Meat Piroshki (Belyashi)

Serve these meat piroshki by themselves or pair them with that awesome garlic dip you might recall from the potato piroshki. The flavor is fantastic!

If you liked the potato or apple pirojki, you will love these meat filled Belyashi! Some people refer to theses as chebureki, but chebureki are usually made with raw meat and have a thinner dough. The dough is so easy when using  a Breadmaker. Serve these meat piroshki by themselves or pair them with that awesome garlic dip you might recall from the potato piroshki. I know these are originally made with lamb, but turkey and beef are more practical and the flavor is fantastic!

Ingredients for the Meat Piroshki Dough:

1 1/2 Tbsp oil
15 oz warm water
4 cups + 2 Tbsp all-purpose flour (divided)
1 tsp salt
1 Tbsp Active Dry Yeast

Ingredients for the Meat Filling:

1 lb ground turkey
1 lb ground beef (Fat content: 80/20)
2 Tbsp olive oil
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 tsp pepper
1/2 tsp garlic powder
1/2 large onion, finely diced
1 medium carrot, finely grated
3 Tbsp dill
2 Tbsp mayonnaise
1/2 cup warm water

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Other Ingredients:

Enough canola oil to go half-way up the side of the piroshky when frying.
Lots of extra flour to dust the cutting board (I probably use at least 1/2 cup extra flour)

Ingredients for Garlic Dip – “Vmochanka”  

(this is for one serving, so increase it accordingly):
1/4 cup  warm water
1 Tbsp olive oil (you can use any kind of oil really)
1 garlic clove, pressed
1/2 tsp salt

How to Make Russian Pirojki (Chebureki) Dough:

How to make the Dough:

1. The easiest way to do this is in a bread maker. If you have one, set it to the dough setting and add the ingredients in the following order: Oil, water, 2 cups flour, salt, 2 cups + 2 Tbsp flour*, yeast.
A bread maker will do the following: mix, let dough rise, mix again and let the dough rise (It takes about 1 to 1 1/2 hours) and once it’s done in the bread maker, its ready to go.

*to get an exact flour measurement, use a dry ingredients measuring cup and scrape off the top with the back of a butter knife.

You can also make this dough using a stand mixer with a dough hook on speed 2 (mix all the ingredients together, let rise, mix again and then let it rise in a warm place (like the oven). (It should be 2 to 2 1/2 times in volume). While it’s rising, work on the meat filling for piroshki – see below.

2. Put the finished dough onto a well floured cutting board, dust the dough with flour and with well-floured hands, shape it into a large log.
It will rise more as you make the piroshki

3. Cut off pieces one at a time about 3/4″ thick.

4. Place the piece of dough over your well-floured hand (dough will be sticky) and shape it into a 3″ to 4″ circle using your hands. Do not put flour on the side where you are going to put the meat, otherwise the sides won’t seal.

5. Stir the meat mix to distribute the juices. Place 1 heaping tablespoon of meat filling in the center.Cover the meat with the sides of the dough (being careful not to let oils or juices seep out), and pinch the edges together to seal the dough. Flatten the pirojki slightly to make them a more uniform size.

Notes:

It helps to wash your hands half-way through the process to keep the dough from really sticking to your hand. And keep those hands well-floured!

6. Heat oil in a large, deep, heavy-bottomed pan or cast iron dutch oven. There should be enough oil to cover the pirojki half-way up the side.

7. Place them in the hot oil (about 330˚ F) and fry until deep golden brown on each side. Sometimes they puff up a lot on one side so you may end up with a third side that needs to be fried.

8. Place on paper towels to cool and enjoy! Try the garlic dip – it’s GOOD!

How to Make Meat filling for Belyashi:

1. Heat a large skillet over medium/high heat. Brown ground beef and turkey, breaking it up into small pieces with a spatula. Season meat with 1/2 tsp salt, 1/ tsp pepper and 1/2 tsp garlic powder.

2. When the meat is almost done, add diced onion and saute 5 minutes, stirring occasionally.

3. Add shredded carrots and saute another 3 minutes, stirring occasionally.

4. Add 3 Tbsp dill, mix well.

5. Add mayo, stir well.

6. Stir in 1/2 cup water to moisten the meat mix. Transfer meat mix to a bowl and let cool to warm or room temperature.

Meat Piroshki (Belyashi)

4.77 from 17 votes
Prep Time: 2 hours
Cook Time: 20 minutes
Total Time: 2 hours 20 minutes
Serve these meat piroshki by themselves or pair them with that awesome garlic dip you might recall from the potato piroshki. The flavor is fantastic!
Author: Natasha of NatashasKitchen.com
Skill Level: Medium
Cost to Make: $8-$10
Servings: 20

Ingredients

Ingredients for the Dough:

  • 1 1/2 Tbsp oil
  • 15 oz warm water
  • 4 cups + 2 Tbsp all-purpose flour divided
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 Tbsp Active Dry Yeast

Ingredients for the Meat Filling:

  • 1 lb ground turkey
  • 1 lb ground beef Fat content: 80/20
  • 2 Tbsp olive oil
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/4 tsp pepper
  • 1/2 tsp garlic powder
  • 1/2 large onion finely diced
  • 1 medium carrot finely grated
  • 3 Tbsp dill
  • 2 Tbsp mayonnaise
  • 1/2 cup warm water

Other Ingredients:

  • Enough canola oil to go half-way up the side of the piroshky when frying.
  • Lots of extra flour to dust the cutting board I probably use at least 1/2 cup extra flour
  • this is for one serving, so increase it accordingly

Ingredients for Garlic Dip – “Vmochanka”:

  • 1/4 cup warm water
  • 1 tbsp olive oil you can use any kind of oil really
  • 1 garlic clove pressed
  • 1/2 tsp salt

Instructions

How to Make Meat filling for Belyashi:

  1. Heat a large skillet over medium/high heat. Brown ground beef and turkey, breaking it up into small pieces with a spatula. Season meat with 1/2 tsp salt, 1/ tsp pepper and 1/2 tsp garlic powder.
  2. When the meat is almost done, add diced onion and saute 5 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  3. Add shredded carrots and saute another 3 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  4. Add 3 tbsp dill, mix well.
  5. Add mayo, stir well.
  6. Stir in 1/2 cup water to moisten the meat mix. Transfer meat mix to a bowl and let cool to warm or room temperature.

How to make the Dough:

  1. The easiest way to do this is in a bread maker. If you have one, set it to the dough setting and add the ingredients in the following order: Oil, water, 2 cups flour, salt, 2 cups + 2 Tbsp flour, yeast. A bread maker will do the following: mix, let dough rise, mix again and let the dough rise (It takes about 1 to 1 1/2 hours) and once it’s done in the bread maker, its ready to go.
  2. You can also make this dough using a stand mixer with a dough hook on speed 2(mix all the ingredients together, let rise, mix again and then let it rise in a warm place (like the oven). (It should be 2 to 2 1/2 times in volume). While it's rising, work on the meat filling for piroshki - see below.
  3. Put the finished dough onto a well floured cutting board, dust the dough with flour and with well-floured hands, shape it into a large log.It will rise more as you make the piroshki.
  4. Cut off pieces one at a time about 3/4″ thick.
  5. Place the piece of dough over your well-floured hand (dough will be sticky) and shape it into a 3″ to 4″ circle using your hands. Do not put flour on the side where you are going to put the meat, otherwise the sides won’t seal.
  6. Stir the meat mix to distribute the juices. Place 1 heaping tablespoon of meat filling in the center.Cover the meat with the sides of the dough (being careful not to let oils or juices seep out), and pinch the edges together to seal the dough. Flatten the pirojki slightly to make them a more uniform size.
  7. Heat oil in a large, deep, heavy-bottomed pan or cast iron dutch oven. There should be enough oil to cover the pirojki half-way up the side.
  8. Place them in the hot oil (about 330° F) and fry until deep golden brown on each side. Sometimes they puff up a lot on one side so you may end up with a third side that needs to be fried.
  9. Place on paper towels to cool and enjoy!

