How to Cook Buckwheat Kasha

How to Cook Buckwheat. Did you know it's a Super Food and Gluten Free?! @natashaskitchen

Buckwheat is a superfood that you may not know about. It’s definitely under-appreciated and under-utilized in the US, but everyone should know how healthy and scrumptious it is! I love it more than rice or quinoa. It’s also completely gluten free!

It’s name is a little deceiving because it’s calledย buckwheat but there isย no relation to wheat – none whatsoever! It’s also just as simple to make as white rice. My son loves buckwheat with this mushroom gravy on it and I love it plain with butter (pickle on the side of course).

We’ll be rolling out some really yummy buckwheat recipes like this buckwheat with mushrooms so be sure to pin this one for later! Also, read on to learn why buckwheat is so good for you! ๐Ÿ™‚

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How to Cook Buckwheat. Did you know it's a Super Food and Gluten Free?! @natashaskitchen

Ingredients for Basic Buckwheat:

1 cup toasted buckwheat groats
1 3/4ย cups filtered water
1-2 Tbsp butter, to taste (I used unsalted butter)
1/2 tsp salt, or to taste (I used sea salt)

How to Cook Buckwheat Kasha-2

Note:

I love the buckwheat sold at the Russian store because it usually comes pre-toasted and is golden brown in color. If the buckwheat you buy is not toasted, you can quickly toast it on a dry skillet over medium heat 4-5 min until it is golden brown in color then remove from heat and proceed with the recipe.

How to Cook Buckwheat Kasha-3

How to Cook Buckwheat (Stove-top Method):

1. Rinse and drain buckwheat well.

How to Cook Buckwheat Kasha-4

2. In a medium sauce pan, combine buckwheat groats with 1 3/4ย cups water, 1 Tbsp butter and 1/2 tsp salt. Bring to a simmer then cover with a tight fitting lid and simmer on low for 18-20 minutes. Just like with rice, you should hear hissing while it’s cooking and it will get quiet when it’s done. Stir in additional 1 Tbsp butter if desired.

How-to-Cook-Buckwheat-Kasha-8

How to Cook Buckwheat (Rice Cooker Method):

Transfer all ingredients to the rice cooker and set on the white rice setting. When it’s done, add an extra Tablespoon of butter if desired and stir in 1-2 tsp water to moisten up the kernels if they seem a little dry. Serve hot.

Buckwheat Nutrition info:

Buckwheat is a great source of Potassium, Fiber, Protein, Iron, and Vitamin B6. It is also a good source of manganese, magnesium, copper, and zinc, which are great for the immune system. Yeah it’s definitely good for you and much healthier than white rice. ๐Ÿ™‚

How to Cook Buckwheat. Did you know it's a Super Food and Gluten Free?! @natashaskitchen

How to Cook Buckwheat Kasha

4.79 from 23 votes
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 18 minutes
Total Time: 23 minutes
How to Cook Buckwheat. Did you know it's a Super Food and Gluten Free?! @natashaskitchen
Buckwheat is a superfood that you may not know about. It's definitely under-appreciated and under-utilized in the US, but everyone should know how healthy and scrumptious it is! It's also completely gluten free! It's name is a little deceiving because it's called buckwheat but there is no relation to wheat - none whatsoever! It's also just as simple to make as white rice. My son loves buckwheat with gravy on it and I love it plain with butter (pickle on the side ofcourse).
Author: Natasha of NatashasKitchen.com
Skill Level: Easy
Cost to Make: Varies
Servings: 2 cups

Ingredients

  • 1 cup toasted buckwheat groats
  • 1 3/4 cups filtered water
  • 1-2 Tbsp butter to taste (I used unsalted butter)
  • 1/2 tsp salt or to taste (I used sea salt)

Instructions

Stove-top Method:

  1. Rinse and drain buckwheat well.
  2. In a medium sauce pan, combine buckwheat with 1 3/4 cups water, 1 Tbsp butter and 1/2 tsp salt. Bring to a simmer then cover with a tight fitting lid and simmer on low for 18-20 min. Just like with rice, you should hear hissing while cooking and it will get quiet when done. Stir in additional 1 Tbsp butter if desired.

