Mom’s Adjika Recipe

This Adjika is not hard to make, considering all of the ingredients are just whirled in a food processor and you don't have to seed the jalapenos - SCORE!

Pesto is to Italians as Adjika is to Slavic people. What is Adjika (adzhika in English)? It’s like a semi-spicy salsa,  similar to Italian Red Pesto. It’s used to flavor food. I like to spread it over pork. I recently discovered adjika is awesome with fajitas and tacos!

This is a canning recipe. This makes 7 (1 pint) jars of adjika. i.e. 14 cups. It’s not hard to make, considering all of the ingredients are just whirled in a food processor and you don’t have to seed the jalapenos – SCORE!

Ingredients for Mom’s version of Adjika:

1 lb (about 2 large) Carrots, peeled and cut into 1″ pieces
1 lb (about 5 medium) Apples, peeled and cored
1 lb (3-4 large) Bell peppers – Red or Yellow, chopped into 1″ pieces
5 lbs (about 10 cups) ripe tomatoes, sliced into quarters
1 cup oil (olive, canola or vegetable oil)
150 grams (2/3 cup or about 24) large garlic cloves
150 grams (2/3 cup or about 14 medium) jalapenos, stems removed (If you like your odjika spicy, use a few more jalapenos)
2 Tbsp Salt

How to make Mom’s  Adjika:

1. Using a food processor: Mince carrots and put them in a large soup pot.

Mince apples and add them to the pot

Mince bell peppers and add them to the pot

Mince tomatoes and add them to the pot.

2. Bring the pot to a boil over high heat, stir and bring to a boil again and repeat a few more times until the mixture is heated through and boiling consistently when stirred. The mixture is very thick so it takes a few stirs to heat it through.

3. Reduce heat, cover and simmer for 1 1/2 hours. Stir occasionally.

4. Mince the garlic and jalapeños together in the food processor.

This Adjika is not hard to make, considering all of the ingredients are just whirled in a food processor and you don't have to seed the jalapenos - SCORE!

5. Add Oil, Salt, Garlic and Jalapeños to the pot and continue to simmer for another 30 minutes.

This Adjika is not hard to make, considering all of the ingredients are just whirled in a food processor and you don't have to seed the jalapenos - SCORE!

6. Prepare the cans (see canning process).

Canning Process:

1. To sterilize your clean jars:  wash them and let them dry in the oven at 215 for about 20 min or until completely dry. Boil the lids 5 min.

2. Transfer your boiling hot adjika to the jars using a glass measuring cup and a funnel (least messy method) leaving about 1/4″ space.

3. Screw the lids on enough to keep a tight seal in place but don’t over-tighten them since air bubbles need to be able to escape and place in the oven at 350˚F for 15 min. Carefully remove from oven (don’t tighten the lid more or you might disturb the seal that has formed), flip upside down and let cool to room temperature.

Note:

Current safety standards say that it’s best to put the jars in a boiling water bath with 1-2″ water covering the lid (instead of the baking method) for ten minutes after tightening the lids to preserve shelf life and kill any potential bacteria. For more info on current canning guidelines, click here. I think I need a boiling water canner! 

Mom’s Adjika Recipe – A Russians’ Pesto! (Аджика)

4.79 from 14 votes
Prep Time: 1 hour
Cook Time: 2 hours
Total Time: 3 hours
This Adjika is not hard to make, considering all of the ingredients are just whirled in a food processor and you don't have to seed the jalapenos - SCORE!
Author: Natasha of NatashasKitchen.com
Skill Level: Medium
Cost to Make: $20
Servings: 14 cups

Ingredients

  • 1 lb about 2 large Carrots, peeled and cut into 1" pieces
  • 1 lb about 5 medium Apples, peeled and cored
  • 1 lb 3-4 large Bell peppers - chopped into 1" pieces
  • 5 lbs about 10 cups ripe tomatoes, sliced into quarters
  • 1 cup oil olive, canola or vegetable oil
  • 150 grams 2/3 cup or about 24 large garlic cloves
  • 150 grams 2/3 cup or about 14 medium jalapenos, stems removed
  • 2 Tbsp Salt

Instructions

  1. Using a food processor, mince carrots, apples, bell peppers, tomatoes and put them in a large soup pot.
  2. Bring the pot to a boil over high heat, stir and bring to a boil again and repeat a few more times until the mixture is heated through and boiling consistently when stirred. The mixture is very thick so it takes a few stirs to heat it through.
  3. Reduce heat, cover and simmer for 1 1/2 hours. Stir occasionally.
  4. Mince the garlic and jalapenos together in the food processor.
  5. Add Oil, Salt, Garlic and Jalapenos to the pot and continue to simmer for another 30 minutes.
  6. Prepare the cans.

