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Mom’s Rye and Whole Wheat Bread (Video)

Rye and Whole Wheat Bread

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I’ve had several requests for my Mom’s rye whole wheat bread recipe. Mom bakes it all the time and it’s the same bread I showed you on Instagram (@natashaskitchen). The rye whole wheat flour make it a healthier bread and I feel so good about giving a warm buttered slice to my 3-yr old son (he’s in line just as soon as it comes out of the oven!). As an added bonus and because I really want you to succeed in making this bread, I’ve also included a complete photo tutorial for this recipe. So read on!

Quick breads like the no-knead artisan bread are gorgeous and are a great choice for dinner parties but they are best eaten the same day they are baked. My mom’s bread is one that keeps well in the fridge or freezer without becoming crumbly (if that makes any sense to you).

This recipe makes 2 loaves of bread. Eat one and freeze the other. My mom usually bakes 6 loaves and if all five of her girls (I have 4 sisters) stop by, she’s usually left with one loaf at the end of the day.

Watch How to Make Whole Wheat Bread:

This recipe is an all-day project (lots of effortless rising time) so it’s worth-while to double or even triple the recipe and freeze the extras for weeks of enjoyment. You do not need a bread-maker for this recipe. P.S. If you don’t have rye flour, you can substitute with more wheat flour.

Rye and Whole Wheat Bread-2

Ingredients for Rye and Whole Wheat Bread:

2 1/4 cups luke warm water
1/2 Tbsp salt
1 1/2 Tbsp sugar 
2 tsp active dry yeast
3/4 cup whole wheat flour *measured correctly
3/4 cup rye flour *measured correctly
3/4 cup better for bread flour *measured correctly
plus 2 1/2 cups better for bread flour *measured correctly
2 Tbsp canola oil plus more to grease counter and pan

*Watch our easy video tutorial on how to measure correctly

How to Make Rye and Whole Wheat Bread:

1. In a large kitchen aid mixer bowl, combine 2 1/4 cups warm water (about 100˚F), 1 1/2 Tbsp sugar and 1/2 Tbsp salt; stir to dissolve.

Rye and Whole Wheat Bread Recipe-1

2. Sift the 3/4 cup wheat flour, 3/4 cup rye flour and 3/4 cup better for bread flour with 2 tsp yeast into the salted water. Do not discard anything left in the sifter (it’s the good stuff!); toss it into the batter. Whisk together until well blended. Let it rise on the counter uncovered for 3 hours, stirring the batter about once every hour. It will be bubbly.

Rye and Whole Wheat Bread Recipe-2

3. Using the dough hook attachment add 1/2 cup all-purpose flour until well blended, scraping down the bowl if needed. Blend in the rest of your flour (2 cups) a heaping Tbsp at a time, letting the dough dissolve the flour in between each spoon (this takes about 20 min).

Rye and Whole Wheat Bread Recipe-3

4. Once all the flour is incorporated, add 2 Tbsp canola oil. Let mix for an additional 20 more minutes on speed 2 with the dough hook or until dough is no longer sticking to your bowl. Note: after you add the oil it will look like it’s coming off the walls and then it will appear to get stickier, then towards the end of your 20 minutes, it will actually stop sticking to the walls as it mixes. Just let it do it’s thing and everything will work out ;). Remove dough hook and Let it rise in the bowl, uncovered, until double in volume.

Rye and Whole Wheat Bread Recipe-4

5. Grease your bread pans, counter and fingers a little with the canola oil. Punch down the dough and transfer it onto the oiled counter
6. Pinch the dough in the center to form two sections with your hands. Grease your pan lightly with oil. Place dough into each prepared bread pan and mold the dough to the base of the pan (no gaps in the corners). Let it rise on the counter until  2 1/2 to 3 times in volume (about 1 1/2 hours). Bake at 360˚F for 55 minutes.

Rye and Whole Wheat Bread Recipe-5

7. When done, brush the tops with butter as soon as bread comes out of the oven. Remove bread immediately from the pans and cool on a wire rack. If you leave bread in the pans, it will get moist from the steam in the pan. Once bread is just warm, butter up a slice of soft and delicous bread and enjoy. You deserve it!