Rice Cooker Method:

  1. Transfer all ingredients to the rice cooker and set on the white rice setting. When done, add an extra Tbsp of butter if desired and stir in 1-2 tsp water to moisten up the kernels if they seem dry. Serve hot.

Recipe Notes

Selecting & Toasting Buckwheat: I love the buckwheat at the Russian store because it usually comes pre-toasted and is golden brown in color. If the buckwheat you buy is not toasted, you can quickly toast it on a dry skillet over medium heat 4-5 min until it is golden brown in color then remove from heat and proceed with the recipe.
Nutrition Info: Buckwheat is a great source of Potassium, Fiber, Protein, Iron, Vitamin B6 and Magnesium. It is also a good source of manganese, magnesium, copper, and zinc, which are great for the immune system. Yeah it's definitely good for you.

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How to Cook Buckwheat. Did you know it's a Super Food and Gluten Free?! @natashaskitchen

Do you get creative with buckwheat (grechka)? I’d love to hear how youย prepare and serve it. Are you a gravy lover too? Let me know in a comment below. I’m always looking for new ways to cook this stuff up.

natashaskitchen

Welcome to my kitchen! I am Natasha, the blogger behind Natasha's Kitchen (since 2009). My husband and I run this blog together and share only our best, family approved recipes with YOU. Thanks for stopping by! We are so happy you're here.

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  • Ilanilani
    May 15, 2018

    How to make the buckwheat more softer, should I ad more water, or longer cooking? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 15, 2018

      Hi, for a softer buckwheat, add a little more water and increase the cooktime. Reply

  • BayBuckwheat
    April 22, 2018

    I eat roasted buckwheat Kasha every day or at least 5 times a week!
    I love it!
    Thanks for the info and the recipe! Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      April 23, 2018

      You’re welcome! I hope you love this recipe, please let me know what you think when you decide to make it! Reply

  • Kristin
    February 27, 2018

    My Ukrainian boys love it with condensed milk drizzled over the top. : ) Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      February 27, 2018

      Oh yum, that sounds delicious Kristin! Thanks for sharing! Reply

  • Kim
    February 21, 2018

    Can I soak buckwheat overnight with almond milk and yogurt to have it for breakfast? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 21, 2018

      Hi Kim, I honestly have never tried that or seen it done. We always cook the buckwheat. Have you seen it done that way online? I would suggest a google search for that one. Reply

    • Jan
      May 21, 2018

      Kim, I just made my overnight oatmeal (oat groats) and included buckwheat groats as well as wheat berries, all cooked in a crock pot overnight on low.
      Measurements — 1 cup of grains to 4 cups of water, 1 tsp salt. Cook on low in a crock pot. Reply

  • Javonni Gresham
    February 2, 2018

    I love buckwheat groats with butter, salt and pepper. But I was wondering how much water would you use to make a single serving? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 2, 2018

      HI Javonni, you could pretty easily cut the recipe in half using a small sauce pan with a tight fitting lid. Reply

  • C
    January 28, 2018

    Add crumbled bacon, green onion and chopped and sautรฉed mushrooms. It is amazing. Reply

  • Helen
    January 21, 2018

    My mother used to make Buckwheat Golombki on Fridays because we couldn’t eat back then. I’m checking out your recipe because I forgot how to cook the buckwheat that I got in the Russian store. I’m making the Golombki tomorrow. Can’t wait because its been years. Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      January 21, 2018

      I hope you find it helpful Helen! Please let me know what you think! Reply

      • Helen
        January 22, 2018

        The buckwheat gloom ki came out great. Nostalgia going on today. Love all your recipes! Reply

        • Natasha's Kitchen
          January 22, 2018

          I’m happy to hear that Helen! Thanks for sharing! Reply

  • Salena
    January 1, 2018

    I also have leaky gut syndrome so I have been enjoying buckwheat every morning cooked in unsweetened coconut milk topped with berries, more coconut milk, shredded coconut and honey. So far I prefer my buckwheat not toasted but Iโ€™d like to try roasting it myself to see if that makes a difference. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 1, 2018