Canning Process:

To sterilize your clean jars: wash them and let them dry in the oven at 215 for about 20 min or until completely dry. Boil the lids 5 min.

  1. Transfer your boiling hot adjika to the jars using a glass measuring cup and a funnel (least messy method) leaving about 1/4" space.
  2. Screw the lids on enough to keep a tight seal in place but don't over-tighten them since air bubbles need to be able to escape and place in the oven at 350˚F for 15 min. Carefully remove from oven (don't tighten the lid more or you might disturb the seal that has formed), flip upside down and let cool to room temperature.

Recipe Notes

Current safety standards say that it’s best to put the jars in a boiling water bath with 1-2" water covering the lid (instead of the baking method) for ten minutes after tightening the lids to preserve shelf life and kill any potential bacteria. For more info on current canning guidelines, visit: http://nchfp.uga.edu/publications/publications_usda.html. I think I need a boiling water canner!

 

natashaskitchen

Welcome to my kitchen! I am Natasha, the blogger behind Natasha's Kitchen (since 2009). My husband and I run this blog together and share only our best, family approved recipes with YOU. Thanks for stopping by! We are so happy you're here.

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  • CHRISTINE R HUNTER
    September 11, 2018

    I asked my husband this morning if we had enough Roma tomatoes left in the garden for canning today. I will give this a try. I have used the water bath canning method for years, but you need to add a tsp. of bottled lemon juice to the jar before adding the tomato product, this balances the acid level in the tomatoes. Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      September 11, 2018

      Thank you for sharing that with us Christine! I hope you have enough tomatoes in the garden to make this! Reply

  • Julie
    June 12, 2018

    Oven canning is not safe and can actually cause the jars to break and shatter. Canning jars are meant to be placed in boiling water which is 212 degrees or in a pressure cooker which if I remember correctly is 250 degrees and both are in a moist environment. The oven is dry and too warm. You also need to pressure can this as there is not enough acid or sugar to preserve the food. Unfortunately, you can not see botulism and only pressure can kill the spores. Botulism can develop without a broken seal so even though the food looks and smells safe it can be dangerous if proper canning methods are not used. The USDA has a site with safe canning practices if you are curious about the methods. The USDA notes that we must use different methods today than our parents and grandparents because of the acidity changes on homegrown and store-bought produce over the decades. I this helps. This recipe looks very similar to a meat relish my german grandmother made. Reply

    • Natasha
      June 12, 2018

      Thank you for sharing your tips! I’ll be investing in a good canning system when we finally move into our own place. What system are you using? Do you like it? Reply

      • Joy Filkins
        July 19, 2018

        I love my new electric Ball Water Bath Canner. It frees up my stove. I also have the Pesto brand but my pick is the electric. I can’t wait to try this recipe! Reply

  • Zack G
    February 20, 2018

    Hi Natasha,
    I’ve always wanted to make this recipe but it is way more than I need. Any advice from experience/others on reducing the recipe? I would reduce it by at least half. What are your thoughts?

    P.S. I love that you have Ukrainian recipe roots on this site. I lived in Donetsk for a few years and I miss the cuisine. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 21, 2018

      Hi Zack, we always make a big batch for canning but that would work to reduce it by half. Reply

  • Drew Tanzosh
    February 2, 2018

    Do you need to peel the apples? If you are going to grind them up, would it matter? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 2, 2018

      Hi Drew, we have always peeled the apples first and I always assumed it was for texture reasons – to make the adjika smoother. Reply

  • Tanya
    December 28, 2017

    Hi Natasha!
    I bought 5 lb of chili peppers today, they looked like gypsy peppers but they happened to be hot. I was wondering if I can substitute bell peppers and jalapeños with those chili ones? Do you think it might work? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 29, 2017

      Hi Tanya, I’m not sure what the difference will be in the level of heat in the adjika using the same amount of chili peppers. I think it could work though. Reply

      • Tanya
        December 29, 2017

        Ok, I will give it a try, and let you know Reply

        • Tanya
          January 8, 2018

          It turned out sooooo good. It was mild taste with a little hot accent . My whole family enjoyed it. Even my 4 year old one 😉 Reply

          • Natasha's Kitchen
            January 8, 2018

            Awesome, I’m glad to hear that! Thanks for sharing! 🙂

  • kelly
    August 14, 2017

    Hi Natasha, this recipe looks delicious. How long does this last in the pantry? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 14, 2017

