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Prime Rib Recipe (VIDEO)

A garlic-crusted Prime Rib Recipe with a trusted method for juicy, melt-in-your-mouth tender prime rib roast. Watch the video tutorial and learn how to trim, tie, wrestle (kidding), and cook a standing rib roast.

Garlic Crusted Prime Rib Recipe carved in the roasting dish

This post may contain affiliate links. Read my disclosure policy.

Repeat after me, “prime rib is not scary.” It’s actually very simple to prepare. Prime Rib Roast can be intimidating because it is an expensive cut of beef and is usually made for important life events or holidays, but really, this is not hard to make.

The secrets to a great prime rib are (1) a meat thermometer and (2) a trusted method. TA-DA!! 🙂 Prime rib pairs really well with creamy mashed potatoes and baked asparagus for the ultimate holiday feast. And don’t forget the Creamy Horseradish Sauce

What Cut is Prime Rib Meat?

There are 2 grades of prime rib at the grocery store; prime grade and choice grade. Prime grade has more fat and marbling and can be considerably more expensive per pound. Ask your butcher whether your roast is prime or choice because it isn’t always clear on the packaging and most cuts sold are actually “choice”. This recipe works for either prime or choice, so go with the best you can buy.

Look for Bone-in prime rib, also known as a “Standing Rib Roast.” We used a 7 lb bone-in Beef Prime Rib, but you can use larger or smaller roasts and modify the baking time per the “Prime Rib Cooking Time” chart below.

Prime Rib meat cut choice versus prime cut

We included our Amazon affiliate links below for tools to make prime prime.

How to Carve and Tie Prime Rib Roast:

Pre-cutting the bones away is completely optional but will make carving easier when ready to serve. It’s best to do it ahead than struggle with it in front of company. Removing and re-attaching the ribs with string doesn’t change the juiciness of the roast at all.

Cut away the bones and tightly tie them right back onto your roast with kitchen string, looping the string around in 1″ intervals. A butcher can cut away the ribs and tie the roast for you (usually free of charge).

How to Carve and Tie Prime Rib Roast

Garlic and Herb Prime Rib Rub:

Stir together: 6 finely chopped garlic cloves, 1/2 Tbsp salt, 1/2 Tbsp black pepper, 1 tsp chopped fresh rosemary leaves, 1/2 tsp chopped fresh thyme leaves and 3 Tbsp olive oil. Note: Do not use a garlic press as pressed garlic burns under high heat.Garlic and herb rub ingredients mixed in bowl

How to Cook Prime Rib:

1. Sprinkle meat all over with about 2 tsp salt, cover loosely with plastic wrap and let it rest on the counter for 3 hours to come to room temperature. The roast will bake more uniformly if it is near room temperature. When nearly at room temperature, Preheat Oven to 500˚F with rack in the lower third of the oven.

Seasoning prime rib

3. Pat the roast dry with paper towels then rub all over the top and sides with prime rib rub. Place into a roasting pan, rib-side-down. Put an oven-safe meat thermometer into the thickest portion of the meat and cook according to the Cooking Time Chart Below.

Adding prime rib rub to prime rib roast

4. Once out of the oven transfer to a cutting board, tent loosely with foil and rest 30 minutes before carving. If you don’t rest the roast, it will juice out and become chewy. Remove the kitchen string and use a carving knife to slice against the grain to desired thickness

How to Cook Prime Rib on roasting pan

Prime Rib Cooking Time:

Bake in a fully pre-heated oven at 500˚F for 15 minutes. Reduce heat to 325˚F and continue baking:

  • 10-12 min per pound for rare
  • 13-14 min per pound for medium rare
  • 14-15 min per pound for medium
  • 16-17 min per pound for medium well

Roast until the thermometer registers:

  • 115-120˚F for rare,
  • 125-130˚F for medium rare
  • 135-140 for medium doneness
  • 145-150 for medium well

My 7 lb roast baked at 500˚F for 15 minutes then at 325˚F for 1 hr 30 minutes for medium doneness.

Notes on Cooking Prime Rib Roast:

A colder or thicker roast will take more time to cook and oven strengths can vary so a meat thermometer is ultra important.

The internal temp of the roast will continue to rise 5-10 degrees even after it’s out of the oven so don’t over-bake it. You can put it back in the oven if you want it more done.

Prime Rib Cooking time for medium doneness

The garlic crust and initial roasting over high heat seals in the juices and makes every bite so tender and flavorful.

Watch Natasha Make Prime Rib:

I hope you are super pumped to make your own prime rib roast after watching this!

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Prime Rib Recipe

4.98 from 44 votes
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 1 hour 45 minutes
Total Time: 2 hours
A garlic-crusted Prime Rib Recipe with a trusted method for juicy, melt-in-your-mouth tender prime rib roast. Watch the video tutorial and learn how to trim, tie, wrestle (kidding), and cook prime rib.

A garlic-crusted Prime Rib Recipe with a trusted method for juicy, melt-in-your-mouth tender prime rib roast. How to trim, tie and cook a standing rib roast.

Author: Natasha of NatashasKitchen.com
Skill Level: Easy
Cost to Make: $ varies by grade and size
Keyword: prime rib, prime rib recipe
Calories: 822 kcal
Servings: 12 Each rib yields about 3 servings (4 ribs = 12 servings)

Ingredients

For the Roast:

  • 7 lb beef prime rib (bone-in) boned and tied
  • 3 1/2 tsp sea salt divided
  • 1/2 Tbsp black pepper freshly ground
  • 1 tsp fresh rosemary leaves, minced from 1 sprig or 1/2 tsp dried rosemary
  • 1/2 tsp fresh thyme leaves, mnced from 1-2 sprigs, or 1/4 tsp dried thyme
  • 6 garlic cloves finely chopped
  • 3 Tbsp olive oil

Instructions

How to Make Prime Rib:

  1. Sprinkle meat all over with 2 tsp salt, cover loosely with plastic wrap and let it rest at room temperature for 3 hours to come to room temperature (it will bake more uniformly). Then preheat Oven to 500˚F with rack in the lower third of the oven.

  2. Make your Prime Rib rub: In a small bowl, stir together: 1/2 Tbsp salt, 1/2 Tbsp black pepper, 1 tsp minced rosemary, 1/2 tsp minced thyme leaves, chopped garlic, and 3 Tbsp olive oil.