Rye and Whole Wheat Bread Recipe-6

Rye and Whole Wheat Bread-35

Mom's Rye and Whole Wheat Bread Recipe

4.69 from 19 votes
Prep Time: 6 hours
Cook Time: 55 minutes
Total Time: 6 hours 55 minutes
Rye and Whole Wheat Bread
Author: Natasha of NatashasKitchen.com
Servings: 2 Loaves

Ingredients

  • 2 1/4 cups luke warm water
  • 1/2 Tbsp salt
  • 1 1/2 Tbsp sugar
  • 2 tsp active dry yeast
  • 3/4 cup whole wheat flour
  • 3/4 cup rye flour
  • 3/4 cup better for bread flour
  • plus 2 1/2 cups better for bread flour
  • 2 Tbsp canola oil plus more to grease counter and pan

Instructions

  1. In a large kitchen aid mixer bowl, combine 2 1/4 cups warm water (about 100˚F), 1 1/2 Tbsp sugar and 1/2 Tbsp salt; stir to dissolve.
  2. Sift the 3/4 cup wheat flour, 3/4 cup rye flour and 3/4 cup better for bread flour with 2 tsp yeast into the salted water. Do not discard anything left in the sifter; toss it into the batter. Whisk together until well blended. Let it rise on the counter uncovered for 3 hours, stirring the batter about once every hour. It will be bubbly.
  3. Using the dough hook attachement add 1/2 cup all-purpose flour until well blended, scraping down the bowl if needed. Blend in the rest of your flour (2 cups) a heaping Tbsp at a time, letting the dough dissolve the flour in between each spoon (this takes about 20 min).
  4. Once all the flour is incorporated, add 2 Tbsp canola oil. Let mix for an additional 20 more minutes with the dough hook on speed 2 or until dough is no longer sticking to your bowl. Note: after you add the oil it will look like it's coming off the walls and then it will appear to get stickier, then towards the end of your 20 minutes, it will actually stop sticking to the walls as it mixes. Just let it do it's thing and everything will work out ;). Remove dough hook and Let it rise in the bowl, uncovered, until double in volume (45 min).
  5. Grease your bread pans, counter and fingers a little with the canola oil. Punch down the dough and transfer it onto the oiled counter.

  6. Pinch the dough in the center to form two sections with your hands. Grease your pan lightly with oil. Place dough into each prepared bread pan and mold the dough to the base of the pan (no gaps in the corners). Let it rise on the counter until 2 1/2 to 3 times in volume (about 1 1/2 hours). Bake at 360˚F for 55 minutes.
  7. When done, brush the tops with butter as soon as bread comes out of the oven. Remove bread immediately from the pans and cool on a wire rack. If you leave bread in the pans, it will get moist from the steam in the pan.

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natashaskitchen

Welcome to my kitchen! I am Natasha, the blogger behind Natasha's Kitchen (since 2009). My husband and I run this blog together and share only our best, family approved recipes with YOU. Thanks for stopping by! We are so happy you're here.

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  • Sonia
    December 2, 2019

    The first time I made this recipe the bread had excellent flavor but came out a little dry. The second time i checked the temperature and the breads were brown and 201 degrees My bread at 40 minutes at 360 degrees. This is a really good recipe. Reply

  • Eugene
    April 26, 2019

    This looks interesting and I would like to try it out. Can I use bread maker for this recipe by just throw everything in and let the machine do all the work? Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      April 26, 2019

      Hi Eugene, I haven’t tried in a bread machine. It depends on the size of your bread maker, whether or not you will have to adjust the recipe proportions – if your bread maker is large enough, it might possibly work to do the full batch as one large loaf. With a bread maker, you will probably want to addd the yeast with the initial water and sugar and let it proof for 5-7 minutes before adding in all of the flour and switching it on. I just haven’t tested it myself. Reply

  • Tammy
    February 9, 2019

    Would glass pans work as well as the one’s that you use? My husband has been begging me to make bread. Can’t wait to try out your recipe. Thanks so much! Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      February 9, 2019

      Hi Tammy! I haven’t tried that is a glass pan, I imagine it should work! If you experiment, let me know how you liked the recipe Reply

      • Laura H.
        February 12, 2019

        Hi, regarding using glass – I tried this recipe over the weekend and because I only have one proper bread pan, I had to use glass for one of the loaves. It worked perfectly! Both loaves were amazing. Also, I used sprouted rye flour. My family couldn’t get enough! I don’t have a Kitchen-aid, so kneaded it for 20 minutes…. very therapeutic. 🙃Easily the best bread I’ve ever made. Thank you for this recipe. Reply

        • Natashas Kitchen
          February 12, 2019

          Thank you so much for sharing that with me, Laura! I’m so happy you enjoyed that!! Reply

  • Sharon
    October 13, 2018

    Hi, I can’t wait to try this recipe but i have a question. In the photos you show punching the dough down before removing from bowl and pinching to two pieces but the instructions don’t mention that. Reply

    • Natasha
      October 13, 2018

      Hi Sharon, you are right! I missed the punching the dough section – I added that to the photo and print-friendly instructions. Thank you so much for pointing that out! Reply

  • Halyna
    March 11, 2018

    Thank you very much for this recipe, I’ve added 1/2 cup of ground flax seeds instead of 1/2 cup of white flour & the bread turned out great! Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      March 12, 2018

      You’re welcome Halyna! I’m glad you enjoy the recipe. Thanks for sharing! Reply

  • Inna
    February 5, 2018

    Natasha, thank you for the recipe! The bread turned out amazing! Did you try to bake it in a bread maker? If yes, how shall I adjust the recipe? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 6, 2018

