Borscht Recipe with Meat

Finally, a borscht recipe with meat! I’m a borsch lover. To prove it, here’s my first borscht, my second borscht (an easier/quicker version of the first one), my superfood borscht and now this beef borscht for those of you who love a good piece of tender meat in your spoon :).

Borscht is originally Ukrainian but it is made by most Slavic people and is a very common food in Russia. If you didn’t make it to the Olympics in Sochi this year, you’ll still get a taste of Russia when you try this borscht. It will also help you to loosen up those tense shoulders as you watch the Olympics (it makes me so anxious to watch! You?). By the way, Borscht, Borsch, Borshch… potatoes, patawtos). πŸ˜‰

Ingredients for Borscht with Meat:

(This list looks lengthy but the ingredients are simple)Β 
1 lb Beef: sirloin, stew meat, or whatever kind of beef you like, really (bone-in or boneless *see note)
14 cups cold water
1 Tbsp salt + more to taste
2 large or 3 medium beets, washed, peeled and grated
4 Tbsp olive oil
1 Tbsp vinegar
1 Tbsp sugar
2 Tbsp tomato sauce, or paste (or 3 Tbsp ketchup)
1 Tbsp butter
1 medium onion, finely diced
2 carrots, grated
2 large or 3 medium potatoes, peeled and sliced into bite-sized pieces
1/2 head of small cabbage, sliced
2 tomatoes, peeled and diced (**see note)
2 bay leaves
1/4 tsp freshly ground pepper
1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley + more for garnish
2 cloves garlic, pressed

Garnish: Sour cream and fresh sprigs of parsley or dill.

Meat Borsch

How To Make Borscht with Meat:

1. Wash meat in cold water, cut into 1″ pieces and and place in a large soup pot with 14 cups cold water and 1 Tbsp salt. Bring it to a boil and remove the foam crud as soon as it boils (if you wait, it will be hard to get rid of the crud as it integrates into the broth and you’d have to strain it).

Lower the heat, partially cover and cook at a low boil 45 minutes – 1 hr, periodically skimming off any crud that rises to the top. Sorry I forgot to take a picture of the crud. Maybe we’re better off??

2. Grate beets on the large grater holes (the food processor works amazingly well). Place them in a large heavy-bottom skillet with 4 Tbsp olive oil and 1 Tbsp vinegar and saute for 5 minutes, then reduce heat to med/low and add 1 Tbsp sugar and 2 Tbsp tomato sauce Mix thoroughly and saute until starting to soften, stirring occasionally (about 10 min). Remove from pan and set aside.

3. In the same skillet (no need to wash it), Saute onion in 1 Tbsp butter for 2 min. Add grated carrot and sautee another 5 min or until softened, adding more oil if it seems too dry.

4. Once the meat has been cooking at least 45 min, place sliced potatoes intoΒ the soup pot andΒ cook 10 min, then add cabbage, sauteed beets, onion & carrot, and chopped tomatoes. Cook another 10 minutes or until potatoes can be easily pierced with a fork.

5. Add 2 bay leaves, 1/4 tsp pepper, and more salt to taste (I added another 1/2 tsp salt).

Meat Borsch-12

6. Chop parsley and pressed garlic then stir them into the soup pot, immediately cover and remove from heat. Let the pot rest covered for 20 minutes for the flavors to meld.

Meat Borsch-13

Serve hot with fresh sprigs of parsley or dill and a dollop of sour cream if desired. Sometimes I do, sometimes I don’t. πŸ™‚

A must try this Ukrainian borscht recipe with beef for those of you who love a good piece of tender meat in your spoon. Serve with dollop of sour cream.

NOTES:

*P.S. Pork can be used also. And if your meat has a bone in it, place it in the water whole. After it boils for 45 min to 1 hour, remove it from soup, cut away and discard the bone and cut meat into 1″ pieces).
**To peel whole tomatoes, blanch them in boiling hot water for 30-45 seconds, then transfer to cold water and the skin should peel right off.Β 

Borscht Recipe with Meat

4.92 from 91 votes
Prep Time: 30 minutes
Cook Time: 1 hour 30 minutes
Total Time: 2 hours
Borscht is originally Ukrainian but it is made by most Slavic people and is a very common food in Russia. P.S. The list of ingredients looks lengthy but they are simple. Serve hot with fresh sprigs of parsley or dill and a dollop of sour cream if desired.
Author: Natasha of NatashasKitchen.com
Skill Level: Medium
Cost to Make: $9-$12
Servings: 8 -10

Ingredients

  • 1 lb Beef: sirloin stew meat, or whatever kind of beef you like, really (bone-in or boneless *see note)
  • 14 cups cold water
  • 1 Tbsp salt + more to taste
  • 2 large or 3 medium beets washed, peeled and grated
  • 4 Tbsp olive oil
  • 1 Tbsp vinegar
  • 1 Tbsp sugar
  • 2 Tbsp tomato sauce or paste (or 3 Tbsp ketchup)
  • 1 Tbsp butter
  • 1 medium onion finely diced
  • 2 carrots grated
  • 2 large or 3 medium potatoes peeled and sliced into bite-sized pieces
  • 1/2 head of small cabbage sliced
  • 2 to matoes peeled and diced (**see note)
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1/4 tsp freshly ground pepper
  • 1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley + more for garnish
  • 2 cloves garlic pressed
  • Garnish: Sour cream and fresh sprigs of parsley or dill.