  3. Lightly pat the roast dry with a paper towel then rub all over top and sides with garlic rub. Place into a roasting pan bone-side-down and put a meat thermometer into the thickest portion of the meat. Bake at 500˚F for 15 minutes.

  4. Reduce heat to 325˚F and continue baking following these guidelines: 10-12 min per pound for rare, or 13-14 min per pound for medium rare, and 14-15 min per pound for medium. Roast until the thermometer registers: 120˚F for rare, 130˚F for medium rare, 140 for Medium, 150 for medium well.* This 7 lb roast baked at 500˚F for 15 minutes then at 325˚F for 1 hr 30 minutes for medium doneness.
  5. Transfer to a cutting board, tent loosely with foil and rest 30 minutes before carving. Remove string and rack of ribs then slice to desired thickness.

Recipe Notes

*Meat internal temp will continue to rise 5-10 degrees even after it's out of the oven so don't over-bake.

Nutrition Facts
Prime Rib Recipe
Amount Per Serving
Calories 822 Calories from Fat 657
% Daily Value*
Fat 73g112%
Saturated Fat 29g181%
Cholesterol 160mg53%
Sodium 796mg35%
Potassium 593mg17%
Protein 36g72%
Vitamin C 0.5mg1%
Calcium 24mg2%
Iron 3.9mg22%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

If you make this recipe, I’d love to see pics of your creations on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter! Hashtag them #natashaskitchen

I learned to make prime rib from my blogging friend, Elise of Simply Recipes and I am using her method for prepping and roasting.

We always have prime rib at Christmas dinner (and sometimes we go all out and make turkey also!) If this recipe graces your holiday table, I hope you tag your photos with #natashaskitchen so I can see your beautiful creations.

What is the star of your holiday table? I’d love to hear about your traditions in a comment below.

 

Garlic Crusted Prime Rib - we make this recipe for Christmas or New Years! Simple and delicious prime rib recipe with step-by-step photos.

natashaskitchen

Welcome to my kitchen! I am Natasha, the blogger behind Natasha's Kitchen (since 2009). My husband and I run this blog together and share only our best, family approved recipes with YOU. Thanks for stopping by! We are so happy you're here.

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  • Nancy Downey
    April 22, 2019

    My first time making prime ribs. The cooking times were right on. We like our prime rib rare. It turned out just as well as prime rib I have ordered in restaurants. Eager to try out more of Natashas recipes!! Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      April 22, 2019

      That’s so great! I’m so happy you enjoyed that Nancy! Reply

  • Ann Marie
    April 22, 2019

    Hi Natasha
    I love your videos and have successfully made several of your recipes. I want to make the prime rib but we are only two people. Would this method work for a smaller 2 lb roast or should I sear it on the stove then roast as directed on the lower temperature? I have a gas oven oven with convection feature. Thanks! Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      April 22, 2019

      Hi Ann Marie, I’m so happy you are enjoying our recipes! That should work! I would suggest following the cooking time stated per pound of meat and using a meat thermometer to verify the correct temperature. With a roast that small, it would be safest to use a meat thermometer to avoid drying it out. Reply

  • John
    April 7, 2019

    Hi Natasha,

    What was the extra probe you used in the meat and then plugged into the side of your oven, I have never seen one before?

    I also tried to read what brand meat thermometer you were using in the video?

    Cheers,
    John Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      April 7, 2019

      Hi John, that is a built-in meat thermometer that plugs into the oven. It came with the oven. It’s quite handy to not have to keep checking on the temperature but there are others you can purchase that work similarly. Reply

      • John
        April 7, 2019

        Thanks Natasha, I shall have to have a bit of a search for them.

        Cheers,
        John Reply

        • Kathi Arocha Jessup
          June 20, 2019

          Did you find one? If so can you share where you purchased?

          Thank you

          Kathi Reply

  • Cynthia
    February 18, 2019

    I used to be so intimidated cooking prime rib. But following your recipe was so easy I gave it a try. It was perfect! Thank you. Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      February 18, 2019

      Wow! Thank you for that thoughtful review, Cynthia! I’m so happy you gave this recipe a try! Reply

  • Tasha
    January 6, 2019

    Natasha! I have made soooo many of your recipes and I have not had any problems with any of them. I usually encounter something difficult or the recipe doesn’t come out right but yours have ALL been new favorites with my family. I should have known when I saw that you are also an RN (like myself) and that our names are similar! lol I look forward to making more of your recipes. Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      January 6, 2019

      Awww that’s the best! Thank you so much for sharing that with me :). I’m all smiles! Reply

  • Kim Jackson
    January 1, 2019

    It was PERFECT. I so supper intimidated by this cut of meat. Loved the video and detailed instructions. Great fist dinner of the 2019. 👍 Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      January 1, 2019

      Awww that’s the best! Thank you so much for sharing that with me :). I’m all smiles! Reply

  • Kim Jackson
    January 1, 2019

    It came out PERFECT!! Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      January 1, 2019

      That’s just awesome!! Reply

  • Richard Anke
    January 1, 2019

    Natasha, I used your Prime Rib Recipe to make our New Year Day dinner and it was the best I’ve ever made. Thanks for so many great recipes. I can’t figure out how to send you a photo though. Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      January 1, 2019

      I’m so glad you enjoyed it! Thank you for sharing your great review, Richard! You are welcome to share that on any social media channel and tagging #natashaskitchen Reply

  • Leslie
    December 31, 2018

    I just realized that my roast is boneless. How should I adjust for boneless? Does it cook faster or does it take longer? Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      December 31, 2018

      Hi Leslie, I think it would work with a boneless prime rib as well, but it may cook faster. I definitely would recommend using a meat thermometer to check for doneness. I haven’t tried that so I don’t have any specific adjustments for you. Reply

  • Jeni
    December 30, 2018

    Yum! This was dinner tonight and it was delicious! Leftovers for NYE tomorrow night will be prime rib sandwiches, can’t wait. Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      December 31, 2018

      That sounds lovely! Thank you for the great review, Jeni! Reply

  • Karen
    December 29, 2018

    We are going to try this tomorrow for our 34th wedding anniversary. Can’t wait to try it. Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      December 29, 2018