      Hi Inna, I believe my Mom has made it in a bread maker but I’m not able to ask her right now since she is on vacation. It depends on the size of your bread maker, whether or not you will have to adjust the recipe proportions – if your bread maker is large enough, it might possibly work to do the full batch as one large loaf. With a bread maker, you will probably want to addd the yeast with the initial water and sugar and let it proof for 5-7 minutes before adding in all of the flour and switching it on. I just haven’t tested it myself. Reply

      • Inna
        February 6, 2018

        Thank you! I will try to bake the whole batch and proof water, sugar, and yeast Reply

        • Natasha's Kitchen
          February 6, 2018

          You’re welcome Inna! 🙂 Reply

  • ianna
    December 26, 2017

    My father in law loves rye bread but dislikes sugar in his bread, so I made him these loaves without sugar. Tastes great, and there was no discernable difference in rising times, perfect!! Thank you for sharing this lovely recipe! Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      December 26, 2017

      You’re welcome Ianna! I’m glad to hear you enjoy the recipe. Thanks for sharing your great review with other readers! Reply

  • Jake
    November 17, 2017

    Just started this recipe and wondering what speed to use for the 20 minute dough-hook mixing? Usually, I’d just play it by ear, but if it’s running for 20 minutes, the speed will make a big difference! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 18, 2017

      Hi Jake, with a dough hook, you should not be exceeding speed 2 according to the Kitchenaid manufacturers instructions so I always mix on speed 2 when using a dough hook. I will include that detail in the recipe. Sorry for the late reply. We traveled all day yesterday. Reply

  • Nica
    June 26, 2017

    A wonderful recipe – I came across it last Summer and have been making it ever since – it’s a favorite of mine. I especially love adding Carraway and onion to the dough. Thank you for sharing this!! Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      June 26, 2017

      That’s great to hear Nica! I’m glad you enjoy the recipe so much! Thanks for sharing 😀 Reply

  • E Marsolais
    July 22, 2016

    Made this today. Turned out perfect. Crusty outside and fluffy inside. I milled my own rye flour. Very fresh. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 22, 2016

      Thank you for such nice review, I’m so happy to hear that you liked it 😄. Reply

  • lindsay
    May 24, 2016

    My husband and i are new to making our own bread. This looks so good and will be making it but how do you keep your bread fresh for a couple days? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 25, 2016

      Hi Lindsay, usually, I will keep it loosely wrapped in a plastic bag for a couple of days on the counter, and after that I store bread in the refrigerator since it lasts much longer in the fridge. It’s not super fresh after refrigeration though so my favorite way to eat refrigerated bread is sautéed in a small amount of butter. I freeze the second loaf right away if I’m not planning to eat it for awhile. I have found that if you freeze it fresh, it will taste fresh when you thaw it 🙂 Reply

  • Eric
    April 12, 2016

    I am trying to figure out how to use the recipe for imperial as I find cups very confusing , my attempts to convert have failed miserably, any help would be most helpful.
    Eric Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 12, 2016

      I am trying to use metric measurements with my current baking posts but I did not weight the flour for this one. Next time I make it, I will try to remember to include that. You’ve probably seen charts like this online, but for now, I would recommend searching for specific conversions on google. Reply

  • Nanci
    November 22, 2015

    I came across your bread recipe while searching for a rye bread to practice on for baking class! It was a long process but so worth it. Thank you for sharing. I would make this bread again. Great with some wild honey! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 22, 2015

      A baking class sounds so fun! I’m so happy you enjoyed the bread and thank you for the awesome review! 🙂 Reply

  • Malou Chua
    August 18, 2015

    Hi Natasha. I came across your site just today and I immediately made your No Knead Artisan Bread. It was a success though mine is a bit flatter than yours. I will try to do it again. Now I see this Rye Whole Wheat Bread and I can’t can’t wait to try this. Your other recipes are wonderful too. And your Dessert Recipes….Oh my goodness! By the way, my husband and my youngest son loved the bread. God Bless you. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 18, 2015

      Thank you so much for your wonderful reviews! 🙂 Reply

  • Kateryna
    March 10, 2015

    Hi Natasha,

    Thank you for this great recipe. Could I use only whole wheat and rye flour for this recipe? I also would like to incorporate whole grain rye to make it healthier. What do you think would be a good proportion for everything?

