Get the Latest Recipes in your inbox:

Basic Russian Vareniki or Pelmeni Dough (Russian Pierogi)

This post may contain affiliate links. Read my disclosure policy.

I’m not gonna lie to you. Basic Russian Vareniki or Pelmeni DoughThese vareniki are a lot of trouble, but they are soo soo good. We grew up on these. Who didn’t?  The dough is very easy to make. Make a ton of them because they freeze very well.

You can modify the filling a hundred different ways. Butter them up and serve them with a generous heap of sour cream. Don’t forget to coat them with “zazharka;” fried up bacon and onions. Uhh, I am drooling now!

If you want to make your man happy, make him some Vareniki (вареники). P.S. If you are new to making these, check out this new recipe with more exact measurements. 

Ingredients for Dough:

1 large egg
2 Tbsp sour cream
3/4 cup water + 1 1/4 cup 2% milk (or 1 cup water + 1 cup whole milk)
5 cups all-purpose flour, plus about 1 cup more for dusting

For the Filling:

(I will post these individually)
Potato & onion
Blueberry
Cherry
Ground pork and turkey

Toppings:

For Potatoe filled vareniki:
Zazharka: Saute bacon and onion in butter and drizzle over your finished vareniki/pierogies.

For Meat filled pelmeni:
Melted butter. Also good dipped in vinegar or ketchup.

For fruit filling:
Dust finished product with some sugar to keep from sticking and dip in sour cream.

How to Make Basic Pierogi dough:

Basic Russian Vareniki or Pelmeni DoughBasic Russian Vareniki or Pelmeni Dough

1. Whisk together egg and sour cream until well combined.

2. Whisk in 1 1/4 cup milk and 3/4 cup water.

3. Using a spatula, mix in four, 1 cup at a time.

Basic Russian Vareniki or Pelmeni Dough

4. Place the dough onto a floured surface. Using a food scraper, knead the dough by turning and folding it with the food scraper. Dust the dough with flour as you need it until it is soft and doesn’t stick to your hands (you’ll need around 1 cup more flour). Knead for 6 to 8 minutes. Don’t add too much flour or the dough will become hard to work with.

5. Place the dough under a bowl and let it sit at room temperature for about 1 hour. Someone mentioned they made this recipe without letting it sit for an hour and it turned out great.

Basic Russian Vareniki or Pelmeni Dough

6. Cut the dough into 4 to 6 pieces. Work with one piece at a time and keep the rest covered with plastic wrap.

7. Form your chunk of dough into a log and cut off small pieces, one at a time. Pieces should be a little larger than a gum ball. Dust your rolling pin and cutting board with flour and roll out a piece of dough until it is 1/8″ thick and 3″ diameter. .

8. Fill these circles with the desired filling (potatoes, cherries, blueberries or meat). Fold the dough over the filling to form a crescent and seal the edges tightly with your fingers. If making pelmeni (meat filling), pinch the two edges together to form a “diaper” shape. Place the finished pierogis on a cutting board dusted with flour until ready to boil.

Basic Russian Vareniki or Pelmeni Dough

9. Bring a large pot of salted water to boil. As you finish the first batch of pierogies, place them in boiling water. After they float to the top, cook about 2 to 3 minutes more, then remove them with a slotted spoon to a bowl. Drizzle the pierogies with melted butter.

10. Repeat steps 7 through 9 with the rest of the dough.

Notes:

To freeze the pierogies, place them on a cutting board and stick them in the freezer uncovered. Once they are frozen, transfer them to a large freezer-safe ziplock bag and dust generously with flour. They stay perfect for months.

Basic Russian Vareniki or Pelmeni Dough (Russian Pierogi)

4 from 1 vote
Prep Time: 2 hours
Cook Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 2 hours 10 minutes
Author: Natasha of NatashasKitchen.com
Skill Level: Medium
Cost to Make: $4
Servings: 10 +

Ingredients

Ingredients for Dough:

  • 1 large egg
  • 2 Tbsp sour cream
  • 3/4 cup water + 1 1/4 cup 2% milk or use 1 cup water + 1 cup whole milk
  • 5 cups all-purpose flour plus about 1 cup more for dusting

For the Filling: (I will post these individually)

  • Potato & onion
  • Blueberry
  • Cherry
  • Ground pork and turkey

Toppings:

For Potatoe filled vareniki:

  • Zazharka: Saute bacon and onion in butter and drizzle over your finished vareniki/pierogies.