Instructions

  1. Wash meat in cold water, cut into 1" pieces and and place in a large soup pot with 14 cups cold water and 1 Tbsp salt. Bring it to a boil and remove the foam crud as soon as it boils (if you wait, it will be hard to get rid of the crud as it integrates into the broth and you'd have to strain it later). Reduce heat, partially cover and simmer 45 minutes - 1 hr, periodically skimming off any crud that rises to the top.
  2. Grate beets on the large grater holes (a food processor works amazingly well). Place them in a large heavy-bottom skillet with 4 Tbsp olive oil and 1 Tbsp vinegar and saute for 5 minutes, then reduce heat to med/low and add 1 Tbsp sugar and 2 Tbsp tomato sauce Mix thoroughly and saute until starting to soften, stirring occasionally (about 10 min). Remove from pan and set aside.
  3. In the same skillet (no need to wash it), Saute onion in 1 Tbsp butter for 2 min. Add grated carrot and sautee another 5 min or until softened, adding more oil if it seems too dry.
  4. Once the meat has been cooking at least 45 min, place sliced potatoes into
  5. the soup pot and cook 10 min, then add cabbage, sauteed beets, onion & carrot, and chopped tomatoes. Cook another 10 minutes or until potatoes can be easily pierced with a fork.
  6. Add 2 bay leaves, 1/4 tsp pepper, and more salt to taste (I added another 1/2 tsp salt).
  7. Chop parsley and pressed garlic then stir them into the soup pot, immediately cover and remove from heat. Let the pot rest covered for 20 minutes for the flavors to meld.

Recipe Notes

*Pork can be used also. And if your meat has a bone in it, place it in the water whole. After it boils for 45 min to 1 hour, remove it from soup, cut away and discard the bone and cut meat into 1" pieces).
**To peel whole tomatoes, blanch them in boiling hot water for 30-45 seconds, then transfer to cold water and the skin should peel right off.

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natashaskitchen

Welcome to my kitchen! I am Natasha, the blogger behind Natasha's Kitchen (since 2009). My husband and I run this blog together and share only our best, family approved recipes with YOU. Thanks for stopping by! We are so happy you're here.

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  • Basil
    November 27, 2018

    I usually make a different type of borscht that my father taught me to make. This one is very different and very delicious! I had to add a little more salt and garlic but wow the flavors were amazing! Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      November 27, 2018

      Thank you for that wonderful review!!! πŸ™‚ Reply

  • Kelly Deis
    November 20, 2018

    This was a great recipe and sautΓ©ing the vegetables ahead of time heightens their sweetness. Will definitely make again. Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      November 20, 2018

      That’s so great! vI’m so happy you enjoyed that. Thank you for sharing that with us! Reply

  • Russell
    November 18, 2018

    Having been to Ukraine and Russia numerous times in the last few years I have become addicted to all types of traditional foods. Borsch, however, holds a very close place in my heart. This soup recipe is amazing, almost as good as the first bowl I had of my girlfriends family soup in Kiev. I like to use homemade chicken stock, beef ribs, and I replace a cup or two of the water/stock with beet kvass which in my opinion is the secret ingredient that made my girlfriends fanily soup the best. Thanks for sharing this amazing recipe! Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      November 18, 2018

      Thank you for sharing this with us Russell!! Reply

  • Simona
    November 1, 2018

    I’ve only been going by this borscht recipe and it never disappoints! I did end up adding vegetable broth this time in the end to β€œthin it out” (since I had it loaded with veggie goodness) and it gave more flavor πŸ™‚πŸ‘ŒπŸ» Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      November 1, 2018

      I’m so glad you enjoyed it! Thank you for the wonderful review! Reply

  • Emily
    October 20, 2018

    This was delicious!! I’m a beet novice – I really want to love them, but I come from a family of beet-haters lol. This recipe was the perfect introduction – I was shocked at how much flavor it had, given that the ingredients are so simple. (A little secret… this was even better than the borscht my Russian host-mother made for me when I studied abroad!) So happy I can make authentic Russian recipes at home, thanks to your amazing blog!! Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      October 20, 2018

      I’m so happy you found this recipe, Emily! Thank you for this amazing review! Reply

  • Mary Gebhart
    October 15, 2018

    What a great meal on a cool fall evening! My Russian students taught me to make borscht a long time ago. They would be impressed! My husband was, for sure! Thank you! Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      October 16, 2018

      That’s so great! I’m so happy you found this recipe! Reply

  • Zhanna
    September 29, 2018

    How would you convert this recipe into an Instant Pot recipe? Please help….. Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      September 29, 2018

      Hi Zhanna! That is a great question! Honestly, I have only made this on a stove top so I can’t really recommend a method of using the Instant pot for this. If you experiment I would love to know how you like it! Reply

  • Nicole
    September 24, 2018

    Hi Natasha, I would love to try this recipe using my Instant Pot / pressure cooker, is this possible? Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      September 24, 2018

      Hi Nicole! That is a great question! Honestly, I have only made this on a stove top so I can’t really recommend a method of using the Instant pot for this. If you experiment I would love to know how you like it! Reply

  • Riepko
    September 23, 2018

    This recipe of borsch tasted lovely. The first time I tasted borsch was last year when I visited Russia. Actually I tried two different types of borsch, but none of them with meat.