      Hi Salena, thanks for sharing that! My sister Anna is CNS, RN and she also has leaky gut and just started a blog about the healing benefits of leaky gut. It’s incredible for me to start learning about it and how it affects people and causes various problems and disease processes. I hope you have a chance to check out her blogReply

  • December 20, 2017

    I like to make it and then add olive oil, salted Roma tomatoes, as well as chopped fresh parsely. Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      December 20, 2017

      Yum, great suggestion Flo! Reply

      • Zoria Low
        January 1, 2018

        Is delious as an alternative for rice in cabbage rolls. Can be used as a combination of mashed potatoes dill kasha, bacon bits sauted onions in a crust similar to pot pies. Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          January 1, 2018

          I love your ideas! Thank you for sharing! ๐Ÿ™‚ Reply

  • Paul
    December 6, 2017

    I use the stove top method with 1 water to 1 3/4 buckwheat tsp of butter and at the end I mix it with fresh celery and parsley. I love the nutty flacor of the wheat and the crunch celery ! Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      December 6, 2017

      Yum, that sounds delish! Thanks for sharing Paul! Reply

  • Sandy
    November 1, 2017

    Thanks for the instructions on how to cook it. I have leaky gut and supposed to avoid grain, but feel deprived without it (I also have adrenal fatigue and need some for energy). I am going to cook it and add coconut oil, unsweetened coconut, cinnamon, nutmeg, blueberries and chopped walnuts (when I have them). This is how I liked my oatmeal when I had it. Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      November 1, 2017

      Please let me know how it turns out Sandy! Reply

  • Heidi Linsรฉn
    August 27, 2017

    My late grandmother was from Russia and has evidenced the poorer years in her youth. She made buckwheat oven porridge with loads of butter. I mean a LOADS of butter. And it was best served the next day, when it was heated in a pan with a butter and when put on a plate, you added another good chunk of butter on top of it. No wonder I had all that energy growing up! ๐Ÿ˜€ Yet, I must mention, not she on none of us surprisingly never gained extra weight. But now Iแธฟ looking for different ways of cooking buckwheat and as I write, there is some boiling on the stove. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 27, 2017

      Ha! That is common in the slavic world. My Mother always made the best pasta and rice because of the butter! Same thing in our family – we didn’t go out to eat much at all growing up and there weren’t really any serious weight problems. I suspect that eating homecooked meals (even with all the extra yummy butter), is what kept us healthy growing up ๐Ÿ™‚ Thank you for sharing your story with us! Reply

  • Praphulsen Ugrasenan
    August 1, 2017

    Was in a Russian project in UAE. learned only two russian word. and that I ate that for over a month regular at noon, partly as I never new any other words and also partly coz I loved the dish

    “Grechikha and svinina”

    Never could get the love for Grechikha out of me. so started cooking it at home now my son is also big fan of it Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 1, 2017

      That is so great! It’s such a healthy grain ๐Ÿ™‚ Reply

  • June 2, 2017

    I am gluten free so I brought some of my own food while visiting friends.
    I invented a new breakfast while there.
    Buckwheat eggs florentine!
    I used some spinach as the first layer, then the buckwheat and topped it with a fried egg. Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      June 2, 2017

      YUM! Thanks for sharing your great review Amy! Reply

  • Prema
    June 1, 2017

    In India buckwheat is cooked by women during religious fasting. Obviously very healthy and easily digestible. I have just started cooking it as I am not comfortable with wheat,rice or quinoa. So far I feel good eating it. I got the porridge buckwheat first and then the groats and have been looking at various ways of cooking it and came upon your site. In India flat breads called chapaties and fried ones called pooris are also made with buckwheat flour. Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      June 2, 2017

      Thanks for sharing your insights with other readers! ๐Ÿ™‚ Reply

  • T.
    May 24, 2017

    My Slovak partner told me how his mom prepared the roasted buckwheat so it wasn’t gooey. Boil it for only 3 minutes, then put a tight fitting lid on it and turn off the heat. Let it sit and finish cooking for 15-20 minutes. I like to ‘fluff’ my rice/kasha with a fork before serving to separate the grains and it is light and soft. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 25, 2017

