Plum Vareniki (Plum Pierogi)

Plum vareniki are quite a treat; sweet inside and out. This was my favorite food growing up and it always brings back sweet memories.

I’ve been meaning to make vareniki with plums for a long, long, long, long time. I halved my recipe for pelmeni dough. Why? (1) It’s blazing hot outside and I didn’t want to spend half the day making these. (2) I suspect hot days make me lazy. (3) I wanted to go shopping ;).

Admittedly my pierogi are, well, ugly and at times a little frumpy, but they sure taste good. Plum vareniki are quite a treat; sweet inside and out. This was my favorite food growing up and it always brings back sweet memories. My mom always made the best plum vareniki and this recipe is hers.

Ingredients for Plum Vareniki Dough:

1/3 cup buttermilk
1/2 Tbsp sour cream
1 cup warm water
1 large egg
1 tsp salt
3 1/2 cups plus 3 Tbsp all-purpose, unbleached flour

Ingredients for Plum Vareniki Filling:

1 lb sweet plums, thinly sliced
1/2 cup sugar

Plum Vareniki

How to Make Plum Vareniki:

1. In the bowl of an electric mixer, whisk together 1/3 cup buttermilk, 1/2 Tbsp sour cream, 1 cup warm water, 1 large egg, and 1 tsp salt, just until well blended. Note: you could do all of this by hand, but who would want to?

Plum Vareniki-8

2. Using the dough hook attachment, add in 2 cups flour and mix on speed 2 until well incorporated.

Plum Vareniki-9

3. Add in your remaining 1 1/2 cups flour, half a cup at a time, allowing each addition to become well incorporated before adding more. Allow the dough to mix for 15 minutes, then add more flour 1 Tbsp at a time until your dough no longer sticks to the sides of the bowl. Continue mixing another 5 minutes. Total mixing time from  the time you first add flour is 20-25 min. (You could use this time to learn a new hobby, check your facebook page or be productive and slice your plums ;)). Your dough will be elastic and feel sticky, but won’t stick to your fingers.

Plum Vareniki-10
4. Cover dough with plastic wrap until ready to use.

Plum Vareniki-2

5. Cut off about a gum ball of dough at a time and roll into a flat 3-inch circle sprinkling with flour as needed to keep the dough from sticking to your work surface or the rolling pin.

Plum Vareniki-3

6. Place two slices of your plum over half of your dough, being careful not to get plum juice on the edges of the dough or it won’t stick together. Pour 1/2 tsp sugar over your plums (use more or less depending on how sweet/tart your fruit is). Bring the two sides together and pinch tightly to seal the edges. Transfer to a well-floured cutting board.

Plum Vareniki-11

7. Bring 4 quarts of water to a boil and add 3/4 Tbsp salt. Carefully place finished pierogi in boiling water. Add them in batches (maybe 1/4 at a time). Wait for them to float back too the top and then give them another minute to cook. Pull them out with a slotted spoon and drain well. Drizzle sugar in between layers of cooked pierogi to keep them from sticking to each other. The sugar will melt over the hot pierogies and turn into a light syrup. Serve with sour cream or eat them as is.

Plum Vareniki-12

Plum vareniki are quite a treat; sweet inside and out. This was my favorite food growing up and it always brings back sweet memories.

Plum vareniki are quite a treat; sweet inside and out. This was my favorite food growing up and it always brings back sweet memories.

Plum Vareniki (Plum Pierogies)

4.6 from 10 votes
Prep Time: 1 hour 45 minutes
Cook Time: 15 minutes
Total Time: 2 hours
Plum vareniki are quite a treat; sweet inside and out. This was my favorite food growing up and it always brings back sweet memories.
Author: Natasha of NatashasKitchen.com
Skill Level: Medium
Cost to Make: $4-$6
Servings: 6 -8

Ingredients

  • 1/3 cup buttermilk
  • 1/2 Tbsp sour cream
  • 1 cup warm water
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 3 1/2 cups plus 3 Tbsp all-purpose unbleached flour
  • 1 lb sweet plums thinly sliced
  • 1/2 cup sugar

Instructions

  1. How to Make Plum Vareniki:
  2. In the bowl of an electric mixer, whisk together 1/3 cup buttermilk, 1/2 Tbsp sour cream, 1 cup warm water, 1 large egg, and 1 tsp salt, just until well blended.
  3. Using the dough hook attachement, add in 2 cups flour and mix on speed 2 until well incorporated.
  4. Add in the rest of your remaining 1 1/2 cups of flour, half a cup at a time,  allowing each addition to become well incorporated before adding more. Allow the dough to mix for 15 minutes, then add more flour 1 Tbsp at a time until your dough no longer sticks to the sides of the bowl. Continue mixing another 5 minutes. Total mixing time from  the time you first add flour is 20-25 min. Your dough will be elastic and feel sticky, but won't stick to your fingers.

