Russian Pelmeni Recipe + New Dough!

This recipe is for Russian Pelmeni along with a NEW dough recipe! This dough is softer, tastier and has more exact measurements. I strongly recommend a KitchenAid Mixer for the job. It’s the workhorse of the kitchen. A pelmeni mold also speeds up the process.

They can be purchased on Amazon. Pelmeni are a royal pain in the bottom to make. They are however, cheap and tasty – and you’ll recall your childhood (detstvo vspomnish). You will have enough for about 6 dinners with this recipe, so if you are up for suffering through the process once, you will have a nice stash of these in the freezer.

Serve these in a good quality chicken broth, or boil and butter them up, then dip in sour cream, vinegar or ketchup.

OUR LATEST VIDEOS

Ingredients for Russian Pelmeni Dough:

2/3 cups buttermilk
1 Tbsp sour cream
2 large eggs
2 cups warm water
1 1/2 tsp salt
7 cups plus 6 Tbsp unbleached all-purpose flour

Ingredients for Pelmeni Filling:

1 lb ground turkey
1 lb ground pork
1 medium onion, finely diced
1 Tbsp olive oil
3 garlic cloves, pressed
1/2 tsp ground pepper
3/4 tsp salt
1 tsp hot sauce, optional

Ingredients/ Ideas for Toppings:

Butter, melted
Sour cream, vinegar, ketchup

How to Make Basic Vareniky or Pelmeni Dough:

1. Using the whisk attachment on medium speed, mix together: 2/3 cup buttermilk, 1 Tbsp  of sour cream  2 cups warm water, 2 eggs and 1  1/2 tsp salt until well blended (please excuse the fact that this picture has the paddle attachment – I hauled my mixer to my sister’s house to make these and forgot the whisk!).

2. Switch to dough hook and add 4 cups flour. Mix on speed 2 until well blended.

3. Add 3 more cups of flour (one cup at a time and wait for the dough to become well blended with each cup). Add the rest of the flour 1 Tbsp at a time, until the dough is no longer sticking to the sides of the bowl (I used 6 Tbsp). Once it is no longer sticking to the bowl, continue to mix 5 minutes. (Total mixing time is about 20 minutes from the time you start adding flour).

4. Place the dough on a lightly floured surface.

How to Make Pelmeni Filling:

1. Heat 1 Tbsp oil in a medium skillet. Add onion and saute until golden and soft. Add garlic and saute another minute.

2. Mix together pork, turkey, onion & garlic mix, 3/4 tsp salt, 1/2 tsp ground pepper and 1 tsp hot sauce (optional).
The KitchenAid is very useful for mixing meat as well, so your hands don’t freeze even if your meat is cold.

 

If using a pelmeni mold:

1. Cut off about tennis-ball-size chunks of dough and roll out into a circle.

2. Place over mold. Place 1/2 tsp meat into each pocket space on the mold.

3. Roll out another chunk of dough and place over the mold.

4. Use a rolling pin, roll the top, working from the center – outwards until the pelmeni are well-defined.

5. Turn the pelmeni maker over and push the pelmeni out onto a well-floured cutting board.

6. Arrange pelmeni evenly on the cutting board, sprinkle with flour and place in the freezer. Pinch together any open edges on pelmeni or the meat will float out during cooking.

7. Once they are fully frozen, put them in large ziploc bags, sprinkle with flour and freeze them for future enjoyment.

If making pelmeni by hand:

1. Shape a portion of the dough into a 1 to 2 -inch thick log. Cut off 1 piece at a time (about gum ball sized) and roll into disks to form a 1.5-inch circle with rolling pin. Sprinkle rolling pin and surface with flour if needed.

2. Place 1 tsp pelmeni filling in the center,

3. lose the edges and pinch together.

4. Pinch the corners to gether to form, well… a diaper shape.

5. Place pelmeni onto a well-floured cutting board. Arrange pelmeni evenly on the cutting board, sprinkle with flour and place in the freezer.

6. Once they are fully frozen, put them in large ziploc bags, sprinkle with flour and freeze them for future enjoyment.

To Cook Pelmeni:

Bring a pot of water to boil (add 1 Tbsp salt for a large soup pot, or 1 tsp salt for a smaller 4 quart pot). Add FROZEN pelmeni and return to a boil. They should float to the top, then boil for 3 minutes longer (or until meat is fully cooked). Drain pelmeni and place them in a clean bowl. Toss pelmeni with butter and sprinkle with dill (optional). Serve them warm with ketchup, sour cream or vinegar (my personal favorite).

Russian Pelmeni Recipe + New Dough Recipe!

4.94 from 31 votes
Prep Time: 2 hours
Cook Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 2 hours 10 minutes
Author: Natasha of NatashasKitchen.com
Skill Level: Medium
Cost to Make: $8-$10
Servings: 180 + pelmeni

Ingredients

Ingredients for Pelmeni Dough:

  • 2/3 cups buttermilk
  • 1 Tbsp sour cream
  • 2 large eggs
  • 2 cups warm water
  • 1 1/2 tsp salt
  • 7 cups plus 6 Tbsp unbleached all-purpose flour

Ingredients for Pelmeni Filling:

  • 1 lb ground turkey
  • 1 lb ground pork
  • 1 medium onion finely diced
  • 1 Tbsp olive oil
  • 3 garlic cloves pressed
  • 1/2 tsp ground pepper
  • 3/4 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp hot sauce optional

Ingredients/ Ideas for Toppings:

  • Melted butter sour cream, vinegar, ketchup

Instructions

How to Make Basic Vareniky or Pelmeni Dough:

  1. Using the whisk attachment on medium speed, mix together: 2/3 cup buttermilk, 1 tbsp of sour cream 2 cups warm water, 2 eggs and 1 1/2 tsp salt until well blended
  2. Switch to dough hook and add 4 cups flour. Mix on speed 2 until well blended.
  3. Add 3 more cups of flour (one cup at a time and wait for the dough to become well blended with each cup).
  4. Add the rest of the flour 1 Tbsp at a time, until the dough is no longer sticking to the sides of the bowl (I used 6 Tbsp). Once it is no longer sticking to the bowl, continue to mix 5 minutes. (Total mixing time is about 20 minutes from the time you start adding flour).
  5. Place the dough on a lightly floured surface.

How to Make Pelmeni Filling:

  1. Heat 1 tbsp oil in a medium skillet. Add onion and saute until golden and soft. Add garlic and saute another minute.
  2. Mix together pork, turkey, onion & garlic mix, 3/4 tsp salt, 1/2 tsp ground pepper and 1 tsp hot sauce (optional).

If using a pelmeni mold:

  1. Cut off about tennis-ball-size chunks of dough and roll out into a circle.
  2. Place over mold. Place 1/2 tsp meat into each pocket space on the mold.
  3. Roll out another chunk of dough and place over the mold.
  4. Use a rolling pin, roll the top, working from the center - outwards until the pelmeni are well-defined.
  5. Turn the pelmeni maker over and push the pelmeni out onto a well-floured cutting board.
  6. Arrange pelmeni evenly on the cutting board, sprinkle with flour and place in the freezer. Pinch together any open edges on pelmeni or the meat will float out during cooking.
  7. Once they are fully frozen, put them in large ziploc bags, sprinkle with flour and freeze them for future enjoyment.

If making pelmeni by hand:

  1. Shape a portion of the dough into a 1 to 2 -inch thick log. Cut off 1 piece at a time (about gum ball sized) and roll into disks to form a 1.5-inch circle with rolling pin. Sprinkle rolling pin and surface with flour if needed.
  2. Place 1 tsp pelmeni filling in the center,
  3. Close the edges and pinch together.
  4. Pinch the corners together to form, well... a diaper shape.
  5. Place pelmeni onto a well-floured cutting board. Arrange pelmeni evenly on the cutting board, sprinkle with flour and place in the freezer.
  6. Once they are fully frozen, put them in large ziploc bags, sprinkle with flour and freeze them for future enjoyment.

To Cook Pelmeni:

  1. Bring a pot of water to boil (add 1 tbsp salt for a large soup pot, or 1 tsp salt for a smaller 4 quart pot). Add FROZEN pelmeni and return to a boil. They should float to the top, then boil for 3 mintues longer (or until meat is fully cooked). Drain pelmeni and place them in a clean bowl. Toss pelmeni with butter and sprinkle with dill (optional). Serve them warm with ketchup, sour cream or vinegar (my personal favorite).