    Next time I will try to prepare your recipe of borsch again, but then using pork instead of sirloin meat. Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      September 23, 2018

      I look forward to hearing how you like our version! Reply

  • Polinovna
    September 17, 2018

    Your recipe make me to remember my student life at Russian Friendship dormitory in Moscow-Russia. My roommate Anuchko Tania cook borscht very delicious. Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      September 18, 2018

      Borscht is a classic! I’m so happy you found our recipe! Thank you! Reply

  • Elizabeth Eastman
    August 28, 2018

    This is a family favourite! I started making this soup years ago, and recently we moved to a very Russian area and some people said that there was no way I had eaten “authentic” Borscht before. When I made this soup for them they were so shocked that a non-Russian could make Borscht so well. πŸ™‚ One person said it tasted just like their Grandma’s… πŸ™‚ Thanks for this recipe and for the so many others that really are “tried” and turn out, giving satisfaction to me as the cook and to the many guest who enjoy them around our table. It is nice to read a recipe and know that it will really work! Reply

    • Natasha
      August 28, 2018

      That is music to my ears! Thank you so much for sharing your story and amazing review! I’m so glad you all loved the borscht recipe! Reply

  • Reggy
    June 18, 2018

    Just made borscht for the first time with this recipe. It tasted really good, everyone who ate from it had 2 servings! πŸ™‚ Thanks!

    It also took me exactly 2 hours to make πŸ™‚ Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      June 18, 2018

      I’m so glad you enjoyed it! Reply

  • Susan Goebel
    May 6, 2018

    We had this for dinner tonight. Alot of work, but well worth the effort. In the past, when I made borscht, it came out bitter and I had to dump in alot of sour cream to cover it. But, this recipe didn’t come out bitter – I liked it! I will make it again! Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      May 7, 2018

      Hello Susan, I’m glad you enjoy the recipe! Thanks for sharing your excellent review with other readers! Reply

  • Thierry
    April 26, 2018

    I love your culinary technical term “crud” for the solids and suds that boil up with the beef! Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      April 26, 2018

      LOL, thanks! πŸ™‚ Reply

  • Annika
    April 18, 2018

    Hi Natasha,

    How could I tweak this to make a slow-cooker version? I tried but was not so successful lol.

    Thank you! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 18, 2018

      I honestly haven’t tried to make this in a slow cooker so I won’t be able to offer any advice. Maybe someone else has tried and can offer some input? Thanks in advance! πŸ™‚  Reply

  • Tim
    March 22, 2018

    Hi Natasha! My wife, Olena and I got married a little over a year ago, after she moved to the U.S. from Odessa. She has missed Ukrainian/Russian food very much! But thanks to your recipes I can still give her a taste of her homeland! This recipe for Borscht has been her favorite (like her mom used to make it). Do you have a recipe for Solyanka? Thanks!

    – Tim Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 23, 2018

      Hi Tim, I don’t have a recipe for solyanka yet but if I come up with something great, I will be sure to share it πŸ™‚ Reply

  • Olga
    March 9, 2018

    I only make borsh by your recipie now. So delicious! Thank you!!! Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      March 10, 2018

      I’m glad you enjoy the recipe so much Olga! Thanks for sharing! Reply

  • Amber
    March 9, 2018

    This is a family favorite! I’ve made this recipe for the past few years and it never lasts long in the house! It tastes even better a few days later. The broth is my favorite. Thank you for sharing such a great recipe. Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      March 9, 2018

      My pleasure Amber! I’m glad to hear how much your family enjoys the recipe. Thanks for sharing your wonderful review! Reply

  • Helena
    March 9, 2018

    Hi Natasha,
    Love your recipe and, as you said, there are a lot of variations.
    I come from Poland and Barszcz is a staple diet. But I use sauerkraut instead of cabbage and, at the end of cooking, pour in zur or the brine from dill pickled cucumbers. Gives it a great tangy flavour. If you don’t have dill, just dry-fry then crush some caraway seeds and then put in towards end of cooking. Also finely dice some dill pickled cucumbers and add just before serving. A slightly different take. Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      March 9, 2018

      Hello Helena! I’m glad you enjoy the recipe. Thanks for sharing your review and great suggestions with other readers! Reply

  • JoyceK
    February 27, 2018

    5-stars all the way!! This is so delicious!! One of the very best recipes I have ever found! No modifications needed! So nutritious too!! I use thick cut pork chops in mine. I make this borscht frequently. My house is always on the cooler side, and I leave the left-overs on the stove to cool overnight. The next day, I heat the soup again, eat and repeat! As long as one brings it to a boil, each day, it will not require refrigeration. If you keep your house on the warmer side, this method may not be for you, but I have very limited space in my refrigerator, and the leftovers the first day require a very big storage container. Thanks, Natasha! Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      February 28, 2018