Recipe Notes

It helps to wash your hands half-way through the process to keep the dough from really sticking to your hand. And keep those hands well-floured!

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natashaskitchen

Welcome to my kitchen! I am Natasha, the blogger behind Natasha's Kitchen (since 2009). My husband and I run this blog together and share only our best, family approved recipes with YOU. Thanks for stopping by! We are so happy you're here.

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Read comments/reviewsAdd comment/review

  • Sue Mishoe
    February 24, 2018

    Hi Natasha!

    I’ve just made piroshkis with beef and rice. They came out good, but a little bland. It wasn’t your recipe. 😉

    I’ve seen two sauces…your garlic dipping sauce and another “thousand island” type sauce. I see your garlic one is for potato stuffed pies. So I was hoping you could suggest the best Russian dipping sauce for a beef and rice meat pie?

    Or would the garlic sauce
    work well?

    Thanks in advance for your help!
    I intend on using your version next time I make them! 😊
    I’ve tried a couple of your recipes and love them!!!
    Best Regards,
    Sue Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 24, 2018

      Hi Sue, the garlic sauce would work really well for this also :). I’m guessing it probably needed more seasonings with using rice vs all meat for the filling. Reply

  • Ali
    November 22, 2017

    Hi Natasha, I want to make this recipe, but I’m wondering, can I use ground pork instead of ground turkey? Or will the taste be different? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 22, 2017

      Hi Ali, that will still work well 🙂 Reply

  • Mariel
    October 15, 2017

    I’m beyond excited to make this today! I’ve tried so many recipes for piroshki and they’re disappointing… my dad’s side emigrated from Prussia in the late 1800s but they weren’t big on keeping to tradition. They moved to a Polish area and made pierogi, which are a poor substitute. lol

    When I was a child, my mother (who speaks Russian) would take me with her every Saturday, to help USSR refugees learn English. They’d make a FEAST of piroshki, dolmadakia, eggplants to make a kind of babaganoush salad, and a salad made from leaves and a lemony, homemade kind of mayonnaise. We’d be sent home with a stinky, greasy paper bag of piroshki and eagerly dug into them at home.

    This looks EXACTLY like the dough I remember, which I’ve been looking for and trying other recipes to replicate for YEARS. I think I’ve finally found it – THANK YOU! Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      October 15, 2017

      My pleasure Mariel! Please let me know what you think of the recipe!! 🙂 Reply

  • Valentina
    December 15, 2016

    My family makes their piroshki a bit different we use raw meat filling for the inside. Anyways, I had a question for you and was wondering how do you keep your oil clean? Not just with piroshki but also like otbivniye and things like that it seems like my oil gets that black sticky stuff after the first batch. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 15, 2016

      Hi Valentina, I usually get the blackened bits if my prioshki aren’t sealed and some of the filling seeps out and gets burned in the oil. I would use a fine mesh spatula or sieve like this one to skim off the black stuff if it occurs and that helps to keep the pan clean. Reply

  • I do not have a bread maker. How long do I have to mix the dough by hand?
    I am a desperate person who must make these Piroshkis soon. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 23, 2016

      Hi Evan, Using a stand mixer with a dough hook on speed 2
      1. mix all the ingredients together and knead for 10 minutes until well blended.
      2. Cover with plastic wrap and let rise in a warm place for 30 min until double in volume,
      3. mix again and then cover with plastic wrap and let it rise in a warm place (like the oven, but not hotter than 100 degrees F). (It should be 2 to 2 1/2 times in volume ~ about 1 hour)
      I hope that helps. Reply

  • Jessica
    November 23, 2016

    That’s a great recipe for fried meat pirogi, however, it’s definitely not belyashi. Belyashi are made with diffent kind of dough and have hole on top;) Reply

  • Olga Melnik
    November 7, 2016

    Hi Natasha,
    Does this dough make soft(like fluffy) peroshki? Or is it more like the chebureki style? I’m trying to recreate something this granny used to make but never got the recipe. She makes like soft ponchiki balls filled with meat and deep fried.. Would this recipe work? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 7, 2016

      Hi Olga, it sounds like it would work based on what you’re describing. The dough is very soft 🙂 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 7, 2016

      Hi Olga, it sounds like it would work based on what you’re describing. The dough is very soft 🙂 Reply

  • Tina
    June 14, 2016

    Are there any ready made dough’s that you recommend for this? My family loves perashkis, i want to make them but i want to buy the dough instead of making it from scratch. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      June 14, 2016

      Hi Tina, I haven’t found anything comparable. Have you tried raw tortillas? Although the form for those is different and they are more like turnovers but they still taste very Slavic :). If you haven’t discovered them yet, they are really really tasty! 🙂 Reply

    • Elena D
      August 10, 2017

      Rhodes Frozen Dinner Rolls is what I use when I’m too lazy to make my own dough. Reply

  • Julie
    April 14, 2016

    Hi Natasha,

    THANK YOU for this blog. My late grandmother used to make this amazing sweet bread with beef or sauerkraut in it…I don’t think she ever wrote the recipes down. This seems like it might be a similar recipe. Is sauerkraut a common replacement for the beef?

    Julie Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 15, 2016

      Hi Julie! I’ve heard of it being done but I’ve only tried with braised cabbage which has sauerkraut mixed into it and it’s super tasty! Here’s where I used that filling for the baked version of piroshki but you can totally use it in fried piroshki. Reply

  • Lisa
    April 14, 2016

    My ancestors moved to Canada from Russia in 1860s we still cook a lot of this food.I’m studying it now.thanks for the blog Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 15, 2016

      You’re so welcome! I hope my blog is a good resource for you 🙂 Reply

  • Irina
    April 2, 2016

    Hi Natasha! Can you please advise on how long should I let the dough rise the first and second time. And also what should be the oven temp when plased to rise for the second time in it. I am using the mixer method since I don’t have a bread maker… yet 🙂 Spasibo! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 2, 2016

      Hi Irina, it depends on if you are leaving it at room temperature or in a warm (not hotter than 100˚F) oven. If it’s in a warm oven, I’d say about 30-45 minutes each rise but at room temperature it could take at least an hour each rise. Reply

  • Mila
    March 23, 2016

    Natasha,
    Can this dough recipe be used for baking as well?
    You think I should use your recipe for baked apple piroshki for the dough (only use meat filling) or use this recipe and bake?
    I am trying to see if the dough was meant for frying, would it taste different if baked in the oven.
    Thank you. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 23, 2016

      Hi Mila, I don’t think this recipe would work well for baking. If you want baked piroshki, you are better off following this recipe Reply

      • Mila
        March 23, 2016

        Thank you Natasha. But when when I clicked on that link new page appeared saying ‘404 – page not found. Sorry, the page you were looking for could not be found’

        Maybe something is missing in the link? Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          March 23, 2016

          Thank you for letting me know, I just got it fixed and you can go there by clicking here as well. Reply

          • Mila
            March 24, 2016

            Thank you! I saved it.
            I have a question. I know it’s not in the topic, but I couldn’t find the right thread for it.
            I am trying to re-create the old familiar ‘Kartoshka’ Cookies taste that we used to make in the Soviet Union from cocoa powder, walnuts, butter and condensed milk. I got it all, but am having a trouble to find the right cocoa powder for that. Some are light, some dark some are already sweet, some have no sugar.