For Meat filled pelmeni:

  • Melted butter. Also good dipped in vinegar or ketchup.

For fruit filling:

  • Dust finished product with some sugar to keep from sticking and dip in sour cream.

Instructions

  1. Whisk together egg and sour cream until well combined.
  2. /4 cup 2% milk and 3/4 cup water.
  3. Using a spatula, mix in four, 1 cup at a time.
  4. Place the dough onto a floured surface. Using a food scarper, knead the dough by turning and folding it with the food scraper. Dust the dough with flour as you need it until it is soft and doesn't stick to your hands (you'll need around 1 cup more flour). Knead for 6 to 8 minutes. Don't add too much flour or the dough will become hard to work with.
  5. Place the dough under a bowl and let it sit at room temperature for about 1 hour.
  6. Cut the dough into 4 to 6 pieces. Work with one piece at a time and keep the rest covered with plastic wrap.
  7. Form your chunk of dough into a log and cut off small pieces, one at a time. Pieces should be a little larger than a gumball. Dust your rolling pin and cutting board with flour and roll out a piece of dough until it is 1/8" thick and 3" diameter.
  8. Fill these circles with the desired filling (potatoes, cherries, blueberries or meat). Fold the dough over the filling to form a crescent and seal the edges tightly with your fingers. If making pelmeni (meat filling), pinch the two edges together to form a "diaper" shape. Place the finished pierogis on a cutting board dusted with flour until ready to boil.
  9. Bring a large pot of salted water to boil. As you finish the first batch of pierogies, place them in boiling water. After they float to the top, cook about 2 to 3 minutes more, then remove them with a slotted spoon to a bowl. Drizzle the pierogies with melted butter.
  10. Repeat steps 7 through 9 with the rest of the dough.

Recipe Notes

To freeze the pierogies, place them on a cutting board and stick them in the freezer uncovered. Once they are frozen, transfer them to a large freezer-safe ziploc bag and dust generously with flour. They stay perfect for months.

Final Final Picmonkey Hashtag banner

natashaskitchen

Welcome to my kitchen! I am Natasha, the blogger behind Natasha's Kitchen (since 2009). My husband and I run this blog together and share only our best, family approved recipes with YOU. Thanks for stopping by! We are so happy you're here.

Read more posts by Natasha

Get the Latest Recipes in your inbox:

Read comments/reviewsAdd comment/review

  • Lyudmila Kizer
    April 11, 2019

    Do not call it Russian, This is UKRAINIAN food, and you know it! Reply

    • Nina
      April 20, 2019

      Varenyky are definitely Ukrainian, but Pelmeni are Russian. This dough crosses borders. I am Ukrainian and I do understand the frustration of the Russification of Ukraine that has taken place for decades. Most Ukrainians don’t even know how to speak Ukrainian. It is those of us in the diaspora who have maintained the language. I do appreciate Natasha’s blog, and she has a blend of both cultures in her. Reply

  • Olga
    April 4, 2019

    Easy peasy, I made a big batch of vareniky using this recipe, they turned out perfect. We grew up eating these, and my kiddos now seem to enjoy vareniki as much as we do. Love it! Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      April 4, 2019

      That’s so great Olga! I’m so happy your entire family enjoyed that! Reply

  • Inna Ramos
    December 29, 2017

    Natasha, thanks for sharing your wonderful and tasty recipe with us. They are really great! A question for you,have you had to freeze the dough? If so,how does it come out?
    Thanks.
    Inna Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 30, 2017

      Hi Inna, it isn’t recommended to freeze the dough before making the vareniki – it becomes firm and more difficult to work with. I usually mold the vareniki completely, dust with flour, place them in a single layer on a baking sheet and freeze. Once they are frozen, you can transfer them to a ziploc bag and keep them in the freezer until ready to boil (no need to thaw). Reply

      • Inna
        December 30, 2017

        Thank you,Natasha! I also remember you commented you freeze golubtsi. Can you tell me more in details how you do it?
        Thanks! Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          December 30, 2017

          I put them into freezer safe Ziploc bags in a single layer with as much juice as you can get in there and freeze. Thaw in the refrigerator then sauté on the skillet to heat them up. Reply

  • Lidiya
    November 14, 2017

    You should try this dough recipe, it’s super simple and the dough doesn’t dry out nor is it super sticky.

