Olivye – Ukrainian Potato Salad

My husband makes this version of the famous olivye salad. The chives and dill add a nice element of freshness. The great thing about Russian and Ukrainian cooking – there is no one right way to make any recipe. Each family has their own version which get passed down through generations.

This olivye recipe really is the best I’ve tried. It takes some time to dice everything, but in the end you get the best potato salad that lasts almost a week in the fridge.

Ingredients for Olivye (potato salad):

1 pound of ham
3 medium potatoes
4 medium carrots.
1 (15 oz) can sweet peas, drained or 2 cups of thawed frozen peas
5 boiled eggs
5 medium-large pickles (I use Vlasic)
1/3 cup chopped green onion
1/4 cup chopped fresh dill
3/4 cup to 1 cup mayo (to taste)
Salt and Pepper (to taste)

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How to Make Olivye Potato Salad:

1. In the same pot, boil whole unpeeled potatoes and carrots for about 30 minutes, or until knife pierces them smoothly. Don’t let them get too soft.

2. In a separate pot put eggs in salted cold water. Bring to a boil, turn it off and leave it on the same burner with the lid on for 15 minutes (Remember this; it’s how to make the perfect hard-boiled eggs!!) Cool them down in cold water.

3. Remove the vegetables and eggs from boiling water and allow them to cool to room temperature prior to chopping. Skin the boiled potatoes and carrots with a small knife. It’s easier to skin the carrots if you make a slit down the length of the carrot and skin in a circle around the carrot.  (One of the readers suggested alternative method for cooking carrots and potatoes. She said to try dicing raw carrots and potatoes then boiling them together about 12 min in unsalted water. Rinse with cold water and drain well on paper towels. Easy and consistent results!)

Olivye Ukrainian Potato Salad-3

4. Chop ham, potatoes, carrots, pickles and eggs into equal size dice (pea size). The Vidalia Chop Wizard is the secret to quick potato salad!

Olivye Ukrainian Potato Salad-4

5. Mix together potatoes, carrots, pickles, eggs, green onion, dill and mayo. Add more mayo, Salt and pepper to taste.

Olivye Ukrainian Potato Salad

6. Fold in the peas last so they aren’t crushed.

Olivye Ukrainian Potato Salad-2
Olivye Ukrainian Potato Salad-7

If you prefer more onion, pickles, or anything else; add more. Its easy to modify this recipe!

Enjoy!! If you make olivye, let me know what is unique about your salad.

Olivye - Ukrainian Potato Salad - Оливье

4.89 from 17 votes
Prep Time: 1 hour
Cook Time: 30 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour 30 minutes
My husband makes this version of the famous olivye salad. The chives and dill add a nice element of freshness. The great thing about Russian and Ukrainian cooking - there is no one right way to make any recipe. Each family has their own version which get passed down through generations. This olivye recipe really is the best I've tried. It takes some time to dice everything, but in the end you get the best potato salad that lasts almost a week in the fridge. Cost to Make: $10 to $12 Servings: 6 to 8
Author: Natasha of NatashasKitchen.com
Skill Level: Easy
Cost to Make: $10
Servings: 8

Ingredients

  • 1 pound of ham
  • 3 medium potatoes
  • 4 medium carrots.
  • 1 15 oz can sweet peas, drained
  • 5 boiled eggs
  • 5 medium-large pickles I use Vlasic
  • 1/3 cup chopped green onion
  • 1/4 cup chopped fresh dill
  • 3/4 cup to 1 cup mayo to taste
  • Salt and Pepper to taste

Instructions

  1. In the same pot, boil whole unpeeled potatoes and carrots for about 30 minutes, or until knife pierces them smoothly. Don't let them get too soft.
  2. In a separate pot put eggs in salted cold water. Bring to a boil, turn it off and leave it on the same burner with the lid on for 15 minutes. Cool them down in cold water.
  3. Remove the vegetables and eggs from boiling water and allow them to cool to room temperature prior to chopping.
  4. Skin the boiled potatoes and carrots with a small knife. It's easier to skin the carrots if you make a slit down the length of the carrot and skin in a circle around the carrot.
  5. Chop ham, potatoes, carrots, pickles and eggs into equal size dice (pea size).
  6. Mix together potatoes, carrots, pickles, eggs, green onion, dill and mayo. Add more mayo, Salt and pepper to taste.
  7. Fold in the peas last so they aren't crushed. If you prefer more onion, pickles, or anything else; add more. Its easy to modify this recipe!