Final Final Picmonkey Hashtag banner

natashaskitchen

Welcome to my kitchen! I am Natasha, the blogger behind Natasha's Kitchen (since 2009). My husband and I run this blog together and share only our best, family approved recipes with YOU. Thanks for stopping by! We are so happy you're here.

Read more posts by Natasha

Read comments/reviewsAdd comment/review

  • Stephanie G
    April 17, 2018

    If I want to make them and eat them immediately afterwards, will it affect the taste? Do they need to be frozen before cooking or can I cook them fresh? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 18, 2018

      Hi Stephanie, these can be boiled and eaten fresh. I included a freezer option since we usually don’t eat the entire batch but they do freeze really well! 🙂 Reply

  • Olga
    April 8, 2018

    The best pelmeni recipe! Our family loves them😋I just add about 3/4 cup of cold mineral water. This is the hack for juiciness 😊You should try it. Thank you for the recipe!!! Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      April 9, 2018

      You’re welcome Olga! I’m happy to hear your family enjoys the recipe as much as mine does. Thanks for sharing your excellent review! Reply

  • Amy
    March 16, 2018

    My boss had a grit idea I thought I’d share. He fills a jerky gun with the meat mixture and uses that the fill them. He said it worked great. Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      March 16, 2018

      Great suggestion, thanks for sharing! Reply

  • Olympia
    March 12, 2018

    I remember my mom and I sitting at the table making pelmeni, only difference is she used pork and ground hamburger. When she came to visit me, she took the short cut and bought the wonton, pre-made dough from the Asian market. It comes frozen, not as good, but works. Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      March 12, 2018

      I’m happy the recipe brings back fond memories! If you decide to give this recipe a try, please let me know what you think! Reply

  • Angelina
    December 8, 2017

    We sometimes don’t drain the water, we eat it as soup… It’s so good!!! Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      December 9, 2017

      Yum, great suggestion Angelina! Thanks for sharing 🙂 Reply

    • Laura
      February 28, 2018

      Hi Natasha! Do you think plain whole milk kefir would work instead of the buttermilk? Reply

      • Natasha
        natashaskitchen
        February 28, 2018

        Hi Laura, yes that would work great 🙂 Reply

  • Tatiana
    November 30, 2017

    Hi Natasha! If I use beef instead of turkey and pork would you recommend to change proportions of other ingredients (like add more onions to make the filling juicier/softer) or add anything else? Thanks for the recipe! Tatiana Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 1, 2017

      Hi Tatiana, I would suggest using beef not is not too lean. You can add more of the other filling ingredients if you like – I think it would still work well to keep it moist. Reply

  • brooke kobe
    September 19, 2017

    how many servings dose it make Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      September 19, 2017

      This recipe makes 180+ pelmeni. Reply

  • Katerina
    June 28, 2017

    Any suggestions what I could serve with pelmeni in order to make it a more balanced meal? I’m struggling to come up with something that will pare well. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      June 28, 2017

      Hi Katerina, I would pick a fresh salad – maybe something like our Cucumber Tomato Salad – you can explore all of our salads here. These cucumbers would also be really good! Reply

  • May 3, 2017

    I am pregnant and CRAVING this right now. Seriously I would kidnap a russian grandma just to have her make me these as there is no place around here that sells anything russian. Natasha think I can pay and you ship them out? lol Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 3, 2017

      LOL pregnant women do some interesting things! ha ha!! That gave me a good laugh. Congratulations on your pregnancy!! 🙂 Reply

  • Inna Kaushansky
    April 1, 2017

    I froze meat pelmeni and cooked them 2 months later. Dough tasted good but meat was too dry. Can you please give me advice on how to improve filling taste. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 3, 2017

      Hi Inna, usually the meat would be dry if it had a low fat content (say if you used only ground turkey) or if it was overmixed/overworked when it was made. Try a meat with a higher fat content. I hope that helps! Reply

  • Maryna Hopkins
    March 23, 2017

    Wow! These pelemeni tasted amazing! Will definitely be a keeper in the house. Thank you for the amazing recipe. I can’t stop eating them! Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      March 23, 2017

      You’re welcome Maryna! I’m glad you love the recipe! 😀 Reply

  • Lina
    February 24, 2017

    Hi Natasha! Love your website:) Question- can I use whole wheat flour for this recipe? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 24, 2017

      Hi Lina, I think the dough would be really tough to chew with whole wheat. I think it would be difficult to reach the same soft consistency with whole wheat. Reply

  • Katerina
    January 31, 2017

    Hello, How long can the dough last in the fridge? I had some leftover pelmeni dough 2 days ago, and I wonder if I can use it to make some vareniki today?

    The recipe is great btw! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 31, 2017

      It really is best to use the dough fresh for this recipe because the consistency of the dough changes after refrigeration. You might possibly be able to use it, but you will have to knead it for a little bit and maybe add some flour to keep it from being sticky, but even then, the door would probably be more dense than when using fresh. Reply

      • Katerina
        June 28, 2017

        Thank you, I’ll have to try that salad. Reply

  • Inna
    January 29, 2017

    I want to make vareniki with farmer cheese. Do you know if I can freeze Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 30, 2017

      Hi Inna, they should be ok to freeze. I would do the same process as my potato ones. Line them up (uncoooked) on a floured cutting board or baking sheet and freeze them on the sheet. Once they are frozen, transfer them to a plastic ziploc bag or freezer safe container, then when ready to cook, boil water and add them to the pot frozen. Enjoy!! Reply

  • Inna
    December 12, 2016

    These were so easy to make and super delicious, thanks for sharing!! I loved the convinience of using a pelemeni mold!! And to make things even easier I piped the meat filling into the rolled dough on the mold.. (I used a freezer gallon ziplock bag and cut a small hole in the corner to make my own piping bag) super duper easy! Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      December 13, 2016

      I’m so happy to hear that Inna! Thank you for sharing your great review! Reply

  • Sarah P.
    October 27, 2016

    Hello Natasha,

    I used your recipe for my first attempt at homemade pelmeni and they were a huge hit with my 12-year-old who is one of the pickiest eaters on the planet. He had three servings and then we ran out. (Lots in the freezer though.) My husband is the son of immigrants from Moscow and he said it did not taste like whatever he was used to. But, that did not matter. He also had 3 servings. (Also, my husband is used to the frozen pelmeni from a Russian store– and I am not a fan of those made in an industrial kitchen. I have had the real ones in Moscow and they are a far cry from the factory-made ones.)

    I used a slight variation on your recipe. I an American who has lived in France and can do just about any French dish from scratch. But, preparing Russian food is new for me. My husband and I have been married almost 15 years and I am getting around to it.

    I did not have buttermilk so I used 2 2/3 cups water with 4 tablespoons melted butter added into the water. I kneaded the dough for a long time with my hand-mixer. It was perfectly pliable before I stopped kneading it. I also used an organic, extra-fine flour. After that, I let it sit for about 1/2 hour.

    Next, I used a half/half combination of ground chicken and ground veal. Finally, I added some sautéed, caramelized onions and sautéed green cabbage to the meat mixture.

    The dumpling meat had a naturally sweet taste (probably because of the caramelized onions) and the dough was melt-in-your-mouth good. The meat inside was extremely tender and had a delicate flavor.

    I would recommend to anyone out there to use 4 tablespoons melted butter in lieu of buttermilk. Also, the sautéed onions and green cabbage was a great combo and made the meat soft.

    Our kids loved them and I have never seen my 12-year-old eat so much.

    By the way, you guys are a beautiful family!

