour is a good idea:)

    Reply

  • Mami2jcn
    August 28, 2013

    tweet–https://twitter.com/mami2jcn/status/372834775666393089

    Reply

  • Mami2jcn
    August 28, 2013

    We get our whole grains from whole grain cereal.

    Reply

  • Susanna
    August 28, 2013

    I am Ukrainian, so bread is a big deal! Our favorite bread is the dark round bread that was sold in Ukrainian stores. We eat all types bread, no surprise there. So making the family eat grains is no problem.

    Reply

  • Anna
    August 28, 2013

    The way my mom does it is she sneaks a little whole wheat flour into bread other recipes. So half is white flour, the other is wheat……We barely taste the difference!Lol
    *Side-note*
    I asked my mom if they ever made pampushki back in Russia and she says”That’s a food? No way! We used to call all the chubby babies that name!”

    Reply

  • TrishInFL
    August 28, 2013

    I serve warm whole wheat rolls with butter, and make whole grain waffles or pancakes on the weekends, served with fruit. Those are my favorite ways to get the family to eat healthy grains.

    Reply

  • Zina P
    August 28, 2013

    Luckily, my family has always eaten what I put on the table, so it’s easy to control what they eat and how healthy the meals are….rarely a complaint either!

    Reply

  • Oksana
    August 28, 2013

    My husband is the one who wants me to start incorporating whole wheat or rye flour in the breads that I bake. I’m just a hard sell, I love fresh white bread. But I’ll have to try your garlic pampushki for the next family gathering. We eat buckwheat, oatmeal (trader joe’s has amazing steel cut oats that the entire family likes), I like to add quinoa to my soups now too.

    Reply

  • Liz
    August 28, 2013

    It’s no problem in our family. We love them and it’s just part of everyday cooking and baking.

    Reply

  • AK
    August 28, 2013

    One of the things I do is add oats/ flax seed to kotleti.

    Reply

  • Elena
    August 28, 2013

    https://twitter.com/ElenaIstomina/status/372786777565569024

    Reply

  • Elena
    August 28, 2013

    I like to make quinoa or buckwheat salad with fresh veggies

    Reply

  • Lea @ Lea's Cooking
    August 28, 2013

    Love the idea of tossing bulochki in garlic butter. I feed my family with whole wheat cous cous, quinoa, buck wheat, organic rolled oats. Making my own bread too.

    Reply

  • Nadia
    August 28, 2013

    We eat oatmeal in the mornings and my kids love it!

    Reply

  • Karolina
    August 28, 2013

    I usually get my family to eat more grains by buying “killers bread” which has whole grains of all sorts, and add sweet strawberry jam on top and drink with tea.

    Reply

  • Vitalinka
    August 28, 2013

    Thank You so much for posting all these recipes! They are all amazing!!! Your Chicken Plov is a new staple in my house (I sub brown rice, of course).

    I get my family to eat whole grains whenever possible. I always switch out white rice for Brown and regular pasta for Whole Wheat. We eat lots of Quinoa and Israeli Couscous. The most difficult in my household is trying to limit the amount of potatoes eaten. My husband is a serious addict.

    Reply

  • Irina
    August 28, 2013

    I add whole wheat flour to the bread I bake.

    Reply

  • lana
    August 28, 2013

    We pretty much eat only whole grain and whole wheat. we love the 100% whole wheat organic pasta from Costco. ๐Ÿ™‚ (even my toddlers too). i love everything from quinoa to wild rice to steel cut oats. and costco has this really good pasta made from quinoa and wild rice. you just have to get your taste buds used to eating whole wheat.:)

    Reply

  • Felicia
    August 28, 2013

    We eat a lot of oatmeal, whole wheat bread, and quinoa.

    Reply

  • Miriam
    August 28, 2013

    In my husband’s country, they pretty much eat rice everyday all day, so I try switching to brown rice when I can.

    Reply

  • Veronika
    August 28, 2013

    The way I make my family eat grains is by making our normal food but change the white grains for the whole wheat. I have made whole wheat pizza dough and I add whole wheat flour to bread.

    Reply

  • Irina
    August 28, 2013

    I bake my own bread and we all LOVE it …

    Reply

  • Snow
    August 28, 2013

    My mom makes her own rosemary bread and we only buy whole wheat cereal…mmm so good:)

    Reply

  • Erin R.
    August 28, 2013

    Wow, you actually toss the warm rolls in the garlic sauce? Brilliant! I’ll definitely have to try that method.

    As for the whole grains, I always use at least half whole wheat flour when I make bread and at least half oat flour in cookies. Nobody has ever been able to tell with the cookies. ๐Ÿ˜‰

    Reply

  • Alisa
    August 28, 2013

    I experiment with grains like buckwheat and use whole wheat flour whenever I can.

    Reply

  • Roxanne
    August 28, 2013

    We love our buckwheat, and brown rice ๐Ÿ™‚ Also whole wheat pasta tastes better when cooked longer than usual, and serverd with Alfredo (penne). Although angel hair cooks the same as regular, my husband hasn’t even noticed the difference!