  5. Cover dough with plastic wrap until ready to use.
  6. Cut off about a gumball of dough at a time and roll into a flat 3-inch circle sprinkling with flour as needed to keep the dough from sticking to your work surface or the rolling pin.
  7. Place two slices of your plum over half of your dough, being careful not to get plum juice on the edges of the dough or it won't stick together. Pour 1/2 tsp sugar over your plums (use more or less depending on how sweet/tart your fruit is). Bring the two sides together and pinch tightly to seal the edges. Transfer to a well-floured cutting board.
  8. Bring 4 quarts of water to a boil and add 3/4 Tbsp salt.
  9. Carefully place finished pierogies in boiling water. Add them in batches (maybe 1/4 at a time). Wait for them to float back too the top and then give them another minute to cook. Pull them out with a slotted spoon and drain well. Drizzle sugar in between layers of cooked pierogies to keep them from sticking to each other. The sugar will melt over the hot pierogies and turn into a light syrup. Serve with sour cream or eat them as is.

Final Final Picmonkey Hashtag bannerWhat’s YOUR favorite vareniki filling?

natashaskitchen

Welcome to my kitchen! I am Natasha, the blogger behind Natasha's Kitchen (since 2009). My husband and I run this blog together and share only our best, family approved recipes with YOU. Thanks for stopping by! We are so happy you're here.

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Read comments/reviewsAdd comment/review

  • Cathy
    May 4, 2018

    Hi Natasha, how can I send you a recipe & pictures? One time I commented on these Vareniki and told you about the Hungarian version called Gomboc. You asked me to send you the recipe. I have a recipe that was published in a magazine that I could send you along with a picture. Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      May 4, 2018

      Hello Cathy! If you are on Facebook, I would love it if you joined our private Facebook group where you can share your yummy photos!! Reply

  • Scott
    May 3, 2018

    Hello. Thank you for the recipe; I was going to make this for my 87 year old mother, who remembers her grandmother making the cherry version.
    Two questions:
    1) in the mixing step, you write “Add in the rest of your flour 1/2 cup at a time allowing each addition to become well incorporated before adding more. Allow the dough to mix for 15 minutes, then add more flour 1 Tbsp at a time until your dough no longer sticks to the sides of the bowl.”

    Do you mean add the three and a half cups, one half-cup at a a time, mix for 15 minutes, then add the remaining 3 tablespoons? If so, do you add only enough of the 3 tablespoons so it doesn’t stick to the sides anymore?

    2) About how thinly do you roll out the dough? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 4, 2018

      Hi Scott, you will add the remaining flour which is 1 1/2 cups (1/2 cup at a time). I clarified that in the recipe. And yes, add the last 3 Tbsp as needed 🙂 We roll the dough about 1/8″ thick. Reply

  • Marianna Chubaruk
    March 16, 2018

    Can I freeze them once done, before boiling? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 16, 2018

      Hi Marianna, yes these can be frozen. Arrange them on a floured cutting board or baking sheet, just so they are not touching, dust them with flour and freeze. Once they are firm, transfer them to a freezer safe ziploc bag and freeze up to 3 months. If you put them in the freezer bag after they are already frozen, they wont stick and you can cook them from frozen (no need to thaw). Reply

  • Nataša
    August 16, 2017

    Hi! I’m Natasha, just like you 🙂 in many ways. I enjoy cooking, and my grandmother was Ukrainian. I live in Bosnia and Herzegovina and my grandmother made these often, my mom as well, but by the time I got interested in cooking both of them passed away. As I remember, dough recipe was different and we don’t have buttermilk here, so is there something I could use instead of it? I have some guests coming over in two days so I would like to serve them this for dessert. Thanks 🙂 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 16, 2017

      HI Natasa, you might try this recipe with sour cream instead. I hope you love the recipe! 🙂 Reply