    By the way, Thank you for creating this wonderful website with our Ukrainian cuisine for people to enjoy. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 10, 2015

      I haven’t tried those substitutions, so it’s really difficult to guess. Baking is such a science that it really needs experimentation in order to give you exact measurements. I think if you leave out the all-purpose flour, the bread probably would not be as soft. I wish I could be more helpful with your question. Thank you for your sweet comment comment 🙂 Reply

      • Kateryna
        March 11, 2015

        Thank you, Natasha! I will experiment 🙂
        You are too sweet! Reply

  • Lyuda
    February 2, 2015

    Hi Natasha! I want to bake this bread as one whole, just like the other one you have here on website. So what temperature and for how long would i bake it? Thank u!! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 2, 2015

      I haven’t tried making it as a single loaf outside of the pan so it would have to be an experiment. I imagine it is going to be about the same as the original recipe since it will be more spread out. Reply

  • Seema
    January 28, 2015

    Hi Natasha,
    I tried your “no knead artisan bread” two days back and it was a hit. Ofcourse that motivated me to try this wholesome bread as well…eventhough it’s a day process but the end result is superb! My son simply loved it. Thank you for sharing such great recipes! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 28, 2015

      Thank you Seema for the great review, I’m glad you enjoyed the recipe :). Reply

      • Seema
        January 30, 2015

        Hi Natasha,

        Have you tried the same recipe with milk? I was going to try it out but thought of checking with you if it worked well?! Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          January 30, 2015

          I haven’t tried it yet, but if you do test it out, do let me know how it goes :). I’ve made bread with whey from making cheese but haven’t tried milk. Reply

          • Seema
            February 4, 2015

            Hi Natasha,
            I tried this recipe replacing water with milk and results were really good. I would say that taste wise it was a notch higher. But during the 40mins of kneading, the dough appeared dry compared to the original version. So I added extra milk during the kneading process…say 1/8-1/4 cup more. Next time I will note the amt I increase n let u know.

  • Nancy
    December 31, 2014

    Natasha, no way will my husband eat wheat bread. I was wondering if I can omit the wheat and rye flour and increase the white flour. I have been looking for a light bread recipe so I am anxious to try this on. Reply

  • Greg
    December 19, 2014

    Have been making your Artesian Bread for several months and it is easy to make, has a wonderful texture and taste. Makes me look good every time I make it. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 20, 2014

      I love that! Thanks for sharing your great review! Reply

  • Ina
    December 19, 2014

    Hi, can i substitute regular white flour for better for bread flour?

    Thanks
    Ina Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 19, 2014

      Bread flour is typically better for breads since it has a higher level of gluten which creates a stronger rise, but it would work if aren’t able to get the bread flour. Reply

  • Maria
    October 21, 2014

    I think my husband makes a similar bread. It took him some time to develop his own process and proportions. Usually it’s overnight. Great additions: dried cranberries and walnuts or pecans. Another option: chopped olives.
    Regarding the freezing for those who asked: let the bread cool down on wire rack. Then slice it as thin as you like, put in zipper bag and freeze. This way it’s so easy to take out just as many slices as you need. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 21, 2014

      Thank you so much for sharing! 🙂 Reply

  • Sonia
    October 2, 2014

    I used this recipe to make bread last night and I must say, it was quite good if I may say so myself. I did tweak a few things to my tastes, though. I replaced one whole cup of the bread flour with flaxseed meal, and I used olive instead of canola oil (I don’t mind its flavor at all). The resulting dough was probably a little wetter than usual, which prompted me to add about 1/4 cup of extra bread flour. The dough still stuck to the sides of the bowl after several incremental additions, so I stopped and continued. The bread turned out soft and fluffy, and roasted, it has a great crunchiness. I’m definitely bookmarking this recipe. Thank you!! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 2, 2014

      I’m so glad you enjoyed it and thank you for sharing your modifications. I’ll have to try your version! 🙂 Reply

  • Alana
    September 8, 2014

    i will want to try this recipe but i never used the “better for bread flour” do you use specific brand..? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 9, 2014

      Alana, I use “Gold Medal” brand. Let me know if you have any additional questions :). Reply

  • allison
    August 3, 2014

    Hi Natasha. I wanna know what’s in better for bread flour? Wheat or white flour, or a combo? Also, I don’t have bread pans…. do I need to invest in one or can I use something else? Thanks so much! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 3, 2014

      The baking time will be different for different sized pans. A bread pan will help the bread rise as it should. I’m not exactly sure what the differences are with the better for bread flour. I think that the big thing is a difference in the amount of gluten in the flour? Reply

  • Nadia
    July 7, 2014

    I would love to make this bread but don’t have a kitchen aid mixer. Is it possible to do it by hand? What would I have to do different if I were to do it by hand? Can’t wait to try this bread. Thanks. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 7, 2014

      Yes you can do it by hand, you just need to incorporate the flour with a spatula at step 3 and then knead the dough by hand, until it’s smooth and elastic and just barely sticking to the walls of the bowl. Reply

  • Alya
    June 13, 2014

    Hey Natasha! I absolutely love your website and all your amazing recipes…I have a question about the mixer you’re using to make the bread dough. Can you tell me what brand you use and where did you get it from? Thanks in advance:) Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      June 13, 2014

      We use the KitchenAid professional 6 Qt capacity. It’s the workhorse of my kitchen and makes baking so much easier! 🙂 We purchased ours online Reply