    Thank you!
    Sarah Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 27, 2016

      Thank you so much for sharing your variations! They sure sound wonderful and I’ll be trying the butter idea! 🙂 Reply

  • Laura-Anne Borsoff
    August 30, 2016

    If you are in a pinch use a shot glass to cut dough into circles! My grand mother taught me that she came from Russia and was very traditional! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 30, 2016

      Thank you for the tip 😄 Reply

  • July 25, 2016

    I just made these, they turned out SO good! I have been looking for a good dough recipe for a while. I rolled the dough pretty thin, and these came out so light and tender (made them by hand instead of using a mold). Do you think the same dough can be used to make Vareniki? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 25, 2016

      Hi Marina, absolutely! I use the same dough for both 🙂 Reply

  • Katya Vasilev
    April 21, 2016

    I love Natasha’s instructions here because I have a mold so I thank Natasha for using instructions according to that. If using a mold the recipe makes 180 pelmeni, so that is five molds, or 15 dozen pelmeni. It’s a better dough recipe than mine! It’s very pliable and easy to use with a rolling pin. Adding garlic to the meat is also delicious! I’ve used great grandma’s recipes but this works better.! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 21, 2016

      Thank you so much for the wonderful review! I’m so glad you enjoyed the recipe! Also, thank you for sharing the count 🙂 Reply

  • Robert Brown
    February 14, 2016

    Hi Natasha,i have not tasted these for many years since visiting Ekaterinberg,my girlfriend used to make them and the were so good,i am so glad you have taken the time to show us how to make them,i have a question,she also used to make a pastie type thing using the same dough only she would cook them on a griddle/frying pan,they had the same filling.i remember her saying the name of them it sounded like a cartoon character “Cheburashka” do you know what i am talking about?do you have the recipe perhaps? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 14, 2016

      You might be referring to chebureki? I have a simplified version using raw tortillas here Reply

      • Robert brown
        February 14, 2016

        Exactly them thank you again 🙂 Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          February 14, 2016

          awesome 🙂 Reply

  • Inna
    February 6, 2016

    Would replacing buttermilk with kefir (from the Russian store) produce the same dough? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 6, 2016

      Hi Inna, I haven’t tested that substitution to compare but from what I know about kefir, it should work as a substitute. Let me know how it goes 🙂 Reply

  • Nick
    January 10, 2016

    Instead of butter/sour cream try eating with a bit of soy sauce. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 10, 2016

      Thanks for the tip Nick 😀. Reply

  • Natallia
    November 28, 2015

    I just made pelmeni following your recipe. After I cooked them, the dough turned out very hard. Yes. I did boil extra minutes and still.. What gives? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 28, 2015

      Hi :). It could be several different reasons – what kind of flour did you use? You may have added too much flour and created too dense of a dough, maybe it needed a little more kneading? – did you use a mixer to knead or do it by hand? It could have also been rolled out too thick. Did you use your dough right away rather than refrigerating it? I hope that helps. Reply

  • Elena
    November 13, 2015

    can pelemi be made using a ravioli maker that can be attached to a kitchen aid? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 13, 2015

      Hi Elena, I’m not sure to be honest since I haven’t tried it. I think it’s worth experimenting. If you try it, let me know how it goes. I’m very curious now! 🙂 Reply

  • Inna P.
    October 19, 2015

    I have been making pelmeni with my mom ever since I can remember, andmy job was to do the filling while my mom would roll the dough. One great thing we discovered to make the job easier is to use a cream piper to fill meat with. So much easier, faster and neater! Just make sure you have a tip wide enough to let the фарш through and just go at it! I ussually use a star tip or a round tip. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 20, 2015

      Inna, what a great idea, thank you for sharing :). I was just talking couple days ago with my son about making pelmeni this week. Reply

  • Natalya
    October 17, 2015

    Hi. I just found out that I’m gluten intolerant so I can’t have regular flour. I bought gluten free flour and wanted to ask if you had any suggestions for using the gluten free flour instead? Would the measurements be the same? Any info would be appreciated. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 17, 2015

      I honestly haven’t tried making this gluten free. My sister’s mother in law made them gluten free but I don’t know what kind of flour she used specifically. They were a little bit grainy but still good. I just haven’t tested it so I can’t really tell you. Sorry I can’t be more helpful! Reply

  • Marina
    September 3, 2015

    I finally made pelmeni myself! I don’t know what happened to my pelmeni mold, so I had to do it by hand. Definitely time consuming but SO worth it! They’re delicious. Husband always buys them at the Russian store. Not anymore! I didn’t have any onions or garlic, I substituted with powders. Amazing. Thank you Natasha! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 3, 2015

      Sometimes we get store bought too for convenience but homemade is so much better, probably because of better quality ingredients. Reply

  • Abby
    August 18, 2015

    Hi Natasha!

    I adore your recipes. my significant other is Ukranian and I am American, so the fact that I have pulled off many of these wonderful recipes, thanks to how simple you make them, has scored me many brownie points ;)!

    One question for ya… I plan on making both Vareniki and the poppyseed roulette this weekend. I unfortunately do not have a kitchen aid or bread maker. I have a hand held electric mixer… am i able to use that? How would you reccomend making the dough with my limited kitchen equipment? Second question, was regarding the poppyseeds that need to be put through the meat grinder. Can I use a ninja to get the job done? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 18, 2015

      You can make the dough for both by hand. I would not recommend an electric hand mixer since those are not suitable for mixing doughs and it would likely break your mixer. The best second option for grinding poppyseeds is a clean coffee grinder. I’ve tried other things and nothing cuts them like a meat grinder or coffee grinder. In a blender or food processor, they will just spin around since they are so tiny. Reply

  • Rida
    April 2, 2015

    Hi Natasha! Thanks so much for this recipe! My husband recently discovered russian dumplings after moving to Seattle and he’s been crazy about them since.

    I tried and loved your recipe but I had trouble with the dough. I don’t have a kitchen aid mixer so tried using my food processor because I’ve seen my mother-in-law use that for dough. It turned out to be a fairly messy business (the dough would climb up the central post away from the mixing blade). Also, I had to forgo the end 5 minutes of mixing once everything’s combined because the machine started overheating.

    I found it challenging to roll out the circles thin enough and ended up with 30 pelmini instead of 90+ (half batch). Is it just coz I’m not used to the dough or is it because it wasn’t mixed properly? I want to make it again but don’t want to use the processor. Can I do it by hand or my electric mixer that I use for cakes etc.?

    Thanks a ton! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 2, 2015

      I’ve never used a food processor for the dough so I can’t vouch for it. I’ve only used the KitchenAid mixer for it and have made it by hand. A couple of my readers have reported good results in a bread maker. The pelmeni should be rolled pretty thin or you won’t get quite as many. I usually use the pelmeni mold so I get much more but they are smaller than the hand molded pelmeni. Reply

    • Elena Mila
      August 2, 2016

      Buy Gyoza Wrappers at any Asian food store- works great! Reply

  • Inna
    April 1, 2015

    Would it be okay to use ground beef? I have so much left over ground beef and was thinking about making pelmeni. Даже лучше сказати що мені намiкали зробити. 🙂 Reply

  • Irina
    March 31, 2015

    Natasha:

    Could you please recommend a good salad to go with pelmeni? What else is usually served with a pelmeni meal (besides sour cream, vinegar, etc.)?

    Thanks! Reply

  • Theresa
    March 21, 2015

    Congratulations on your new baby! I just had to write and let you know that this kitchenaid pelmeni recipe is perfect. I have been making pelmeni for years..I was taught how to make them by my Slavic mother in law. She was born in Siberia and was a wonderful woman. She would have loved the tender texture of your dough..I have mastered my pelmeni mold too! So much easier and faster than making the hundreds that I make every time than making them by hand. Thank you so much sharing your recipe!! It is outstanding..We eat them with a sauce made on your plate of sour cream, vinegar and sweet hot homemade mustard(also my mother in law’s recipe) similar to a Chinese mustard..You may want to try this too..take care and thank you again. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 22, 2015

      I agree it is much more efficient to use the mold than making than by hand. I’m so happy you love the recipe 🙂 Thanks for sharing your tip about the Chinese mustard mixture! Sounds really really good! Reply

  • Laura
    February 24, 2015

    Thank you for sharing this recipe. I just made some with half of the dough. Could I freeze the other half of the dough? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 24, 2015

      Hi Laura, the dough will be the softest and easiest to work with if you use it fresh. I haven’t tried freezing to be honest so I don’t have a good answer for that. I have refrigerated the dough and subsequently used it to cook just pieces of the dough (dumplings) since it’s too tough for me to roll out at that point. It works best to make all of the pelmeni and freeze half of them once they are fully made. It’s alot of work, but it’s worthwhile 🙂 Reply