      You’re welcome Joyce! I’m happy to hear how much you enjoy the recipe. Thanks for sharing your excellent review! Reply

  • DJ Surge
    January 29, 2018

    Great recipe. I have made this at least 10 times. Always comes out great. Reply

  • Violetta
    January 21, 2018

    Hello Natasha!
    I made borcht last night and finished towards the evening. it was too hot to refrigerate and I asked my husband to put it into the fridge later, and I fell asleep. Well he forgot! And we woke up in the morning with it on the stove all cooled down.. I reboiled it and put it in the fridge after… Do you think it’s still ok to eat? Thank you!! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 22, 2018

      Hi Violetta, We do that all the time if we make a hot pot of soup in the evening, we let it cool on the stove and then refrigerate the next morning. It’s best if you can put it in a cold garage, but we have left it on the stove and it was still fine. I would personally refrigerate it in the morning and carry on πŸ™‚ Reply

      • Violetta
        January 22, 2018

        Ahh thank you so much, that makes me feel better πŸ™‚ ! Reply

        • Natasha's Kitchen
          January 22, 2018

          No problem! πŸ™‚ Reply

  • Bridget
    January 14, 2018

    Hi Natasha! A friend turned me onto your page. Just in time! I’m planning to host a fancy dinner party for some friends will be visiting in March. And my theme this time will be green cuisine. I plan to make borscht and I found your wonderful recipe here, but wondered if it can be made ahead and refrigerated. Thanks for letting me know Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 15, 2018

      Hi Bridget, absolutely! It refrigerates really well and will taste just as good if not even better for a few days when reheated. πŸ™‚ Reply

  • Natalia
    January 8, 2018

    This tasted just like the one my Mom makes! Thank you thank you!! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 8, 2018

      Hi Natalia, I’m so happy to hear that!! πŸ™‚ Reply

  • Erika
    January 8, 2018

    I think the skeleton of this recipe is ok, but I’d recommend using about half the liquid (it comes out tasting very watered down) and using a 50/50 water/beef broth ratio instead of plain water. Also I cannot understand why there are no seasonings other than salt and pepper. Traditional Russian/eastern European recipes are enriched by the hefty use of caraway seed and dill (fresh or freeze-dried). I’d recommend using 3-4 teaspoons of both. Incorporate the caraway seed by adding it to the onion as you sautee. You can add the dill in the step when all the veggies go into the pot. Finally, a delicious add-on is to use the fresh greens of the beets, chopped and sauteed with the carrots. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 8, 2018

      Hi Erika, thank you for sharing your modifications – we love dill in our soups but haven’t tried caraway! Reply

  • Kristie
    January 6, 2018

    Awesome recipe!!! I made it with Golden Beets and it was delish. Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      January 6, 2018

      I’m glad you love it Kristie! Thanks for sharing your great review! Reply

  • Jessica
    December 20, 2017

    Thank you so much for the recipe! My fiancΓ©e’s mom is Ukrainian. Unfortunately she died when he was young, leaving him without much knowledge of the preparation of Ukrainian food. He always talks about how much he loved borscht growing up. We decided to make this today and it was delicious! This was my first time trying borscht and I loved it. He said it tastes almost identical to his mom’s. He was very happy with the recipe and your website. We will defiantly be making this and many more recipe of yours. Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      December 21, 2017

      Hello Jessica! I’m happy to hear how much you both enjoy the recipe. I hope it brings your fiancΓ©es some comfort. Thanks for sharing your great review! Reply

  • Gretchen O'Neill
    December 3, 2017

    Absolutely wonderful! My husband served a mission in Yekaterinburg, Russia, and had this all the time! I wanted to make something special for him, and we loved it! Thanks for sharing! ❀️ Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      December 4, 2017

      My pleasure Gretchen! I’m happy to hear how much you both enjoy the recipe! Thanks for sharing your wonderful review! Reply

  • Rena
    November 19, 2017

    Natasha, this was beyond delicious! I am Russian and this is my first time making it and it’s better than my moms πŸ™ˆ The only things I did differently was pan fry the meat a little with a drizzle of olive oil and added the juice of half a lemon. I will make this again and again πŸ™‚ Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      November 20, 2017

      Awesome, I’m glad to hear how much you enjoy the recipe Rena! Thanks for sharing your excellent review! Reply

  • Natasha
    November 7, 2017

    This borscht is amazing! I am Russian, I’ve been cooking this type of soup forever. Your recipe is more labor intensive, but it’s worth the time! It elevates borscht to the next level, and now I have to cook it your way πŸ™‚ I made it multiple times. The kids also LOVE “the red soup”. Thank you! Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      November 7, 2017

      You’re welcome Natasha! I’m so glad to hear how much your and your family loves the recipe! Thanks for sharing your excellent review! Reply

  • Sasha
    October 30, 2017

    This is my third time making this recipe and I have to say it just gets better every time!! Absolutely love it. My bf asked me to make borscht the β€œUkrainian” way and he was so pleased when he tried it! Thanks so much!! Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      October 30, 2017