      Hi Kelly, if canned, it has a shelf life of at least a year. Reply

  • Nadia
    August 9, 2017

    Hi Natasha, what kind of apples do you use for this recipe? thank you Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 9, 2017

      Hi Nadia, we usually use a variety of whatever apples we have on hand. This recipe is pretty forgiving. I would go with any kind of crisp sweet/tart apple like gala or golden delicious, pink lady, etc. Reply

  • Olgitta
    August 3, 2017

    Hi Natasha! One more question. I don’t have big food processor just tiny one. I wonder if is it better to use myasorybka or regular tyorka or ( I don’t think blender good idea). I don’t think they would use food processor in Ukraine. How can I do other then food processor? I was thinking myasorybka for tomatoes and peppers. And carrots with apples on tyorka. What do you think? Thanks for fast reply Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 3, 2017

      Hi Olgitta, A good blender would work to blend in batches, pulsing it until it is still a somewhat chunky consistency – keep an eye on it so it doesn’t turn into a smoothie :). I also think a grater would work, you would just have a slightly different consistency. I hope you love it! Reply

  • Olgitta
    July 31, 2017

    Hi Natasha! I really want to try your recipe. I’ve done adjiga many times but I never canned my. I keep it I fridge I put only tomatoes, bell peppers, garlic and jalapeños in it. But canning sound so good. I’m very concern of your recipe. Wouldn’t it be sweet. We really wouldn’t like sweet adjiga. Can I skip apples? Or it’s very important in this recipe. Also can you put less oil? I never put any in my. Thanks I’ll wait for your reply then I’ll do it! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 31, 2017

      Hi Olgitta, No worries, this is not a sweet adjika recipe. The apples help to balance it and it is important in this recipe. I haven’t tried it without oil so I’m not sure about that. Reply

  • Teona
    July 9, 2017

    Adjika is a traditional georgian sauce, please make a revision of this information. thank you 🙂 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 10, 2017

      Hi Teona, thanks for sharing! This is my Mom’s Ukrainian version of the sauce. Reply

  • Kim
    February 22, 2017

    This looks very tasty but there are too many nonacidic vegetables compared to tomatoes to be safely waterbathed. There is also way too much oil. Even if it had safe proportions, the processing time is not long enough. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 22, 2017

      We’ve never had any issues with the recipe. You can definitely experiment if you’re concerned but this is the way we’ve been making it for years 🙂 You can also keep it refrigerated if you’re concerned.  Reply

      • Merv
        February 25, 2018

        Natasha, PH4 or lower is safe for water bath per USDA guidelines. PH test strips are available online. And water bath isn’t hard at all 🙂 Neither is pressure canning. You could go pro-biotic and lacto ferment this. You’d have an Adjika Kvass. 😀 Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          February 26, 2018

          That is an excellent excellent suggestion! Thank you so much for sharing!! Reply

  • Carolina
    November 7, 2016

    hi, Natasha! this looks so delicious, can’t wait to try it! have two questions first: 1. what are the best apples for adjika? 2. how long should we wait before we can start eating it??:) thank you! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 8, 2016

      Hi Carolina, just about any crisp sweet apple will work (I would avoid Red Delicious and Green though) – braeburn, fuji, gala, golden delicious, pink lady, nearly any apple would work. 🙂 Reply

  • Marina
    September 12, 2016

    Thank you for the recipe! I’m going to try it.
    Do you need to add vinegar or lemon juice to preserve it? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 12, 2016

      Hi Marina, we don’t add anything additional and it preserves well. Reply

  • Angelina
    September 12, 2016

    how many jars does this recipe makes (jars on the picture) ill be making this tonight Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 12, 2016

      Hi Angelina, “This makes 7 (1 pint) jars of adjika. i.e. 14 cups.” Enjoy! Reply

      • Angelina
        September 14, 2016

        THANKS FOR THE REPLY, BTW MY SISTER-IN-LAW (ANGELA) AND I ARE HOOKED ON YOU, YOUR RECIPES ARE FINGER LICKING GOOD, THANK YOU! Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          September 14, 2016

          Angelina, I’m so happy to hear that my blog is a blessing to your family. Thank you so much for sharing that with me 😀. Reply

  • PaulaK
    September 11, 2016

    Natasha, I admire your diplomacy! I’m going to try to break this down to a smaller recipe (we don’t need that much). It sounds just like one of my grandmas recipes, without the benefit of a food processor! I can’t wait to taste it! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 11, 2016