  • Yazneiry Reyes
    May 17, 2014

    Love your website great recipe
    Can I use a hand mixer i have the kitchen aid 9 speed which is very strong
    I don’t own a stand mixer Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 17, 2014

      It’s best to do it by hand unless you have a mixer with a dough hook or it will break your mixer. Reply

      • Tiffany Kordis
        June 9, 2019

        Hi Natasha,
        Love you’re recipes!
        In the ingredients list you mention two amounts of bread flour but in the directions you mention all purpose flour. Which is the correct type of flour to be used.
        Thank you Reply

        • Natashas Kitchen
          June 9, 2019

          Hi Tiffany, I’m more than happy to troubleshoot. We have whole wheat and rye flour posted in this recipe, no all-purpose flour. Was this comment possibly intended for another recipe? Reply

  • Teresinha
    March 14, 2014

    Dear Natasha,

    I am so glad that I found your website.
    Let you know that everything I have been making turns sooooooo delicious.
    Yesterday I made the Easter bread, but I already make whole wheat bread, the white one also. OMG my house smells sooooo wonderful!

    Thank you so much to share w us your talent for cooking.

    Keep doing, you do an amazing job! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 14, 2014

      You are on a roll!! It sounds like I need to post more breads just for you! Make sure you try the baked piroshki with cabbage or apples. I think you’d LOVE them too! 🙂 Reply

  • Paul
    February 10, 2014

    Great recipe!
    I’ve made it a few times now and it’ll probably be the main bread I bake from now on. Since I don’t know where my stand mixer is, I just do it all by hand which is a little more of a pain but I still get good results.
    I have changed it a little to suit my process, with the main thing being the sponge. So the night before I bake:
    1) I mix the 3 flours with the same amount of water, sugar, only 1/4 teaspoon of yeast, and don’t add the salt and leave it to ferment til I wake up.
    2) The next morning, I add the salt, 2 tsp of yeast, 1 tbs of oil and mix.
    3) I get 2 cups of bread flour and mix in 1 tablespoon of vital wheat gluten then add it to the sponge. When it pulls away from the bowl, I dump it onto the counter and knead it for 10 mins or so, slowly incorporating the last 1/2 cup of flour. When the last of the flour is incorporated and it starts to become tacky again, I add 1/2 tbs of the oil and keep kneading and continue adding the oil until it’s used up.
    4) Oil the bowl, let rise for 1 hour, deflate and shape into loaves in bread pan, let rise for 1 hour and 30 mins then bake for 35-40 mins (in my oven) at 360F.
    The wheat gluten makes the bread light and super soft, so I definitely recommend people trying it with that addition.
    Definitely a keeper 😀 Now I’ll have to go around and try some of your other recipes~ Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 10, 2014

      I’m do glad you love the bread 🙂 I love that you turned it into an overnight method! Thanks for sharing your process with me. Reply

  • Zina P
    February 9, 2014

    I made these two loaves of bread today and I can truly say that they came out perfect following the recipe exactly…..and delicious. This will be my go-to recipe for home baked bread. I have yet to be disappointed by any of your recipes. Many thanks! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 9, 2014

      Thank you Zina for such a great review! I’m so happy you’ve had success with all the recipes you have tried. I hope to continue to WOW you 😉 Reply

  • Olga
    January 29, 2014

    Спасибо огромное, Наташа, за рецепт хлеба. Я много перепробовала рецептов, но ваш самый лучший. Очень вкусный и нежный хлебушек. Вашей маме благодарность за такой рецепт.
    Olga Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 29, 2014

      You are very welcome Olga, I will let my mom know and thank you for a good report :). Reply

  • adnileb
    January 17, 2014

    This recipe is great with a couple teaspoons of caraway seed to give it that “rye-ish” taste during step 3. Thanks for posting up this recipe! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 17, 2014

      I’ll have to try that next time I make the bread, thank you for the tip :). Reply

  • teresa
    November 25, 2013

    Hi Natasha!
    I stumbled upon your blog a few days ago, completely by accident, and am I glad I did! I just love what I have seen so far, and there are a few recipes I really want to try (already). Also, you take the time to answer every comment, that is so nice of you.
    I started whit this bread, and my dough was very wet. I don’t know if it’s supposed to be like that, so I resisted the urge to add more flour. Should I have? The only thing I did different was using unrefined sugar and olive oil. The texture of the bread is kind of like an english muffin bread. But it is really tasty, so I plan on making it again.
    Thank you

    Funny coincidence, my husband just got back from Kiev. He was there for two weeks. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 25, 2013

      The change in ingredients might have made a small difference. It should be much softer and fluffier than english muffins. Add a few more Tbsp of flour next time. If it’s still really sticking to the bowl, you should add 2-3 Tbsp more flour and that should do the trick! 🙂 Reply

  • Erika
    November 20, 2013

    Hi Natasha,

    I was wondering if you had a black bread recipe. I am looking for a bread that looks like the black bread that is normally done in the village in Ukraine.