      That is a great suggestion – thank you!! ๐Ÿ™‚ Reply

  • Janice Clack
    December 4, 2016

    Our family tradition is to make cabbage rolls (holubshi) with buckwheat, untoasted variety, fried salt pork and onions mixed in. A lot of work but well worth it! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 4, 2016

      Mmm that sounds great!! Reply

  • Yakov
    November 14, 2016

    Do you have a similar recipe where instead of water you’d use milk? In other words, it would simmer in milk for some minutes. I remember my mom used to make it, and it tasted better than the water version, though was a bit trickier to prepare as far as I remember. Thanks! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 14, 2016

      I don’t have anything like that unfortunately. Reply

    • January 15, 2017

      I’ve never heard of milk, but I have made kasha with sauerkraut juice instead of water. Then I mix in some sauerkraut after it’s done cooking. It makes the kasha about 20x tastier in my book. Reply

  • Anubha
    November 8, 2016

    Hi, In India we have two types of Buckwheat, one without peel other is peeled one. Please let us know for this receipe, we have use peeled buckwheat or without peal Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 8, 2016

      I’m not sure if I’ve ever seen unpeeled buckwheat in stores here in the US. I believe it is the peeled one. Does your peeled one look like what I have pictured here? Reply

  • Brian
    August 28, 2016

    I have been eating Buckwheat Groats for more than 50 years. My grandmother was Polish and always had it in the house.
    I frequently have it for breakfast, but cook it a bit differently than outlined here. I usually brown up a 1/4 cup in a tablespoon of butter and then add a cup of hot water and simmer for 12 minutes. To serve it, I add lots of butter and salt. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 28, 2016

      Thank you for sharing your method! We are major buckwheat fans over here so I’ll be trying your method :). Reply

  • Kalena
    August 16, 2016

    Hello Natasha; thank you for this insightful post. Going ‘buckwheat’ is a foreign concept to me but I now feel a little more comfortable, thanks to you. My question relates to the selection of buckwheat in the stores; the variety can be fairly intimidating. Whole Foods and Mom’s Organic carry a handful of varieties, to include hulled, dehulled, groats, roasted, etc. Can you clarify? Thanks in advance for your time. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 16, 2016

      Buy roasted buckwheat groats – they tend to stay firmer and are less likely to become mushy. Any buckwheat I’ve purchased from European markets (like this one with Russian writing on the package), have all worked great. We buy common buckwheat and not dehulled buckwheat. Reply

      • Kalena
        August 18, 2016

        Thank you for your response! I will look for those at our local shop. Reply

  • Tina
    July 26, 2016

    Do you happen to have a picture of the buckwheat brand you bought? I live in Las Vegas, there are a few Mediterranean markets but no Russian markets. Can you please post a picture so i can see what brand it is so i can order it or have someone bring it to me from California? I have made buckwheat before and it came out mushy, probably because it wasn’t the correct kind. My husband loves Buckwheat (Greshka) so i want to make it soon. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 26, 2016

      Tina, check your email. I just sent you the picture. Hope this helps. Reply

      • Tina
        July 26, 2016

        I received it, thank you!! =) Reply

  • Sparks
    July 19, 2016

    ‘I love it more than…quinoa…’.

    Whoa. Talk about damning it with faint praise. Sorry, I’m so not a quinoa fan. After several tries the mate and I gave it up as a lost cause.

    This looks lovely though. Will be making it tonight to sample. Hoping to be able to sub it for rice (tired of brown rice), and eat it for cereal. Yours was the only ‘start here’ recipe I found in the first 3 pages Google threw at me. I’m not ready to be making blini or my own soba noodles just yet. So Thank You! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 20, 2016

      Welcome to the site, I hope you love cooked buckwheat groats. Our family eat this all the time. We eat it just as often as rice, if not more. ๐Ÿ˜„. Reply

  • LTLNBLT
    May 14, 2016

    This was oddly the only thing I have been able to keep down in days (I’m in my first trimester). I smothered it with Brassica & Brine’s Four Thieves kraut (divine). Great recipe! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 14, 2016

      Oh and it’s so good for you too! I’m so happy it agrees with you in your first trimester. Buckwheat is a sort of superfood! That kraut sounds fantastic (did you know sauerkraut is one of the best natural probiotics?)! Where do you purchase that brand? Reply

      • LTLNBLT
        May 14, 2016

        Indeed! My tummy has been off all day. I opened the fridge to look for the pickles you recommended and eyed my kraut and my tummy went, “ding ding ding!”