      Diplomacy… 😉 You’re comment made me smile. I hope you love the recipe! 🙂 Reply

  • Inesa
    September 11, 2016

    This recipe is something else, I have been doing it for past 3 years and every time was delicious.
    First time was not enough spicy, second time I made it twice one because one was too spocy(too many jalapeños with seeds) and one less spicy. Still we loved it and all our friends wanted the sicret recipe. This time I’m using a couple whole jalapeños and the rest without the seeds. Thank you Natasha for sharing this delicious recipe and make all the great recipes for families like ours that likes to eat the best stuff. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 11, 2016

      Jalapenos are tricky like that – sometimes they are spicy and sometimes they really aren’t. We’ve had this happen both when they are homegrown and storebought. It’s always a surprise 🙂 I’m so happy you enjoy my recipes! Reply

  • Bella Mater
    September 7, 2016

    I feel like I should have seeded the tomatoes first… mine’s pretty runny 🙁 I seem to recall the stuff I bought at the rynok in Kyiv was much thicker.

    Stilll tasty… SPICY… but tasty 😀 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 7, 2016

      Thank you Bella 😀. Some tomatoes are juicier than others and it would not hurt to seed them first for thicker results. Reply

  • Margarita
    August 25, 2016

    Hi Natasha I followed your recipe exactly even adding bit more apple and carrot and I canned only 5 pint jars. I compared on my weight scale and your measurements not sure how that happen. Maybe that’s imwhy it’s too spicy? I added 12 jalepenos into this batch. Next time I won’t be afraid to tweak it a bit. Add more tomatoes, add onions and less hot peppers. ive done extensive research on canning , and I learned adding oil decreases shelf life. Maybe this recipe we can omit, and add oil once Jarvis opened. That is how many can pasta sauces. Overall great base recipe! And ideally pressure canning is safer, however my mom keeps drilling that’s how they can for decades lol and they all are fine 🙂 I did process in a water Bath 12 min. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 25, 2016

      Hi Margarita 🙂 I have found that jalapeños can vary in how spicy they are so that can make a difference and it’s really hard to tell how spicy they will be just looking at them. If you like it less spicy, you can definitely add less jalapeños. We’ve had this sit on the shelf for over a year and never had a jar go bad even with the oil in it. I haven’t tested it without oil. Thank you for sharing your process and review! 🙂 Reply

  • Love4ever
    August 24, 2016

    The best adjika resipe ever!
    I”m making same adjika for almost 30 years and all in my family loves it 🙂 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 24, 2016

      That’s just awesome!! Thank you for sharing your wonderful review 🙂 Reply

  • n
    June 27, 2016

    I have made this recipe, and it is delicious. I often use it to dip toasted pita bread in, for a snack. (probably not a traditional use, but I love it). Also, I will add a big spoonful to a bowl of soup.

    I brought some to a party and everyone was raving about it. I served it with pita and crackers. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      June 28, 2016

      Thank you for the wonderful review on the Adjika, I’m so happy you liked it 😀. Reply

  • George
    October 15, 2015

    Adjika is in no ways russian or slavic, It is Georgian, its origin is western Georgia. labeling all post-soviet Countries and people as russians is offending and ignorant. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 15, 2015

      George, this is my mom’s Ukrainian version of the recipe. Every family makes it a little differently. Reply

  • Olga
    October 6, 2015

    So I made this recipe about a month or so ago cause I had a lot of extra tomatoes I needed to use up. My mom never made it before so in not exactly sure what I can actually use it for? Can you recommend some recipes or dishes it is incorporated in or really any particular way I can eat it? I don’t want it all to just go to waste after taking the time to prepare it!!

    Thank you ahead of time!! Your recipies really are fantastic (I plan most of my meals from your site :)) I just made the poppy seed cake roll last weekend and it was seriously bomb <—totally a middle school expression but it explains my feeling for it quite well!! 🙂 Now I'm off to making the pasta with creamy tomato sauce and the Chocolate Spartak cake!! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 7, 2015

      I’m so happy to hear you’re enjoying the recipes :). As far as the adjika. It works really well in anything you’d want to put salsa in – breakfast burritos, on top of tacos, fajitas. You can also spread it over meats like pork to add great flavor. Reply

  • Natasha
    September 10, 2015

    Do you think I could make it using my Vitamix?
    I remember that my mom added horse reddish root to her adjika. Will be calling her tomorrow for the recipe and then try to make a little bit of each. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 11, 2015

      I haven’t tried it with radish. Let me know how it works out. A vita mix should work fine. Reply