    Thank you! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 20, 2013

      I’m actually looking for a great one myself. I’m always on the lookout for something and really need to get back into experimenting! If you find one first, please let me know! 😉 Reply

  • Anna@eatwithtaste.com
    November 10, 2013

    Thank you for the recipe. I never baked bread myself but I really want to give it a try.
    How do you film the recipe and take the pics at the same time? Do you only do recipes you plan on posting while someone is home to take pictures for you or what? I find this part to be very difficult for me since I do recipes during the day when my husband is at work so I’m left with taking the pictures myself:( It’s really hard because my hands are dirty while cooking and I constantly have to wash them to take pictures. How do you do this? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 10, 2013

      I wash them to take pictures. lol. It takes forever. For video filming, my husband is always there to help, but I do most of the step-by-step photography myself. With a really complicated recipe, I do recruit my hubby to help 🙂 I usually don’t video and photograph the whole recipe. This was an exception. Reply

      • Anna
        November 11, 2013

        Oh, OK. Thank you for sharing. Reply

  • Ira M
    November 4, 2013

    Hey Natasha, it love this recipe but I was wondering if I can use the leftover whey from tv org instead of water and if it will turn out the same? Thanks in advance 🙂 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 4, 2013

      I haven’t tested it myself, but my mom uses whey from time to time and it turns out great if not better :). Reply

  • Elva
    October 19, 2013

    Hi Natasha,
    I’m trying out this recipe right now. The dough is rising in the pan as I type. However it’s been in there for over an hour now but the surface of the dough is still very bumpy. Will they smooth out after baking like the ones on your picture? I did do this with a hand mixer(with the dough hooks) and beat 20 minutes after adding the oil. But I guess my arms were weaker than the stand mixer and couldn’t maintain a perfect circular motion while fighting the gluten. So my dough didn’t quite reach the unstick to the walls stage. Could that have been the reason? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 19, 2013

      It can be a little lumpy and that’s ok. Let me know how it turns out. Reply

  • Frank
    August 31, 2013

    Would it work with no oil I can’t use any oil because of health reason.
    Would I need to add something instead of the oil? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 31, 2013

      Can you use any kind of oil or all all oils off limits? Reply

  • Anna
    August 27, 2013

    Hi! I was wondering if I could substitute the sugar with honey? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 27, 2013

      I haven’t tried that, but I think it’s a good idea and it could work 🙂 Reply

      • Anna
        August 28, 2013

        Honey’s big house at our house so I incorporate it everywhere- I’ll let you know how it comes out! Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          August 28, 2013

          Our goal for this year is to try to transition to honey more. How else have you been able to use honey in your cooking successfully? Reply

          • Anna
            August 29, 2013

            I made the bread yesterday using 1/4 cup of honey instead of sugar and it came out amazing! Absolutely delicious!

            I’ll admit that I’m a bit of a health nut. One of the things that scares me the most is reading an ingredient list and not being able to pronounce words. If I can’t pronounce it and don’t know where it came from, then no way am I buying it for my family!
            So about honey- I use it everywhere. Literally. When a recipe calls for sugar–use honey instead. It’s simple. Sugar is a sweetener, not an active agent in the baking process. Meaning, if you forget to add it to cake batter the cake will still rise beautifully and look great, but will taste bland. In some of my favorite dessert recipes, like carrot cake and cinnamon buns, I use honey and apple sauce to add sweetness and softness to the dough. I have great recipes if you want to try them 🙂 One of my weaknesses is coffee, although full of antioxidants and other goodness, it’s healthy in moderation which most people, like me of course, lack because it’s just so good 😉 Anyways, the only time I will use sugar, that is “Stevia sugar”, is in my coffee. Stevia is a plant known for its sweet leaves that produce a highly concentrated type of sugar. Therefore, you only use a little bit and don’t feel as bad. Another note about honey–if you’re going to switch over completely to honey, do it right away. It’s so much healthier, especially for kids! Also, use local honey. I’ve read so much about the positive effects of using honey from bees that pollinate locally. Your body will be more receptive to it since its already breathing and absorbing from you area. Depending on the time of year the honey can be light or dark in color but always thick in texture. If it’s too runny, your seller might have diluted the honey with water… watch out for that! Talking about the benefits of organic and healthy options is my passion- feel free to ask about anything anytime 🙂

          • Natasha
            natashaskitchen
            August 29, 2013

            Please please please send me recipes. I love to try out tried-and-true recipes from my readers. I was actually saying to my hubby that I want to switch over to honey as much as possible. It’s been around forever and it’s a much healthier option. We are going to buy two large jugs of honey locally this week and will start working with it more. Any other healthy/organic recipes you’d like to share with me, I’d love to try them. My email: Natashaskitchen@yahoo.com