        ๐Ÿ˜‰

        Brassica & Brine is a locally-made brand here in L.A. They sell at farmers markets. It’s probably the best kraut I’ve ever had! Very well-balanced and easy on the stomachs. They’re really great to just talk to about all things fermented ๐Ÿ™‚

        http://www.brassicaandbrine.com Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          May 15, 2016

          Thanks for sharing! ๐Ÿ™‚ Reply

  • Helen
    April 18, 2016

    Buckwheat used to be a luxury to eat in many families in Belarus. It is one of my favourite porridge and I can eat every day. We do have special recipes when you put buckwheat and milk together overnight but it is mostly done for dieting by our women. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 18, 2016

      That’s interesting! Thanks for sharing that with us ๐Ÿ™‚ Reply

  • Voy
    April 5, 2016

    I must be doing something wrong! I followed the instructions but the water got absorbed by the buckwheat really quickly so I added more and it all turned to mush! Help, please! Ps I used kasha roasted buckwheat Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 5, 2016

      Hi Voy, where did you purchase your buckwheat? Some places (like Winco) just have really bad quality buckwheat and even if it says “toasted,” it turns mushy. Also, did you test your buckwheat when the water was absorbed to see if it was cooked? Reply

      • Voy
        April 7, 2016

        Hi Natasha
        It was from a local Turkish shop I think. The water was absorbed within a few mins so I thought it was strange if you recommend 18-20 mins cooking. Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          April 7, 2016

          That is odd. I’ve never had that happen before. Are you certain you used the same amount of water? Reply

  • ะะš
    March 31, 2016

    buckweat in a ricekooker comes out perfectly (only if it is pre-roasted)

    Also – pre-roasted cooked buckweat is good then to stir fry with butter.. very tasty.. also for the good buckweat it is important to cover it after taking out from stove and wrap it in the blanket for an hour (similar effect in the pressure cooker on the “keep warm” option).. then it will come out all grain non stick together and very fluffy.. russian grandmas use to do this … Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 31, 2016

      Thank you so much for sharing that! Wrapping it that way also makes it a great make-ahead option! Reply

  • Michele
    March 16, 2016

    I buy toasted buckwheat at Nuts.com and mix it with raw hemp seed and chia seeds. I mix a tablespoon or 2 of this mixture into yogurt, oatmeal, or cottage cheese along with fresh fruit. It’s better if you let it sit overnight. The buckwheat stays somewhat crunchy and nut like. Great take along breakfast!
    I also make delicious cabbage rolls with buckwheat and mushrooms instead of ground meat. One of my favorites. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 16, 2016

      That’s so interesting!! Does the buckwheat soften overnight in yogurt and can be eaten uncooked? Reply

      • Michele
        March 17, 2016

        Yes, it is crunchy but not hard. I always used to put almonds or cashews in my oatmeal/yogurt/cottage cheese but am trying to cut calories. The buckwheat gives my the same crunch. Reply

  • February 22, 2016

    Hi Natasha,

    I just found your blog while looking for a recipe for cooking buckwheat.. thanks for the tip about grilling it first, I popped it in the microwave and zapped it until brown, like I do when grilling nuts… it worked fine.. I really loved the taste of the cooked buckwheat.. I didn’t use butter, but added some oat/hazlnut milk at the end, which added a really nice flavour and texture, I also added chopped apple pieces to the water, yum ! and then I added blueberries and sunflower seeds with a stream of maple syrup at the end.. What a delish breakfast.. in every bite. I am surprised I have never cooked buckwheat kasha before, my grandfather was Ukranian!! I never met him, though.. Unfortunately.
    But, I bet he ate this often.
    Thanks… Leesa Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 23, 2016