      Happy Anniversary! I hope you love that! Reply

  • Paratee Blevins
    December 28, 2018

    Hi Natasha. I made my first prime rib ever following your recipe and it came out great. One question though, how do you reheat the leftover? Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      December 28, 2018

      Hi there! If you have quite a bit left I would place it in a pan with some beef broth, cover with foil and bake until the meat is the desired temperature. Reply

  • Bridget
    December 26, 2018

    Made my first prime rib and needed to find a recipe. (First prime rib and for Christmas also…no pressure!!!) Used your recipe and it came out perfectly!!!! Out of thousands of recipes online, I picked yours and I’m so happy I did. Thank you so much and Happy Holidays to you and your family. Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      December 26, 2018

      You’re so welcome! I’m so happy you all enjoyed that! Reply

  • Cristina Sanchez
    December 26, 2018

    Hi Natasha, I am curious about the meat thermometer you use, what is that you plug in inside the oven? Reply

    • Natasha
      December 26, 2018

      Hi Cristina, that is a built-in meat thermometer that plugs into the oven. It came with the oven. It’s quite handy to not have to keep checking on the temperature but there are others you can purchase that work similarly. Reply

      • Cristina Sanchez
        December 26, 2018

        Thank you! Reply

        • Natashas Kitchen
          December 26, 2018

          You’re welcome!! Reply

  • Cristina Sanchez
    December 26, 2018

    I made this roast for Christmas dinner at my daughter’s mother in law. Was so easy to make and was perfect roast, juicy and yummy, everyone love it. Thanks Natasha for sharing your awesome recipes, and all of them are easy to make, and even a person that doesn’t have experience in cooking can do it with your recipes. Merry Christmas and Happy New Year! God bless you and your family! Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      December 26, 2018

      Thank you for that great feedback, Cristina! Merry Christmas & Happy New Years! Reply

  • Christina
    December 26, 2018

    Made this for Christmas dinner and it was AMAZING!! Our roast was 10lbs, so I doubled the rub recipe to ensure it covered properly. Roasted to 130°, temp went to 140° as it rest on the counter. Thank you for such an awesome recipe! ❤ Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      December 26, 2018

      This recipe is so perfect for Christmas dinner! I’m so happy you enjoyed that! Thank you for the great review! Reply

  • Kristin
    December 26, 2018

    We made this for Christmas Dinner. It came out perfect and was a big hit. Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      December 26, 2018

      That’s so great, Kristin!! Thank you for that awesome review! Reply

  • Mariam
    December 26, 2018

    This is a keeper. I made our 13 lb Boneless Prime Rib using this recipe for our Christmas Eve family Dinner. It came out juicy and so delicious. I set the internal oven thermometer to 130F and baked with the convection setting. The only adjustments I made was I seasoned the Prime Rib with more salt than indicated and I tripled the garlic. All other ingredients I doubled. Next time I make this I’m definitely making more of the rub. Thank you for sharing this recipe. Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      December 26, 2018

      You’re so welcome!! Thank you for that wonderful review!! I’m so happy you all loved that! Reply

  • Kaytee
    December 25, 2018

    Prime rib turned out amazing. The house smelled wonderful and everything was so simple to do to ensure a successful prime rib. Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      December 25, 2018

      That’s just awesome!! Thank you for sharing your wonderful review 🙂 Reply

  • Linda Moyer
    December 25, 2018

    Delicious!!!! Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      December 25, 2018

      I’m so happy you enjoyed it Reply

  • Kathi Peterson
    December 25, 2018

    Yesterday my son and I prepared our very first prime rib. We followed Natasha’s directions precisely and the meat was total perfection! We’ll
    use this recipe every time in the future! Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      December 25, 2018

      That’s so great! It sounds like you have a new favorite! Reply

  • Daniel
    December 25, 2018

    Thank you for your recipe. One thing I do, is that I roast using a cast iron skillet. I heat my skillet to 500 degrees then remove it from the oven and set atop my burner with heat on high. I then drop my oven temperature to 350. I use my high temperature skillet to sear both ends of the roast. This locks in the juices on each end, keeping the prime rib tender and moist. After searing I place it in my cast iron skillet and return it to the oven to roast until done.

    After I remove it from the oven, I let it sit for about 15 minutes. I then cut it to serve, and will use the cast iron to further cook individual slices to order per each guests wants, on top of the stove. This lets those that want a more done cut to have one.

    Merry Christmas. Reply

  • Elizabeth Gamache
    December 24, 2018

    Thank you for making me look like a rock star! I had a 7lb roast and it came out perfectly med. rare. Using my convection oven, after the first 15 min at 500; it only took 70 min. at 325. 30 min rest, Perfection! Merry Christmas! Reply

  • MeowBoops
    December 24, 2018

    Made this today for a 4.69lb prime rib roast (bone-in). Followed the cooking time exactly. I have an oven thermometer and a meat thermometer. We also use a gas oven. I had to keep roasting it for an extra 40ish minutes for the center to get to 140 for medium. I let the roast sit out for 3 hours on the counter, salted, followed directions to the T. I’m not sure why I had to bake it for so much longer. Maybe because it’s a gas oven? Either way, IT WAS SO GOOD. A meat thermometer is definitely a must.Thanks for sharing! Happy Holidays! Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      December 24, 2018

      That could be why. I do recommend making sure your oven is calibrated and the temperate is accurate by checking with an oven thermometer. I’m so happy you loved this recipe!! Reply

  • karen A Suit
    December 23, 2018

    I’m not sure “Still” Where to put the thermometer…..Should I put it through the top of the Roast Fat Side or in the side of the Roast? I am fixing it later today! Thank you!! Reply

    • Natasha
      December 23, 2018

      Hi Karen, it depends on how much space you have above or to the side of your roast (size of your oven). You could put it in the top or into the side of the roast, so long as the tip is in the deepest portion of the meat. Reply

  • Sue
    December 22, 2018

    One reader mentions tenting. So is the roast tented while cooking or only while resting once out of the oven? Reply

    • Natasha
      December 22, 2018

      Hi Sue, I tent loosely in step 4 while its resting, otherwise I don’t tent in the oven. Reply