  • Oksana
    August 27, 2013

    I am wanting to try this recipe. I dont have rye flour and you mentioned wheat can be used instead. Do I use the same amount of wheat as I would have the rye to substitute. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 27, 2013

      Yes, substitute the same amount 🙂 Reply

  • Elizabeth
    August 27, 2013

    Hi Natasha,
    Just wanted to let you know this recipe is in constant rotation at our house. I bake it as a single artisan loaf in a preheated Dutch oven and it comes out with a fabulous crust. Today I’m going to try it as batard loaves on a perforated pan. Excellent bread! What culinary school did your mom go to?
    🙂 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 27, 2013

      Thanks for sharing that with me 🙂 I haven’t tried it in a dutch oven but now I really want to! I’m not sure which school she went to. I know it was in the Seattle area. I’ll have to ask her. Reply

  • Andrea
    August 19, 2013

    Hi Natasha!
    I want to tell you how much I enjoy your blog. I am an American who married a Ukrainian. I try to get recipes from my mother-in-law and other Russians to make my husband dishes he grew up with but they don’t always want to share their recipes. I have found so many recipes on your blog that make my husband so happy! Thank you!

    I was wondering what you put the bread in to freeze it: ziploc, plastic container, plastic wrap, etc.? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 19, 2013

      You can freeze it. My mom does that sometimes if the kids don’t come over and take all the bread home 🙂 Reply

  • Alli
    August 2, 2013

    Hi Natasha,
    I’ve tried this recipe twice, step by step, and all goes good until I make out the loaves into the bread pans. The dough doesn’t rise there! It rises very well during the 3 hours and after I add all the flour so I know my yeast is still active and good. Then in the bread pans it rises maybe 1/2 times and thats all. And it doesn’t rise on the oven either. What can this be?? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 3, 2013

      How long are you letting them rise in the bread pans? Try putting them in a warm place, but no more than 100°F. I hope that helps :). Reply

  • Oksana
    May 25, 2013

    Hey, I used King Arthur’s Whole Wheat, King Arthur’s Bread flour and some other brand for rye. Could the brands be the reason why the dough is wet even after 40 mins. of mixing? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 26, 2013

      It could be but the difference should minimal; try adding a few extra tbsp flour. Reply

  • Oksana
    May 24, 2013

    Natasha, I’ve made this bread twice and it is delicious. However, for some unknown reason my dough never “unsticks” from the mixer stand after the second 20 minutes of mixing. I’ve even turned up the speed in hope that it would stop sticking but it didn’t. I surely followed all of the steps correctly and wondering why does my bread still stick after 25 minutes of mixing? Did this ever happen to you when you made this bread? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 24, 2013

      Are you using the same kind of flour? You might add an extra 1 or 2 Tbsp of flour. Reply

  • Oksana
    May 22, 2013

    Last question – if I double the recipe at once, would I need to mix the dough longer? For example, originally you would mix 20 minutes then another 20. Would I mix 40 then another 40? Or doubling the recipe doesn’t have an impact on the time it takes the mix the bread? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 22, 2013

      It should take the same amount of time to mix if you double it. You do need a pretty large mixing bowl or you might have to do it in 2 batches. Reply

  • Oksana
    May 22, 2013

    I wonder if I could double the recipe at once and get 4 loaves? (My husband is the bread eater in the family – can easily go through 1/2 loaf in 1 day lol). I only have two bread pans and wonder how I could shape the rest two loaves so they would turn out nice like the other bread? Would I also bake the 4 loaves at the same time? Thanks in advance! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 22, 2013

      You can also form them into loaves and just bake them right on a non-stick baking sheet. My Mom triples the recipe (but she has 6 professional loaf pans!) Reply

  • Ally
    April 28, 2013

    Oh sweet! Thanks so much!;) Reply

  • Ally
    April 26, 2013

    Would this work in a bread machine? I just don’t have bread pans and would need to go buy some. Lol Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 27, 2013

      I haven’t tried in a bread machine. But the beauty of this recipe is that you do not need bread molds. You can just bake it directly on a nonstick baking sheet. Just make two loaves and form them into logs then let them rise and bake without the molds. Reply

  • Galina
    April 24, 2013

    Just had a piece (hmmm, actually 2 pieces) of this bread. Turned out very good. Easy to make (just takes some time and no work) and delicious! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 24, 2013

      I’m so glad you enjoyed it 🙂 Thanks for reporting back! 🙂 Reply

  • April 23, 2013

    I’m really looking forward to trying out this recipe. Homemade bread is amazing. Great video, as always. I especially admire how relaxed and approachable you are. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 23, 2013

      Awww thanks Olga, that means alot to me. I’m still finding my “voice” in video, but I think it’s getting a little better each time. 🙂 Reply

  • alison
    April 23, 2013

    I love your video presentations. They make me wanna try the recipe every time. Thanks!!!!!! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 23, 2013