  • Kateryna
    August 31, 2015

    Hi, Natasha! Just a quick question… May I add some vinegar to adjika? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 31, 2015

      I have not needed to add any vinegar to this recipe, since I have found the tomatoes to add enough acidity. You could try but I would recommend testing it by stirring it into a small batch so you don’t overwhelm the flavor with vinegar. Reply

  • August 9, 2015

    Thats not Adijika. Adijika has Saffron in it but your moms resipe does not even mention it. I would call your ”Adijika” salsa more than anything. But still the resipe is good;) Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 9, 2015

      Different countries, towns and families make it differently. I’ve never heard of adjika with saffron but it does sound interesting. Doesn’t the tomato and jalapeno overpower the saffron? I imagine you’d need quite a bit of it to taste it at all. How much do you add? Reply

  • Ann
    July 13, 2015

    Love your website! I’m definitely going to try this recipe, but I’m a little concerned about the food safety factor. I’m no canning expert, but it seems to me that the acidity of the tomatoes and apples are not necessarily enough to make water-bath canning safe – some are very acidic, others not much at all. Do you think pressure canning this would ruin the flavors? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 13, 2015

      I haven’t tried pressure canning, but I imagine it would probably be ok. I’m curious what kind of tools do you use for canning? Reply

    • Elaine M
      May 3, 2016

      This must be pressure canned! Reply

  • Olga
    April 23, 2015

    Hi!
    Seems great – will try it sometime. I never thought of adding the apples – sounds awesome. Jalapenos isn’t a typical ingredient though – it has a very distinct Mexican taste to it. The original Russian recipe has a horseradish in this dish – and boy, is it great!!! You should try that instead – it def brings back memories 🙂
    Cheers Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 23, 2015

      I haven’t tried with horseradish. I should ask my Mom about it. She has a bunch of it growing in her yard 🙂 Reply

  • oleg
    January 12, 2015

    Pls clarify that Adjika (translated as salt in Abkhaz) is originally Georgian Abkhazian traditional spicy dip, which is also popular in former Soviet countries, such as Russia and Ukraine. However, Georgians and Abkhazian are not slavic people, so Adjika is not slavic food. Reply

    • Olga
      April 23, 2015

      Yes, you are absolutely right! Even the word itself isn’t Russian in any way – but it was a staple (lol) sauce in the Soviet Union, so it is sometimes called Russian – it’s like officially any ex-Soviet citizens are nowadays referred to as Russians by the westerners. Russian cuisine got an incredible boost from the Soviet neighbours – before it was rather meat-based and in my opinion watery and boring. Spicy food rules! Reply

      • Natasha
        natashaskitchen
        April 23, 2015

        I love to hear the origins and history of foods. Thanks so much for sharing! I agree, spicy food rules! 🙂 Reply

  • rose
    October 14, 2014

    hello!
    do we have to keep it in the fridge, or can it be stored in a pantry, if pantry than for how long? thankyou!!!
    GOD BLESS YOUR GROWING FAMILY!!!!!!!!!!!! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 14, 2014

      Thank you Rose! This is a canning recipe so it is ok on the shelf if you go through the canning process outlined above. If you feel better about leaving it in the fridge, that’s fine too :). It’s good served cold or at room temp. Reply

  • Anna
    September 29, 2014

    Hi Natashaskitchen! Can I put less jalapeño pepper since my family doesn’t like to spicy? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 29, 2014

      Yes, you absolutely can reduce the amount of jalapeno. I hope you love it! 🙂 Reply

  • gues
    September 2, 2014

    Hi! I made this and your canned tomatoes yesterday and i feel like a “hoxyaichka”now :))
    I made half ur recipe and used 5small red hot pepper, i dont know what type theu are, but it turned out perfectly mild and delicious!!
    I never liked adzhika before because my parents always madr it too spicy.. Now im in love.. And i never knew theres apples in there.. Awesome :))
    Also, i had a quick question, when my filled bottles were in the oven they leaked a bit.. (yeah it smelled from the oil) but after they cooled the bottle seems sealed, the button is down.. You think its still safe to store ??
    Thanks!! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 2, 2014

      If the tops are sealed and the button is down, it should be fine. If you are really concerned, you can keep the leaked ones refrigerated. You might fill them slightly less next time. Did they all leak? I’m so glad you liked the recipe 🙂 Also, make sure the seal stays put in the future; they should never be bulging before you open them.  Reply