    • Mariana
      October 19, 2017

      Hi, my heritage is Romanian/Polish/Ukranian and I’ve eaten perogi all my life. Although I’ve come across a couple of different dough recipes for boiled perogi usually the dough receipe I use is simply 2 C flour, (up to) 1 C water, salt to taste (maybe 1/2 tsp?), and either 1 beaten egg OR 1 sloppy TBSP of oil (son had allergies).
      I make a well in the flour, sprinkle in salt, and add not quite the whole 1 C of water (I save and cool the boiled potato water to use AND I add in either the egg or the oil to make up total liquid). With the liquids in the flour well, I beat just until it all comes together and forms a ball (you should be able to rub your hands together and have dough come away cleanly from hands). You’re supposed to cover with a damp towel for about 20 minutes but I’ve rolled out the dought right away and didn’t notice any huge difference.
      I quarter the dough and roll out thin enough to see through (about 1/8″). I usuallly use a glass dipped in flour and cut rounds out of the rolled out dough, then fill each round. Good luck and enjoy!
      P.S. I also have a receipt for baked perogi with sour cream and baking soda that are served in a dill/garlic sauce – yummy! Reply

  • stefany reich-silber
    July 19, 2017

    I am happy to find your piroshki/vareniki dough recipe. My grandmother, from L’vov (now L’viv and was Lemberg when my grandmother lived there, Austro-Hungary) used to make piroshki both with meat and also potato. She also used to make the plum vareniki and they were the same dough. The plum dumplings were boiled and when I used to bite into them, the hot plum would scald my mouth. The piroshki were baked I think, not fried, or leavened with yeast like so many recipes. Thank you. I will try your recipe. Such a shame that I did not think to get her recipes. Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      July 19, 2017

      My pleasure! Please let me know what you think of the recipes! Reply

  • Val
    March 16, 2017

    Hi Natasha, i noticed that you used half cup less flour than in your other vareniki dough, is there any reason for that? Which is your prefered? My vareniki seem to take forever to boil no matter how thin i try making them, so im trying to get a different dough recipe. Also could you please share a tvorog nachinka? Thanks so much!:) Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 17, 2017

      Hi Val, I have a few different dough recipes and it’s usually to accommodate for a differing amount of liquid ingredients. The lengthy cooking may be due to rolling the dough out too thick. Try rolling it a little thinner and see if that makes a difference for you. I don’t have a tvorog filling yet but thank you for the idea! 🙂 Reply

  • tracy
    June 7, 2016

    that’s amazing recipe! In China we make dumpling like that, but we never put plums or any fruit inside. Can we try with cherry? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      June 7, 2016

      Hi Tracy, yes absolutely! Cherries are absolutely delicious inside! 🙂 Reply

  • Sheri
    October 8, 2015

    Being married to someone with a Polish background (Okinewski), I’ve made goulash & golubki but haven’t tried pierogies. My new boss has a Polish background & happened to mention plum pierogies so I’ll see if I can get early brownie points 🙂 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 8, 2015

      I’d give you a raise! 😉 I love that there are so many similar flavor preferences between Polish and Ukrainian food. Reply

  • Tasha
    September 12, 2015

    I made these today exactly as described and they were delicious!! I was wondering if I can freeze them before boiling? I would like to make more for later while I have fresh picked plums. Thank you Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 12, 2015

      I think it would work well to freeze them, just dust with flour and place them in the freezer in a single layer then once they are fully frozen, transfer to ziploc bags and return to the freezer. Reply

      • Pat Massier
        August 11, 2016

        I wouldn’t advise that. I did this and the dough turned paperlike. Now I boil, cook, freeze in a layer, and then bag. Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          August 11, 2016

          Hi Pat, I’ve never had that experience. Did you use this dough recipe when that happened? I’ve seen that happen when working with wonton wrappers but this a a pretty sturdy dough for freezing. Reply

  • Leslie
    September 10, 2015

    This recipe reminded me of my childhood friend Tania and her Mom’s Lekvar Prune Butter filled Varenikis! Those were my favorite. I also enjoyed my Mom’s Potato & Cheese Pierogies. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 11, 2015

      I love it when a recipe brings great memories from the childhood :). Reply

  • Cathy
    August 28, 2015

    Hi! One of my roommates was from Russia and we were comparing food. He told me about the pelmeni. A friend of mine called them verenekie (phonetic spelling) and always talked about all the butter. I didn’t know you had fruit versions. My parents are Hungarian and we ate lots of Hungarian food. One of our favourites was very similar – called gomboc. We made dough from left-over mashed potatoes adding an egg and some flour. We filled them with a thick plum jam or now I fill with a pitted prune. We served then with breadcrumbs browned in butter and sugar. Our dumplings looked different too — we cut a square and put fruit in middle and then brough all the corners up and pinched the dough closed. I also made then with a sweeted ricotta filling which was excellent too.