      You’re welcome! I’m glad to hear you both enjoy the recipe so much! Thanks for sharing your excellent review Sasha! πŸ™‚ Reply

  • Brian
    October 27, 2017

    Natasha, There is a Russian market in my neck of the woods. I have inquired with them about a good borsh recipe. They sent me to this site. I have always had an interest in ethnic food and with so many Russian/Ukrainian goods in that store it should be easy to experiment. Looking forward to this, B Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      October 27, 2017

      I’m glad you found my site! Please let me know what you think of the recipe Brian! Reply

  • Dalia Varghese
    October 17, 2017

    Dear Natasha,
    The borscht was fantastic!!God bless you and your family!!
    Dalia Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      October 17, 2017

      Hello Dalia! I’m glad you love the recipe! Thanks for sharing your excellent review! πŸ™‚ Reply

  • September 16, 2017

    I’ve been making your Borscht for a few years now and we really love it! Thank you for sharing your recipe.

    This does freeze well! I make big batches in fall with veggies from farmers market, freeze in quart sized bags and like magic – we have soup all winter. Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      September 17, 2017

      You’re welcome! I’m so glad to hear how much you love this recipe! Thanks for sharing your great review and tip with other readers! Reply

  • Jess
    August 30, 2017

    About 6 years a go, I went on holiday to Estonia and tried borscht (and fell in love) – I probably had it six more times whilst there.

    I’ve never had it since, and was craving beetroot – so made this.

    It is amazing, just as good as the ones I had in Estonia. I used a roasting joint I had in the freezer. Did the 2 hour cook and it turned out tender. Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      August 30, 2017

      Awesome! I’m so glad to hear that Jess! Thanks for sharing your excellent review! Reply

  • Amy
    August 29, 2017

    Delicious! First time making this great soup and it was a hit! The only thing I changed the second time around was adding a bit of beef bullion to the 14 cups of water for some extra flavor. Love every recipe so far and I can’t wait to try your other borscht recipes..x Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      August 29, 2017

      I’m glad to hear how much you enjoy the recipe Amy! Thanks for following and sharing your fantastic review! Reply

  • Alena N
    August 27, 2017

    Hey Natasha,
    When you make this recipe does your meat turn out tender and falls apart? No matter how I do it and have done it with my mown recipe whenever I make beef it’s always kind of tough and chewy? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 28, 2017

      Hi Alena, you may just need to cook your cut of meat longer to get it more tender. My mom likes to cook hers sometimes for 2 hours + or until the meat is at desired doneness. If you use a bone-in piece of beef, its even better and you can cook it for 3 hours and you’ll get a rich amazing flavored broth for even better results. I hope that helps! πŸ™‚ Reply

  • Claire
    August 24, 2017

    Hi, Natasha…this recipe looks wonderful but I am wondering why you recommend washing the meat. I have always been told there is no need to wash meat and in fact doing so removes the flavor. Just curious. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 24, 2017

      Hi Claire, I rinse it for borscht to remove some of the impurities, but you could just add it into the pot if you prefer since you are skimming off impurities at the top of the soup anyways. It would work either way. Reply

  • Sydney
    August 16, 2017

    Hi Natasha! I just wanted to thank you for this recipe and your website! I’m 21 and just beginning to cook, and I wanted to find recipes to reconnect with my roots. The borscht was delicious, and I am so excited to try out your other recipes πŸ™‚ Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      August 16, 2017

      Hello Sydney! I’m so glad you found my page! Thanks for following and sharing your great review! πŸ™‚ Reply

  • Amy
    August 7, 2017

    Hello Natasha! I adore your site. I followed your borscht recipe but my meat was so tough, not tender. Do you have any advice?
    Thank you!
    AMW Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 8, 2017

      Hi Amy, with beef, depending on the cut (very lean cuts will be tougher), it helps to cook it longer. Reply

  • Dan
    August 1, 2017

    So I started growing beets in my garden some time ago but I never knew what to do with them until I stumbled across the idea of borscht. The first few recipes I tried were not that great but your recipe is the keeper I will keep coming back to. This was a delight and is perfect for cold days! Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      August 1, 2017

      I’m so glad to hear that Dan! Thanks for sharing your fantastic review! Reply

  • Becca
    July 20, 2017

    Does this freeze well? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 20, 2017

      Hi Becca, I think this would freeze well. Reply

  • Richard Bensen
    June 26, 2017

    When I was growing up my Polish mother and my Russian born father made borscht but I remember this tasty item had polish sausage included….is that a possibility?. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      June 26, 2017

      Hi Richard, it’s interesting how so many families each make their borscht a different way but it’s always delicious :). I haven’t tried it with Polish sausage but my goodness that does sound good and now you are giving me all kind of delicious ideas!! Reply

  • ChloΓ©
    June 15, 2017

    I’ve been using your recipe for years and must say it is probably my favorite soup. And I grew up in a French household, so we had good food! I tend to use apple cider vinegar in the recipe, but wonder if its health benefits get lost during cooking? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      June 16, 2017