      Welcome to the site Leesa ๐Ÿ˜ƒ. Thank you for sharing your delicious ideas with us! Buckwheat is definitely a staple among the slavic people. It’s wonderful that you can keep those traditions alive. Reply

  • Emily
    February 21, 2016

    Hi Natasha!:) I’ve been wanting to try buckwheat for a while, but haven’t been able to find it at the store – a few days ago, I *finally* found some at the local Whole Foods:) However – their buckwheat was labeled as “Raw Buckwheat Groats”… Can I still use this for buckwheat recipes? Reply

    • Emily
      February 21, 2016

      Oh gosh, wow – just noticed your note on how to toast it in the skillet! LOL! But now I can’t wait to try this!! Your recipes are absolutely fool-proof – they always come out fantastic! Reply

      • Natasha
        natashaskitchen
        February 21, 2016

        Emily, thank you for the compliment and I hope you’ll find many more favorites here ๐Ÿ˜Š. Reply

  • February 13, 2016

    I mix the dry,toasted buckwheat with one egg, let it soak for a few minutes, turn it into my iron skillet and toast until the egg coating is completely dry. Add stock or water, simmer for 20 minutes or so. Fluff it up nad let it rest with the lid askew while you finish supper. Delicious with pork roast and pork gravy. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 13, 2016

      Thank you for sharing your version ๐Ÿ˜€. Reply

  • Linda
    January 17, 2016

    To avoid the development of ‘mush’ my mom used to toast the dry buckwheat with an egg in a skillet. This separated and coated each kernel of buckwheat. Then it got added to browned onions with water to boil it up. My mother-in-law added “bows” to it (semolina noodles in the shape of bows). Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 17, 2016

      Linda, what a great tip, thanks for sharing. I would like to try it out, just need to buy more buckwheat ๐Ÿ˜. Reply

  • Naomi
    September 22, 2015

    Anyone else cook the buckwheat in the rice cooker amd it was over cooked? I like tje convinience but it looks like porridge. Still tastes good. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 22, 2015

      A rice cooker usually works by cooking until all the water is gone. If you are getting overcooked buckwheat, the most likely reason is too much water. Cut back on the amount of water you are using and see if that fixes the problem. Reply

  • vera bentley
    September 2, 2015

    my (late) dad used to luv this cold (next day) with cold milk & sugar ๐Ÿ™‚ Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 3, 2015

      Isn’t it wonderful how food brings back memories of loved ones? ๐Ÿ™‚ Thanks for sharing that with me ๐Ÿ™‚ Reply

  • andrea
    July 8, 2015

    I mix it with my porridge every morning. Reply

  • Marianna
    April 28, 2015

    I love buckwheat with boiled milk in the morning especially with almond milk and honey! Yummy Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 28, 2015

      Mmmm honey and almond milk sound great! Reply

  • Yuliya
    March 21, 2015

    I love buckwheat! Thanks for bringing the spotlight to it!  Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 21, 2015

      It’s such a wonderful and healthy food and I don’t think it gets nearly the attention that it deserves. Reply

  • March 10, 2015

    As all proper Ukrainians, I love buckwheat! Recently I purchased buckwheat (not from the Russian store, as usual and a big mistake). As I cooked, the grains turned to mush even before the water would boil. I tried again. Same thing! And again…

    Reading your post I realized that they must not have been roasted. Thank you for that tid-bit, I will try roasting them and see what happens. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 11, 2015

      If it’s really mushy, you might add a little less water too, but yes toasting the kernels definitely helps ๐Ÿ™‚ Reply

  • Dmitri
    March 7, 2015

    This is one of the greatest meal. But we put butter is already ready. Anyway buckwheat is one of most useful meat for your body and soul. And today buckwheat is one of the product which is GMO free. You can mix buckwheat kasha with everything you want ex. meat, tomato sauce, kidney beans, even gherkins. I like kasha with onion and garlic, fry a bit 2-3 minutes and then add to kasha and the of course butter a bit. Also buckwheat has a lot of folium acid, if you want to have children eat with your husband eat buckwheat kasha and be always strong ๐Ÿ™‚ Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 7, 2015