  • Marina
    December 23, 2014

    Hi Natasha, thank you for this recipe. I don’t have a pelmeni mold, wondering if you can just roll out the dough and use a round cookie cutter to cut out the circles, instead of rolling out each little piece. I remember my grandmother using a glass to cut out the shapes… Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 23, 2014

      Marina, you can absolutely use that method, just don’t roll out the dough too thick. Merry Christmas :). Reply

  • Lori
    October 27, 2014

    I know this is an older post on your site, but just wanted to thank you for the recipe. My hubby spent a couple of years in Russia and after 17 years of marriage and a few failed attempts at pelmeni, this recipe was the one he said was perfect! I just used ground turkey because that is what I had on hand, but they were wonderful! Thanks again! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 27, 2014

      Lori, thank you very much for such a great review and you are very welcome :). Reply

  • Sasha Roukina
    August 28, 2014

    Soooo making them this weekend!!! What a great idea! But I remember when we made them when I was a kid, and we rolled one big dough and then cut out circles with a glass. I think I might do it that way. Omg your website makes my life so fun 🙂 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 28, 2014

      I’m so glad you are enjoying the site. I’ve done the cutting out with a glass strategy before. It seems a little faster with the mold, but either way works well 🙂 Reply

      • Sasha
        August 28, 2014

        yep, bet it would be faster, I should order it for future. With the glass strategy it works if you have a production line type of family 🙂 Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          August 29, 2014

          So true! 😉 Reply

  • Natasha
    natashaskitchen
    August 10, 2014

    Yes, that’s perfectly fine! Thank you for sharing the pelmeni mold link 🙂 Reply

  • Svetlana
    August 10, 2014

    Мне очень нравиться ваш блог, спасибо большое что вы делитесь рецептами по английски, я когда ходжу на пари к американцам то приношу свою еду русско -украинскую, а они как обычно спрашивают рецепты, а я как обычно не все могу перевести на английский язык, так ваш блог это просто жемчужина! Находка! Спасибо большое вам! Я много новых рецептов здесь нашла пристроенных под американские продукты, спасибо! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 10, 2014

      Thank you so much for your sweet comment and for sharing my blog with others 🙂 You’re so nice! 🙂 Reply

  • Svetlana
    August 10, 2014

    Svetlana
    August 6, 2014, 4:10 am
    Здравствуйте! Не знаю можно ли писать здесь по Русски, я по английски не могу писать, понимаю только кода читаю, и то не все, извините меня, Я вот что хотела сказать, у меня також есть пельменница на 91 пельмень и вареничница на 38 вареники и (орешница на 40 орешков в духовку) все формы металические очень хорошие я заказывали их на ” Ebay” вот точное названия как н EBay написано чтобы правильно искать “. Russian Oreshki Орешница 40 FOR OVEN, Pelmeni 91, NEW Vareniki Варенница 38 US” за все три формы $120.00 + пересылка $15.00 отсылают они почтой только в 48 штатов,
    Так как я живу на Аляске мне пришлось заказывать на Нюйорк к своему дяде а он мне уже на Аляску немного накладно но по другому невозможно так как они посылают только в 48 штатов
    Но я не жалею что заказала эти формы они очень качественно сделаны советую всем заказывать это облегчает работу на кухне, очень удобно Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 10, 2014

      Thank you so much for sharing that! I love that you can make 91 pelmeni at once. That’s so great for saving time! Thank you 🙂 Reply

  • Julia
    June 29, 2014

    Hi Natasha,
    We went strawberry picking at the farm today and I used your dough recipe to make strawberry vareniki/pierogies. And OMGosh, turned out perfect and amazing! I halved the dough and it came together really nicely. I made the dough a couple hours before actually rolling, refrigerated it, and then brought it to room temp. for about 30min and it was great and pliable and rolled well. My husband was impressed! Thank you! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      June 30, 2014

      That sounds wonderful with the strawberries! Yummy!! I’m so happy you enjoyed the dough recipe. Reply

  • Larayna
    May 18, 2014

    I’ve been searching for a good dough recipe forever! This is by far the best and most consistent recipe.
    I feel bad for people who don’t have a kitchen aid though 😛 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 19, 2014

      Yeah you definitely have to use some elbow grease if you don’t have a KitchenAid. It’s do-able but definitely more work 😉 Reply

  • Anna
    May 9, 2014

    Do I need to freeze them before cooking if we plan to eat them on the same day? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 9, 2014

      No, there is no need to freeze them Anna :). Reply

  • Mei
    March 27, 2014

    I am working with Russians and just tried this for the first time. IT WAS SO AWESOME. I think she used beef instead of pork and turkey though. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 27, 2014

      Aren’t pelmeni amazing? It’s a standard comfort food for Slavic people. Reply

  • Janelle Gilbert
    March 16, 2014

    Love this recipe. Was trying to replicate a version of this shared with a Ukrainian guest years ago. I cooked and served mine in chicken broth, as he had. Thinking of this man who traveled to the US to learn strategies to help his country. Blessed be. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 16, 2014

      I have tried it served in chicken broth and it is so good. Now I am seriously craving that!! Reply

  • Gino
    March 7, 2014

    I married into a Russian family, and I LOOOOVE pelmeni. I made some using your recipe, and my wife tells me they’re the best she’s ever had. Thank you for this easy amazing recipe! (Have to get a mold though. They take forever to make by hand!) Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 7, 2014

      I’m so glad you are enjoying the recipe 🙂 Thanks Gino! Yeah, a mold really speeds up the process 😉 Reply

  • BillR
    March 7, 2014

    Hi Natasha,
    I can’t wait to try these. Is it possible to use a ravioli mold instead of a pelmeni mold? I have a few of different sizes. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 7, 2014

      I guess you could; they just would probably be tiny compared to the regular pelmeni so they might take forever to make. Let me know how it goes 🙂 Reply

  • Masha
    February 27, 2014

    The dough turned out nice. Didn’t need extra flour or water just right! Thank you. Wahh. Finally found one that has perfect proportions. Yaay. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 28, 2014

      That’s so great!! I’m truly happy for you. It took me awhile to figure it out, so I know exactly how you feel! 🙂 Reply

  • Kaitlin
    January 23, 2014

    Hello, I was wondering if I could make these and then freeze them? Also, if I can would I cook them before or just leave them uncooked? Thanks. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 23, 2014

      Lay them out on a floured cutting board and freeze them raw. Once they are frozen, transfer them to a large zip-loc bag and keep them frozen until you’re ready to cook them. Reply

  • Lena
    January 21, 2014

    Hi, My dough came out very sticky and I was not able to do anything with it. Did I do something wrong? I saw on youtube that some people added olive oil, would that work? So disappointed I had to throw it out. 🙁 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 22, 2014

      I haven’t had to add oil and I just made this recipe last week. If your dough is sticky, you probably just need to add a little more flour. What kind of flour did you use? Different flour measures out differently. Was it Canadian flour by chance? I just used an all-purpose unbleached flour. Next time, add flour a little bit at a time until it’s a little sticky to the touch but doesn’t stick to your fingers. I hope that helps. Reply

  • Anna
    January 9, 2014

    Thank you Natasha! :)) Reply

  • Anna
    January 8, 2014

    I don’t know what I did wrong, but I had a bowl of dough left over.
    I made them by hand (no pelmeni mold yet) and followed your recipe precisely 🙂 It was good, cause I made Vareniki from it, but I don’t want to have leftover dough next time 😉 Any suggestions? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 8, 2014

      When you fill them by hand, you usually add more meat in each one than you would with a pelmeni mold. That might be why. This is a large portion of dough and it’s a good idea to cut it in half if you don’t want to make that many pelmeni. Reply

  • Natalia A.
    January 6, 2014

    I made this a bazillian times thanks to my mother-in-law she brought me pelmeni mold from Ukraine. It made my world so much easier…. Loved your recipe, although I added a bit more flour but it was soft and tasty dough. It’s a keeper… Thanks Natasha! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 7, 2014