    Whisk 1 egg with a pinch of salt
    Then add 3 cups flour and 1 tbsp veg oil.
    Mix until nice and combined then add 1 cup of boiling water. (Don’t worry.. it’ll come together nicely) mix with a spoon then knead it together with your hands, adding flour as needed, until you get beautiful soft dough.

    This is my go to dough for vareniki or pelmeni. 🙂 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 14, 2017

      Thank you so much for sharing!! I will have to try that 🙂 Reply

  • Luba
    September 30, 2017

    Hi Natasha, I was wondering if this recipe would work if I used bread machine to mix dough..would it work? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 30, 2017

      Hi Luba, I haven’t tried this particular dough in a bread maker so I can’t really make that recommendation. This one doesn’t require a lengthy kneading so I’m not sure if the over kneading would toughen or soften this dough. I just haven’t tried it. Sorry, I can’t be more helpful! If you test it out, let me know how it goes 🙂 Reply

  • Lydia
    May 29, 2017

    Can I make the dough a day prior or will it dry out in the fridge? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 29, 2017

      Hi Lydia, the dough is the easiest to work with – soft, pliable and easy to roll out when it is fresh. I would recommend using it after it is made. Reply

  • Ksusha. A
    March 11, 2017

    Hi. I make pelmeni with simple ingredients: flour, egg, water & salt. I like my pelmeni but i wanted to try something new. Have you done pelmeni with simple dough? What is the difference? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 11, 2017

      I think the extra add-ins make it a little softer and tastier 🙂 Reply

  • Danielle
    December 13, 2016

    Thanks for posting this! Do you have a recipe for the classic Ukrainian filling of cabbage/onion? Is it just that simple… cabbage and onion fried up? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 13, 2016

      Hi Danielle, the only cabbage filling that I have is the one in my piroshki, but you could probably simplify it to use just cabbage and onion. Reply

  • Amber
    November 14, 2016

    Is all purpose whole wheat flour okay to use? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 14, 2016

      Hi Amber, this recipe isn’t intended to be used with whole wheat flour – I think they would be tough in consistency with whole wheat. Reply

  • Tanya
    July 19, 2016

    Hi Natasha, this dough recipe is great! I just made about 300 pelmeni! Thank you! I have a question for you: have you ever tried to freeze the pierogi with blueberries (or any other fruit)? I want to make fruit pierogi but not sure if I can freeze them for later use. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 20, 2016

      Wow that’s alot of pelmeni!! Can I have some? lol. You can freeze fruit filled pirogies the same way but fresh fruit is best (i.e. use fresh blueberries rather than frozen). Enjoy! Reply

  • John
    February 10, 2016

    Yes, it would be cheating, but….has anyone thought to purchase the round dumpling dough from an oriental market? I’ve used them for years for turning out 100’s at a time. Also, gave 5 stars for an excellent recipe, although I prefer some more fat (e.g. hamfat, baconfat, lard, etc) in the dough when I make it from scratch. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 10, 2016

      I’ve never tried that but it is a good time saving tip. Thank you for sharing! Reply

      • John
        February 10, 2016

        It is I who thank you 🙂 Most excellent fillings you have listed here!! Reply

  • Anna
    January 15, 2016

    I don’t know if it’s just me – but everytime I make this dough – I follow your recipe exactly – and I ALWAYS end up needing 7 cups of flour just for the dough… Are you using a special kind of flour? 🙂 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 15, 2016

      I am just using an all-purpose flour. Do you possibly use Canadian flour? I will re-measure it next time I make this to double check but I do use just regular American flour. Reply

      • luba
        January 19, 2016

        I use US flour, but it also 7cups. Reply

  • Patrice
    January 2, 2016

    These look so good!
    Do you freeze them before you boil them or after? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 2, 2016