Enjoy!!

Recipe Notes

One of the readers suggested alternative method for cooking carrots and potatoes. She said to try dicing raw carrots and potatoes then boiling them together about 12 min in unsalted water. Rinse with cold water and drain well on paper towels. Easy and consistent results!

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Olivye Ukrainian Potato Salad-8

natashaskitchen

Welcome to my kitchen! I am Natasha, the blogger behind Natasha's Kitchen (since 2009). My husband and I run this blog together and share only our best, family approved recipes with YOU. Thanks for stopping by! We are so happy you're here.

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  • Kaylynn Tkachev
    March 15, 2018

    Love this recipe! It takes a little time, but is so easy and rewarding. My parents go crazy for this salad, and it’s always even better the next day! Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      March 15, 2018

      I’m glad to hear the recipe is such a hit! Thanks for sharing your excellent review! Reply

  • Deena Caunt
    January 27, 2018

    I like to put sweet piccalilli and diced edam cheese in mine. Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      January 28, 2018

      Yum, that sounds delish! Reply

  • Elena
    December 13, 2017

    Natasha, do you have suggestions as to how to boil potatoes for a salad.? What is your choice of potato?
    Best, Elena
    PS Thank you for a wonderful site, it is my go-to resource for dishes I miss from childhood. And more. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 13, 2017

      Elena, thank you for the compliment 😬. I have the steps how to cook potatoes in the recipe. I would avoid yellow potatoes or the ones that have very little starch. Reply

  • M. Kovalchuk
    September 4, 2017

    Made this today for my husband and our nephew before he returns to Ukraine this week. They both thouroughly approved. As a non-Ukrainian in a family where everyone is still living in Ukraine I appreciate your recipes so much when they visit. Even my mother in law liked my honey prune cake last year. Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      September 5, 2017

      You’re welcome! I’m glad I can help and that everyone is enjoying the recipes! Thanks for following and sharing your wonderful review! Reply

  • Clara
    August 13, 2017

    I was expecting/hoping you would use kielbasa, like you mentioned in your recipe version with chicken.

    I was born in Cuba, when the Castro Revolution started I was about 3 or 4 years old, the city we lived in was surrounded and nothing came in nor went out for two years. I used to be a finiki eater until my late 20’s I tried traditional German cusine, then in my late 30’s I was introduced to traditional Japanese Cusine starting with Sushi and Sashimi, then traditional Chinese, what cant I tell you. Now I’m open to at least try, and it’s a good chance I will like it.

    This Potatoe Salad sounds awesome, yet something tells me with Kielbasa would be absolutely the best. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 14, 2017

      Hi Clara, you can use a variety of meats – kielbasa, chicken, ham. We like to change it up and sometimes are just using what we have on hand 🙂 Reply

  • Draya
    June 15, 2017

    Hi. I tried this and it was perfect! Loved it. One question though, why peel the potatoes and carrot after boiling and not before? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      June 15, 2017

      Hi Draya, it helps to keep the nutrients in (or so I hear), as well as the flavor and it seems to absorb less water while cooking. Reply

  • May 23, 2017

    I just made this and took a picture to show you but can’t post it I see. The only changes I made was to double the amount of potatoes (so the Irish in me was satisfied 😂), and used Miracle Whip since I’m out of regular mayonnaise right now. Kept everything else the same. It’s delicious right now and the flavors haven’t even married yet!! Thank you, thank you! Being mostly Bavarian German, I adore all East European recipes! Yum!! But being married to an Hispanic, spent most of my life cooking Mexican 😂!! Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      May 23, 2017

      I’m glad you enjoy the recipe Jan! If you are on Facebook, I would love it if you joined our private Facebook group where you can share your yummy photos!! Reply