            If you ever made it here in the US, can you please suggest best cocoa powder kind that we can find here?

            Thank you again!

          • Natasha
            natashaskitchen
            March 24, 2016

            Hi Mila, to be honest, I’ve never made the kartoshka cookies but it is on my to-do list. I’m not sure exactly but I would guess it’s probably a standard brown cocoa color – I would probably go with the Hersheys regular cocoa powder to make it look like the skins on potatoes.

  • Jackie
    February 8, 2016

    Hi Natasha ..Yummy recipes !!
    I am from India and I have been to Ukraine ..I loved your food !Now am thinking about starting a chain of restaurants in India and GCC..I am thinking about including Russian salads and snacks in our menu..I guess you could help us..kindly let me know how i can contact you for further assistance Reply

  • Mila
    January 13, 2016

    What kind of Breadmaker is best? Which one are you using, Natasha?
    I am so tired of making it by hand and what a relief to see that it can be done in the Breadmaker! Please share your brand of it? Thank you! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 14, 2016

      Hi Mila, I actually just sold mine and I beleive it was a Breadman. This is the brand I’m eyeing to try next: http://amzn.to/1OkjCYu. 🙂 Reply

      • Mila
        January 14, 2016

        Thank you so much! Will this one do too: http://amzn.to/1JNozKr ?

        I saw the one you want, dies it have a button for ‘dough only’ or I will have to watch it and stop on time? I read many Amazon reviews on few Brrad Machines and some people ask the same question. Mostly women who want to continue their own creations in the oven. They want dough only. I guess it’s an important question.

        Thank you again! 🙂 Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          January 14, 2016

          I believe most of them have the dough option. if you look at the Cuisinart one that you linked (which is a nice one!), on the photo in the description below, you’ll see the control panel and #8 says dough. That typically means there is a dough setting. Reply

          • Mila
            January 14, 2016

            Thank you for your advice. I saw most reviews (1000 +) for the Oster CKSTBRTW20 and the Cuisinart CBK-100. I always go by the reviews as I like to read what people say. I believe the more reviews I read, the more I know what’s wrong and what’s not about it. Like I found best doctors by visiting http://www.Vitals.com and http://www.HealthGrades.com
            Best decisions I ever made. By reading what people say or how many stars the left for this or that doctor, saved me money and disappointments. It almost broke my heart to read how many people were mistreated by some docs that I almost chose myself and almost went to!
            I know choosing a breadmaker is not as crucial as choosing doctors, but still I would like to make the right choice 🙂
            I am bouncing between the Oster CKSTBRTW20 and Conair Cuisinart CBK-100. Both 2 lbs.
            Are you thinking about the Oster CKSTBRTW20 one because you have heard or read so much about it or because you personally used it and loved it?
            I am glad I bumped into your website, just when I was getting discouraged with the dough making deal!

          • Natasha
            natashaskitchen
            January 14, 2016

            Thanks for sharing that with me! I’ve had an Oster in the past and it worked well and I do the same thing, I read Amazon reviews and go with the best reviews 🙂

          • Mila
            January 14, 2016

            Here is what I found to compare best ones:
            http://bestreviews.com/best-bread-makers

            Maybe it will help you to make your choice too.

          • Natasha
            natashaskitchen
            January 14, 2016

            Thank you so much for sharing that with me! 🙂

    • Mila
      January 14, 2016

      If you don’t mind, I have one more question. If I want 20 pirojki, how do I know how much of everything to include in the machine? Making by hand is one thing, but machine is different. The ingredients you listed, for how many pirojki is that?
      I listened and watched the videos, read all the feedback, but most of it about making ready bread, not one about the dough.
      Please share how much of the ingredients you used and for how many pirojki? Reply

      • Natasha
        natashaskitchen
        January 14, 2016

        You should get about 20 piroshki from this recipe. Reply

  • Anna
    October 6, 2015

    Awwwwe the best part is when the filling is not cooked prior to deep-frying…. When you put raw ground beef into uncooked dough and then deep-fry it, something incredibly delicious takes place as the meat juices cook the dough from the inside. I’ve tried it both ways and the uncooked beef method is sooooo much tastier. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 7, 2015

      We make our easy chebureki that way and I agree it is delicious! Reply

    • Visitor
      November 21, 2016

      I totally agree with you, Anna! Reply

  • Sameera
    May 6, 2015

    Very good Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 6, 2015

      Thank you so much Sameera 🙂 Reply

  • ruhie
    April 12, 2015

    This recipe is just what I was looking for. Thank you!

    I have a question, too. Years ago, there was a small Russian restaurant in San Francisco that I loved. It was the first place I ever had piroshki, and they were very different from this. They were wrapped in something thin, like a crepe, and maybe steamed (?). The filling was ground beef, onions, dill weed and mashed hard boiled eggs. Is this another kind of piroshki, or was it because the Russian owner’s wife was French? 😉 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 13, 2015

      If they were steamed, then they were probably manti. I don’t have a steamer so I haven’t posted a recipe for them yet. I need to research and get a steamer because manti are good! 🙂 Reply

      • ruhie
        April 13, 2015

        Thank you, Natasha. I’m very happy to have found your blog! Reply

  • Kristina
    March 5, 2015

    Hi Natasha. Quick and probably silly question(s):
    1. When you say to let the dough rise (using stand mixer) for Belyashi the first time around, should it be in the warm place? Also, (this is a stupid question) when you say like the oven…. do you actually mean putting it in the oven or just near it or what?
    2. For Chebureki: do you roll out the dough to make it thinner than for Belyashi?
    Thanks in advance for your response. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 5, 2015

      You can leave it in a warm room or put it in the oven as long as the oven is not warmer than 100°F. It will rise just fine in a 70 deg F room temperature but if you put it in a warm room it will rise faster. I have not tried this recipe for chebureki. I have found that it is way easier to use raw tortillas for those. I do have a great recipe posted for those on my blog. My mom has made Chebureki using a dough similar to this one and it does work but you have to make sure that you mold them flatter so that the meat inside gets fully cooked through. If you have never tried them with raw tortillas, I strongly recommend that you do. They are so tasty and super easy because you don’t have to make the dough. Reply

  • Kinsey
    December 21, 2014

    Hi, I was wondering what is the difference between belyashi and Piroshki ? Thank you for your time,

    Blessings to you! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 21, 2014

      As far as I understand, Belyashi are more commonly made with raw meat that cooks inside while they are fried in oil and they are flatter in order for the meat to cook through. Some people use the terms interchangeably. Piroshki can be made with a variety of fillings such as cooked meats, cooked mashed potatoes, apples, etc. Thank you and blessings to you as well! Reply