      It can vary depending on the flour you use, but I’m so glad you liked it 🙂 Reply

  • Pat Tucker
    January 3, 2014

    used the new dough recipe to make pyrohy, found it a bit soft compared to what I usually make, but, added a bit more flour..one cup more…and it worked just fine…family said it was ‘good’…so it’s a keeper here Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 3, 2014

      What kind of pirohy were you making? Reply

      • Pat Tucker
        January 4, 2014

        potato/onion….sometimes because of the weather you have to make adjustments with flour…everyone liked it, so that’s fine, will do again…and we used our Kefir that we had left over for the buttermilk. Grandma always called it pyrohy…new word after WW-2 varynyky, pelmeni’s she made once a year…yes, alot of work and then they’re gobbled up in a flash. I like to make potato filled piroshki to eat with a big bowl of soup in winter, but I cheat…I use crescents rolls, roll them out into a disk shape, I use Idahoan red bliss instant potato or whatever flavor, bake, done, eat 🙂 Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          January 4, 2014

          I’ve never tried using crescent rolls. I bet that is one tasty shortcut! Have you tried dipping yoru piroshki into the garlic sauce that I have posted here. It will change your world. lol. Reply

  • Susanna Faygenbau.
    December 25, 2013

    I dotn have a kitchenaid standing mixer. Can I make it with a hand mixer or food processor? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 25, 2013

      You could just make it by hand. I haven’t tried in a food processor to be honest, but I think it might work for dough. Do you happen to have a bread maker? You can make this by hand, it just takes a little time 🙂 Reply

  • Vitaliy
    November 6, 2013

    Looking for the “vishni” pelmeni recipe, I found reference to it in the comments and it looks like the dough is the same regardless of the filling. Now vishni are different than cherries from my understanding – or rather old memory from the soviet days 🙂 Can you confirm?
    If so, where can one find vishi here in the US; what would they even be called?

    Thanks! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 6, 2013

      Vishni are more like a sour cherry where the bing cherries are very sweet. Yes, the dough is the same 🙂 Reply

  • Katerina
    October 14, 2013

    Just wanted you to know that yours is the only dough recipe I’ve been able to make work. My family loved the Pelmeni, and I am so excited about finally getting a recipe that works! 😀 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 14, 2013

      Yes!!!! That’s so exciting to hear. You know, I had the same problem for a long time and I finally got together with Mom and learned how to do it and measured everything out exactly. I’m a nerd, but being a nerd is a good thing in this case! 🙂 Reply

  • Irina
    October 1, 2013

    LOVE the dough. Tried once with a breadmaker – UNSUCCESSFUL. Bought a 6 qt KitchenAid and the dough came out so soft. Altought, for some reason I got about 315 pelemenies. 😉 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 1, 2013

      315?!! Wowee!! It’s really great to know that a breadmaker doesn’t work. Thank you so much for sharing. Now I have a concrete answer for people who ask. Thanks again! I can take some of those pelemenies off your hands you know 😉 Reply

  • yana
    September 19, 2013

    i loved the diaper comment! makes me laugh 🙂 Reply

  • July 24, 2013

    Interesting recipe, Natasha. Would love to do this again in the kitchen. Reply

  • Irina
    July 17, 2013

    So, the dough doesn’t need to rise, right? Also, is it fine to refrigerate the dough for the next day if I haven’t had a chance to work on pelmeni? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 17, 2013

      I don’t recommend refrigerating the dough because it’s not as soft after refrigeration. It’s best to use it the same day it’s made. No, it doesn’t have to rise 🙂 Reply

  • peperintpatty
    June 3, 2013

    I had this at a Russian Orthadox church center:Looked like jelly doughnut–breadlike not boiled or fried -maybe baked & has filling of meat onion & rice kindof like stuffed cabbage. I have been looking for this recipe for years. It isn’t pierogi. Anyone have a recipe or know what this is called? Reply

  • Nastia
    May 2, 2013

    Natasha, great recipe! I absolutely love to work with this dough! I despised making pelmeni before finding this recipe. My sister-in-law and I get together and make them. She makes the dough in the bread machine. Just perfect to work with, plus there’s not a single pelmen’ that broke apart.
    Thank you so much! Greetings from Roseburg, OR. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 2, 2013

      That’s wonderful!! Thanks for letting me know how much you enjoyed the recipe! 😉 Reply

  • Lilly
    April 23, 2013

    Thanks for sharing the pelemini recipe, I made it for the first time ever and they turned out amazing. It also gave me a reason to buy a Kitchen Aid Custom mixer which made my dough perfect:)) My parents loved the recipe Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 23, 2013

      Your KitchenAid will become your best friend in the kitchen and you’ll wonder why you didn’t get one sooner! 🙂 I’m glad you and your parents loved the recipe! Reply

  • Katy
    April 6, 2013

    Should I purchase a plastic Pelimeni mould or metal one?? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 6, 2013

      I have a metal one and it works well. 🙂 Reply

  • Jason
    April 1, 2013

    Thank-you. You’ve just enabled me to make my very favorite food. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 1, 2013

      You’re very welcome 🙂 You and me both! Reply

  • sara
    March 27, 2013

    I used to go to this place where they served pelemini topped with butter, rice vinegar, sriracha sauce, curry powder, and cilantro with sour cream on the side. Best ever! I’m craving ’em something fierce so I might have to try out this recipe! 🙂 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 28, 2013

      Those are some delicious toppings for pelmeni Sara :). Let me know how these pelmeni will turn out for you. Reply

  • Diana Pilat
    March 16, 2013

    Hi girls!

    Actually, my bread machine worked beautifully!
    I set it to the “dough” setting and followed the rest of the directions for adding the dough ingredients exactly as Natasha’s recipe stated. After I was sure that all of the “wet” ingredients were fully mixed, I added the four cups of flour, all at one time. I let the bread machine do its thing for as long as it took for it to look mostly mixed. I used a large tablespoon to help the machine out a bit, scraping the extra flour in the corners so it would all get mixed well. After I added the fifth cup of flour and waited for the machine to mix that in, I noticed that the machine had stopped mixing and was trying to force my dough to rise! lol That’s when I stopped everything and reset the bread machine to the “dough” setting. It mixes for no more than half an hour before trying to make the dough rise, so I guess the first five cups took the bread machine half an hour to mix, although the rest mixed in faster. I added the sixth cup after the fifth was fully mixed (helping the machine with the spoon technique occasionally). After the seventh cup, my dough was a ball in the bread machine, but it was wet. That’s when I followed the rest of Natasha’s recipe, adding one tablespoon of flour into each corner of the machine and then sprinkling the final two tablespoons just over the dough ball as the machine continued mixing. The result was a perfectly kneaded ball of dough, ready to be made into pelmeni. 🙂

    I just decided to share because I noticed that the people who said they used a bread machine didn’t explain how they made it work for them, and those who it didn’t work for had to resort to using their hands, etc. I decided to try it out myself and see what happened, and I’m definitely happy with the results 🙂

    Hope this helped! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 16, 2013

      Diana thank you so much for sharing your detailed instructions. I’ll have to try it in the bread machine one of these days. Reply

    • Irina
      July 17, 2013

      Thank you so much. I was just going to make the dough by hands because of the negative comments about the bread machine. But saw yours, and decided to do the same because don’t like doing it by hands at all. QUIET A SET UP, but will try… Reply

  • Linda
    March 9, 2013

    I found your recipe today and tried it. My old recipe was with regular milk and no sour cream but this one was so much more elastic and seemed to roll out better. I just finished them ( as well as making some potato vereneki) and can’t wait for tonight to try them!! My husband and I lived in Ukraine for 4 years and I learned many recipes there which we love! I made Ukrainian bread yesterday. Oh, I also cut up a whole onion in my water when I boil the pelmeni, and then eat them along side. I just ordered my mold so anxious to try it out. Does the dough stick together okay without wetting it or anything? Thanks a lot for your site…I love it. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 9, 2013

      Yes, the dough sticks together well without use of water; water will actually make it worse and just slippery. I love your tip about the onion. Thank you Linda!! 🙂 Reply

  • Paula
    March 2, 2013

    Thank you for this wonderful recipe! I was so intrigued by the beauty of little pelmeni, I sought out a pelmeni mold and made this recipe for my family. It was wonderful! So well worth the effort, and everyone just raved. Thank you for sharing this with us. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 2, 2013