  • pax
    December 22, 2018

    HI Natasha, any recommendations for a gas stove? (Since the heat comes from the bottom only) Reply

    • Natasha
      December 23, 2018

      Hi Pax, I don’t have a gas oven to test this in but I would recommend baking per the instructions and be sure to use a thermometer to ensure it bakes to your desired temperature. If anyone else has any insights into baking prime rib in a gas oven, please share! Reply

  • Jane
    December 22, 2018

    We are planning to try this for Christmas dinner. One question; are there enough drippings to make gravy for those lovely mashed potatoes? Reply

    • Natasha
      December 22, 2018

      Hi Jane, I think there is enough to make a gravy for mashed potatoes! You might need to add some beef broth to bulk it up but the flavor will definitely be there! I hope you love the prime rib! Reply

      • Jane Kimberling
        December 26, 2018

        We made it and we loved it! More than enough drippings for some amazing gravy! Thanks so much! Reply

        • Natashas Kitchen
          December 26, 2018

          You’re so welcome! Reply

  • Tj
    December 21, 2018

    Hey Natasha
    Just wanted to say thanks, my rib roast came out restaraunt quality and tasted delicious! 5 star
    Cheers Reply

    • Natasha
      December 21, 2018

      That is fantastic!! Thank you for the amazing review. I’m so glad you loved the prime rib recipe. Reply

  • Mary
    December 21, 2018

    Hi Natasha,
    you’ve won me over your prime rib looks amazing. I purchased a almost 19 pound roast from costco. Feeding 17 family members so wish me luck.
    My question for you is do you set your high end oven to roast or bake when cooking a prime rib? Maybe it doesn’t matter but in your video you said bake several times. Not every oven has a roast feature but mine does, it is a wolf oven. Would truly appreciate an answer if you have time before Christmas day. Reply

    • Natasha
      December 21, 2018

      Hi Mary, I always use the regular baking mode for consistency and since not everyone has a roasting option. I baked this one on regular bake mode where the heat comes from the top and bottom. In roast mode – heat comes from the top so the garlic might be more at risk of scorching. I would still always recommend using a thermometer to keep an eye on the internal temperature of the prime rib. I hope you love it and wish you great success!! 🙂 Reply

  • Anna M.
    December 20, 2018

    Hi Natasha,
    Would you adjusting cooking temperature and times with a boneless prime rib roast?
    Thank you! Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      December 20, 2018

      I think it would work with a boneless prime rib as well, but it may cook faster. I definitely would recommend using a meat thermometer to check for doneness. I haven’t tried that so I don’t have any specific adjustments for you. Reply

  • Lina
    December 19, 2018

    Hi Natasha, I’m new to your site but it caught my eye searching for prime rib roast recipe. Just bought a 21 lb. bone-in roast (lots of family) but had the butcher remove the bones for me. I plan on cutting the roast in half and cook side by side in two roasting pans. My question is, now that the roast is “boneless”, do you know how much weight from the bones I lost from the original weight of 21 lbs.? I’m not sure if this now boneless roast is still within the 20 lb or so range. Thanks for your help! Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      December 19, 2018

      Hi Lina, I wish I could tell you, I recommend weighing it on a kitchen scale to see what that would be I can’t say since each cut is so different! However, I’m so happy you discovered our blog!! thank you for sharing your review with us! Reply

  • sal
    December 18, 2018

    when are you going to have a giveaway? Reply

    • Natasha
      December 19, 2018

      Hi Sal, I don’t have any planned currently but I will put it on my list. The year sort of got away from me with moving 🙂 Reply

  • Barry W Ramer
    December 18, 2018

    Hi Natasha ~ YES !! great recipe. One little difference I use. I mix Herbs de Provence with soft butter, dry the roast thoroughly with paper towel and coat the roast. This gives a really nice sear. I roast a little slower at 320F after I am satisfied with the sear to an internal temp of 127F.. that is a magic temp for the perfect roast. Everything else you say is right on the numbers. If you have rosemary of thyme springs you can throw them in on top when you reduce the heat for a little added flavor. Merry Christmas to you and the family Reply

    • Natasha
      December 18, 2018

      Hi Barry! Thank you so much for sharing your method and recipe for prime rib! I’m excited to try your method the next time I make it. Did you season the prime rib roast in advance or just while it is coming to room temperature? Reply

      • Barry & Trisha RAMER
        December 19, 2018

        Hi Natasha ~ I leave the roast out overnight to bring it to room temperature. I rinse the roast with water and dry it with paper towels so the butter and herb mix will stick. Very important. I put a lot of salt and pepper on the roast and then coat liberally with the butter herb mix. I use a Thermoworks ChefAlarm thermometer inserted so the probe is right in the middle and set to alarm at 127F. I sear at 475F instead of 500 – seems to burn and smoke to quickly — sets off my smoke alarm LOL. Searing takes about 25-35 minutes. I keep an eye on it till it is just the color i like it. Then turn temp down to 320F to finish till the alarm goes off. Tenting is very important. I cook bones on and cut them off before carving and keep them for a snack later.. they are delicious. Merry Christmas !! Reply

        • Natasha
          December 19, 2018

          Hi Barry! thank you so much for sharing your method for making prime rib! I love the idea of keeping the bones – they are also great for beef bone broth! Reply

          • Nancy
            December 23, 2018

            Keeping a roast at room temp overnight is dangerous. You should not leave meat unrefrigerated more than 2 hrs without risking food poisoning.