  • December 9, 2014

    Thanks so much. can i put the bowl in the oven first then turn it on, & how long should i leave the oven on to to make 100 deg. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 9, 2014

      What is the temperature of the warm setting of your oven? Every oven is different so you have to kind of guess. You could also leave it at room temperature to rise; it will just take a little longer. Reply

  • olga
    December 8, 2014

    Hi natasha.I folowed the derictions but my dough didnt really rise in the oven i coverd it & still the top was dry. can u tell me why that happed, whats the temp.is suposty be? How is yr pregnancy so far? time flies u r almost due. May God bless u & give u srength to bring this baby to the world. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 8, 2014

      It sounds like your oven was probably too hot. it shouldn’t be hotter than 100˚F or you risk cooking the dough and killing the yeast. That could explain why it wasn’t rising. I’ve been down that road before, especially since my previous oven didn’t have a “warm” setting cooker than 170˚ and I always had to get creative with propping the oven door open, setting the bowl over towels (anything to keep the dough from getting too hot). I hope that helps! I’m feeling so tired lately. I hit the third trimester and it sure slowed me down. Thank you so much for your sweet words 🙂 Reply

  • Cristina
    December 2, 2014

    Natasha, it is a great recipe! Do you know the ingredients for cheese filling? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 2, 2014

      Farmers cheese, egg and sugar, but I haven’t developed a recipe with exact measurements yet. One of my readers, Lora, shared her version:
      Farmers cheese filling:
      1/2 pound farmer’s cheese
      1 egg
      2 tbs sugar
      2 tbs sour cream
      1 tsp vanilla Reply

      • Cristina
        December 2, 2014

        Awesome. Thank you for your quick reply! Reply

  • Laura-Boitschenko-Yarington
    November 19, 2014

    bolshoya spaseebah ! Reply

  • Marina
    November 7, 2014

    Made these yesterday. They were delicious! The dough was incredible, and so easy to make. I always had anxiety towards dough for peroshki…I think it left now. You could probably use the same dough for cabbage/potato filling too right? Reply

  • natalya
    October 6, 2014

    do u know how many calories in 1 pirazok? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 6, 2014

      I have no idea how to calculate how much oil is in a fried food. I have no idea; sorry :(… Maybe it’s best not to know. 😉 Reply

  • September 17, 2014

    Thank u so much for ur receipts I love all of then and this my first time making dough and baking too 😉 I love all of ur food 🙂 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 17, 2014

      I’m so glad to hear you are enjoying the blog 🙂 Thanks for the awesome feedback 🙂 Reply

  • September 17, 2014

    I have a question how long is the dough some stand? And I don’t have iron Dutch oven can I use pan? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 17, 2014

      It depends on what temp you are letting the dough rise in. If the room is cold, it will take longer, if you put it in a warm (no more than 100˚F) oven, it will be twice as fast. In the oven, I’d give it 30-45 min and at room temp maybe 1 to 1 1/2 hours. It should be about 2 1/2 times in volume. Yes you can absolutely use a pan. Use one with tall walls to prevent oil splatter and one with a heavy bottom to maintain even cooking temps. Reply

  • September 16, 2014

    Hi natasha if I don’t have iron Dutch oven, can I use pan or what can I use? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 16, 2014

      You can use a heavy-bottomed pot; just a pot that heats evenly and you want something with taller walls so it doesn’t splatter as much 🙂 Reply

  • eugene
    September 7, 2014

    I would be nice to have an idea of how much to mix the dough and after it rises how much to mix again Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 7, 2014

      You just mix for a minute or two and then let it rise. I’ll time it next time. In my bread maker it takes an hour start to finish. If not using a bread maker, You will want to let it rise in a warm 100 degree F oven. Reply

  • Luba
    July 28, 2014

    Hi! I just made this recipe and it came out really good but the dough was very crunchy and it wouldn’t get a “golden brown”. 🙁 Was more golden yellow. When my mom made it it would be a nice very light brown color and soft.
    I had to make the dough with a spatula because I don’t have a bread maker nor the mixer with the hook. I also used vegetable oil because canola oil is not natural ( I also recently learned it’s bad for you. ). As far as the dough I did everything else by the recipe. Would you happen to guess where I went wrong? 🙁 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 28, 2014

      It kind of sounds like your piroshki absorbed too much oil. You might try heating the oil up more next time. If you put them in when the oil is not hot enough (or if you put too many in at once and cool down the oil), the piroshki are more likely to absorb oil. About how long did it take you to cook each side? Reply

      • Luba
        July 29, 2014

        Hmmm that’ll make sense. The first ones I put in the oil was too hot…now that I’m thinking about it, the oil sprayed everywhere but the 2 piroshki came out pretty well lol. I didn’t time them but I’d say about 5-10 min. I took them out when I felt like they were in there for too long. How long does it normally take to cook one? Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          July 29, 2014

          They normally shouldn’t splatter unless the seal broke and some of the juicy contents touched the oil. It’s normally not more than 2-3 minutes per side since the filling is already cooked. If you have a candy thermometer, the oil should be about 330˚F. Reply

  • Pman5kMO
    January 13, 2014

    I am going to make some with Venison… because game is yummy Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 14, 2014

      I’m not used to venison, but if you love it, I’m sure you’ll think it’s amazing 🙂 Reply

  • Domnika
    December 3, 2013

    Just saw your meat piroshky ….I put mozzarella cheese in the filling and they are so dang good! That’s the way my mom taught me how to make them. My mom has a certified kitchen at home and does all kinds of craft shows and farmers markets..She is famous for her homemade bread and bagels. So delish! She also does lots of different kinds of canning goods. My parents raised us as Russian old believers and my mom made everything from scratch. Love Russian food! Oh, what kind of flour do you use Canadian or American? My mom and all my family use Canadian. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 3, 2013

      For Piroshki I just use American 🙂 I do love that about Russian cooking; using simple raw ingredients to make amazing dishes! P.S. Do you happen to have a good recipe for black bread? I’ve been searching for some time! Reply

  • November 22, 2013

    Oh. My. God… I am going to a Russian dinner this evening and made these this afternoon. I have never made anything like this but – yum!! Soo so good. I have already eaten 3 and don’t think I will be hungry for dinner! Hehee – took some photos and will post back here a bit later.
    Thank you!
    Mandi Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 23, 2013

      I’m so glad you loved them. They’re dangerously good aren’t they? 😉 Reply

      • November 23, 2013

        Really did and yes! – they were so well received too. Other dishes people brought were caviar pie Romanoff, borscht, beef stroganoff and dessert of pashka! Yumm…

        Russian Meat Piroshki (Belyashi) babushka’s photostream http://flic.kr/ps/29gGc7 Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          November 23, 2013

          That’s awesome! Thanks for including the link to your photo stream 🙂 Lovely, just lovely 🙂 Reply

  • michaellee
    September 21, 2013

    I like to add cheese, I will use Rhodes dough and bake them when in a hurry and they turn out pretty good for a quick baked option Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 21, 2013

      Thank you for the tip Michaellee :). Reply

  • karolina
    August 23, 2013

    hey natasha for how long did you saute the meat? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 23, 2013

      Just until its fully cooked through. Reply

  • Tallya
    August 11, 2013

    It seems like its more of a broth in there i guess… I haven’t made them in a few years, might have to repeat soon per hubby’s request 😉 If you google belyashi, you will see some with holes 😛 Reply