      Freeze before boiling. Set them on a floured cutting board and freeze them then once they are frozen solid, you can transfer them to a large ziploc bag and keep them frozen. To cook them, put them into boiling water, adding them a few at a time so you don’t cool the water too quickly. Reply

  • Galina
    October 22, 2015

    Is there really no salt in this dough recipe? And is there a special reason for that? 🙂

    I made this recipe alongside another recipe that didn’t have the sour-cream, milk or eggs….this one was noticeably more tender and delicious! Thank you! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 22, 2015

      You know this is the first dough recipe that I ever posted and I have since started to add a little bit of salt to my dough. It wouldn’t hurt to add a little. It’s not really necessary if you salt the water and the sour cream adds some nice flavor, but you can add it if you want to. Reply

  • Cricket
    September 29, 2015

    We have always used dry curd cottage cheese. It is difficult to find dry curd in Utah. We rinse the cottage cheese and put it in a strainer for a day or so to remove extra liquid. I have never topped them with onion and bacon, but think the next time we make it we will. My family came from Georgia to Canada with the Doukhobors in 1898. The Doukhobors for the most part were vegatarians, nor did they raise pigs so maybe thay is why I am unfamiliar with the bacon addition. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 29, 2015

      Thanks for sharing your version Cricket and give onion/bacon a try, you won’t be disappointed :D. Reply

    • Bill
      February 20, 2017

      My maternal family, also were Doukabours and we used primarily dry cottage cheese although potatoe and cheese was also popular around the house when I was a child at the farm. Borsht and verinike were always available in the house whenever we
      were hungry. If we weren’t fussy about
      the main course at suppertime we could always have borsht and verinike
      provided we gave appropriate notice before the main meal was started.
      Regards Bill Reply

  • olga
    September 29, 2015

    I love your recipes but your website has gotten slower and slower with all of these advertisements. it takes forever to load sometimes 🙁 sometimes it just freezes Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 29, 2015

      We recently switched to a different ad provider and have seen an improvement. Thanks for letting me know you are having issues with it. Are you usually looking on Mobile or Desktop? Also, what browser are you using? Is there a certain spot on the site that freezes? Thank you for your help – I really appreciate your feedback! Reply

  • Sulamita
    September 25, 2015

    When you said 1¼ cup 2% milk (or 1 cup water, 1 cup whole milk)” did you mean replacing with 1 cup water and 1 cup whole milk or did you mean either one 1 cup water or 1 cup milk? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 25, 2015

      Oh goodness I can totally see how that is confusing. Sorry about that. I clarified the recipe. So you can replace 1 1/4 cup 2% milk and 3/4 cup water with 1 cup whole milk and 1 cup water. Thanks for asking!! 🙂 Reply

  • Janessa
    July 2, 2015

    Could i use an electric for the dough? Or is it best to you a whisk? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 2, 2015

      Electric mixer is not necessary in this recipe. I have another dough recipe that does utilize an electric stand mixer because that one needs to be kneaded. Reply

  • Angie
    December 23, 2014

    Could you use frozen fruit (Blueberries, strawberries) defrosted ahead of time as a filling?
    Would you just add the fruit whole and add sugar? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 23, 2014

      Yes, just add the sugar first and the fruit afterwards. Strawberry would be fine if they are sliced or smaller. Hope this helps :). Reply

      • Angie
        December 24, 2014

        I appreciate the fast response! You are awesome! 😉 Reply

  • Daria
    November 18, 2014

    Thanks for the great recipe! I live at about 1050m (3500 ft) above sea level and am wondering how to adjust this recipe to get my dough to work? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 18, 2014

      I haven’t don’t a whole lot of research on adjusting for various altitudes, but I don’t think there will be a difference in this particular recipe because the vareniki are boiled rather than baked. As far as I know, you usually make adjustments when you bake. Reply

  • Jack
    August 9, 2014

    Thank you for the wonderful site. My russian friend’s Mom made pierogi’s at Christmas time and I was lucky enough too be at the right place at the right time and got my first taste of these wonderful treats. She had several fillings that were all wonderful, but my favorite one was pork and sauerkraut. Have you every heard of this or know its name. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 10, 2014