      Hi Chloe, I don’t have an answer for whether or not the health benefits change with cooking but I do think that is a good healthier substitution and great idea! Reply

  • Kathy
    April 26, 2017

    Delicious! It made my mother-in-law happy Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      April 27, 2017

      Awesome Kathy! I’m glad to hear that πŸ˜€ Reply

  • Vika
    April 22, 2017

    Scored big time with family tonight with this recipe. My daughter is the borscht expert lol and said that she only likes gramas borscht . So I had her do a taste test and she said wow this is better then gramas!!!!!! Score score score. Thank you dear natashinka for making me look really good tonight:) Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 22, 2017

      Vika, your comment is music to my ears πŸ˜¬πŸ‘πŸΌ. Great job and thank you for sharing such a nice review! Reply

  • Pavlo
    April 9, 2017

    This is a very good borscht recipe imo, I liked the addition of meat. I followed this recipe yesterday – but added a small amount of vegetable stock powder at the end instead of adding more salt. It gave the borscht a very nice final taste.

    I should have made pampushki to accompany this but for some reason ended up making the ‘lyenivi golubtsi’. Also a great success. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 9, 2017

      Pavlo, thank you for such a nice review on the recipes! Reading your comment is making me hungry πŸ˜‹ Reply

  • Renee
    April 1, 2017

    Can the barszcz with meat be made a day in advance and then re-heated? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 1, 2017

      Hi Renee, absolutely!! that would work great. This reheats really really well. It tastes just as good refrigerated and reheated the following day and for several days actually! Reply

      • Renee
        April 3, 2017

        It was delicious! I got several comments. Even a Ukrainian complimented it. I will use this again for sure. Thank you! Reply

        • Natasha's Kitchen
          April 3, 2017

          My pleasure! I’m happy to hear that Renee! Reply

  • Renee
    March 30, 2017

    Can this be made ahead and re-heated? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 30, 2017

      Yes, absolutely! It refrigerates for several days and reheats really well. Reply

  • Bonnie
    March 29, 2017

    Just a tip on the “crud”: The vietnamese make a bone broth and they par-boil the bones for about 10 minutes to get the scum to float off. They rinse the bones in a strainer, rinse the pot clean and add bones, fresh water and the rest of the recipe to the pot to finish. I’ve always had clear broth from this method. I think it should work for the lean meat, but maybe lower the time to about 5-7 minutes of a hard boil??? Won’t loose flavor??? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 29, 2017

      Hi Bonnie, thanks for sharing that! I used a fairly lean cut of beef in this recipe and it worked fine :). I cooked the lean steak for close to an hour and by then it was tender enough to be pulled apart easily. Reply

  • Silan
    February 27, 2017

    My teenage son ate six bowls of this in one sitting! I’ve never seen him enjoy a meal so much. Thank you Natasha for this wonderful recipe! Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      February 27, 2017

      You’re welcome! Your review put a big smile on my face! Thanks for sharing πŸ˜€ Reply

  • Kathy
    February 21, 2017

    Looks great! How would you suggest altering the recipe if I wanted to use small cubes of beets? Should I boil them then dice them up or put them in the water earlier? Thanks!! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 22, 2017

      Hi Kathy, I think that would work fine and you can keep the recipe the same except cook the beets a little longer initially in the pan (maybe 8-10 minutes instead of 5 minutes). It depends on how large you’re dicing the beets so check the beets for doneness before turning off the soup pot. Enjoy! Reply

      • Kathy
        February 23, 2017

        I did as you said and it came out great! Thanks so much!! Reply

        • Natasha's Kitchen
          February 24, 2017

          Perfect! I’m happy to hear that Kathy! Reply

  • February 17, 2017

    I followed the recipe to a T and its very watery and not very flavorful. What could possibly have gone wrong. So disappointed!!!! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 17, 2017

      Hi Carrie, I’m sorry to hear that. I’ve never had someone with that kind of result on this recipe. Did you go through the ingredients to make sure you didn’t miss anything? Did you make any substitutions? It’s really difficult to guess without being there but I’m always happy to help troubleshoot. Reply

      • Stefani L.
        July 18, 2017

        Hi Carrie I have made this before with the recipe to a T and have had the same results as you. I have noticed is that there was too much water to too little beets (the ones I purchased were small), but mainly I was grating my beets too small! If you make this recipe again, which I suggest, it’s great, is to try chopping the beets by hand or try using a mandolin. The best size for the beet pieces is the same size that come like in a can of beets (which also makes a great substitution for fresh beets). Reply

    • Jacob
      February 17, 2017

      In fairness, I made the recipe as directed the first time and it was wonderful. But for personal taste, I increase the meat by half, double the garlic and use three large (rather than three medium) beets. FWIW. Reply

  • Angela
    February 7, 2017

    Dear Natasha,
    so I literally never ever reviewed recipes or anything online. However, I made this borsh today… and my very picky 6year old and 2 year old both ate it!!! I’m so grateful that I found your site, and THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR ALL THAT YOU DO! Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      February 7, 2017

      You’re welcome Angela! Reviews like yours put a huge smile on my face!! πŸ™‚ Reply