      Thank you for the great review 🙂 Reply

  • Marina
    February 6, 2013

    Hi Natasha,
    I’m really looking forward to making these.
    Just one question.
    For the dough, do I use the paddle attachment, or do I use the attachment with a hook? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 6, 2013

      I used attachment with the hook. Reply

  • Tanya
    February 1, 2013

    I’ve made pelemeni many times before using my mom’s recipe that required boiled milk and it was just very time consuming. I stumbled upon your pelemeni recipe and decided to give it a try tonight. I followed your recipe exactly but the dough was very hard to roll out, like unbelievably hard to the point where I had to have my husband do it because I just wasn’t getting anywhere, and even he found it very hard to roll out and he’s a pretty strong guy. Any ideas as to what I might’ve screwed up? I really wanted this to be our go-to dough recipe because my usual one is just too time consuming, so we will give it another try one day but thought maybe you would have an idea as to what went wrong. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 2, 2013

      Hi Tanya; what kind of flour are you using? Reply

  • January 19, 2013

    I just made this recipe and the pelmeni are in the freezer getting ready for cooking tomorrow. I did the folding by hand, and only ended up with about 54 pelmenis. Obviously I made them much bigger than intended. Do you think the same cooking rules will apply, boiling till they reach the top + 3 minutes? Is there a way to check for done-ness without breaking one open?

    This is my first time experiencing any sort of Russian food. Hopefully it is as yummy as it sounds!

    Thanks! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 19, 2013

      Hmmm …just how big are they? 🙂 the same rule should apply; give it one extra minute if your worried and I’d probably crack one open and eat it just to be sure 😉 Reply

      • January 20, 2013

        Thanks for the response, Natasha!

        They looked about the same in size as your picture, so I wasn’t too concerned when making them until I had half the meat mixture left at the end. After cooking, I see that it wasn’t the size I was wrong on, but the thickness of the dough. It took plus at least ten minutes after floating to be cooked through since the “shell” was so thick. They were still delicious though!

        Just wondering, what is traditionally served as a side dish to pelmeni? Or is pelmeni considered a side dish? I was thinking about making mashed potatoes but settled for just pelmeni (with sour cream/vinegar mix) instead. Suggestions? Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          January 21, 2013

          Mostly pelmeni are served with sour cream, vinegar or ketchup :). Reply

  • Olga G
    November 29, 2012

    Hi Natasha! Once I rolled out my dough to put over the mold, it was tearing really easily…not sure what I did…any suggestions? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 29, 2012

      I don’t think you did anything wrong Olga. My mom suggested to add 1 tbsp of sour cream in the mixer. Sour cream makes dough more elastic and should take care of the problem. I hope this helps. I also updated the recipe. Reply

  • Lizechka
    November 22, 2012

    Add a bay leaf and a few pepper corns to the boiling water that you cook the pelemeni in. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 22, 2012

      Thank you for the tip Liza 🙂 Reply

  • Li
    October 17, 2012

    ха-ха.
    а мы пельмени годовыми в магазине покупаем. Reply

  • Lina
    September 2, 2012

    Hi does the dough fall apart when cooking? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 2, 2012

      Only if you overcook it. Bring to a boil and let them boil about 3 minutes. They will be floating at the top when they are done. Reply

  • August 4, 2012

    Yes I mix the sour cream , soy and dill together while boiling the pelmeni and then add the pelmeni with a little of the broth. You will have to mix amounts to suite your taste.
    Thanks for the dough hook tip , I’ll have to get a whisk attachment. Reply

  • August 4, 2012

    By the way, my Russian grandparents who left Russia under threat of Communism before the Revolution, escaped to China and then to the United States in the early 1950’s ate their pelmeni with sour cream, soy sauce and dried dill weed. Enough soy sauce to turn sour cream dark brown and a fair amount of dill. It’s wonderful!
    I also put a couple of beef bouilion cubes in the boiling water before plopping in the pelmeni, it adds a nice flavour for the beef and pork filled pelmeni! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 4, 2012

      Ooh thanks for the tip! So do you mix the soy sauce and sour cream together? Reply

  • August 4, 2012

    what attachment do you use when making the dough? You say the wisk but wouldn’t you use a dough hook? Thanks so much! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 4, 2012

      Hi Don, switch to the dough hook in step 2 🙂 Reply

  • Lina
    July 13, 2012

    Natasha, is this the same recipe for dough to make cherry vareniki? Thanks Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 13, 2012

      Hi Lina, sorry for the late reply; yes, it is the same dough you would use for pelmeni, cherries, potatoes, blueberries; anything you want to put in it 🙂 Reply

      • Lina
        July 14, 2012

        No problem on the late reply. I always give myself a few days for a reply before attempting a dish. You are great! Reply

  • Luba
    April 23, 2012

    Thank you Natasha, don’t know if you ever tryed it, but we fry them sometimes, Yes , just take raw pel’meni and put them in hot oil, they will tunr out like MINI CHEBYREKI, it’s just different way to serve them, and add the soure cream and plack peper on the top, yam…… Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 23, 2012

      Oh what a great idea!! I’ve never tried that, but it sounds really really good! Next time I make them, I will try your method. Reply

  • Zina
    March 8, 2012

    These came out wonderful! My son wants me to make them often and now that I ordered the pelmeni mold on ebay, I am all set. What used to be tedious work now is simplified with the pelmeni mold…I never knew there was such a thing, but thanks to you, I have one. My son doesn’t have to go the the Russian store to purchase these anymore and he’s so happy…in fact, he wants to learn how to make them…he already makes pirozhki using crepe-like wrappers, so this will be no problem! LOL Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 8, 2012

      That’s awesome. They are still very time consuming even with the mold, but they are well-worth it 🙂 Reply

      • Zina
        March 8, 2012

        Your recipe made almost 180 of these yummy dumplings and yes, even with the mold it took me 3 hours…but, on the bright side, without the mold I would be making the little ears all day! Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          March 8, 2012

          So very true! Mine look more like little diapers 🙂 I’m no good at making them look cute.  Reply

  • Marie grace
    February 15, 2012

    how long to boil fresh pelemni? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 15, 2012

      Just until they float to the top then another 2-3 minutes. Reply

  • Erika
    February 12, 2012

    Just found your site as am looking for a pelmeni recipe – thank you. Will try it out tomorrow and see what my parents think. I remember my late grandma sitting with her friends making thousands at a time. She served it to us with soy and sesame oil so will have to try sour cream. Anyway can’t wait to try them. Also am trying to find a recipe for something that sounds like pelmechi? I remember they were round pastries with similar meat filling but we’re fried golden. They were round disc shaped completely covered in pastry except for a little hole on top. Does this sound familiar at all? Would love to know how to make them. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 12, 2012

      I make fried piroshki but there is no hole on top. I have posted meat piroshki, apple piroshki and potato piroshki (with a really yummy dip). Hope that helps 🙂 Reply

      • Zina
        March 8, 2012

        I believe these are called beliashi….I make them and they’re out of sight! Yummy!…My family loves these. Basically, it’s a pirozhki yeast dough rolled into a circle, filled with a thin RAW ground beef patty (seasoned with salt and pepper and some fried chopped onion). The sides of the dough are brought around the patty forming a flat, circular dough and leaving a hole about the size of a quarter in the center. Fry these, hole side down first, flip and fry the other side until done. My family prefers these over the regular pirozhki! The meat filling can also be a combination of ground beef and ground pork. Evdokeya Ivanovna, and elderly Russian lady called these Siberian Beliashi and would make them often…that’s when I was first introduced to them years ago when I was a kid. Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          March 8, 2012

          I’ve had those before! They are great, but what is the purpose of leaving a hole in the center? Also is a fluffy dough or a dough like pelmeni that you use? Reply

          • Zina
            March 8, 2012

            I imagine the hole is to let the meat cook through…don’t really know.
            The meat lets out juices so the hole side should be cooked first. It’s a yeast dough.
            Here’s a link to the recipe that I have used for years and found on food.com (from Time Life). I do add salt to the dough because it tastes better that way. http://www.food.com/recipe/beliashi-322402