  • Karin
    May 21, 2017

    The Estonian version of the potato salad consists of potatoes, ham or sausage, cucumber, eggs, pickles (salty or marinated but not sour), canned peas, apple and onion. Apple and cucumber make the salad taste really fresh. Carrots are optional, I prefer to leave them out. For sauce, it’s a combination of mayo, sour cream or light Greek yoghurt and – my secret ingredient – kefir. Kefir is particularly great when working with starchy potatoes. Seasoned with salt, pepper and dried dill. Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      May 22, 2017

      Sounds delicous Karin! Thanks for sharing your suggestions! Reply

  • Steph
    May 1, 2017

    I can’t wait to try out this recipe, it looks really tasty! What type of pickles do you use for this? The sweet gherkin kind, or more sour like dill pickles? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 1, 2017

      Steph I use sour dill pickles that I but at Costco. Let me know how it turns out 😬 Reply

  • February 21, 2017

    I love this salad! I made it a few times when we lived in Odessa. Thanks for sharing! Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      February 21, 2017

      That’s great Karen! Thanks for sharing 🙂 Reply

  • A.
    February 16, 2017

    Hi, Natasha! Do you mean “pea size” is bigger holes or smaller one? Thank you. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 16, 2017

      I use the smaller dicing holes on the chopper to achieve pea-sized pieces 🙂 Reply

  • Stephanie
    January 27, 2017

    Would you recommend using Oscar Meyer Bologna instead of ham? Or does it even matter? Totally looking forward to making this. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 27, 2017

      I think ham would probably taste a little better, but you can use that if you prefer it. Enjoy! Reply

    • Stephanie
      January 31, 2017

      I took your advice. The ham tasted great with it. Plus my Russian students loved your recipe. Thanks again. Reply

  • Jessie B.
    January 5, 2017

    Thank you for posting! We made this when we were visiting some friends in Ukraine and I remember loving this salad. I still remember chopping up all the ingredients into “uniform pieces” to keep the traditional style. Delicious! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 5, 2017

      Jessie, you are very welcome and I’m glad it brings back memories from Ukraine 😁. Reply

  • Erika
    October 12, 2016

    We love this recipe! My husband is Russian and ever since I made this salad the first time, it’s a staple in our home. We make it every week! We just tried the vinaigrette recipe and we loved it as well, so I guess we will be alternating between them.
    Thank you Natasha Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 12, 2016

      I’m so happy to hear that!! This olivye salad is one that we make often as well and it gets eaten up quickly, especially while we are living with my parents because they love it too! Reply

  • Irina
    May 28, 2016

    I love this Olivye recipe! It reminds me of the one my grandpa used to make. Every time I make it, it’s a hit with everyone who tries it (I’ve made it a few times now). The only thing I do add to it, is a few drops of yellow mustard and it’s so delish! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 28, 2016

      I’m so happy you enjoyed it. I love your idea of adding yellow mustard! Brilliant! Reply

  • Ksenia
    April 17, 2016

    Love this recipe as well. Made it countless times and tweaked my family recipe as well! Thank you! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 17, 2016

      Thank you Ksenia! I hope you try the chicken olivye sometime. I hope you LOVE that one too! 😉 Reply

  • Tzivia
    March 22, 2016

    Wow looks really way good Natasha am wondering if it would work with leftover chicken since I can’t eat ham because of Jewish dietary laws with the can of peas do I drain the juice and reserve some or drain it all love the different colors in the salad Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 22, 2016

      Yes, I have just the recipe for you ?. Click hereReply

      • Tzivia
        March 22, 2016

        Saw the other olivye salad mmmm chicken and potatoes what could be better lmao this is on my list to try awesome thanx hunbun Reply

  • Helen
    January 12, 2016

    Hi Natasha, my husband and I visited Russia 6 times while in the process of adopting our two beautiful Russian children, a daughter and a son. We loved the food there. Your recipes have been a go to for a lot of the Russian recipes we like to use for our family events to celebrate Russian holidays.