      I’ve heard of vareniki with sauerkraut and that does sound really good! Were the once you are talking about baked, deep fried or boiled? Reply

  • Inna
    May 6, 2014

    I was wondering if there is a way to make this dough using stand mixer? Reply

  • Krista
    March 1, 2014

    Very nice post. I just stumbled upon your blog and wished to say that I’ve really enjoyed browsing your blog posts.
    In any case I will be subscribing to your rss feed and I hope
    you write again soon! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 1, 2014

      Welcome to the site Krista :). Reply

  • Julie
    November 12, 2013

    Natasha I just want to say that I made the blueberry vareniki for the first time and they came out perfect! My husband loved them and they will definitely be made again soon. Thank you for your wonderful instructions 🙂 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 12, 2013

      Oh goodness blueberry vareniki sound so good!! Man, when am I not hungry? lol I’m so glad you enjoyed them 🙂 Reply

  • olga
    September 12, 2013

    Hi i was wondering if you can use this dough recipe with Amish cheese/ homemade cheese for filling. Love all of your recipes!
    Thanks! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 12, 2013

      You can but you probably want to sweeten it up a little 🙂 is it the tvorog/ farmers cheese? Reply

  • Val
    September 5, 2013

    Can gluten free flour be used for this recipe? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 5, 2013

      I haven’t tried it with gluten-free flour so I’m not sure if the measurements should be different or if the dough would still be soft with gluten-free. Reply

  • Inna B.
    May 24, 2013

    Hi Natasha! I tried this dough recipe for vareniki yeasterday and I loved it. the only thing I would change about it I would add 1 tsp of salt and 1 tbsp of olive oil. Thanks for all the great recipes! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 24, 2013

      I’ll have to try your modification. Thanks Inna! 🙂 Reply

  • anna
    May 9, 2013

    ok thanx:) its just how my mom usually made them and i love it that way:) Reply

  • anna
    May 9, 2013

    i have a question can i make these na paru?? not boil them??? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 10, 2013

      I haven’t tried it, but I think that would be a different recipe. Let me know if you try it. Reply

  • George
    March 6, 2013

    Noticed your mention of “pierogie” in the context of pelmeni and varenniki. Pelmeni and varenniki are nowhere close to “pierogie” – unless you are speaking Polish and referencing Polish cuisine. In Russia/Russian the word “pierogie” is a plural form and actually applies to large rectangular sheet pies (singular – “pierog”) made using pastry or yeast dough with meat, cabbage, or other fillings. They are cut into pieces and eaten with utensils. Smaller sized “pieroshki” made using similar doughs can be baked or fried in oil – similar fillings. These are hand sized and eaten with your fingers. Smaller sized “pieroshki” are usually served accompanying soup. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 6, 2013

      Pierogi is American name for varenniki. They also called that way in Polish cuisine. American reader won’t search for vareniki, but for pierogi, so that’s why I have multiple names. Reply

  • Raisa Galloway
    February 2, 2013

    Hi Natasha, my mother was from Belarus and I remember she made the Cherry Knedliky with yeast in the dough. Have you ever heard of them made with yeast? Reply

  • Paul Corsa
    November 10, 2012

    The moment I saw there was Sour Cream in your dough I knew it was authentic, and not another Polish Pierogi Dough Recipe. Reply

  • sabina
    July 7, 2012

    Dear Natasha,

    Thank you so much for posting these great recipes. I’m going to try and make the Cherry Varenekies first. I was born in Russia and my babushka used to make the cherry ones and the strawberry ones as well. Well know I now live in NJ and married to an American man. But he’s willing to try almost any kind of food. Do you think it will be okay if I used the dark pittied cherries that come in a can, it’s hard to find the other kind.

    Sabina

    P.S. I’m dying to show this web site to my mom, she’ll get a big kick out of it. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 7, 2012

      Thank you Sabina! Yes the canned cherries will work great, just drain well and add more sugar if they are very sour. Hope you love them! Reply

  • Tim
    June 17, 2012

    I happened upon your website by chance. I’m from Winnipeg, Canada, which has a large Ukrainian (and probably Russian too :~> ) population. I now live in Dallas and miss many of the tasty foods that my friends who are Ukrainian made for any of the holidays when we had dinner parties.