      • Guest
        September 2, 2014

        No, just a couple of them. Like 2.. Ok, thaanks! Reply

  • Alla
    August 31, 2014

    Hi Natasha! Thank you for all your hard work and the wonderful recipes that you continue to add! I would also like to share a similar recipe with you but its a bigger batch. It is SO YUMMY that I can literally eat it like soup with bread, lol especially when I’m pregnant!
    5 kg tomatoes
    3 kg red bell pepper
    2 kg carrots
    1.5 kg apples
    1 cup garlic
    2 green hot pepper (I use jalapenos)
    1 bunch of cilantro
    1 bunch of parsley
    plus salt to taste at the end
    Directions are the same as yours! 🙂
    Again thank you so much for all the wonderful recipes you share with us! God bless you! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 31, 2014

      Alla thank you so much for taking the time to share that. I sure appreciate it! I printed it for next time 🙂 Reply

  • August 29, 2014

    I use almost the same recipe here in Ukraine but with onions, less garlic, without jalapenos and I use olive oil. We love it, great as side dish, excellent pasta and pizza sauce!

    Follow the same procedure but use:
    500 grams carrots
    500 grams green apples
    2 kls Roma tomatoes
    1 kl. bell pepper
    2 large white onions
    Bring to a boil then simmer for 45 minutes and add:
    1-2 garlic heads, minced
    1/2 cup olive oil
    salt to taste
    Simmer for another 15 minutes.
    P.S. hope you don’t mind me sharing it! 🙂 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 29, 2014

      I love that you shared it!! Thank you so much for sharing. I can’t wait to try it! 🙂 Reply

  • Lola
    February 28, 2014

    Dear Natasha,

    It’s great that you are promoting the delicious Russian-style cooking. You have, however, a misconception about the origin of Adjika and some of the other recipes.
    Adjika to Russians is not what pesto is to Italians. It is, rather, what salsa is to North Americans – a dish that came from the “South of the Border”. Adjika comes from Georgia, which is south of Russia’s border. Pesto, on the other hand, is an authentic Italian recipe.
    As far as other Slavic people, you cannot pile them into the same pile. For example, Bulgarians have a similar sauce (by a different name), but Poles do not. And I do hope you realize that Georgia is not a Slavic country. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 28, 2014

      Thanks for commenting! It’s always great to hear from my readers. I meant that it’s popular in Russia just like pesto is popular in Italy. Clearly they are completely different recipes with different purposes and uses. This post wasn’t intended to be a history lesson; just a great recipe that my family loves! I try not to get into the nitty gritty of who made what first because there are tons of arguments on both sides. This is a personal blog and I share the foods that are popular in Russia and Ukraine and are loved by my family. Thanks for the history lesson 😉 Reply

  • Vita
    October 28, 2013

    Can you use a manual meat grinder for this if u don’t have the food processor? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 28, 2013

      It should work as just as well :). Reply

  • October 7, 2013

    Perfect recipes, I canned a few portions of this goodness! Awesome recipe, I added a couple more jalapenos 😉 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 7, 2013

      That means you must like it very spicy. I think we could be friends! LOL Reply

  • Lena
    September 16, 2013

    I used 5 jalepanos and it is spicy!! My husband said his mouth is on fire. I don’t think it would be edible with 14. Your homegrown ones must be different. On the separate note, boy did I suffer after handling those jalepanos! My hands were burning soooooo bad for hours! It’s was mini hell on earth I thought! I was crying, screaming, and praying; that’s how bad it was. I googled it after, seems like many people get this “reaction”. I will know to wear gloves next time. (Maybe worth noting that in the recipe for your readers. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 16, 2013

      Ouch!! :-O Your comment makes me think that your peppers were not jalapenos. There’s no way 5 jalapenos in this whole recipe would be even close to spicy. We use 10-15 in another roasted salsa too and it’s spicy but not nearly what you described. The ones we grow are the same as the ones in the store. And, jalapenos don’t usually burn your hands unless you have super sensitive skin. I don’t think those were jalapenos. Reply

      • Lena
        September 16, 2013

        No doubt these were jalapeños. I mean I know what they look like plus they are labeled in the store. As someone mentioned in the comment above, some jalapeños can be very spicy and others not spicy at all. I guess your are on one end and mine on the other. Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          September 16, 2013

          I’ve never heard of them being that super spicy. The homegrown ones we used in this post are just like the ones we buy at he store also. I wonder if someone put them in the wrong bin?? Also, did you try to seed the peppers, is that why you were handling them or did you try to mince them by hand? Anyway, your poor hands 🙁 I hope you don’t change your mind about jalapenos. I think you got an unusually hot batch.  Reply