    I made the Olivye Salad (my husband said it was the best he has ever tasted) Borscht, Chebureki and Syrniki. All was a big hit. The kids just love Chebureki. !!! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 12, 2016

      Awww that’s so awesome! thank you so much for the awesome review 🙂 Reply

  • Rockey
    June 25, 2015

    Hey!!! I love salat olivier!!!! A Russian salad invented by a french man 😛 when you use the gherkins do you use whole? The recipe calls for 5 medium/large gherkins but do you mean whole? I am sorry I travel so frequently that I get confused with measurements. Every country has its own terminology. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      June 25, 2015

      Rockey, I used whole gherkins and just diced them up :). This salad never gets old, we just had some at our picnic yesterday on the lake :). Reply

  • Victoria
    June 17, 2015

    Natasha what kind of ham are you using for this salad?
    Thank you Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      June 18, 2015

      I think it may have been a hickory him or a black forest ham. Either one will work well. Honey him is not my favorite because it’s a tiny bit too sweet for the salad. But that would work too if that is all you have. Reply

  • Victoria
    June 17, 2015

    Natasha, what kind of ham are you using?
    Thank you! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      June 17, 2015

      I prefer hickory or black forest. Honey ham isn’t my favorite because it’s a teensy bit too sweet for this salad, but even if you used honey ham, it still tastes great 🙂 Reply

  • Tania
    May 5, 2015

    This version is almost the same as what we do. Only no carrots and pickles, and we have apple in it. So it taste fresh 🙂 Maybe I should try it this way when we have the next birthday to celebrate. It seems very nice ! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 5, 2015

      I guess I should try it with Apple! Thanks for sharing your version. 🙂 Reply

  • Jim Przedzienkowski
    January 24, 2015

    Very close to Polish vegetable salad, jut no ham in the Polish one. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 24, 2015

      Is there any meat in the Polish version of the salad? Reply

  • Alina D
    November 25, 2014

    I made this, this is soo good recipe! I was thinking agh long to make but when I started making it it wasn’t too long me I was doing other stuff while potatoes and eggs cooking or preparing and cutting bologna while that cooks.. Thanks Natasha for great Recipe haven’t eaten this or made this for a long time but I have a lot of time during the day to cook great food glad I came along this website and glad Russian/Ukrainian food still exists. LOL I love Russian food looking forward to looking into your So glad you made this website :)) Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 25, 2014

      I’m so glad you are enjoying the website and recipes! 🙂 I have recipes from all over the world featured here, but my first food love will always be Russian/Ukrainian food! Reply

  • Nadia
    July 5, 2014

    When boiling potatoes for this salad I cut them into cubes while they are raw, and add one table spoon of vinegar when boiling. The potatoes need to be boiled for about five minutes once the water comes to a boil. The vinegar prevents the potatoe cubes from falling apart. Super easy! And the cubes look perfect. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 5, 2014

      That’s a great tip Nadia, I have to try this next time I’ll make Olivye :). Thank you for sharing your tip. Reply

  • March 17, 2014

    Hi, Natasha! Thanks for always posting such great recipes! Check out my salads at http://thebestisyettocook.wordpress.com/! I made one with beets and another with cabbage. Thanks! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 17, 2014

      Thanks for sharing Sophia, I look forward to exploring your blog :). Reply

  • ania
    February 19, 2014

    Hi Natasha,

    I just came across your channel on YouTube just recently with this recipe. I am Polish European and we also have the same type of salad for us it’s called “Salatka Jarzynowa” or Vegetable salad in English. You got great recipes on here can’t wait to try them out..:) Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 20, 2014

      Thank you Ania! I think the Polish and Ukrainian cuisines have alot in common. Do you know of any great polish food blogs that you could recommend? Or have any Polish recipes you’d like to share? I’d love to try more polish foods. Reply

  • Natasha
    January 18, 2014

    yesterday – Zuppa Toscana ); today – Olivye.
    Great Job, Natasha !
    Keep it up. Very impressed with your dedication. Thanks a lot. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 18, 2014

      I’m so glad you’re enjoying the recipes! You are on a roll! 🙂 Reply

  • Natasha
    January 18, 2014

    thank you so much for sharing your version of this yummy salad. It worked out really perfectly. my husband is extremely picky regarding the food choice. He really appreciated it. Spasibo ogromnoje Natasha Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 18, 2014