    I’ve only started to browse your website, but so far I am very impressed!! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      June 17, 2012

      Thank you! I’m so glad you like the site! I hope our family favorites will become yours. Reply

  • Kristy
    May 8, 2012

    Thank you!! sounds good! I’ll try it out 🙂 Reply

  • Kristy
    May 8, 2012

    I was also wondering.. I had some dough left over for how long do u think can I refrigerate it for? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 8, 2012

      Cover it well with plastic wrap and it should be just fine at least a week. Try Rolling it into a log and cutting off 1/3 inch pieces and boiling till they rise to the top; excellent and easy dumplings. Just butter ’em up! Reply

  • Kristy
    May 8, 2012

    Well I tried this one today and it turned out perfect 🙂 thanks 🙂 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 8, 2012

      Awesome! So glad to hear that 🙂 Reply

  • Kristy
    May 8, 2012

    Does the recipe say if u use one cup of water to use one cup of milk with it? Or its either the milk or water which ever one u want to put in? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 8, 2012

      Yeah; that was a little confusing. Sorry. It’s either:
      3/4 cups water and 1 1/4 cups 2% milk
      OR
      1 cup water and 1 cup whole milk
      I have another recipe posted with more exact flour ingredients that I’ve been using; it does require a mixer though;  Reply

  • Luba
    April 23, 2012

    That is so nice of you to share the Russian recepies with other people, my hubby loves pel’meni, but we do the filling with chicken, you should try it, i”m sure you’ll like it, but thanx for the dough, i’m gonna try it with the soure cream like you do, sometimes this week. God Bless you Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 23, 2012

      Luba, thank you!! God bless you too! What do you mix in with the chicken? Any sauteed onion or just salt and pepper? Reply

  • Tamara
    April 4, 2012

    Hey, do you cook and then freeze them or freeze them before cooking? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 4, 2012

      Freeze them before cooking 🙂 Reply

  • Lyuda
    March 1, 2012

    The amount of flour used is just a general guideline…It depends on your altitude of where you live and how far above or below sea level you are…I found that out from my mama in law…I tried her recipie, it was easy, but it didn’t work, I had to add about two more cups of flour…she lives in a different country… Reply

  • lily
    February 22, 2012

    Hi
    these look great! i am ready to make them finally..

    do u think using a hand mixer will be fine? I will definitely need to invest in a stand mixer soon.. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 23, 2012

      You really don’t need a mixer for this recipe at all. The only thing I’m not crazy about with this recipe is that it doesn’t have “exact” flour measurements. I’ll have to re-do it one of these days. The recipe that I like best is this new dough recipe and you do need a stand mixer for that one. Reply

  • Morgan
    January 26, 2012

    Thank you for sharing your dough recipe! I have tried a few others and they never work out. Always too tough and doesn’t roll thin enough. This one is perfect. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 26, 2012

      Awesome! Thanks for your comment. I know pelmeni are tough to make as it is, which makes it extra painful when it doesn’t work out. Glad you liked the recipe. I have another recipe for dough that has more exact measurements of flour, but I am glad you liked this one 🙂 Reply

  • julia
    January 2, 2012

    wow, so just made pierogies and they turned out AMAZING! I usually eat them after boiling, but my american husband wanted them fried. So I fried them after they cooked. the dough fried reminds me of blini. great great recipe! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 2, 2012

      That’s wonderful! I’m so glad you liked ’em 🙂 Reply

  • julia
    January 2, 2012

    I am so glad I found your site! Currently waiting on the dough to rest before making pierogies. I have had such a hard time finding true russian recipes, spasibo for creating this site! Where I live there are no russian groceries stores or anything so being able to have good russian recipes makes me feel back at home Reply

  • ukie
    July 24, 2011

    you do not need and egg if the flour is of the 00 type
    Eggs are used in baking to reduce the amount of ash and gluten Reply

  • June 27, 2011

    By the way, is it a traditional Ukrainian way to make the potato filling with hard cheese like mozarella? In Poland we have pierogis called “ruskie” (Russian style) but we use white (kind of like cottage) cheese instead of hard cheese. I am wondering if it’s our modification or maybe it’s also practiced by dear neighbors, too. Reply