  • Enia
    January 31, 2012

    Found your site looking for a pelmeni mold dough recipe. Now I want to make everything here. Have you ever made ряжик? It’s a cake that has tons of layers like Spartak. My Mom has her old recipe but we’ve never been able to replicate it succesfully in the US: different ingredients? Thanks! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 31, 2012

      Hi Enia, unfortunately I haven’t heard of that one, but I’ll ask around 🙂 Reply

  • masha
    November 19, 2011

    I can’t wait to try this! I haven’t had home cooked pelmeni since I was about 6 or seven (my mom used to cook the best pelmeni, before she passed away) I am 20 now and learning how to cook my very much missed foods sence I live in America now. Thank you for explaning everything step by step! YUMMY! Reply

  • andrew
    November 16, 2011

    best with browned melted butter and vinegar and parmesan or asiago cheese and some soy. Reply

  • nina o.
    October 26, 2011

    thank you so much for the recipe,i made them for the first time today and they turned out perfect,i love that you discribe every step so its very easy to follow the recipe,i thought i will never be able to make them but now thanks to your recipe i can yay Reply

  • Kathleen
    October 5, 2011

    Pryvit Hi im English but love uraine and Russian food but would like to know the calories of food eaten. you have an excellent web site which I only food today. I have a friend from moldova who cooks for me and tells me its healthy kathleen Rush Reply

    • Natasha
      October 6, 2011

      I have no idea and I just don’t have the time to sit and calculate that with most of my recipes being from scratch. Sorry 🙁 Reply

      • Inna
        April 1, 2015

        If you use the My Fitness Pal app, you can create your own recipes or transfer them from online. It’s a super fast way to calculate calories in home cooking (which can be tedious when calculating personally). It even allows you to omit/add ingredients if you improvised the dish. Hope that helps! Best of health and home cooking. Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          April 1, 2015

          That’s so great to know! Thank you Inna! It sounds even better than the caloriecount website I’ve been using! 🙂 Reply

  • Aileen Smith
    September 26, 2011

    Thanks so much for this new recipe dough. It came out much better than the recipe from the outfit who sold me the molds that requires 1 kg. of flour. The dough was quite tough really did not work well with the mold. Had a very hard time unmolding the dumplings. However, I still find it very difficult to get the dumplings out of the mold. I just notice that you have to roll outwards from the center of the mold. Will try that. Also for the buttermilk I tried using kefir instead and it came out real well. The dough came out real good. Ate them with scallion, ginger sauce from Momofuku.com but cook the ginger and scallions first in peanut oil then add the other condiments. Added my home made red wine vinegar and some sirracha chili sauce, soya sauce and it is a blast. Thanks so much for sharing this recipe. Reply

  • olga
    September 15, 2011

    Does Plemeni taste good with ground turkey? i find it too soft, but I dont think i ever tried it in plemeni.. Im consider giving it a try.. I tried pork and chicken mix and didnt like it that much. Maybe it was the pork that didnt taste so good.. hmmm. Reply

    • Natasha
      September 15, 2011

      HI Olga, I haven’t tried just turkey but it may be a fun experiment. A couple of gals at my church make theirs with just ground chicken and it turns out nice too, so turkey might just work. Reply

      • Oksana G.
        December 21, 2011

        I used just lean turkey for the filling and I think it made them taste dry and the sort of grainy. Do you think it was because it was lean meat? Definitely will try mixing different meats next time or try chicken. But I love this dough recipe – it came out so soft. Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          December 22, 2011

          Lean turkey would probably be too dry. Try a meat with some fat in it next time; it will make all the difference. I’m glad you liked the dough 😉 Reply

        • David
          October 11, 2014

          We only use ground turkey (not ground turkey breast) and love it. I think it’s very tender. Reply

  • Ilona
    September 12, 2011

    I tried making the dough in the bread machine today, but as the previous user said it did not mix well at all, so i just took it out and kneaded myself… the pelmeni turned out really good by the way, thank you for the recipe Reply

  • Yelena
    August 23, 2011

    Have you tried making the dough in a bread machine? I want to try but dont know if I should let it go through the whole dough cycle. Reply

  • Vera P
    August 10, 2011

    Natasha-
    What a wonderful blog you have going here, especially for those who have been searching the world for all these recipes…. and now all of them just on one site-YOURS! I just want you to know how amazing you to have this running for those who are struggling in cooking with Russian/Ukranian touch. Yesterday I made these Pelmeni and today I am making Cheesy Potatoe Cassarole… with couple for your salads. Thanks for all your help!

    Be Blessed, Vera P Reply

    • Natasha
      August 10, 2011

      Thank you so much for your nice comment. Try the chicken and mushroom casserole . Mmmmm 🙂 Reply

  • Ilona
    August 10, 2011

    Natasha,
    would a Breadmaker work to make the dough?? Reply

    • Natasha
      August 10, 2011

      I haven’t tried it so I can’t really recommend it. Let me know how it works out. Reply

      • Viktoriya
        August 12, 2011

        I tried it in bread maker and it didn’t mix very well, I had to do it by hand, kitchen aid is the best thing for it Reply

        • Natasha
          August 14, 2011

          Hi Viktoriya – thanks for letting me know. I’ve had people suggest using a bread maker for the dough and now I hear it doesn’t mix well. I’ll stick with the kitchenaid 🙂 thanks again! Reply

  • August 8, 2011

    i should give this dough recipe a try, i usually make dough that is soft and flavorful too but it has LOTS of butter in it. Reply

  • Tatiana Khochay
    August 7, 2011

    Martha Stewart eat your heart out… Reply

  • July 19, 2011

    I made these the other day and they turned out delicious! I even got my hubby to help by rolling out the dough:) Honestly, thank you so, so much for having this blog! I can read in ukranian but having these recipes in english makes the process actually so much easier and am so glad I can make traditional dishes that taste so amazing. Really. I haven’t tried one recipe that didn’t turn out great. Thanks again! Reply

  • Olga
    June 2, 2011

    I used this dough recipe for varenuki with potato filling and it was awesome! a lot better than the recipe I used to make them with. 😉 thanks so much! and yeah, very true, the kitchen aid mixer is outstanding for the job! I dont know why I never thought of mixing the dough in there before lol thanks again. Reply

  • Charlie
    June 2, 2011

    There was a question about milk. I would not recommend using milk for this. Push comes to shove use water. Milk will make dough tough. Reply

  • Yana
    May 25, 2011

    Thank you for this recipe, I finally found use for the pelimeni mold that I bought in Ukraine. This recipe was really easy! I love it. Reply

    • Natasha
      May 25, 2011

      Hi Yana – I’m glad you liked it. It is easy when the mixer does all the work 🙂 Reply

  • Galia
    May 18, 2011

    This is the best pelemni dough ever! lovin it! I just pork & beef instead of ground turkey. It was super good!!!! Also ground chicken is good for the chicken lovers lol:)) Reply

  • cook
    May 17, 2011

    Hi Natasha,
    I find if you flour the mold before putting a dought circle on it, the pelmeni will come out with a light shake of a mold. Just turn it upside down and shake.)) With a metal mold you will need to use more flour then with plastic one. Reply

    • Natasha
      May 17, 2011

      Thank you and that is a great suggestion for the plastic mold – I always wondered if those are any good! 🙂 Reply

      • cook
        May 20, 2011

        The plastic is better if you don’t want to pock each pelmen ))) As I said, just turn upside down and shake))) Reply

  • Natalie
    May 14, 2011

    I used canadian flour these were so delicous super soft yummie!!!!!!!!!!!:) Reply

  • Natalie
    May 13, 2011

    Thank you! God bless ur sweetheart!!!!!!!!!!!! Reply

  • Natalie
    May 13, 2011

    Natasha is there any way you can split this recipe in half for me in the comment area i really dont feel like making that much lol too lazy to freeze hehe thanks Reply

    • Natasha
      May 13, 2011

      HI Natalie – If you want to make a very small batch, the store-bought wonton wrappers work pretty well, just wet the edges with water to seal them (I think it’s on the package). Otherwise, Just cut the recipe in half exactly:
      Ingredients for Pelmeni Dough:
      1/3 cups buttermilk
      1 large egg
      1 cups warm water
      3/4 tsp salt
      3 1/2 cups plus 3 tbsp unbleached all-purpose flour