    I want to get one of these moulds as it will speed up production – especially if making on my own. Otherwise it’s kind of a fun and relaxing thing to do with friends or family. I will give your recipe a try. Thanks for your post. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 28, 2015

      Your versions sound amazing!! Would you be able to share your recipes with me? I’d love to try them! My email: natashaskitchen @ yahoo.com (no spaces). Reply

  • larry
    April 12, 2015

    found this recipe a few months ago.
    am commenting now!
    my Ciocia Genny made plum pierogies all the time.
    she had plum trees bordering her back yard.
    damson plums and one Italian plum tree.
    when they were ripe they were used fresh for pies, pierogies, and on breakfast kasha (buckwheat groats).
    she also canned them and made jam.
    at Wiglia she made the plum pierogies.
    we poured melted butter with cinnamom over them.
    such good memories.
    your dough recipe is different than the one i use.
    so i decided to try your dough recipe to make plum pierogies.
    i want to thank you for posting this because they were delightful!!!
    this was a great dough recipe.
    i also made them with apples and blueberries.
    thank you for sharing this! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 12, 2015

      I’m so happy you enjoyed the recipe! Thank you so much for sharing that with me and for sharing your food memories 🙂 Reply

  • Ed K
    March 28, 2015

    My absolute favorite too (plums)with butter cream sauce and sugar. I learned to make them to get them more often, Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 28, 2015

      🙂 Aren’t they great? I love how juicy the plums get with cooking. Reply

  • Diana
    December 2, 2014

    Oh my Oh my!!! For the filling I used a mix of bluberries and blank current. They where mouth watering kind is good Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 2, 2014

      That combination sounds delicious, thank you for the great review Diana :). Reply

  • Juan
    September 2, 2014

    Can I use frozen fruit? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 2, 2014

      Yes! 🙂 It’s a little more slippery to work with, but it definitely can be done 🙂 Reply

  • crafty grandma
    August 6, 2014

    My favorite filling was when my mom would make the perogies with potatoes and cheese…..my godmother would make it with plums ….pretty tasty…myself well, unfortunately the family recipes died with my mom so I was so glad to see yours!! My kids and hubby loves them. We used to buy it from the Ukranian Auxilary at their bazaar held at Christmas time. That’s a long way off and since moving five years ago, we haven’t had any since its too far to drive. Thanks for sharing your recipe! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 7, 2014

      You’re so welcome! I love the potato ones best in butter and paired with sour cream. Yum! Reply

  • Nataliya
    September 1, 2013

    Thank you so much for sharing recipes. This new recipy of pierogies came out delicious, made some with cherries and potatoes with onion. Thanks to ur mom for sharing and thank you for finding time to post all these recipes I Love your website. Everything that I made from your website came out delicious Thank you So Much. God Bless your family! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 1, 2013

      You’re so sweet! Thank you so much. I’m so blessed by your comment 🙂 Reply

  • Cherish
    August 3, 2013

    These lil guys look scrumptious and I just happen to have some plums too. I really wanted to make these today until I saw the recipe requires 15 minutes of mixing! I only have a hand mixer which probably won’t handle the pressure of mixing the dough. Is there an alternative? Would it be possible to mix it by hand? Thank you, as always for sharing deliciousness with us! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 3, 2013

      You could definitely mix it by hand it’s just quite a chore. My mom kneaded dough by hand for years until she bought a KitchenAid 🙂 Kneading thoroughly makes it soft and elastic. Reply

  • Elaine
    July 27, 2013

    I was delighted to find this recipe! Thank you SOOO much! My Grandma used to make these as a very special treat when plums were in season! I shall be making this recipe thanks to you Natasha! Now, I want a recipe for “Sauerkraut
    Perogie” as they are not as common as all the others. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 27, 2013

      I’ve seen braised cabbage pierogies, but not sauerkraut. Hmmm that sounds interesting. Is there anything else in there (like meat), or is it just sauerkraut? Reply

  • Nina
    July 18, 2013

    Natasha, my dough turned out seemingly perfect, but after cooking the vareniki, the dough was chewy and rubbery, not sponge-like fluffy as I expected. What is the key to light and fluffy dough? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 18, 2013

      Did you mix it long enough? Kneading the dough with your dough hook will make it softer. You also have to roll it out fairly thin. If the dough is too thick, it might be chewy. Flour made in Canada also makes a softer dough. Hope that helps! Reply

  • I have never had plum vareniki! I can just imagine how good they are! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 12, 2013

      I think they are equal to cherry vareniki 🙂 Reply

  • Dina
    July 11, 2013

    Thanks for the recipe. Delicious! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 11, 2013

      You are welcome Dina :). Reply

  • Margarita
    July 11, 2013

    Hi Natasha, would it be ok to make dough a day ahead? Or would it harden? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 11, 2013