    • Natasha
      June 27, 2011

      I freeze them when they are raw and when I’m ready to eat them, i just put them in salted boiling water Reply

    • Natasha
      June 27, 2011

      The cottage cheese type of filling is more traditional. We just like them this way 🙂 Reply

  • June 27, 2011

    Wow, this freezing tip will save me from trouble in future,. I recently made my first pierogis ever, I cooked them and just chucked them in the freezer in the box and a smaller portion in a smaller box. Then after several days I put the frozen small portion in hot water and most of them lost al the filling to the boiling maelstrom. I guess my only hope with the big portion is let it unfreeze and just saute them on a frying pan with the zazharka. But next time I will know better. Do you freeze them when they’re raw or after cooking? Reply

  • Tanya
    May 6, 2011

    Oh no worries. Take your time. I’m gonna make it with this dough recipe since I have all these ingredients on hand. I’m sure it will be just as good 🙂 And seriously, since I stumbled on your blog, I’ve been literally checking it like every day! Everything just looks so amazing! I wanna make everything! Reply

  • Tanya
    May 6, 2011

    Is it possible to make pelmeni without using pork, or will it make the meat too dry? Reply

    • Natasha
      May 6, 2011

      Pelmeni are made traditionally with beef. I make them with pork and turkey and I know people who just use ground chicken and it turns out good. Hope that helps. Reply

      • Tanya
        May 6, 2011

        What if I was to mix chicken with turkey or either of these two with beef? Or would that turn out weird tasting? Reply

        • Natasha
          May 6, 2011

          I don’t think I would try mixing beef with poultry – I haven’t tried it myself but that just doesn’t seem like the best combo. Ps my other recipe uses buttermilk ameboid nice and elastic too. Reply

          • Tanya
            May 6, 2011

            Do you have that other recipe on this site?

          • Natasha
            May 6, 2011

            I’m drafting it up. I’m hoping to post it tonight. If you need it sooner I can email it.

          • Marina
            May 8, 2013

            I usually mix beef and turkey to make pelmeni filling, kotleti, meatballs, etc. We don’t like pork so this mixture works for us very well.

  • Tanya
    May 6, 2011

    Will the blueberry and cherry filling leak through with this dough? Reply

    • Natasha
      May 6, 2011

      I used it for cherry before and it didn’t leak. but I’ll be posting a new, more exact recipe for dough soon. Reply

      • Tanya
        May 6, 2011

        Sweet! Thank you 🙂 All this time I’ve been using a dough recipe that was so plain but this one seems like it would have a better taste to it. And is it true that the sour cream is put in there to give the dough more elasticity? Reply

  • March 27, 2011

    Thank you so much for the dough recipe! We used it for our Russia food tour when we were making Pelmeni!! Reply

    • Natasha
      March 27, 2011

      You’re welcome! That’s very cool! I’m really looking forward to checking out your website as well! Reply

  • Liza
    December 6, 2010

    I received a new pelmeni mold that I had ordered in the mail today, so I decided to try out your recipe for dough. The one I usually use is a tiny bit different – but I am really glad I tried yours – they turned out amazing! 🙂 Reply

  • Marina
    December 1, 2010

    Hi Natasha!
    For me when kneading the dough, I needed at least 2 more cups of flour. This made it still soft and a lot less sticky. I also used full fat yougurt instead of sour cream since I ran out.
    Overall, everyone really liked them after I cooked them, but next time I will try to roll the dough a little bit thinner..o well, practice makes progress 🙂 I served them with turkey stock, and fried mushrooms and onions as well.
    Have you ever used the pel’meni tool? I am thinking of buying it on ebay or something. It took a lot of time rolling out the dough and making circles with a glass! But this recipe I will be using for sure next time too, thanks! Reply

    • Natasha
      December 1, 2010

      Hi Marina, thank you for letting me know. The next recipe will have exact flour measurements. I’m glad you enjoyed them. Yes, I do use the pelmeni mold when I make them. I think it’s much easier. We bought ours on ebay. They aren’t very pricey as far as I remember and it was shipped from Ukraine 🙂 Reply

  • Marina
    December 1, 2010

    Hi Natasha!
    I am Russian and my husband is Ukranian, but we both grew up on pel’meni! You are right, when I was in Siberia mom would make lots of those and will freeze it outside in the winter!
    We are now in Canada, and before have been buying expensive pel’meni from the Polish store, but now I have more time to cook since kids are in school so I will make this recipe.
    This will be my second attempt, I made one a couple of months ago from a recipe from allrecipes.ru, but it did not turn out right (but we ate it anyways:).