  • Mila
    September 12, 2013

    It’s more of a salsa than pesto. Pesto is not spicy and salsa on the contrary Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 13, 2013

      I meant that it’s our version of Pesto as in: Pesto is to Italians as Adjika is to Russians/Ukrainians 🙂 I’m not claiming that this is pesto 😉 Reply

  • Gigi Rurua
    February 27, 2013

    Hi, I would just like to point out that Adjika is a traditional Georgian sauce, so I would kindly ask you to clarify this:) Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 27, 2013

      I did a little research and from what I can tell, It’s traditional in Russia and Georgia. I’m not sure who had it first, but I think it’s made a little differently in Georgia. Reply

  • Marina
    February 8, 2013

    Hi Natasha,
    I know adjika is good for a long period of time.. Can I store them at room temperature If they’re still unopened, or do they have to stay in the fridge when cooled after making. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 8, 2013

      You can store them even up to a year (or longer!) in the pantry at room temp. Hope you love it as much as we do! Reply

  • Nika
    November 22, 2012

    Hi Natasha! Thx for sharing this recipe! Can’t wait to try it! Can you pls tell me if you can store the unopened cans at room temperature? Do they have to be stored in a dark cupboard or out on the shelf is fine? Thanks in advance 🙂 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 22, 2012

      We have stored them at room temp up to a year 🙂 Reply

  • Natalie
    October 10, 2012

    We call it Russian salsa! Thanks for reminding! Will try your recipe. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 10, 2012

      Let me know what you think of it after you finish making it. :). Reply

  • kat
    September 21, 2012

    I use food ( meat ) grinder to mince veggies. And I did not use Jalapenos at all (since there are no J. in Rus.) , my recipe has 2-3 chilies instead. 14 Jalapenos seems a lot, but living in CA I know they could be not spicy at all or very spicy – go figure… Reply

  • Russian Babyshka
    September 8, 2012

    Just made it – approved by my men . Tell your mom – she is awesome!!! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 8, 2012

      Thank you and I will! 🙂 Reply

  • YanaP
    May 24, 2012

    I made this recipe yesterday and mine was soooo SPICY! My mouth in on fire, and I used 14 medium jalapenos. But it’s delicious! Thank you for the recipe.

    Question: What kind of food processor are you using? I have a mini-processor and it was a pain. =( Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 24, 2012

      The type of jalapeno will also make a difference. We were using home grown jalapenos. I’m glad you liked it! 🙂 As far as the food processor; we make this together with my mom and she has a nice big one (it’s on my wish list; I have a small one too and it just doesn’t cut it for this recipe). Here is a link to the Cuisinart one my mom has and the one I really really want! 🙂 Reply

  • Marina
    May 22, 2012

    Natasha, I just wanted to thank you for creating this website! I love cooking Russian dishes, but I always have a hard time making any of my Mom’s recepies, cause everytime I ask her she just tells me ‘a little bit of this and a little bit of that’.
    So I am very glad that I found your website, I am inspired to cook every single item on your website:-) Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 22, 2012

      Marina, thank you for the encouragement. I’m so glad you enjoy the site and find it handy 🙂 Reply

  • YanaP
    March 29, 2012

    Yum, looks really delicious. Definitely going to try this! Reply

  • Guy
    December 28, 2011

    Love the recipe, thanks for posting. I really missed my father-in-law’s adjika from our trips to Ukraine. I’ve tried various store bought versions at the local Russian market, but none of them were comparable. This was perfect, just like my father-in-law’s. My wife was skeptical that I could find a recipe online (and that I could make it), but she’s a believer now. Our Russian friends are impressed too, I forwarded them your recipe. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 28, 2011

      Awesome, thank you! I’m so glad you enjoyed the adjika 🙂 Reply

  • sveta
    October 13, 2011

    I used medium. but i love it spicy too!! thank you so much for your recipies:) Reply

  • sveta
    October 8, 2011

    Hey natasha i was just wondering how long you keep them stored before trying them? Reply

    • Natasha
      October 8, 2011

      You can open a can and enjoy it as soon as it cools. There’s really no time limit. I still have 1 can left a year later and and it’s still perfect. Reply

      • sveta
        October 8, 2011

        i just finished cooking your version of Adjika and its 2 am…and all i want to do is try it!! it smells AMAZING!!! 🙂 thank you!! Reply

        • Natasha
          October 8, 2011

          Go on, just do it. 🙂 Let me know how you like it. Reply

          • sveta
            October 8, 2011

            i just did! it was so spicy!!! but i loved it! haha my husband thinks its tooooo spicy!! =]

          • Natasha
            October 8, 2011

            Did you use 14 large or medium jalapenos? I used medium and my husband thought it wasn’t spicy enough but I liked it :). On the bright side, if it’s spicier, it will last longer! And I think the spicyness settles down a little when it cools.