  • Bob and Debbie
    January 29, 2017

    Just made your Borscht recipe. Awesome! We will definitely be making it again! Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      January 29, 2017

      I’m glad to hear that! Thank you so much for sharing!! Reply

  • Alla Pasman
    January 19, 2017

    This was absolutely delicious. My hatband says its better than his moms recipe, which is a great compliment. I did omit chopped tomatoes and simmered the veggies a little longer in the broth. Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      January 19, 2017

      What a great compliment! Thank you for sharing Alla πŸ™‚ Reply

  • Paul
    January 10, 2017

    Hi Natasha, Can you use Chicken or Turkey in Borsch? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 10, 2017

      Hi Paul, yes that would work fine. I think using bone in chicken thighs or drumsticks (preferably dark poultry meat), would infuse great flavor into the borscht with the long cooking time upfront. Reply

  • Byron Velichko
    January 6, 2017

    Can you use beef broth instead of water? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 6, 2017

      Hi Byron, that would be fine and even more flavorful just be aware of the salt content in your broth so you don’t over-salt the borscht πŸ™‚ Reply

      • Byron
        January 6, 2017

        Thank you very much for the info. I’m not sure which would taste best vegetable, beef or chicken stock Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          January 7, 2017

          I think any of them would taste great, but my preference would be chicken or beef. πŸ™‚ Reply

  • Giselle
    January 4, 2017

    This is delicious, I’m eating it right now! Thank you for sharing, the recipe was easy to follow. Better than the borscht I grew up on, and that was pretty good! Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      January 5, 2017

      I am so glad you enjoyed it Giselle!! Reply

  • Anna
    November 28, 2016

    Great recipe! Thank you. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 28, 2016

      You’re so welcome! πŸ™‚ Reply

  • Bruno
    November 8, 2016

    Great recipe,
    For the meat i used Irish stew meat.
    What kind of meat do you prefer yourself?

    Also thanks for the detailed recipe ^^ Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 8, 2016

      Hi Bruno, I like stew meat and sirloin for this recipe. Either one works great. πŸ™‚ You’re so welcome! Reply

  • October 23, 2016

    Amazing flavor! Thank you for such a nourishing recipe to use with our grass fed beef! We made a triple batch and purΓ©ed some to freeze for a different consistency & palatability next time. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 23, 2016

      Carrie, I’m so glad to hear that you liked the recipe 😁. Thank you for such a nice review! Reply

  • Kati
    October 22, 2016

    Hi Natasha! It was my first time making your borsh it was delicious!!! You are one talented lady! Thank you so much for sharing with us your recipies! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 22, 2016

      I’m so glad you enjoyed it! πŸ™‚ Reply

  • Diana
    October 17, 2016

    It was my first time making borscht and it turned out fantastic! Many thanks for the recipe. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 17, 2016

      Diana, thank you for such a wonderful review and you are welcome πŸ˜€. Reply

  • MiMi McD
    September 26, 2016

    Turned out fantastic! Followed the ingredient list (used 1/2 red wine vinegar and 1/2 dill pickle juice) and didn’t follow measurements very closely, but the method was great! Thanks! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 26, 2016

      You are welcome and thank you for the nice review 😁. Reply

  • Marina
    September 25, 2016

    Hi Natasha!
    I have a quick question for you. Would it be bad to cook the meat the night before and finish it the next day?
    Thanks:) Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 25, 2016

      Hi Marina, you could do that if you wanted to make it ahead in a way πŸ™‚ Reply

  • Barbara
    September 23, 2016

    Hi Natasha …… Borscht on the menu for dinner tomorrow and I want to make your recipe as above but I see there is no liquid called for as there is in your other borscht recipe …… Is this an error? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 23, 2016

      Hi Barbara, step 1 has 14 cups of water but I added it to the list of ingredients to clarify πŸ™‚ Reply

  • Jeanene Headlee
    September 12, 2016

    This recipe involved a few firsts for me: Handling, tasting, and cooking raw beets, using dill weed.
    I used a crock pot, placed the mostly frozen skirt steak in the bottom, and add each ingredient as soon as it was prepared. It cooked overnight and came out stunningly deep purple pink red, and delicious. It tasted nothing like the terrible canned beets of my childhood. I served it to a group of eight. The vegetable hater in the group ate every bite in her generous bowl. Only one guest had previously eaten borscht (multiple times at an ethnic restaurant here in town) and declared it delicious and ate two bowlfuls. By the way, it was 103Β°F outside at the time! I wish I could post my image of the bowls, ready-to-serve. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 12, 2016

      I wish you could post it too! It sounds so delicious!! If you’re on facebook, I’d love for you to share your picture on my facebook page. Also thank you so much for sharing that it works well in a slow cooker. I’ve been curious how well that works! πŸ™‚ Can you share how long you cooked it? On low I imagine since it was overnight? Thanks again!! Reply

  • Svetlana
    August 28, 2016

    Natasha, I made this last night and could not stop eating it! Soooo Good! The taste of this borsh reminds me when my father used to make it! He put so much love in to it! He always added beans, so I had a can of Bush’s original beans. I drained about half a cup and added to my borsh! Yum! My husband loved it! The best borsh I have made so far! Thank you for the recepie!
    Svetlana M. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 28, 2016