    I bet I just undercooked it. I’ll give it another try! – Natasha

    Reply

  • Sydney
    August 28, 2013

    Eat whole grain bread with lots of butter……..lol

    Reply

  • Pete
    August 28, 2013

    We eat oat meal…………not 1 minute…………..45 minute

    Reply

  • Oksana
    August 28, 2013

    I buy whole grain bread and make sandwiches for my loved ones!! ๐Ÿ™‚

    Reply

  • Alya
    August 28, 2013

    I get my family to eat more whole grains by purchasing whole wheat bread, whole wheat pasta, and organic quinoa. The trick, of course, is being able to mask the healthiness – not so much for my toddler, but for my husband! He’s sooooo used to having his mom’s homemade WHITE bread since he grew up on it. I’m slowly getting him to enjoy healthier foods ๐Ÿ™‚

    Reply

  • Jennifer
    August 28, 2013

    Morning breakfast is how I get my family to eat grains ..

    Reply

  • Olya
    August 28, 2013

    My family only eats whole wheat bread. I usually buy only organic! I love bread also ๐Ÿ™‚

    Reply

  • Alicyn
    August 28, 2013

    It’s just me in my home. But I made the decision about 5 years ago to switch to whole grains. I especially like quinoa, quinoa pasta, and all sorts of good brown rice, forbidden rice, wild rice.
    I found that processed and white foods irritated my ankle joint issues.

    -I LOVE quinoa, but haven’t tried quinoa pasta. I’ll have to give it a try. I’m not a fan of whole wheat pasta (I think it’s dry and hard to make it taste great or maybe I gave up on it too quickly!). That’s interesting that white foods irritate your ankle joint issues. Being a nurse, I’m interested in health-related issues. Thanks for sharing! It’s one of those things that you don’t learn in a text book! Oh and what is forbidden rice?- Natasha

    Reply

  • Vicki
    August 28, 2013

    I find it very difficult. My little boy loves Israeli buckwheat oatmeal & that is one way

    Reply

  • Allie
    August 28, 2013

    Oh my! So good to see a recipe of pampushki. My grandma made them all the time when she baked bread. Definitely going to make this sometime soon. Thank natasha!

    Reply

  • Alla
    August 28, 2013

    Oh they are so cute!! I just rub store bought ones with garlic… sorry… I know you’re disappointed… Maybe I’ll try making these for next family party.

    -I won’t judge one bit. I love shortcuts if I don’t have time to make things from scratch. ๐Ÿ™‚ – Natasha

    Reply

  • Maureen | Orgasmic Chef
    August 28, 2013

    I can’t play the game but I could make these rolls! I wasn’t born in Ukraine but I have spent some time there. The food was amazing!

    Reply

  • Kelly D
    August 28, 2013

    tweet
    https://twitter.com/kellydsaver/status/372682039650045952

    Reply

  • Kelly D
    August 28, 2013

    I get my family to eat more whole grains by incorporating them into my cooking and foods they enjoy, such as whole grain breads and cereals.

    Reply

  • Shannon C
    August 28, 2013

    we have oatmeal every morning now!

    Reply

  • Zhenya
    August 28, 2013

    I respectfully disagree, Natasha, although ะฟะพะผะฟัƒัˆะบะธ look delicious! Grain of today is nothing like the grain our grandmothers grew up on. According to the author of “Wheat Belly” Dr. Davis, today’s grain has been genetically altered to resist infestation, produce more and take less time to grow. Consuming this altered grain has caused alergic reactions in many people (Celiac Desease, anyone?) and is a big contributor to weight gain for many others. I lost 25lbs in two months by ditching wheat and has been able to keep it off for almost a year now by limiting my grain intake ๐Ÿ™‚ I also have more energy and fewer sugar cravings.

    I completely agree with you that grain today is different, that is why I try to buy organic flour and other organic grain products such as quinoa, pasta etc. I think that’s great that you have lost so much weight by not consuming wheat! Congratulations!! Did you also cut out things like quinoa and buckwheat (grechka)? Thanks for your thoughts and sharing your story ๐Ÿ™‚ – Natasha

    Reply

    • Iryna
      August 29, 2013

      I agree with Natasha – non-GMO wheat is OK to eat, just don’t overdo it.

      Reply

    • angie lilly
      September 18, 2013

      exactly. there are also even heirloom grains you can buy and grow yourself if you are super ambitious!

      Reply

    • Anna
      October 2, 2013

      I can’t believe that Dr. Davis can make such bizzare statments and actually make people believe him!

      Reply

      • Pam
        January 10, 2014

        Anna, Dr. Davis’ statements are far from bizarre. This information has been all over the internet for quite some time.

        Reply

        • Anna
          February 15, 2014

          Pam, if you’re not a registered dietitian, there’s no way for you to tell whether Dr. Davis is right or wrong.

          Reply

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