          • Russian Babyshka
            September 8, 2012

            i used large and my son toled me …nice little kick! 🙂 they loved it !!!! for me it was a little “kusachaya” but it was made for the men!

  • Koms
    September 26, 2011

    Natasha, your food sounds brilliant and your recipes cook spot on. could you have a look at mine and see what you think? Also, lets have a debate. how much does it cost to make a home made adjika where you are? http://ognakan.blogspot.com/2011/09/how-much-does-your-adjika-cost.html&nbsp;Reply

  • Lyuda
    September 20, 2011

    oh ok well its ok about the tomatoes…ill prob can some next year anyways..well the adjika is amazing:) i only have like 4 can left..lol so im doing more..so it will last me all winter..thanks again for the wonderful recepies… Reply

    • Natasha
      September 20, 2011

      You’re welcome. I guess I better get to work and stock up for the winter! 🙂 Reply

  • Lyuda
    September 16, 2011

    Really love your site…Im doing adjika right now…!!:) im super excited to try it. Reply

    • Natasha
      September 18, 2011

      Thank you Lyuda. I hope you like it since you will probably have lots of it 🙂 Reply

  • Lyuda
    September 16, 2011

    Hi Natashaa, are you going to put canned tomatoes or cucumbers this year??? Reply

    • Natasha
      September 18, 2011

      My mom already canned tomatoes. She didn’t can cucumbers. I can ask her for the recipe for tomatoes if you’d like. I don’t think I will be able to get exact amounts though. Reply

  • Elena Montik Drozdov
    July 14, 2011

    We add adjika to our borsh! LOve your site! Reply

  • Yana
    February 7, 2011

    Natasha,

    Do you have any recipes to can Tomatoes or Pickles? Reply

    • Natasha
      February 7, 2011

      I don’t but my mom makes the most amazing canned tomatoes. I’ll post it once tomatoes are in season. Mexico’s glossy tomatoes just won’t be the same 🙂 Reply

  • Katya
    January 24, 2011

    Hi Natasha –

    This is a blast from the past for me too! Someone in the family used to make it but I don’t remember the details except it was good. Thank you for sharing the recipe. Love your website – recipes, photos, everything! BTW, I am making stewed cabbage later today using another one of your recipes. 🙂 Reply

  • Irina
    November 8, 2010

    This sounds delicious, Natasha! Adjika is not something that was ever prepared in my family, but, apparently, my mother-in-law used to make it every summer with vegetables from her garden, and perhaps still does. She lives in Russia and we don’t visit very often, so I haven’t had a chance to taste her adjika. Maybe I will try making my own version (based on your recipe) next summer. Reply

    • Natasha
      November 8, 2010

      Looks like this recipe is bringing back memories for some. It is very “old school” and I’m just glad to get it recorded for future generations. Reply

  • Tanya
    November 8, 2010

    My mother-in-law gave us a jar a couple weeks ago, and I ate it mostly on my own. Yes, I let the kids try it, but none of them liked it. Good! More for me. I ate it over scrambled eggs and burritos. Yum! I love that it’s got some spice but not too much, and it’s a great way to get your vegetables in for the meal. Reply

  • November 8, 2010

    Wow, I haven’t had Adjika in forever. I used to love it! I will have to try it sometime. Hey, I really love the photography on your site. What kind of camera do you use? Reply

    • Natasha
      November 8, 2010

      Hi Irina, Thank you! We use the Canon Rebel xsi. For my food pictures I use an inexpensive 50 mm lens that allows for a blurred background (especially nice for food) we bought the lens on ebay around $50-$70 (can’t remember for sure how much). I’m hoping to get a nicer lens soon. I do like the camera very much. It’s really fun to get nice pictures of my family with it too without hiring a pro photographer for everything. I also use Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 2 to edit my photos and that can make a world of difference. Reply

    • Natasha
      April 27, 2011

      Hi Irina – check out the shop tab at the top to see what camera I use 🙂 Reply

  • November 7, 2010

    Wow, I have never heard of this! Reply

    • Natasha
      November 7, 2010

      I think you’d like it! Vadim and I were craving mexican food last night and I made soft tacos. We wolfed down a whole can between the two of us; I’m sure Vadim had more than his “fair” share 🙂 Reply

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