      You’re so very welcome 🙂 I’m so happy you and your hubby liked it! Reply

  • December 19, 2013

    This looks incredible! Do you know approximately how many cups total this will make? Thank you! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 19, 2013

      Hmmmm,… honestly I’ve never measured. I think maybe 10 cups? Reply

  • Lucy Kemnitzer
    December 11, 2013

    I make a thing like this but I don’t call it Olivier salad because I do not always use potatoes (because I am pre-diabetic and I would like to keep the “pre” in there, so I eat less starchy foods). Instead, I use turnips and/or cauliflower.

    I also rarely use ham: I use whatever’s on hand, and ham is rarely on hand. I have made it with any kind of meat (in my house that usually means chicken, but I have used beef and lamb and tuna from a can) and without any.meat. Beans of any type, sometimes from a can and sometimes cooked from dry, can slip in there.

    And I add in whatever vegetables I feel like using. Sometimes if fresh veggies are scarce I’ll use a frozen vegetable mixture.

    Can you see why I don’t call it by the same name, even if I am thinking “Olivier” in my mind? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 11, 2013

      Those sound like some very tasty substitutions! Thanks for sharing and yes, I can totally see why you don’t always call it olivier. 🙂 Reply

  • Natalie
    December 9, 2013

    In Georgia we love this salad and make it just the same way as described in your recipe though with one difference, we don’t put any kind of meat at all. Tastes awesome. :))) Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 9, 2013

      Oh a vegetarian version! I bet it tastes great! 🙂 Reply

  • Alena
    November 18, 2013

    I make the olyvie salad just like you but instead of canned peas i use frozen steamed peas to give it that more green and It tastes a little more crunchy. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 18, 2013

      That’s a very good option as well. Reply

  • Theresa
    May 3, 2013

    One more thing, have never used ham in my ‘Polish Salad’ but definitely will next time. Thanks for the idea. Reply

  • Theresa
    May 3, 2013

    Hi Natahsa, This looks fantastic! Thank you for sharing this recipe. Polish people call this Polish Salad. :o) I just have a question about your chopper, your pieces look so perfect – do you slice the veggies first and then dice them in the chopper? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 3, 2013

      Yes, I slice them first to the thickness I want and then use the Vidalia chopper that I reference above 🙂 Reply

  • Oksana S
    April 5, 2013

    Making this salad today. Its my husband’s favorite! Only thing I do differently is add a cup of thawed peas from the freezer. To make it thaw fast you can add to warm water for a few minutes. Got the idea from my mom and it tastes very good:) Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 5, 2013

      Thank you for the tip Oksana, fresh peas also give more vibrant color to the salad :). Reply

  • Lyuda c Alaski
    April 1, 2013

    I have a suggestion for Olivye. If yours is too runny, try putting chopped pickles on dry paper towel (i usually fold it), in a separate bowl. and change the paper towel a few times, until its almost dry! and put them in when ready to mix everything together. It works for me!! I hope this will help someone!! 🙂 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 1, 2013

      That is a great tip! Thank you! 🙂 Reply

  • Sally
    January 18, 2013

    What is vegenaise ? Since we eat very little meat in our ome–I need suggestions for other non-meat items to add.
    Thanks,
    Sally Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 18, 2013

      Vegenaise is dairy free eggless mayonnaise. You can make this salad without meat. Does anyone have any suggestions for non-meat items to add? Reply

      • February 11, 2013

        Sally,
        Just experiment I say.One week you can have this salad without meat. Another week add cauliflower or broccoli. Have fun. Reply

        • Janna
          August 14, 2013

          Sally,
          Once I used shrimp instead of meat. It worked perfectly!
          An original recipe actually calls for chicken and an apple for this salad.
          But any kind of meat works great and any modifications are worth to try. Reply