      I agree there are so many health benefits for the entire family. Thank you so much for sharing how you like to prepare it ๐Ÿ™‚ Reply

  • Natalie
    March 2, 2015

    I love buckwheat. Unfortunately my husband doesn’t, so I don’t get to eat it very often. I do remember eating it like cereal as a child – with just milk over it (of course after it was cooked). I preferred it warm, but my brother liked it with cold milk. Reply

  • Nataliya
    February 26, 2015

    I just made grechka in my pressure cooker yesterday, and I love how it holds it shape very well and cooked through, when I did it on stove top I didn’t like how it all falls apart. I did use less water though 1:1 ratio and just a tiny bit more water maybe 1\8 c extra, topped with butter during cooking, high pressure for 4 mins, then 10min Natural pressure release. Great results! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 26, 2015

      My rice cooker is similar in that the kernels turn out more formed and firm than on the stove. I haven’t tried making this in a pressure cooker. Thank you so much for sharing your tips with me for how you made it! I’m sure someone else will have questions about making it in a pressure cooker :). Reply

  • February 24, 2015

    ะžะฑะพะถะฐัŽ ะณั€ะตั‡ะบัƒ! But my husband not so much. So I just mix some buckwheat with jasmine rice so both of us can enjoy. ๐Ÿ™‚ Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 25, 2015

      I totally love the idea of mixing buckwheat with rice. That is brilliant! Reply

  • Lana
    February 23, 2015

    My mom makes buckwheat kind of like plov. I used to hate the taste and smell of buckwheat until she made it like that. I might have to ask her how she makes it and share it with you. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 23, 2015

      That would be wonderful!! That is brilliant to make it like plov, especially if it made a buckwheat fan out of you ๐Ÿ™‚ Reply

  • sheri
    February 21, 2015

    i love Buckwheat too, enjoy it plain or with beans, spices, salsa, and sour cream, soooo good. Thanks for showing me how to toast it. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 21, 2015

      Hi Sheri! Thanks for sharing how you like buckwheat. All of that sounds so good and now I’m hungry all over again ๐Ÿ˜‰ Reply

  • Ana S
    February 18, 2015

    My husband loves to cook steak and have buckwheat on the side. That’s usually what he cooks for both of us when IM Working late. Buckwheat with gravy sounds delicious, what kind do you do? Reply

  • February 17, 2015

    I always used to go back to your original buckwheat post and omitted the mushrooms (when I wanted plain buckwheat), and now I have a new post to go to. ๐Ÿ™‚ I need to make buckwheat more often-I really do love it!
    I remember eating warm buckwheat with milk when I was younger…kind of like oatmeal? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 18, 2015

      I’ve had several people say they enjoy it with milk. I haven’t tried that, but it does sound like a nice and healthy breakfast! ๐Ÿ™‚ Reply

  • Lina
    February 17, 2015

    I love love buckwheat!! I like to eat it in many ways! I like it with milk, just cook buckwheat how you usually do it and then when I heat it up the next day I add milk just like cereal. I also cook soup with buckwheat (similar to rice soup) and I love to eat it with warm fresh bread with butter, Yumm! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 17, 2015

      Mmm sounds so homey ๐Ÿ™‚ Reply

  • alena h.
    February 17, 2015

    We love grechka at our house. I usually make it with mushrooms, or buckwheat soup, and I’ve also tried stuffing a bird and baking it in oven. All very good if you’re a fan of grechka. Now, I know some people cook it in milk but I did not like that at all. I guess it depends on what you’re used to. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 17, 2015

      I haven’t tried cooking it in milk but I sure love all of your suggestions! Thank you so much for sharing! How do you make the soup? We’re big fans of buckwheat in our family. Reply

      • alena h.
        February 17, 2015

        I believe olgasflavorfactory has the soup recipe. She uses beef, I usually do it with whatever I have, chicken or Turkey. Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          February 18, 2015