    I just made the dough and am letting it rest for an hour, I will let you know how it goes! Reply

    • Natasha
      December 1, 2010

      I hope they are the way you remember them. I am working on another recipe that uses buttermilk and I will put exact measurements for flour since not everyone knows just how the dough should feel when it’s done. I’ll try to get that posted soon. Reply

  • liya
    November 8, 2010

    You know how some ppl make dough in bread makers. Well you think i should follow ur steps or just purt everything in one time and let it do its thing? What do u think? Ever tried that? Reply

    • Natasha
      November 8, 2010

      I wouldn’t recommend the vareniki dough in a bread maker. If you knead it too much it will become tough, it really doesn’t take long to knead this dough. I do it by hand with a food scraper. I do use the bread maker to make the dough for pirojki and it works well for that, especially since pirojki dough needs to rise in a warm place. Reply

  • Ben
    November 4, 2010

    Maybe I missed it, but did you post the recipe for the pelmeni filling? I can’t wait to try it out but I don’t know how to do the filling. Reply

    • Natasha
      November 4, 2010

      Hi Ben, I haven’t posted it yet, but I do have a very good recipe, here’s the general idea: 1/2 lb pork & 1/2 lb turkey, 1 small onion (minced) & 1 garlic clove (crushed), 1/2 tspn salt and 1/4 tspn pepper, a couple dashes of tobasco sauce (or any hot sauce). Saute onion in a couple tbsp oil for a few minutes till soft, add garlic and saute another minute. Mix everything together and there you have it! Reply

      • Ben
        November 4, 2010

        Thanks! Reply

  • Brittney
    September 26, 2010

    I just wanted to say thank you! I’m an American married to a Ukrainian man, Zahar, and I try so hard to make foods that are from his home. I spent the last summer with him and his family & tried my best to communiate with his mother to get recipes…but it didn’t work out the best with the language barrier…so I found your site and I’ve been so happy to be able to bring some foods from home to table for him! He thanks you too! 🙂 Keep it coming! Reply

    • Natasha
      September 26, 2010

      You’re both very welcome! Reply

    • brenda
      May 26, 2013

      OMG- I know how you feel Brittney. Im American married to Oleg-Russian/Ukranian (moms Russian-dads ukranian). When we got together over 12years ago, it wasn’t too popular to mix cutures. But his mom, though she doesnt speak English, was nearly the only one that liked me.
      But, I so understand the language barrier. My mother in law constantly speaks to me in Ruskiy, I’m not sure if she knows I don’t understand much of what shes saying, or if she is just speaking outloud. Whatever the case may be, I feel blessed to have a mother in law that doesnt judge me for being different. She even let me move in with her and her younger child (and she was even a recent widow)when I learned I was pregnant 12 years ago. This is when I discovered my love for Russian food. She would cook me delicious plates of various Russian food several times daily. I can imagine that her decision to take me in as her American daughter, wasnt too popular, but I truly am grateful that she went with her heart.:-) Reply

      • Natasha
        natashaskitchen
        May 26, 2013

        What a great story. Thanks for sharing that here 🙂 Reply

  • August 8, 2010

    Hey, I love your website.

    Props for making these from scratch. I eat so many pelemeni that I could never make enough myself. Reply

    • Natasha
      August 8, 2010

      THanks for stopping by. Glad you enjoy the site. Do you buy pelmeni premade? I admit I have before too 🙂 Reply

  • A11a
    July 26, 2010

    Can you make some extra for me and slavel? Reply

Add comment/review

Leave a comment

As Featured On

Get the Latest Recipes in your inbox:

Never Go "Hangry" Again!

Get weekly updates on new recipes, exclusive giveaways plus behind the scenes photos.