  • Tallya
    August 9, 2013

    Ugh… I hate frying! I know that food fried at the correct temp does not absorb as much oil, but i still dont like it. Though fried dough obviously tastes amazing. I read some comments and I have to admit, when I make things such as pelmeni, which is really rare, I do like to add a bit of mayo, I feel it gives great flavor as well as moistingness (not a word, i know) to the meat filling. I have to say though, these are pirojki, and that is great 😉 but not belyashi, as those are made with raw meat and a hole in the middle, when you drop them in the oil, you do so with the hole side down and that way after they are done frying on the other side, there is a “juice” on the inside 🙂 Not that I’m a pro, and I didnt grow up on belyashi and pirojki… just what I learned from my 7 years of marriage and lots of cooking using russian recipe sites. Thanks for your recipes Natasha! That’s my name too btw 🙂 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 9, 2013

      Thanks Natasha! 🙂 I didn’t know about the hole in the middle but that sounds interesting. And they don’t absorb too much oil with the hole there? Reply

  • Nelya
    August 5, 2013

    Hi Natasha – what do u think about placing these in a deep fryer? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 5, 2013

      I think it would work well. The cooking would be more even, just make sure they don’t brown too quickly. You want the filling to be nice and hot 🙂 Reply

  • peperintpatty
    June 1, 2013

    I am trying to find similar recipe to meat piroshky that I had after mass. It was like a filled donut but soft bread like and it had ground beef onion and rice. This was a Russian orthodox church recipe. Does anyone have a recipe like this? Reply

  • oksana
    June 1, 2013

    Hi Natasha,
    just a quick question, how long do you kneed the dough, then how long do you let the dough rise after the first mix? And then do you just redo the same length of kneeding and rising again? I dont have a bread maker, but I do have a kitchenaid mixer with a dough hook. The times werent really clear… Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      June 1, 2013

      Using a stand mixer with a dough hook on speed 2
      1. mix all the ingredients together and knead for 10 minutes until well blended.
      2. Cover with plastic wrap and let rise in a warm place for 30 min until double in volume,
      3. mix again and then cover with plastic wrap and let it rise in a warm place (like the oven, but not hotter than 100 degrees F). (It should be 2 to 2 1/2 times in volume ~ about 1 hour)
      I hope that helps. Reply

  • xAnastasiya
    April 17, 2013

    This is an absoloutely beautiful recipe! My babushka makes traditional piroshki and I haven’t been able to get my hands on her infamous recipe yet, but these turned out quite well. 🙂

    Has anyone tried serving them with Soy Sauce and cream together? Whenever we eat pelmeni we cover them in soy and cream, and it complements it beautifully, but no one else seems to have heard of the combination.

    Thanks so much for the recipe, Natasha! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 17, 2013

      You are welcome Anastasiya, I’m glad you like the recipe :). Reply

  • Oksana
    March 7, 2013

    I don’t have a bread maker but would like to make this using my handy dandy Kitchen Aid mixer. Have you ever made it using the mixer? If so, could you tell me how long to knead the dough and allow it rise, etc? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 7, 2013

      I had some notes on the Kitchen Aid mixer in step #1: “You can also make this dough using a stand mixer with a dough hook on speed 2(mix all the ingredients together, let rise, mix again and then let it rise in a warm place (like the oven). (It should be 2 to 2 1/2 times in volume).” It takes about 1.5 to 2 hours to rise; it also depends on where you let it rise; it will rise faster in a 100 degree oven and slower at room temp. Cover the top with a towel so it doesn’t dry out. Reply

  • Vita
    February 26, 2013

    Hey Natasha, would vegetable oil be ok to use instead of canola oil? I want to try these today, but don’t have canola oil, and don’t want to run to the store just for that… Thanks! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 26, 2013

      Yes vegetable oil would work for these 🙂 Reply

      • Vita
        February 26, 2013

        Thanks! I’ll give it a try and let you know later how it went! 🙂 Reply

        • Vita
          March 1, 2013

          Hey Natasha! Sorry, finally getting some time to let you know how the piroshki went! They were pretty good. I actually ended up making half with meat and half with the potatoes…and I did make the garlic dip. I would say that the ones with potatoes are my favorite, and really delicious with the garlic dip. But I did take another readers advice and let the garlic sit for atleast an hour, and I totally noticed a difference in flavor! Way much better the longer it sits!

          Question for you or Vadim, have you guys tried making garlic butter dip? If so, what amounts of what?

          Thanks for all the work you both put into this blog!! Its my favorite go-to blog for recipes!!! 🙂 Reply

          • Vita
            March 1, 2013

            Forgot to mention, I did use vegtable oil, and it worked out just fine…I just kept checking the temp of the oil with every piroshok I put in.

          • Natasha
            natashaskitchen
            March 1, 2013

            Vita thank you for letting me know that you enjoyed the recipe. Looks like I’ll be marinating my garlic longer before I dip 🙂 Thanks for the tip!

  • Adriana
    February 8, 2013

    Hi.. Adriana here again… I just wanted to let you know how excited I am for finding your blog filled with recipes that i had no idea about. I am Brazilian and as you can imagine out ethnic background is completely different, but I find it comforting to know that we have something in common…. the love of food! We Brazilians love hearty foods and i will definitely will be trying this recipe! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 8, 2013

      I hope you’ll find lots of new favorites :). Reply

  • Jennifer
    January 26, 2013

    I made these and they turned out amazing. They were a huge hit. How do you think the recipe would turn out if I tried to bake these instead of frying them? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 26, 2013

      I haven’t tried baking this dough recipe, but I think it needs to be a different dough to work well for baking. I’ll be testing a couple recipes that I have this week and will post which ever one I think is best 🙂 Reply

      • Jennifer
        January 28, 2013

        Thanks, that sounds great! Reply

      • Lina
        February 22, 2013

        Hey Natash.. Did you ever figure out a recipe for the dough that can be baked? Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          February 22, 2013

          A couple of my readers shared their recipes with me and they will be tested soon; I’m thinking next week. Sorry my to-do list is a mile long! 🙂 Reply

          • Lina
            February 22, 2013

            oh no prob.. i just realized this is a new post.. for some reason the date seemed a year old to me.. lol

          • Natasha
            natashaskitchen
            February 22, 2013

            No, you are correct; I’ve taken forever and a day to post a baked piroshki recipe. 😉

  • Olia
    January 22, 2013

    I made those for dinner tonight. Awesome! I just can’t get enough of you wonderful recipes. I already planned my meals for the week 🙂 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 22, 2013

      Thank you for a sweet comment Olia, I’m glad you enjoying the recipes :). Reply

  • Lisa
    January 21, 2013

    These sound wonderful, I am going to make them for dinner tonight! What can I serve as a side dish? I spent the majority of this morning looking at all your recipes and I’m super excited to try them 🙂 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 21, 2013

      Welcome to the site Lisa. I would serve some vegetables on the side like Cabbage and Bell Pepper Salad or they also go great with soups. Hope this helps :). Reply

  • Yulya
    January 2, 2013

    Natasha! Your recepies are amazing!! Thanks so much for all the work you do to make my life easier!!! Just made this pirozhki- they are soooooo good. I never thought of precooking meat. Thank you for all your recepies!!! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 2, 2013