          Thank you so much for sharing that! ๐Ÿ™‚ Reply

  • natasha
    February 16, 2015

    Buckwheat is the best like cereal, I just make sure that I don’t cook it with butter. THE best breakfast food for me! Love it! 8) Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 17, 2015

      So you just cook it in water? Do you add milk or just enjoy it plain? Reply

  • olga
    February 16, 2015

    Thank you for posting this recipe. I actually bought some buck wheat from Russian store cause my hubby is a fan of it. And I haven’t made any. For I wasn’t sure how. I don’t like buckwheat in general and the smell too. But with gravy I can comprimise. Now how to get my kids to try it too. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 16, 2015

      My son eats it with gravy over the top :). Have you tried giving it to them with gravy? I’ve also snuck it into meat patties (katleti) and my son ate them up! Reply

  • Nadya
    February 16, 2015

    I love buckwheat! I was so excited when I found it here in the US.
    I cook it with chicken drumsticks a lot. I pour biking hot water over buckwheat and cover for 5min, then transfer it to a baking dish, place chicken drumsticks on top. Then place some pieces of butter on top of everything and season to taste with pepper, Veggetta seasoning, and some herbs. Cover with foil and cook @350 for about an hour. Take away the foil 5mun before taking out of the oven.
    I love how buckwheat gets cooked in the chicken juices… So yummy ๐Ÿ™‚ Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 16, 2015

      That’s brilliant and I absolutely love your idea! How much buckwheat to water do you use? I’m so excited to give it a try! Reply

      • Nadya
        February 16, 2015

        I use 2 cups of water per each 1 cup of buckwheat. Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          February 17, 2015

          Thank you so much Nadya!! ๐Ÿ™‚ Reply

  • Adi
    February 16, 2015

    Hi Natasha, Thank you so much for this recipe. I was waiting for it :-). I can see the the whole Mendeleev Table is in a grain of buckwheat. Great food! may I ask, how should I adapt it for oven cooking? Thank you,Adi Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 16, 2015

      I don’t currently have any oven-baked buckwheat recipes but I do love the idea of making a casserole buckwheat recipe. Thanks for the idea! I’ll add it to my list of things to experiment with ๐Ÿ™‚ Reply

      • Adi
        February 16, 2015

        Thank you so much Natasha Reply

        • Larisa
          February 17, 2015

          I stuff duckling with buckweat, i mix buckweat with spices i like , diced onions, grated carrots and stuff the duck with it. Then i bake it in the oven. Buckweat comes out soooo flavorful and delicious,. Iprior to stuffing the duck i cover it generously with mayo,&blk pepper inside and outside, that way the meat is flavorful also Reply

          • Natasha
            natashaskitchen
            February 17, 2015

            That is a great idea! I love that you are using buckwheat as stuffing and I’m sure it tastes amazing!

    • Erin R.
      February 21, 2015

      Mix about two cups (cooked and cooled) with an egg, press into a pie plate and bake 20 minutes. It’s a fantastic crust for a quiche. I do it with millet all the time. Reply

      • Natasha
        natashaskitchen
        February 21, 2015

        That’s brilliant! I love it! Thank you for sharing your creative idea! ๐Ÿ™‚ Reply

  • February 15, 2015

    I love how you posted this! Putting grains like this into dishes is SO EASY and yet it packs the meal with so much good nutrition. Love this! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 15, 2015

      Thank you Shelby :). That’s so true! We use buckwheat quite a bit in our house and like to get creative with it :). Reply

  • Olga
    February 15, 2015

    My family loves kasha. I have also cooked it in broth for extra flavor and have topped it with either sautรฉed onions or mushrooms. A dollop of sour cream on the side is also yummy. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 15, 2015

      I love the idea of cooking it in broth and adding onions with mushrooms. We love the mushroom version too (I have a recipe posted in the first paragraph of this post). I also love it plain. Buckwheat is just great all around! ๐Ÿ™‚ Reply

  • Julie
    February 15, 2015

    I love buckwheat! I made some just yesterday. Thanks for the recipe. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 15, 2015

      Me too!! I crave it every time I look at the pictures. I’m a major fan ๐Ÿ™‚ Reply

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