          • Natashas Kitchen
            December 24, 2018

            Thank you so much for sharing that with me

        • April 5, 2019

          Natasha and Barry,
          I also am going to lower my sear temp due to smoking and burn too quickly for my oven – Are you Searing from the 3rd rack from top in your oven? To take 25 minutes…and 320 for a slower roast? Is 127 pull temp getting you a rest time of 30 minutes and a medium or medium rare roast? It’s the first time I’m cooking a bone in roast so I want to put it in the oven at 12:30 and serve it by 2:30. It’s a 10 roast and bones weigh 3lbs total weight of 13 pounds. My bone out roast usually only takes 1 and 45 minutes total for medium after pulling at 123. And resting for 15 minutes. I use to cook these at 5oo and lower to 350 and I think I want a medium rare roast . My old method is too done. So I’m not sure if I should wait to 127 to pull roast.
          I’m confused. Can anyone help me . My oven is a kitchenaid new , porcelain inside. So fan cycles off and on. I don’t want my Easter Guests to have to wait long, they arrive at 2pm Thank yo Reply

  • Janice Henry
    December 17, 2018

    Natasha, love your recipes. Do you have a recipe for a nice, creamy horseradish sauce to have with this prime rib recipe? Reply

    • Natasha
      December 17, 2018

      Hi Janice, I don’t have on posted yet – I ran out of time this year to post it with the prime rib. Wish I could be more help with that. Reply

  • Ruth
    December 17, 2018

    you made my Christmas merry Natasha, now I am looking forward for the family Christmas dinner I am hosting this year this steak is worth trying its fantastic love this recipe. You deserve the applaud Natasha
    and Merry Christmas girl 🙂 Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      December 17, 2018

      I’m so happy to hear that, Ruth! Thank you for that wonderful review! Merry Christmas!! Reply

  • Jamielyn
    December 16, 2018

    Delicious! PERFECT for holiday dinners! Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      December 16, 2018

      Yes! I agree! Thank you for sharing that with us! Reply

  • Katie Wyllie
    December 15, 2018

    Prime Rib is one of our holiday favorites! Definitely more scary than it is! This garlic and herb rub looks divine! Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      December 15, 2018

      It is so perfect for the Holidays! Thank you for that great review, Katie! Reply

  • David B Shank
    December 15, 2018

    Do you take it out of the 500* oven while the temp drops to 325? Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      December 15, 2018

      Hi David. No we kept it in the oven 🙂 Reply

  • Sharon
    December 15, 2018

    Does the prime rib have a strong garlic taste/flavor? I have two family members who aren’t crazy about a heavy garlic taste Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      December 15, 2018

      It wasn’t overwhelming for us, we do enjoy garlic, however. Reply

  • Toni
    December 15, 2018

    The step-by-step photos makes preparing this recipe a breeze! Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      December 15, 2018

      I’m so happy you enjoyed that! Thank you for that great feedback! Reply

  • Irina
    December 15, 2018

    It’s funny, my husband just asked me today if I could make a standing rib roast for New Years Eve 😂 I can’t wait to try this recipe. I’m sure it’s just as good as your other recipes 😊

    P.S. You look great in your videos! Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      December 15, 2018

      You’re so nice! Thank you, Irina! I love that this came at the right time for you!! Thank you for that wonderful review! Reply

  • Jennifer
    December 15, 2018

    I have never made prime rib before and have always wanted to. Great recipe! Reply

    • Natasha
      December 15, 2018

      Hi Jennifer, I think prime rib is kind of like turkey for many people; someone else is always in charge of making it for the holidays ;). Thank you! I’m glad you like it 🙂 Reply

  • Tami
    December 15, 2018

    My neighborhood Safeway had a great deal on the roast and you should have seen the looks I got at the register as I rolled up with an 18lb SEASONED giant roast. The garlic aroma alone had them drooling. If you ask your butcher (ahead of time) they will season and cradle the rib roast for you. I liked that you can tuck whole cloves or even halved heads of garlic between the ribs and the roast before tying. Ribs serve as a rack, that space between the bone filled with garlic helps infuse great flavor into the meat and cooks it more evenly. I’m sure that’s how Costco preps their huge prime rib roasts too, all seasoned and garlic-ed out 4 ya. For people who are not into the super pink center, hubby briefly sears thick slices on a screaaming hot cast iron pan right before serving. LIKE! Reply

    • Natasha
      December 15, 2018

      I love all of your tips! I’ve done that before; searing slices of prime rib roast for my Mom who loves zero red/pin in the center. An 18lb roast is huge!! I’m sure it was spendy but worth it 🙂 Reply

      • Christine
        December 20, 2018

        I just bought a 22.5 lb rib roast, and I’m super nervous about how to cook it. I’ve never done a roast, let alone anything this big. Can you give me multiple tips to cooking it perfect? It’s for 28 people for Christmas dinner! Yikes! Reply

        • Natashas Kitchen
          December 20, 2018

          Hi Christine! I recommend reading through the entire recipe before starting. We have tips on how long to cook that based on the desired doneness. I hope you love it! Happy Holidays! Reply

          • Christine
            December 22, 2018

            Ok, we are following this recipe for our huge beast of meat. 500 degrees for an hour and a half is nerve wrecking but I’m crossing my fingers! Thanks!

          • Natashas Kitchen
            December 22, 2018

            I hope you love it!! “Bake in a fully pre-heated oven at 500˚F for 15 minutes. Reduce heat to 325˚F and continue baking” – not 500 for the full 1.5 hours 🙂 I hope this helps.

        • Tiffany
          December 24, 2018

          Christine!! Oh my, I hope you read this comment!! I don’t think you are supposed to roast it at 500 degrees for an hour and a half.😨 I’m pretty sure you do that for only 15 minutes and then lower to 325 degrees for the remainder of the cooking process, at which point you cook according to pounds and desired doneness.
          So, if you want your prime rib to be cooked medium, you would roast at 500 for 15 minutes and then you would lower the temperature to 325 and cook for around 5.5 hours. I could be wrong. Hopefully Natasha can clarify! Reply

          • Natashas Kitchen
            December 24, 2018

            That is correct Tiffany!

          • Christine
            December 24, 2018

            I’m not sure where I read an hour and a half. Ha! Must have been another recipe. We are trying your method for this gorgeous hunk of meat. Although, I think we are going to do 450 for about 20-25 minutes then lowering to 325. We do have a good meat thermometer so we should be good! Thanks for the help. I’ll update later!