  • Denise
    December 29, 2012

    We adopted our kids from Russia and I fell in love with this on the first trip! I’ve made it many times for Russian Christmas potlucks and have an easy cheat that has fooled Russian friends! I start by boiling frozen hashbrowns (cubed style, not shredded), use diced ham and a drained can of peas & carrots along with the mayo and spices. This greatly reduces the time needed to dice! 🙂 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 29, 2012

      Wow that sounds much easier. Brilliant! Thank you for sharing! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 29, 2012

      That would really cut down on the time. Thank you for sharing the “cheat” :). Reply

  • Mindaugas
    November 4, 2012

    Actually, in Lithuania we do the same recipe and we call this sald – white salad. Ussually we make this on every birthday! Great taste, love it! 😉 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 4, 2012

      Oh cool! Do you make it the same way? I’m very curious! Reply

  • Pat
    September 18, 2012

    One of our church members makes this, hasn’t in a while, but thank you for posting this…it’s the first salad to disappear at church functions… Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 18, 2012

      Same with our church functions. This salad always appears and disappears 🙂 Reply

  • September 5, 2012

    Hi there – thanks for this recipe. I haven’t had this salad since my mom passed away. I was really happy to find it. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 5, 2012

      You are welcome Hannah 😀 Reply

  • September 4, 2012

    In Spain, this salad is called Russian salad Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 4, 2012

      Wow, you are all the way from Spain? Welcome to the site! 🙂 Reply

      • September 4, 2012

        Yes, I’m another emigrant who miss our food 😀 Reply

  • Marina
    August 22, 2012

    Hi,

    Just spoke to my mom about finding this salad and she told me that this salad is originally a European dish maybe French or Italian.Have you heard that before? Have a good day.

    God bless,
    Marina Reply

  • Marina
    August 22, 2012

    Hi,

    I am so excited to find this recipe. Smiles. I make this salad every week.I have been eating it since childhood but since I started my diet this year I had to change things around.I use organic chicken, cucumbers in brine, Vegenaise and no potatoes. Grins.Thanks so much for posting this.

    P.S. Shocked to find out that this salad in English is a potato salad.=0o Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 22, 2012

      Is it good with vegenaise? I was just thinking about that yesterday! Reply

      • Marina
        August 27, 2012

        Hi,

        Yes it is good with Vegenaise and much healthier too.I just add one spoonful of the stuff to the bowl.There is not much of a taste difference unless you have a very sensitive pallet. Reply

  • anna
    July 21, 2012

    I second the green apple suggestion, i mince it in, no one can tell what it is but it adds a little something. I also use fresh cucumbers. The olivie i grew up with is similar to this recipe but the one DH prefers is what i refer to as a “white olivie”. His recipe is: rotiserrie chicken breasts, potatoes, eggs, pickles, skin removed cucumbers, dill and peas- no carrots or colorful meat …

    Anyhow, what i actually wanted to share was what I do now days that happened by accident, I dice raw potatoes, then boil, then drain in strainer and dry on paper towels then toss in salad.(i actually drain all diced ingredients on a paper towel: pickles, onions, peas etc) Sounds insane but it gives me the best results in terms of cooked potatoes and it makes it much faster. Including boiling and dicing i am done in an hour, no time to wait for everything to cool.
    Try frozen steam peas instead of canned, they keep their shape and color better too… i tried this after reading about some recent transplant from Russia that said canned peas are all wrong and she uses frozen. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 21, 2012

      Thank you Anna. I think this calls for Olivye II. 🙂 Reply

  • Tonya
    July 19, 2012

    I made it with dry dill and it turned out a bit sour. I don’t knw what I did wrong. Is it a big difference putting dry dill instead of fresh? I put 2 tbsp Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 19, 2012

      You only want to use either fresh dill or dill that has been frozen fresh. Dry dill is best for soups. Hope this helps. Reply

  • Tonya
    July 17, 2012

    I add regular onion instead of green onion. but I will have to try green onion Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 17, 2012

      We’ve used both and found them to be equally good 🙂 Reply

  • Olga
    July 15, 2012

    My Mom call this “Lazy Olivye”, the real Olivye should be prepared with 3 types of meat: ham, bologna, and roast beef, all cubed. Well, at least that’s what my Mom says =D Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 15, 2012