      Thanks Yulya; you’re so sweet 🙂 Reply

  • ELla
    December 15, 2012

    Hello Natasha,
    Were you able to try out a recipe where the piroshki were baked?
    I’ve found some baked versions for sweet ones, and figured if you just don’t put in the sugar, the dough should work well for the meats too. What do you think? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 15, 2012

      That sounds like it would work; it’s the same idea with fried piroshki. Let me know how it works out and if you find a great recipe! 😉 Reply

  • October 29, 2012

    This is mouthwatering! Thank you! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 29, 2012

      You’re very welcome Reply

  • Diana
    October 23, 2012

    I used the dough except instead of meat filling i made a cabbage filling. The dough was perfect!! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 23, 2012

      Awesome! So glad you liked it! Reply

  • Vita
    September 28, 2012

    I made these yesterday and they turned out delicious!! This is the best dough for pirozhki that I have tried so far! It’s so easy to make and it’s so light and tasty. Thank you for a delicious recipe! I will be making them again next week:) Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 28, 2012

      Thanks Vita. I’m so glad you enjoyed the recipe. Now try the one with potatoes and the garlic dip. DROOL. And the ones with apples are quite nice too 🙂 There’s so much you can do with that dough! Reply

      • Vita
        September 29, 2012

        Yes, I will be definitely trying the potato and apple ones next week:) Reply

  • Ana
    August 7, 2012

    I’m trying these this week! Gonna half the recipe though, since I’m just making it as a snack for 4 people.. Sadly, I didn’t find ground turkey.. Will it taste okay with just ground beef? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 7, 2012

      I think it should be fine, just maybe a little dryer, but should still be ok. Reply

  • Oksana
    August 4, 2012

    Hi, i just try those to make…….They are still VERY white after frying. NO one has that???? there is no sugar in dough. They taste ok Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 4, 2012

      If they aren’t turning golden, it’s usually because your oil is not hit enough, try turning it up a notch. Also wait a little bit between adding each pirojok since they cool down the oil. Reply

  • vera
    July 21, 2012

    How much sugar do u put in da dough? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 21, 2012

      Oops sorry that was a typo. You don’t need sugar for the meat piroshki dough. If you are filling the dough with something sweet like apples, then you would add sugar according to the apple piroshki recipe. Thanks for asking 🙂 I’ve corrected the error. Reply

  • Olya
    July 19, 2012

    What is the best dough recipe for belyashi using a breadmaker? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 19, 2012

      I haven’t tried other recipes besides mine. Reply

  • Courtney
    July 2, 2012

    OMG OMG OMG I am SO excited aboug this recipe. I love tbese so much and cannot get my friend’s grandmother’s recipe to save my life. THANK YOU gor sharing!! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 2, 2012

      You’re welcome 🙂 Enjoy it!! Reply

  • Stacey
    June 24, 2012

    Hi, can these be frozen raw and cooked later? Thanks 🙂 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      June 24, 2012

      I haven’t tried that but I don’t think it’s a good idea with these. The dough is super soft and I think freezing them might ruin the dough. I can’t imagine what they would look like thawed. Reply

  • Lena
    June 18, 2012

    how long do you have to cook the meat? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      June 18, 2012

      Just until it’s cooked through and starting to brown. Sorry I didn’t time it. As long as it is cooked through, it will be good. Reply

      • Lena
        June 22, 2012

        okay cool, thanks I will try them out 🙂 Reply

  • Karen
    June 15, 2012

    I can’t wait to try these! I am 1/4 Polish and don’t have even ONE recipe from my Grandma (or anyone else from Poland.) I have a few questions:
    #1 I can’t stand the smell of fried oil- if I were to bake these what temperature would I use? How long would I bake them?
    #2 Can these be prepared and then frozen?
    #3 Do you have any Polish cookie recipes? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      June 15, 2012

      Alas, I haven’t mastered a recipe for baked pirojki that are anything close to these. I wait for summer to make these; then I can open all the windows and doors so the house doesn’t smell like fried food. I don’t think the dough will work baked. It’s definitely something I’d like to experiment with this summer. Reply

  • Aida
    April 10, 2012

    OMG! This recipe is just delicious! Thank you so much Natasha. It was so perfect that I didn’t need to change anything about it.
    I think I’m going to try all your recipes in near future 🙂 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 10, 2012

      Thank you Aida, We usually devour them pretty quick 🙂 Reply

  • karen
    April 2, 2012

    My nephew and I made these again this week. Oh my goodness, so delicious! We shared with a group of friends and they loved em also!
    I must say that the Garlic Sauce is almost the big hit here! I just wanted to point out to all who would want to give these a try…make the garlic dip ahead of time and it’s even 100% better than when I just threw it together last minute before dinner!

    Now I want to try it with the original recipe you posted it with because we all want to find a way to enjoy the garlic dip! Besides just dipping bread into it which was a fantastic use of it too! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 2, 2012

      So glad you all enjoyed it!! Thanks for the tip about the dip! I will definitely do that next time 😉 Reply

  • Olga
    March 31, 2012

    Is it possible to decrease the dough in half? Maybe use everything in half? But what about yeast?

    Would jam be okay in this dough?? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 31, 2012

      I’ve never used jam, but I guess it would work if it is thick enough. If you are decreasing in half, just decrease the whole recipe in half including the yeast. Reply

  • Olga
    March 29, 2012

    Oh, I was using vegetable oil. I need to get some canola oil. Thank you for the advice!! Reply

  • Olga
    March 26, 2012

    How do you get the oil not the burn so fast? After cooking like 6 belyashi, the oil starts to darken. 🙁 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 27, 2012

      I’ve had the same problem before, I try to keep a candy thermometer attached to the pan to check the temp of the oil (about 330 degrees F). If the oil is too hot, they cook too fast and the oil starts to burn. Try turning down the heat a notch. It takes some fine-tuning without a thermometer, but it should be right around the medium heat mark on your turndial. And if you put in too many belyashi at a time, the temperature of your oil will drop and you’ll be tempted to turn up the heat causing a roller coaster of temperatures (and emotions probably :). To avoid this problem, just place them in one at a time and wait 10-15 seconds between each one. I hope that helps. Also, are you using Canola oil (just wanted to make sure you weren’t using olive oil or another oil that burns quicker)? Reply

  • Tanya
    March 11, 2012

    These were wonderful! My husband and my little one especially liked them, he helped me with the dough, and even made his own pirojok…that was the best part! Thanks again Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 11, 2012

      How cute 🙂 I’m so happy it was a hit with your family! Reply

  • Tanya
    March 8, 2012

    About How many piroshki does this recipe make? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 8, 2012

      If I’m remembering correctly its about 25 Reply

  • Anastasiya
    March 3, 2012

    Natasha,
    I made these tonight and they were awesome. So delicious! Thanks for sharing 🙂
    -Anastasiya Reply

  • Alena
    February 3, 2012

    These look amazing and sounds reasonable to make. Can you please clarify on how to keep the dough warm and rising in the oven, do you need to pre-warm it or how exactly is the best way to keep it rising well?? Thank you! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 3, 2012

      A bread maker is ideal but put it in an oven that is about 100 degrees F. And let it rise Reply