      It’s absolutely best to use fresh dough with this recipe. Reply

  • July 10, 2013

    We are moving to Ukraine in November and last night we had a “Ukraine Night” with some friends. Each of us made some food to share. I made vareniki with cherries. YUM! I think my favorite kind in Ukraine is with potatoes and the yummy friend onions on top. Now I’m hungry!! 😉 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 10, 2013

      Yum :), vareniki with cherries never get old. Which part of Ukraine are you moving to? Reply

  • Irena
    July 10, 2013

    I made the “vareniki” yesterday in the mixer ! ! !….. so much easier thank the old way …. and I will make them again. My mom would be proud! ! And yes, I made them with blueberries, but will make them with plums next time. Again thank you for bringing great memories. With my mom gone, you bring the Ukrainian in me………Дякую 🙂 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 10, 2013

      I’m so happy it brings back memories for you 🙂 What a sweet way to remember your Mama. Thanks for sharing that with me. Reply

  • July 9, 2013

    Sounds interesting with the plum. Reply

  • Yana
    July 9, 2013

    Would these work with peaches/nectarines?? Just bought a big box of sweet organic peaches and nectarines and am trying to see what else I could do with them! Thanks! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 9, 2013

      I think they would be amazing with both. You might try chopping them into smaller chunks and adjust sugar to the sweetness of your fruit 🙂 Reply

  • July 9, 2013

    I don’t remember ever eating fruit vareniki. I might’ve done as a child but I don’t remember it and the texture of boiled fruit scares me a little. 🙂 Yours however, look REALLY beautiful. Btw, creme fraiche in England taste very similar to smetana in Russia, more so than sour cream ever does. Reply

  • July 8, 2013

    Oh, Natasha, it is a real joy every time I receive notification of a new post! These look awesome and making the dough in the mixer – genius! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 8, 2013

      Aww, thank you Iryna! You are so sweet 🙂 Yes, using the mixer just makes life so much easier! Reply

  • July 8, 2013

    Wow these look amazing! I love vareniki with fruit inside. I agree, it does bring back happy childhood memories . Definitely need to try your recipe. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 8, 2013

      I would love to hear how they turn out :). Reply

  • Julia
    July 8, 2013

    Wow, I didn’t realize making your own homemade vareniki was so easy. I am Russian, but my mom always bought the pre-made frozen ones with cherries (which are great, but I am sure homemade are better!) I have tried my mother-in-laws (she’s Polish) homemade potato pierogies and they were amazing! I am definitely going to try these with the plums!!! Looks so easy to make and delicious! Thanks! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 8, 2013

      I agree, they are easy to make, just take some time :). Reply

  • Inna
    July 8, 2013

    Need to try it with plums!! In our family we always made them with strawberries! and we make ours ‘na pary’ the dough comes out very fluffy!! I also love vareniki with cabbage!! 🙂 Reply

  • Irena
    July 8, 2013

    Need to try it with blueberries… my favorite…. drizzled with honey !! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 8, 2013

      You just made me drool Irena :D, I need to try that asap. Reply

  • July 8, 2013

    Vareniki are on my menu for this week and I was so happy to read your post this morning. I was going to make mine with blueberries and cherries, but now I think I’ll make some with plums too. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 8, 2013

      Let me know which one tastes the best, but I don’t think you can go wrong with any of those ingredients :). Reply

  • July 8, 2013

    Great idea to make vareniki with plums. Yum!!! Reply

  • D
    July 8, 2013

    Looks yummy! I like the idea of cutting a little bit of dough each time to make a varenik. In my family they usually made a very thin layer of dough and cut out a bunch of circles using a glass or a cup. I think your way is good ’cause it is less messy. Its also good for small kitchens where you don’t have much space to roll out the dough. Reply

  • July 8, 2013

    Ah, oh…sweet vareniki are my favourite! #1 cherries, #2 strawberries. Never tried or heard of them made with plums. OMG, I will be making them this month and will try with plums. And yes, I totally agree, sweet vareniki – THE BEST summer childhood food. My grandma always made them. With sour cream and more sugar on top. TO DIE FOR!!! Ukrainian sour cream is OMG so good. Recently tried similar one in Mexico. Was missing vareniki though.:) Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 8, 2013

      My mom in law buys Mexican sour cream for same reason :). Reply

      • July 8, 2013

        I should look for a Mexican store in Vancouver too.:) Just tried it on my recent vacation to Mexico. Loved the cottage cheese too!
        You should try vareniki with sour cherries (vishnya). We buy jarred because it’s hard to find fresh one. To die for!!! Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          July 8, 2013

          I’ve tried with fresh cherries and it was very good. I’ll have to give it a whirl. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 8, 2013

      I really have to try them with strawberries; wow that sounds good!! Reply

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