      Thank you; you’re so sweet. I’m still trying to find my “voice” in video, but it’s getting better and easier with each one 🙂 Reply

  • Janetw100
    April 23, 2013

    For the person asking about using all whole-wheat… Whenever I use all whole-wheat for bread, I always add a teaspoon or two of gluten to it. I buy it from King Arthur Flour, but I’m sure you can find it elsewhere. It makes it rise up real nice! 🙂 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 23, 2013

      Oh I’ve never thought about doing that before. That’s brilliant! Thank you! Reply

  • Irina
    April 22, 2013

    Natasha, do you think I can use instant yeast instead of active dry? And how much of instant yeast should I use? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 22, 2013

      Honestly I haven’t tested it with instant yeast so I can’t give you an answer for that. I don’t usually work with that ingredient. Sorry that’s not very helpful… Reply

  • Katerina Kalyandra
    April 22, 2013

    Thanks for sharing!! Would this bread work well for your Kvas recipe or does it need to be a stronger rye flavor? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 22, 2013

      it needs to be stronger and darker, so this won’t work. Reply

  • Oksana
    April 22, 2013

    What a lovely presentation! You are definitely a natural and you have a beautiful son! 🙂 Okay, I have a question about flour. I started buying King Arthur bread flour lately in place of Better for Bread Flour. Do you know if I could use those flours interchangeably or not? Do those flours both have high gluten or one out beats the other? Thanks in advance. Will be making some bread soon when my Spring semester will be over! I can’t wait to finally breathe and start cooking/baking! 🙂 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 22, 2013

      Thank you 🙂 I’m all to familiar with hoping for school to end soon so I’m very happy for you! 🙂 I’m not sure how the gluten content compares but the king arthur bread flour should work just fine for this bread. Reply

  • lana
    April 22, 2013

    By the name of the post, I was hoping it would be all whole wheat!! Do you think it would turn out good if I used whole wheat flour for the better for bread flour? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 22, 2013

      I haven’t tried that so I can’t recommend it without testing it. It would be a darker bread, but I’m not sure if it would be as soft as using the bread flour. I just consulted with my mom and she agreed that the wheat flour is heavier and doesn’t have as much gluten in it so it wouldn’t be as soft, but again, I haven’t tested it.  Reply

    • April 22, 2013

      Whole wheat bread wouldn’t rise as much also. To keep similar consistency you can replace 1/3 of the white flour with whole wheat. I often do that with no knead bread. Also add seeds to it. Reply

  • April 22, 2013

    Natasha, I am looking for a good Russian bread, something like this. My moms makes bread every week but I want something new so I want to try your recipe.
    Can you explain the 3 hours of sitting, is it necessary to mix? I wonder if you leave overnight if the results would be the same? Maybe your mom has tried this? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 22, 2013

      I just called her to ask and she hasn’t tried it overnight, but she thought it might work. Neither of us have tested it, but it looks like we should! Obviously you won’t be waking up to mix it at night, but I really think it sounds like a good experiment. I might have to try that tonight. 🙂 Thanks for the idea! If you beat me to it, let me know how it worked out . Reply

      • April 22, 2013

        I was just wondering if there was a specific reason why you would mix it. I like the recipe I use, with overnight process. Its easy to just wake up and finish it up.

        I might try this tonight Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          April 22, 2013

          Let me know how it goes. I’m not sure about the chemistry behind it, but I think it helps the yeast to activate and work better. Maybe someone else could explain this better? Reply

          • April 24, 2013

            So, I made the bread. It turned out good. I let the dough sit overnight.
            Also when I was baking bread, I added baking sheet with water on a lover tray for 20 minutes. It helps the dough rise higher.

          • April 24, 2013

            So, I made the bread. It turned out good. I let the dough sit overnight.

            Also when I was baking bread, I added baking sheet with water on a lower tray for 20 minutes. It helps the dough rise higher.

          • Natasha
            natashaskitchen
            April 24, 2013

            Thank you for letting me know!! I will definitely try the overnight method! 🙂

          • When you leave yeasted dough overnight it ferments, yielding a certain aroma that’s produced through fermentation. It is also recommended to put lesser amount of yeast if you leave it overnight, because you do not want the dough to rise so high that it gets deflated on it’s own, because when this happens the yeast deactivates not producing as high of a rise when baking and giving off a ‘sour’ smell when baked.

          • Natasha
            natashaskitchen
            August 1, 2013

            Good to know! Thanks Marina! 🙂

  • April 22, 2013

    I’ve been wanting to try another bread. Maybe I’ve found my Saturday project!? Thanks! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 22, 2013

      let me know how it turns out Amanda :). Reply

  • Fresh homemade bread is the best. Delish!!! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 22, 2013

      I can’t agree more Inessa :). Reply

  • Pat
    April 22, 2013

    so, can I safely assume that ‘better for bread’ is bread flour?? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 22, 2013

      Yes. 🙂 Reply

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