  • Jodie
    January 27, 2012

    I can’t wait to make these! so If I wanted to eat dinner by 5pm, I would have to start the dough around 330pm to allow time for it to rise? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 27, 2012

      I would start a little sooner since they take some time to mold and fry also. Reply

  • Emma
    January 26, 2012

    Scrumptious! Reply

  • Zhanna
    January 20, 2012

    I see that nobody wants to share Belyashi with uncooked filling )))
    Try those http://forum.say7.info/topic8719.html The review are awesome. By the way, yours look awesome too, it’s just might be a little easier to skip “prepere the meat filling” part. ))) Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 20, 2012

      I posted some chebureki with raw meat and raw tortillas. Reply

      • Zhanna
        January 20, 2012

        I saw them. I actually wanted to do them because I had ground meat but then I saw raw tortillas… Well I have no idea where to find them here so I looked up belyashi on my favourite cooking forum and saw your comment about sharing a recipe with raw filling. )) I thought you might like them. I just finished them, they are super juicy. ))) Reply

  • lora m
    September 5, 2011

    The dough looks right, but the filling is not suppose to be precooked and there is no carrots in the beliashi.. Filling is suppose to be juicy, that is why you use fat meat and mayo is not a good way of adding fat to the recipe. It is funny that a lot of people in Ukrainian community are adding mayo to many recipes after moving to USA, we did not do it back home. Any way precooking your filling makes it dry and it is not the same anymore. Reply

    • Natasha
      September 5, 2011

      You are right about belyashi needing raw meet. Belyashi are flat and cook through better. That is why raw meat wouldn’t work for piroshki – the dough is thicker and fluffier and it would never cook raw meat completely. I’m actually fond of using mayo to make meat more moist. If you think about what mayo is made with: mostly mayo and egg, it actually works really well and tastes awesome! If you have a good recipe for real belyashi filling and dough, please do share 🙂 Reply

  • Suzanna
    August 17, 2011

    Hi Natasha,

    thank you for your recipe: I have always struggled to make dough with yeast and decided to give yours one a try. It turned out well, much better than all my previous ones: again thank you-very tasty..
    I can see people have been asking you for the oven version.
    I thought the dough had to be a little different for the oven version and if you have the recipe for that: I would love to have it. My mum and dad want me to make it.
    Thanks
    Suzanna Reply

    • Natasha
      August 18, 2011

      I think it is a different recipe too. I’ve never tried baking them, but I’ll look into it. Maybe my aunt has a good recipe. I’ll ask around. Reply

  • Nusia
    August 1, 2011

    How far in advance can you make these? Can they be served at room temperature? I’d love to serve them at my son’s birthday party, along with other закуски… Reply

    • Natasha
      August 1, 2011

      These are best fresh and can be at room temp for 3-4 hrs. U can make them the day before but it won’t be the same quality of fresh piroshki. Reply

      • Tim
        July 25, 2013

        Can you prepare the dough in advance and just fry them straight before? Preparing dough with yeast in advance is always a bit problematic… :/

        Otherwise, if you were to do them a few hours in advance would you reheat them in an oven or keep warm in an oven or how? Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          July 25, 2013

          I wouldn’t make the dough ahead of time… too risky! You can re-heat them in the oven or even micro if you wanted to. Reply

  • July 25, 2011

    This is just like what we Italians make, Panzerotti! I bet these are delicious! Reply

    • May 12, 2012

      Do you make pepperoni rolls, Annamaria? I use my piroshki dough to make pepperoni rolls since my husband is Italian. Delicious! (Baked!) Reply

  • Annamaria
    July 25, 2011

    This is just like what we Italians make, Panzerotti! I bet these are delicious! Reply

  • Liliya
    June 24, 2011

    I tried these and they are amazing! Thank you so much for your recipes! I always go on your website and look for something new to make. Reply

  • lily
    June 15, 2011

    I dont know why but my dough didn’t even rise. I think it was because my “warm water” turned cold quickly.. I will have to try the dough again today. Reply

    • Natasha
      June 15, 2011

      If you aren’t using a bread maker, the most likely reason was the place you set it to rise probably wasn’t warm enough. A warm oven or in a sunny, warm spot on the counter works great. Reply

  • Marina
    June 2, 2011

    I don’t do especially well with “na vkys” either, thats why your recipes help so much. It will come with time, i’m sure 🙂 Reply

  • Marina
    May 31, 2011

    I made two batches of these today and ate more than was good for me. I just gotta say, this is a great recipe, it’s going straight into my recipe book. Natasha, you are so wonderful for taking the time out of your busy life to post your recipes for everyone to enjoy. No one ever has the exact measurements for traditional Russian/Ukrainian food, it is assumed this is something we should know from birth. Your exact measurements and clear instructions help so much (pictures help too!) This is exactly what i’ve been looking for. Keep up the great work and keep those recipes coming!:) Reply

    • Natasha
      June 1, 2011

      What – you mean you weren’t born knowing? 🙂 I especially love when someone tells you “na vkys” (to taste), when you don’t know what it’s supposed to taste like! I have to say, Russian/Ukrainian moms are geniuses aren’t they? They have so much experience that they just know what to put in and how much to put in and it always turns out great! I’m not at that level yet. I work pretty well from recipes 🙂 Reply

      • May 12, 2012

        LOL! Actually, we were by our mother’s knees helping out and THAT’S how we znali na vkys! 😉 and 🙂 Reply

  • Marina
    May 30, 2011

    Natasha, can you please tell me how many piroshki one batch makes?Approximately… Reply

  • Kristina
    May 26, 2011

    Some russian websites might have good recipes for oven. I think meat piroshki are really good oil fried it makes them taste like real belyashi lol Reply

    • Natasha
      May 26, 2011

      True – I haven’t tried any baked meat piroshki, but it would be pretty hard to make it taste better than the fried piroshki 🙂 Reply

      • April 29, 2012

        I always bake my meat piroshki and they’re wonderful. My “bread” part of the recipe differs very little, so I imagine that the principle is the same. And yes, super delicious. Good idea w/ the mayo…I’ll give that a try. My grandmother made both the fried version (which, of course, I loved) as well as the baked. I find that I don’t even need to put any yolk or egg white wash on them before placing them in the oven, that they bake beautifully at 425, high, I know. Love your website…great job! Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          April 29, 2012

          I’ll try the egg wash. Thank you! What’s different about your dough? I haven’t tried baking them so I don’t know if my dough would work or not. Reply

          • May 12, 2012

            It looks like there’s egg and dry milk (I think this makes the dough special) with a bit of sugar, which would help the dough rise, in our recipe. But looking at the consistency of the dough in your pictures, it really reminds me of our family’s. And I like a lot of meat filling in the piroshki, so the dough is spread pretty thin as I start to close it up. I then them rise again for 10-20 minutes (quite nicely!) on the baking sheet (covered lightly) before putting them in the oven. When my kids were growing up, the piroshki were quite popular with the kids’ friends.
            Ира

  • Kristina
    May 25, 2011

    If you bake them in the oven you gotta have the right dough. I think this dough is only good for to oil. Reply

    • Natasha
      May 25, 2011

      Good to know – thank you! I’ll have to find a good baking recipe. I’ve tried one I found online awhile ago and it was terrible. I’ll see what I can come up with. Reply

      • Vera
        December 23, 2012

        Natasha, I have a lot of really good baking recipes. I often bake sweet piroshki as well as the normal ones with potatoes, meat, etc.