  • Dale
    December 14, 2018

    Hi Natasha. Could this be done in an air Fryer? Would you know What temp and time should be used for medium to rare? Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      December 14, 2018

      Hi Dale, I have not tried that in an air fryer so I can’t advise regarding that. If you experiment, let me know how you liked the recipe Reply

      • Dale
        December 14, 2018

        Going to try it. Will let you know. Reply

        • Natashas Kitchen
          December 15, 2018

          I look forward to it! Reply

  • Inna
    December 14, 2018

    Ok I guess I’m the only one wondering here..maybe it’s a new appliance thing that everyone else has… but, what is that thing you inserted into the meat and plugged into the oven..? Reply

    • Natasha
      December 14, 2018

      Oh yes! I should have explained. That was a meat thermometer that comes with my oven which is so handy because my oven alerts me when it reaches the desired temperature. I love using it to double check but the leave-in $10 thermometer gave me exactly the same reading 🙂 Reply

  • Tara
    December 14, 2018

    Thanks for breaking down this intimidating recipe and making it easy to follow. So delicious! Reply

    • Natasha
      December 14, 2018

      I’m so glad you liked the tutorial! That was my goal to demystify the prime rib roast! 🙂 Reply

  • Nicole
    December 2, 2018

    Is the rib roast photo your medium well done? Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      December 2, 2018

      Ours is more Medium on that photo. Reply

  • garry,i have been doing them for many years and gone thru alot of nice meat to back up my claim,,,,,you are 100% right ...it is ment to be roasred
    November 10, 2018

    for the lady who is thinklng of a slow cooker for prime rib…..it will destroy a gorgeous piece of meat….roasting is rhe only wayto go! Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      November 10, 2018

      Thank you for sharing that! Reply

  • DS
    April 14, 2018

    Looks amazing. Making it this weekend. I bought a 12 lb roast for a large crowd. Do you recommend cutting it in half? Or baking it as is? If so, should I double the time when its placed in the oven at 500 degrees? Thanks! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 14, 2018

      Hi DS, I think you could cook it whole but I probably wouldn’t double the time since the exterior would be pretty dark. I would suggest following the cooking time stated per pound of meat and using a meat thermometer to verify the correct temperature. With a roast that large, it would be safest to use a meat thermometer. Reply

  • Janet
    December 25, 2017

    Thank you for the step by step instructions. Even though I’ve done Christmas dinner for the family for thirty years this was very helpful for someone who has never cooked prime rib before. Thank you again from a ‘seasoned’ cook of 59 years! The results were delightful! Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      December 26, 2017

      You’re welcome Janet! I’m glad to hear how much you enjoy the recipe. Thanks for sharing your excellent review! Reply

  • Maria
    December 24, 2017

    Just absolutely amazing! Meat was super flavorful and so easy to make!!! Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      December 26, 2017

      I’m glad you love it Maria! Thanks for sharing! Reply

  • Ken
    December 20, 2017

    Have you ever made Yorkshire pudding from the drippings?

    It sounds like it will still work but may have a yummy garlic taste? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 21, 2017

      Ken, I have not experimented with Yorkshire pudding but now you got me interested 😬 Reply

  • Sandra
    November 9, 2017

    What was the internal temp when you took it out of the oven? And what is the internal temp supposed to get up to after 30 mins of tenting? It looks so great in the pictures so I’m curious. & thank you for being very specific in this blog!! I’m planning to make one for the first time and this blog has given me more confidence than any other blog or video I’ve seen so thank you!! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 9, 2017

      We usually cook it to medium well done so it was probably 140 to 145 when it came out of the oven. The temperature chart is for the reading when it just comes out of the oven so you can cook it to your desired doneness. I’m so glad this post gives you confidence. I hope you love the recipe! Reply

  • Matilde
    October 18, 2017

    Hi Natasha!
    I would like to give it a try. It looks delicious!!!! Can you let us know which meat thermometer did you use?
    Thank you!
    Matilde Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 19, 2017

      Hi Matilde, I just used an inexpensive meat thermometer that you leave in the meat while it roasts in the oven. It was the store brand one at Fred Meyer – nothing fancy :). Reply

  • Lana
    October 7, 2017

    Can I do this in the slow cooker? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 7, 2017

      Hi Lana, I have not tried this in a slow cooker – you might look up some slow cooker recipes online and see if it can be adapted. I have always roasted prime rib. Sorry I can’t be more helpful. Reply

  • Bob
    May 30, 2017

    Great recipe as a starter. Instructions are easy and the process works. Can be adjusted with herbs or spices if so desired but following the recipe will give you a good end product Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      May 31, 2017

      Thanks for sharing your great review Bob! I appreciate it! 🙂 Reply

  • Helyn
    April 4, 2017

    My goodness, Natasha! Another winner!!
    Can’t go wrong with your recipes.
    Thank you again! Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      April 4, 2017

      You’re welcome Helyn! I’m happy to hear how much you enjoy the recipes! Reply

  • Linda
    December 30, 2016

    I made this prime rib 8 lb. for Christmas dinner 2016. I did take it out at 130 degrees and it was excellent. Also i baked my in electric roasting pan because of no room in oven..lol I didnt get the beauitful outside as yours, i guess because of electric oven..This is a keeper!!! Will use again and again!!! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 30, 2016

      Linda, thank you for the great review, I’m glad you liked the recipe 😬. Reply

  • Linda
    December 24, 2016

    Almost all the comments are questions I’m sorry but the Directions Are Very Clear!! It Sounds delicious and I’m making it tomorrow!! Thanks so much for the recipes.. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 25, 2016

      You are very welcome Linda, enjoy! 😬 Reply

  • Christine
    December 23, 2016

    Hi Natasha,
    Would this recipe work for boneless prime rib as well? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 23, 2016

      I think it would work with a boneless prime rib as well, but it may cook faster. I definitely would recommend using a meat thermometer to check for doneness. Reply

  • Cory
    December 21, 2016

    Not sure if this has been meantioned. I wasn’t able to find a rib roast over 5pds. Do I still cook at 500° for 15 min? Or is that too much time for such a small roast? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 21, 2016

      Hi Cory, I would probably still put it in at 500 for the same amount of time or at the very least 13 minutes if you are concerned about it. The reason for the high heat start is to sear the roast and seal in the juiciness of the meat. Once you reduce the heat, roasting time will depend on the size of your roast and desired doneness per the chart. Reply

  • Helen Limberopoulos
    December 21, 2016

    Hi Natasha, Do you have a horseradish sauce recipe to go with this? I know you mentioned you ran out of time to post it but I was wondering if you can post a recipe now.
    Thank you. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 21, 2016

      Hi Helen, I haven’t yet, and to be honest, I’ve completely forgotten about it!! I do have a red horseradish sauce that is more traditional in Eastern Europe but not the creamy horseradish like you are probably thinking about. Reply

  • erika
    December 21, 2016

    Hi Natasha,

    Do you recommend any specific horseradish sauce for this prime rib?