      Wow that IS fancy! I’ve never heard of it that way. Are there any other changes or is it just the meat that’s different? Reply

      • Olga
        July 22, 2012

        Well, you know, there are some variations: in Summer we used fresh cucumbers, in Winter – pickled, salted mostly =). Nowadays I use both, the smell of fresh cucumbers makes Olivye awesome! Try this sometime, you’ll be amazed =D Reply

      • Olga
        July 22, 2012

        Oh! There is one more idea: omit mayo and peas, and this recipe becomes a great base for Okroshka (Окрошка), just add a cup of kvas (квас) in each serving. Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          July 22, 2012

          I’ve heard kvas was good in okroshka. Do you have a favorite brand or do you use homemade? Reply

  • December 31, 2011

    This is one of our favorite salads…I use chicken sometimes and we like it that way too! Reply

  • vika u :)
    September 14, 2011

    hi natasha!
    thanks so much for always posting great recipes! you are talanted!!!

    our unique way of makin olivie is actualy we use franks(chicken, pork, beef) instead of bologna! and its goood.. but i definatly wana try bologna cuz my husband lovees it.. thanks so much for this idea!!!

    one more thing, would u happen to know how to make crab salad? or do u have it on your blog and i missed it ? :/
    thanks 🙂 Reply

  • Alona
    June 22, 2011

    Hi Natasha 🙂
    I’m making Olivye today and it was so refreshing to no that you have a cooking blog because I could not rememer exactly all that went into this salad lol
    My mom makes it with chicken and I’m doing it today to and instead of so much mayo for those who are watching there waistline try adding sour cream and mayo half & half you can’t tell the differance and so much better for you 🙂 Thank You for your awesome Blog!!!
    Alona Tupis (Melnik) Reply

  • Alina
    January 19, 2011

    I also add fresh cucumber. Just like the dill and chives, it gives the salad a fresh taste! Reply

  • Marina
    January 13, 2011

    I add a couple of green apples to my olivye, it tastes incredible! I also use baby pickles instead of large ones. I find that large pickles are too juicy and the juice makes the salad too moist for my taste. I don’t have that problem with baby dills. Thanks for sharing your version! Some of your tips I’ll use next time when making olivye. God bless! Reply

    • Natasha
      January 13, 2011

      I really like your idea of using the baby dills. I have made olivye that seemed to turn out just a little too juicy. That’s brilliant! Thank you! Reply

  • Ryan
    October 29, 2010

    Hello, and thank you for this great recipe! Having returned from an extended stay in Ukraine, I had a hankering for Olivye, and following the instructions this one brought back fond memories of Kiev! Looking forward to trying some other things as well. Reply

  • Ilona
    April 15, 2010

    thats the same reason my mother in law didnt make this salad often. So, i gave her this slicer for Christmas and she loves it Reply

  • Ilona
    April 14, 2010

    I never tried this salad with green onions, so i will give it a try next time i make it… Bed, Bath, and Beyond or Macy’s sell a onion shredder (but you can use it for everything) for only 15 dollars. Everybody in my family uses it to make olivye and it seriously takes us no longer than 20 minutes to cut everything. It also looks nice because all the ingridients are cut same size. Just wanted to share this with everybody to make life easier. Hope it helps Reply

    • Natasha
      April 15, 2010

      I will deeeefinitely look into that. We have a bed bath & beyond close by. I admit thats the main reason this salad doesn’t get made as often is because it takes awhile. Thanks!! Reply

    • oksana
      September 29, 2012

      Thank you ilona. i definantly need one 🙂 Reply

  • Inna
    December 24, 2009

    We are having dinner at my house tomorrow but lucky for me my mom volunteered to make olivye (since its so time consuming). My mom always saves the egg yolk from one of the hard boiled eggs and then after she put the peas on there she used a cheese shreader(ms?)to shred the egg yolk for decorational purpose . (hope my explaining made sense) Reply

    • Natasha
      December 24, 2009

      That is a good idea. And, yes, it did make sense. I think I’ll try it next time. Sounds like an easy way to fancy up the salad. Reply

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