        One of the recipes that always worked for me since I was a little girl is this:
        1 стакан (200 грам) кефира, 1/2 стакана (100 грам) растительного масла , 11 грам сухих дрожей, 1 ч.л. соли, 1 ст.л. сахара, 3 стакана муки.
        Кефир смешать с маслом и немного подогреть, добавить соль и сахар.
        Муку смешать с дрожами. Влить постепено кефирную смесь и замесить тесто. (I always use the KitchenAid mixer)
        Тесто накрыть и поставить в тёплое место нв 30 минут.
        Пока тесто подходит я готовлю начинку, any kind will work.
        Пирожки ложу на кальку, смазую яйцом, и пеку на 350 до золотистого цвета.

        For me this recipe always worked. It is super easy and fast. I really like that they turn out really soft. We always bake them with girls at church and sell them as a fundraiser for missionary trips. People like them and often ask me for a recipe. I hope you try this recipe out and like it as well.

        I also often do кальцоны at home they are somewhat like piroshki but they taste like pizza. I use the bread maker to make the dough. I put 300 ml of warm water, 2 teaspoons of sugar, 1 teaspoon of salt, 2 Tablespoons of vegetable oil, 500 grams of flour, and 3 teaspoons of dry yeast. It usually takes 1 hour and 30 minutes.
        For the filling I cut 300 grams of meat (chicken, varenaya kolbasa, or any of your choice) cut into small cubes, 1 bell pepper, garlic 3-5 cloves minced, 1 raw egg, and 300 grams of cheese grated.
        For this recipe I make 6 big kaltsioni (такой же формой как пирожки), смазую яйцом, и пеку 30 минут на 350.
        My family really likes this recipe, especially the boys. They often ask me to make them so they can take them to work for lunch. Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          December 23, 2012

          Wow! Vera thank you so much for sharing. I’m going to print your recipes and try them! 🙂 Reply

          • Vera
            March 7, 2013

            Natasha I strongly recommend you to try this recipe.

            В хлебопечку ложить в таком порядке:
            Теплую воду или молоко 240 мл. (я ложу воду)
            Растительное масло 3 ст.л.
            1 яйцо
            1 ч.л соли
            2 ст.л сахара
            480 грам муки (замерять висами)
            1.5 ч.л дрожей

            Включить на програму dough 1 час и 30 минут.
            Когда тесто готовл оно будет очень нежное и воздушное. Выкладывать тесто на стол и немножко посыпать мукой ( мне это ненадолго было делать тесто неприлипало). Разделяет тесто на кусочки (~25 маленьких или 16 больших). Лепим пирожки и ложим на продвинь застелены бумагой для выпечки. Края пирожков немножко смазываем маслом потому что пирожки очень поднимаются и немного слепляются а масло помогает разлепить.
            Разогреть духовку на самый маленький огонь и выключить. Туда ставить пирожки чтобы подходили примерно 30 минут. Потом достаем пишные пирожки и смазываем желтком немного раздавленые с водой. Печь в разогретой духовке на 355 примерно 20-25 минут.

            Пирожки получаются очень мягкие и пишние. Их можно делать с любой начинкой. 

          • Natasha
            natashaskitchen
            March 7, 2013

            Vera thank you so much for sharing! Do you use a meat, fruit or cheese filling for this recipe or can it be any of them? Also, are you using Canadian flour or American all-purpose?

  • Kristina
    May 23, 2011

    Can you please post some recipes for ribs? 🙂 Also some recipes with mushrooms! yum! thanks Reply

  • Yana
    May 23, 2011

    Yes please try out by baking them. I would love to know =) Reply

    • Elizabeth
      May 23, 2011

      When I bake these in the oven I rub some butter into the dough and brush the shaped piroshki with egg before baking. Reply

      • Natasha
        May 23, 2011

        Thank you! I’ll refer to your tip when I try baking them 🙂 what temp and how long do you bake them? Reply

  • Kristina
    May 20, 2011

    Can you bake them in the oven? Reply

    • Natasha
      May 21, 2011

      I haven’t tried baking them and I honestly forget to try it every time. I need to stick a sign on the breadmaker to jog my memory! Reply

      • Irina
        December 12, 2013

        My mother used to make pirozhki for company; she deep-fried some, and baked the rest… She filled them with meat, povidlo (jam), or cooked kapusta (cabbage). Everyone always looked forward to them.

        I don’t think there was any mayo in her filling tho…;) Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          December 12, 2013

          I’ve made them with cabbage too and they were so so good! 🙂 Reply

  • Hanna
    May 20, 2011

    Can You please post Manti? 🙂 Reply

    • Natasha
      May 21, 2011

      What are manti? Maybe I make them and call them something different? 🙂 Reply

      • Lena
        May 23, 2011

        Manti are similar to pelmeni but they are big and are made with lots of onion and chopped meat-mostly are made with lamb(look like pig asian potsticker but way better tasting) Also you need to have a special “pot” or maybe its more like a steamer that has two to three levels with holes in them(depends on size). So you basically put water on the bottom of the pot and then put the Manti on each level with holes and stack the levels up and close with a big lid and steam them. I think its more of Kirgiz or Turkish dish. The steamers I heard are sold at Asian stores. I never made them by myself but helped my sister in law make them- very yummy. Reply

    • Karolina
      November 21, 2012

      Manti are a Bukharian (Uzbekistan) dish. They are simply steamed dumplings. The dough however is not a yeast dough and, like piroshki, is braided or pinched closed. Manti are filled with raw meat and onions or tikvah with onions. The meat is finely diced and onions finely chopped and zera (cumin) is added. You then dip the dumplings in oil then place on the steamer. They steam for about 45 minutes depending on which cut of meat is used. If you have left overs you can fry then the following day. We eat them with a drizzle of olive oil and vinegar. 🙂 yummy!! Reply

  • Irina
    May 19, 2011

    Natasha…….Thanks for posting this recipe. My Mother, Baba and Aunt use to whip out almost 100 of these at a time. They are my favourite…..I love your recipe. I’m for sure going to make these soon. Sometimes they filled them with potatoes or Kapusta [cabbage].
    I make something similar like these that I learned from my Turkish Mother/in/Law……..they call them Pogaca.

    I love your Blog…..you have such good recipes that I grew up with in growing up.
    ……….have a great day!!!! Reply

    • Natasha
      May 19, 2011

      Thank you Irina! I have the potato filled piroshki posted too. I love those!! Try the garlic dip for the potato filled ones if you haven’t allready. But, be warned – it’s hard to stop eating them!! 🙂 Reply

  • Hanna
    May 19, 2011

    Eww lol good to know! This time around means its the meat season? lol Reply

  • Hanna
    May 18, 2011

    Did you use your meat grinder to get ground beef and turkey?:) Reply

    • Natasha
      May 18, 2011

      I purchased the meat at Winco this time around. You can grind the meat yourself or buy pre-ground. I think it was a ground chuck? I don’t like getting just “ground beef” because it’s sometimes a mystery meat – you don’t know what’s really in there. (sorry, I know that’s a little gross). Reply

  • Rebekah
    May 18, 2011

    Yay!!! Thanks so much for posting this recipe! When you get a chance can you please post the thin dough chebureki that would be totally sweet! Thank you Natasha!!!!!!!!!! Reply

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