      Ingredients for Pelmeni Filling:
      1/2 lb ground turkey
      1/2 lb ground pork
      1/2 medium onion, finely diced
      1/2 tbsp olive oil
      1-2 garlic cloves, pressed
      1/4 tsp ground pepper
      1/2 tsp salt
      1/2 tsp hot sauce, optional Reply

  • Jasmine
    May 12, 2011

    Cant wait thanks so much, this means alot to me:) Reply

  • Jasmine
    May 12, 2011

    Can you please put up a recipe called “Chebureki” my grandma made it for us wihen we were kids but she passed away and i didnt get a chance to learn how to make it! I would really appreciate it Natasha!!!!-Jazzy:) Reply

  • Inna
    May 12, 2011

    What type of flour did u used for pelmeni bleached or unbleached Reply

    • Natasha
      May 12, 2011

      Unbleached all-purpose flour. I’ll edit that into the recipe. Reply

    • Natasha
      May 12, 2011

      I haven’t tried it yet, but my readers (see comments above) have been raving about Canadian flour. 🙂 Reply

  • heather
    May 12, 2011

    Can u plez post more dinner recipes! Thanks! Reply

  • heather
    May 12, 2011

    Cash and carry is having half price on Canadian flour! So cheap and the flour is so amazing esp for piroshki they are soft and fluffy like never before! awhhh Reply

  • Inna
    May 12, 2011

    thanks 🙂 oh and i want kitchen aid mixer now so bad lol 🙂 Reply

  • Inna
    May 11, 2011

    Hi Natasha! This recipe look delicious, I have one question though were did u get the mold I really need one

    Thanks,

    🙂 Inna Reply

    • Natasha
      May 11, 2011

      Hi Inna I put a link to the molds on eBay. It’s in the top paragraph of this post. We purchased ours on eBay. I don’t remember which seller but it did come in a set of 2 straight from Ukraine 🙂 Reply

  • heather
    May 11, 2011

    Thanks 4 having the time to post!:) Reply

  • svetlana
    May 11, 2011

    finally a pilmeni recipe, u rock natasha! im so inspired by u and ur dedication to make whattever u do flawless, i used to make fun of u as a kid but now im jealous when i look at my half butted job of somethings!!!! love u Reply

    • Natasha
      May 11, 2011

      Thanks Sveta although this I one of the more unusual comments, it’s always nice when one of my sisters comment. 🙂 Thanks skittles for your support and encouragement. Reply

  • heather
    May 11, 2011

    Do you think flour from Canada would be softer when cooked?:) lol Reply

  • Rozmin
    May 11, 2011

    Hi, I just found your site recently. My fiance is from Odessa, and so I’ve learned to make many Russian “classics” from his Mama over the years. 🙂 It’s so nice to see your take on the dishes I know how to make, and to learn new ones as well.

    About pelmeni, we found that they are also very nice with soy sauce! His parents came to visit us once, and of course while we were at work all day Mama was cooking up a storm. She loves to try new things, and our kitchen had many ingredients that aren’t in hers…so that’s how we came to try pelmeni with soy sauce.

    After that experience, they took home a 1 L bottle of the stuff back to Ukraine, as it’s expensive there!

    I enjoy your site (although it threatens to take me off my pre-wedding diet), and look forward to more of your posts! Reply

    • Natasha
      May 11, 2011

      Hi Rozmin, thanks for the tip with soy sauce. I’ll try that next time! I know alot of my recipes aren’t “diet food” 😉 but it’s still better than eating out. Reply

      • michael
        September 16, 2011

        Grew up with soy sauce being the only dip. I’m so use to it, I’m always surprised to hear what else is good. Reply

        • Natasha
          September 18, 2011

          You’re not the first person to mention soy sauce. I should really try that! Reply

  • Marina
    May 11, 2011

    I was planning on making pelmeni this week, thanks for the dough recipe, ill try yours this time! Is there a special reason you saute onions besides preventing pelmeni burps? I always add raw onions but I started noticing that when pelmeni have been frozen for a while and when you cook them, they smell like onions pretty badly and don’t taste as good. I was planning on making pelmeni without them this time but now I’m wondering, does sauteing onions prevent pelmeni from smelling and tasting weird? Reply

    • Natasha
      May 11, 2011

      They don’t seem to have that strong onion smell when you sauté the onion. They tasted fine being cooked after they were frozen. Let me know what you think 🙂 Reply

  • heather
    May 10, 2011

    Is the dough yoou made soft? When you cooked the pelemni was the dough really soft? Reply

    • Natasha
      May 10, 2011

      It wasn’t super soft but yes it was soft after it cooked. I think it was just right 🙂 Reply

  • olga
    May 10, 2011

    Thanks darlin! Reply

  • Tanya
    May 10, 2011

    Would this dough be good for vareniki as well or is the first one better? Reply

    • Natasha
      May 10, 2011

      You can use this dough recipe for either one. I like this dough – I think it’s softer. Reply

      • Tanya
        May 10, 2011

        Ok thank you. 🙂 Also, would I be able to use this pelmeni filling for pirojki? Reply

        • Natasha
          May 10, 2011

          Try 1 lb each of turkey and ground beef. Sauté meet in olive oil. Add finely grated carrot and add 1/2 onion finely diced. Cook till all meat is fully cooked and veggies are tender. Add dill to taste near the end. Sorry it’s not a full recipe but I will put one up eventually. Reply

          • Tanya
            May 10, 2011

            Ok thanks a lot 🙂

          • Natasha
            May 10, 2011

            Don’t forget to season your mix 🙂

  • Mila
    May 10, 2011

    Can’t wait to try this! My husband has been begging for them 🙂 You are awesome!!! Reply

  • olga
    May 10, 2011

    Do you think you can substitude milk instead buttermilk? Reply

    • Natasha
      May 10, 2011

      Try milk and 2 tbsp sour cream to make it more elastic. Reply

      • Joe in N Calif
        May 11, 2011

        Or you can clabber the milk with some vinegar (I prefer using cider vinegar over white vinegar).

        I learned to make these from Russians who came to the US through Harbin. When we made large batches at church we used won ton wrappers. I can still hear, said over and over, “No, Joseph, you fold them like THIS!” until Shura, Magda, and Zoya decided I was hopeless at it and put me to making more filling. Knife, onion, meat, pan, fire….I’m good. Reply

  • olga
    May 10, 2011

    can you post beef plov:) Reply

  • May 10, 2011

    I’d love to try to make these someday. I feel like it’s the type of thing I need to have helpers around for. (I’ve always wanted to make ravioli too but that hasn’t happened either). Good to know there is a mold you can buy. I don’t really want more kitchen equipment, but I imagine it makes things much easier? Reply

  • olga
    May 10, 2011

    Did you ever use canadian flour instead of regular all purpose? The dough is incredibly soft its amazing! Reply

    • Natasha
      May 10, 2011

      Thank you for the tip Olga – I know my mom likes to use Canadian flour for some things – I’ll look into that. Reply

  • Margo
    May 10, 2011

    Perhaps it would be good to mention that the pelmenis go into the water still frozen- don’t defrost first =-) Reply

  • Margo
    May 10, 2011

    Mmmm! Our favorite! I use the bread machine to make the dough. Reply

    • Natasha
      May 10, 2011

      I’ll have to try that – do you let it go through the full dough cycle? Reply

      • margo
        April 4, 2013

        Never answered this: No, just the first half of the dough cycle- I get the dough going, and then let it stay in the breadmaker until the filling and the mold is ready, usually about 1/2 hour, sometimes a couple of hours if I get distracted 🙂 Reply

  • May 10, 2011

    Diaper shape?? haha, how’d you come up with that one?

    These were my favorite food as a kid. Not so much anymore because of the tasty pelmeni burps. Reply

    • Natasha
      May 10, 2011

      Julia – try sautéing the onions first. Much less potent pelmeni burps. It’s primarily due to raw onion going into the meat mix. Reply

      • Yana
        May 26, 2011

        We love to eat pelmeni with satsibel’ (сацибелъ) oh and where can I find a mold for pelmeni??? Reply

Add comment/review

Leave a comment

As Featured On

Never Go "Hangry" Again!

Get weekly updates on new recipes, exclusive giveaways plus behind the scenes photos.