    Thanks! Happy Holidays! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 21, 2016

      Thank you Erika! 🙂 I do have a red horseradish sauce that is more traditional in Eastern Europe but not the creamy horseradish like you are probably thinking about. Reply

  • Mimi
    December 20, 2016

    Hi. Do you have to cover the prime rib while it’s cooking or not? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 20, 2016

      Mimi, I cook it uncovered. Reply

  • Maha
    August 27, 2016

    I’m enjoying exploring your recipes, after making your teriyaki salmon, and feel really inspired to make crepes! I came across your prime recipe and thought I’d share my own. It’s super easy and virtually foolproof – really! But you’ll need a new kitchen gadget: a sous vide cooking element. I bought the Anova Precision Cooker. Here’s the recipe:

    For flavor, you can use the ingredients in your recipe, or go even simpler:

    8-9 lb standing rib roast, bones separated
    Montreal steak seasoning
    garlic powder
    Kosher salt
    cooking twine
    oil rendered from salt pork (I’m sure any oil will work – one with a high smoke point is probably best)
    1. Bind rib roast with twine
    2. Coat all sides with steak seasoning, then garlic powder, then salt
    3. Vacuum seal roast in a long bag so the moisture doesn’t get sucked into the vacuum sealer
    4. Cook in 133 degree bath for 24 hours (up to 36). Note: if you’re cooking meat for more than 2 hours, the temperature must be over 129 degrees.
    5. Repeat steps 2 and 3 for the bones and freeze for another time or cook right away at 133 for 72 hours.
    6. Remove roast from bath and bag (reserve juice if you desire)
    7. Pat roast dry with paper towels
    8. Sear each side of the roast in a heated cast iron skillet with oil for 2-3 minutes/side.
    9. Slice and serve with horseradish sauce

    The beauty of this method is first, the roast cooks at the desired final temperature and the entire roast is at this temperature, not just the center. Second, because it’s been cooking in its juices, you do not have to let the roast rest before slicing it. Third, your oven is freed up for other things for that big holiday dinner.

    There are other sous vide recipes for prime rib, but this is mine. My family devoured this roast last Christmas and it was like we were eating at a 5-star restaurant. Truly. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 27, 2016

      That sounds like an amazing method!! What tools/equipment do you use to cook the roast in a bath? I’ve never prepared meats that way but I would love to learn! 🙂 Reply

      • Maha
        August 28, 2016

        Based on what I’m reading so far on your blog, I think you might like this method. It’s sooooooo easy and the results are fantastic. To learn how to do it, there are lots of youtube videos – search sous vide. Here’s the equipment you need:

        1. The heating element. I use Anova Precision Cooker (anovaculinary.com). You can google it. I looked at it on Amazon, waited two weeks, got a $50 off coupon and then bought through Amazon. Anova runs frequent $50 off coupons too, but with your blog, you might be able to get the coupon anytime. Their site also has a bunch of recipes.

        Instead of a heating element, you can get a sous vide oven. These run into the hundreds of dollars, and after doing a lot of research, I decided this was not for me. It wasn’t just the cost, it was the storage issue as well. If you get the oven, you can skip #3 and possibly #4 below.

        2. A vacuum sealer. I use FoodSaver V4440, which I picked up at Costco. I’d had one previously, but it was 10-15 years old and I wanted a more fancy one.

        If you don’t want to purchase a vacuum sealer, you can use ziploc bags and use the air displacement method to remove air: place the food in the bag, place the bag in the water bath and the water will displace (push) the air out of the bag. I tried this method too and prefer using a vacuum sealer. It makes more sense for larger cuts of meat, like a roast, tri tip or ribs.

        3. Some kind of vessel for the water bath. It has to be deep enough to submerge the food and be able to attach the heating element to. At first I used a large stock pot, but the problem with that is if you cook something for more than a couple of hours, you need to insulate the pot and cover the top to reduce evaporation. I wrapped towels around the pot and used plastic wrap on the top and a towel on top of that. That became cumbersome fast. I ended up buying a Coleman 16 Quart Excursion Cooler and had my husband cut out a round notch in the front corner of the lid to fit the heating element. It works perfectly – I’ve cooked 72 hour pork baby back ribs and had little to no evaporation losses. The other thing about having the cooler is I can fit more items into it.

        4. This is optional but I recommend it: Sous Vide Supreme Universal Pouch Rack (http://www.sousvidesupreme.com/Shop/Accessories/EN-US/SousVide_Supreme_Universal_Pouch_Rack-37/Product.aspx). It fits perfectly in the cooler and helps keep the food separated from each other to allow better water circulation. It also helps keep food submerged if you place the food pouches in and turn it on its side.

        Here’s why I love the sous vide method of cooking:

        a. It’s so flipping easy and the results are simply scrumptious. Big bang for the effort!
        b. I can freeze the food vacuumed sealed either before or after cooking for cooking in bulk. Right now I have two frozen raw tri tips ready to go (btw, this makes excellent lunch meat) – I just have to plop them into a water bath for 24 hours. I also have at least one pouch left of already cooked baby back ribs. I just need to defrost, reheat (either in the microwave or the water bath at the temp I cooked it at) and complete the final step (broil or bbq with bbq sauce) if I want to.
        c. You can purchase less expensive meat or on sale and get great results because you’re cooking it longer at a lower temperature so all the connective tissue has time to break down. Plus you’re cooking it in its own juices.
        d. You cook food at the final temperature you want it at and the whole piece of meat is at that temperature, not just the center which leaves the outer part overcooked. No no need to let the meat rest before slicing.

        You can cook veggies sous vide, but I didn’t find them to be amazing. It’s said that cooking eggs this way is the way to go, but I haven’t tried it yet. There are other things that can be cooked sous vide, but I mostly do just meats.

        I hope you’re able to give this a try – I think you’ll like it. It’s what some restaurants do to get that $35+ plate made :-). Let me know if you have any other questions! Feel free to email me privately as well. Hopefully you can see my email when I submit my comment. Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          August 28, 2016

          Thank you so much for sharing all of that wonderful information with me!! I already have a foodsaver which makes it even easier :). Thanks again! 🙂 Reply

  • Doral Allen
    March 16, 2016

    How many people does the 7-lb. prime rib recipe serve…? Also, I’m wondering what Marina N might have meant by “marinating” this ahead of time…could she perhaps have meant just putting the dry rub (and olive oil) on two days early? Isn’t a marinade usually wet? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 16, 2016

      It sounds like she was probably referring to the dry rub as the “marinade.” I usually include the serving size in the print friendly recipe toward the bottom of the post. Each rib yields 2 servings (3 ribs = 6 servings) Reply

  • Mary B
    February 5, 2016

    I make Philly Cheesesteak sadwiches by sautéing peppers and onion in butter, then adding smaller slices of roast beef, tossing to warm, and melting cheese (provolone) on top, and stuffing rolls grilled with butter. My husband likes to spread the roll with jarred Old English Cheese. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 6, 2016

      Mary, thank you for sharing. It sounds mouthwatering 😁. Reply

  • Irina Solovyeva
    December 31, 2015

    Hey Natasha!

    This Prime Rib recipe seems to be delicious! would you be able to translate this in Russian for my mom? 🙂 she doesn’t understand the recipe in English. I would translate it myself if I could, but I’m only fluent in Moldovian, lol
    Thanks a lot! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 31, 2015

      Irina, I would recommend highlighting and copying the recipe instructions from the print friendly section and pasting them in Google Translate. It will translate the recipe for you. Many browsers allow you to right-click on the content and choose “translate in to English”. Once you click that, It will give you option to choose Russian and will translate entire page. Hope this helps. Reply

  • V. Meyster
    December 28, 2015

    Hey, do you have any suggestions for rib roast leftovers? I have about 2.5 lbs of this stuff left sitting in the fridge, and would hate for it to go to waste. Thanks Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 28, 2015

      Hmm… great question! You might use it for something like french dip sandwiches instead of pastrami. Ideally, the meat should be sliced pretty thinly though. You could also use it to make steak tacos. Reply

      • V. Meyster
        December 30, 2015

        Thanks, I made the Slow Cooker Stroganoff you posted earlier with it. Will definitely try the steak tacos next time, that sounds great! Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          December 30, 2015

          I hope you love the steak tacos! 🙂 Thank you so much! Reply

      • Tom Keith
        January 1, 2016

        HI Natasha, Love this recipe! A couple of years ago I did this with a large Bison Standing Rib roast and then made Guisada with the leftovers. It was awesome! Thanks so much for all your wonderful ideas and recipes. Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          January 1, 2016

          I had to look up guisada – so it’s like a ragout, yes? Sounds delicious and I love that idea for using up leftovers! Reply

          • Tom Keith
            January 2, 2016

            Had Natasha, Yes the ragout is exactly like carne Guisada. I had been searching out recipes for many years because I love it so much. I finally asked a friend what Guisada meant, Lupe said “meat stew”. Sounds like ragout to me! Blessings for your family in this New Year

          • Natasha
            natashaskitchen
            January 2, 2016

            Thanks Tom! 🙂

  • Tanya
    December 27, 2015

    How long should I bake the meat if I want it to be “well done”? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 28, 2015

      Hi Tanya, 5. The bake time will vary based on the size of the roast, but the best way to ensure it’s well done is with a meat thermometer. It is well done when it reaches 160˚F. It might be a little tough to chew at that point though, but that’s how well done meat usually is :). Let me know how you like it! Reply

  • December 24, 2015

    Hi Natasha! Isn’t prime rib wonderful? So easy to prepare, and such a delicious roast. Glad you found my instructions so helpful. Merry Christmas! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 25, 2015

      Oh Elise!! I’m honored to have you stop by my corner of the web. Thank you again and I hope you have a wonderful Christmas!! 🙂 Reply

  • Marina N
    December 23, 2015

    Hi Natasha, could i marinade this like couple days before? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 23, 2015

      I think that would be fine. I imagine it would taste even better 🙂 Reply

  • Tanya
    December 23, 2015

    How long should I bake it to make it “well done”? Thanks Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 23, 2015

      The bake time will vary based on the size of the roast, but the best way to ensure it’s well done is with a meat thermometer. It is well done when it reaches 160˚F. It might be a little tough to chew at that point though, but that’s how well done meat usually is :). Let me know how it goes! Have a Merry Christmas! Reply

  • December 23, 2015

    Looks lovely, Natasha!! I hope you and your family have a wonderful Christmas 🙂 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 23, 2015

      Thank you so much Natasha 🙂 Reply

  • December 23, 2015

    We always have prime rib at my mom’s house and I’ve tried to make it myself, but it is such an expensive bit of meat and I spend so much ~ and it’s um, beyond well done every time! I will be trying yours and Elise’s method (love her blog too) and see if I can do better this year! Seriously, my in the past has been so well done that you nearly break your teeth on it! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 23, 2015

      Hi Laura! I agree it is a spendy piece of meat! We usually just serve it for special occasions. Do you use a thermometer? It makes a huge difference and I find that I’m not stressed out guessing if it’s done or not. Reply

  • December 22, 2015

    Umm…the sexiest photo of a prime rib if I ever saw one! I already have dinner plans for Christmas but Boxing day is wide open. Prime rib is definitely happening here. 🙂 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 22, 2015

      Awww thanks Julia! That means alot coming form you. Your meat dishes photography always make me hungr! 🙂 Reply

      • December 22, 2015

        I just showed the photos to Brad and he said he wanted to shave off all the outside bits and eat them. We are definitely making it, it looks ridiculously good! Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          December 23, 2015

          That’s awesome!! 🙂 Reply

    • December 23, 2015

      I need a ‘plus one’ button. That first photo was the best picture I’ve seen of a prime rib. Reply

      • Natasha
        natashaskitchen
        December 23, 2015

        Awww you’re so sweet. Thank you. That is a huge compliment! 🙂 Reply

  • December 22, 2015

    This prime rib looks divine! I love your tutorial photos too, very helpful. Definitely makes me feel like I can attempt this! 🙂 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 22, 2015

      Thank you so much for the awesome feedback! It means so much to me :). Have a wonderful Christmas Roxana! 🙂 Reply

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