      I’m so happy you both loved it!! πŸ™‚ Thank you for sharing your wonderful review πŸ™‚ Reply

  • Natasha
    July 13, 2016

    My mom always made borsh without meat because it always turned out great and she says that her borsh doesn’t turn out as tasty with meat so she left it out. But I want to learn to make it with meat because my husband was used to borsh with meat lol. I have a question though, why do you put Bay leaf at the end when the borsh is cooked? Isn’t it supposed to cook to give the flavor? My mom always put it in the pot in the beginning of the cooking. I don’t know much about bay leaf so I wonder what the difference in taste would be. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 14, 2016

      Hi Natasha, I’ve done it both ways with the bay leaf and to be honest, I haven’t really noticed a difference with borscht because the additional flavor is pretty mild. Reply

  • B. Lucas
    May 27, 2016

    Perfect as written… thank you natasha! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 27, 2016

      Thank you! πŸ™‚ Reply

  • Nathaniel Goodchild
    May 25, 2016

    Hi Natasha, I love borscht but lost my recipe but have now found yours which looks great and I am going to make it for an evening of Russian ballet, Swan Lake to be precise. 3 B’s Borscht, Bread and Ballet:)
    I wanted to ask, what do you think of using red cabbage instead of the normal green. Also I am going to use a Kassler pork chop which I shall boil and then shred into the soup, using the stock from the Kassler chop for the soup as well.
    Please let me know what you think of this. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 25, 2016

      I think the pork chop sounds like a great idea! I’m not sure about the red cabbage – I haven’t tested it with red cabbage to see how it affects flavor but I have seen other recipes online that use it so I imagine it works. That sounds like a really fun evening! Reply

    • fritzie
      June 4, 2016

      Kassler pork chops are smoked. My German ancestors who lived in the Ukraine always used smoked meat–for them probably a matter of availability in late summer and fall when the other ingredients become available, for me a matter of nostalgia–a real Borcht as Mom and Oma made it, has a wonderful smokey flavor. I tend to use smoked turkey or chicken legs, but ham, sausage or any other smoke cured meat will do.

      On food blogs one often finds people looking for the borscht of their childhood. If you have a Baba or a Russian Grandma, chances are the recipe above is perfect. If you have an Oma, try the smoked meat. Doukhobors use no meat but lots of cream, and Mennonites often skip the beats, but never the cabbage. There have been bar fights over the right way to make an authentic borscht πŸ™‚ Reply

  • Elizabeth
    May 23, 2016

    I’ve made this before for my husband, who is from Siberia. He bragged about it to his entire family, who all wondered- how did an American girl learn to make borsch? When I told them where I had gotten this recipe from, they had already heard of you and loved you!

    I want to make it again, only I have some questions- any idea how many cans of canned beets it would take to make this (I just had a baby do my time is limited). Also, would browning the meat first add to the flavor? Why would you do that in, say, a stew but not this soup? Thank you, and I love your recipes so much!!! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 23, 2016

      Hi Elizabeth! That’s awesome that they’ve heard of my blog :). Although I think fresh does taste best (and if you have a food processor with a grater attachment, it becomes much easier to prep the beets) but if using canned, I would suggest 2 (15 oz each) cans of beets. I can totally understand time constraints with having a new baby. You know to be honest, I’ve never seen meat seared in an Eastern European soup. I’m not sure why – maybe it’s more of a Western trick, I have no idea and you have me stumped! πŸ™‚ Reply

  • Janet
    May 11, 2016

    Hi Natasha, I plan on trying your meat version of borsch for my book club’s dinner this Sunday…the book them is Russian, a book about Putin actually. So being a new and hug fan of yours, I sent the hostess a link to your website and she will be making the pork schnitzel with new creamy garlic potatoes. If I am not too tired from making borsch, I will attempt the apple cake or an easy dessert. (They know me for my baking too). What can you suggest other members make to go with the menu so far? We are truly also a huge foodie group and love to eat! p.s. I tried your original Olivye salad last weekend with left-over smoked ham and kielbasa and it was a huge hit! Thank you, Janet Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 11, 2016

      I’m so happy to hear you are enjoying my recipes! πŸ™‚ You’ll need a salad to go with it! Here are some classic options: radish cucumber, cucumber tomato, fresh cucumber, Russian beet salad. There are so many options in the salad categoryReply

      • Janet
        May 13, 2016

        Thanks for the options Natasha! I have passed this suggestion on to the group so we shall see what else we come up with. My beets are not the long types like in your pictures, but are more fat/round as in a tennis ball or onion shape. How many would you think I need for your recipe? I bought 5, just in case. Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          May 13, 2016

          Hi Janet, it depends on how large they are. You could use 4 to 5 medium beets. It really won’t harm the soup if you add an extra beet πŸ™‚ I hope you love it! Reply

          • Janet
            May 18, 2016

            Hi Natasha, Well, our Russian-Themed dinner on Sunday was a huge success! The borsch turned out fantastic and so tasty with the extra beets πŸ™‚ We made the pork schnitzels that day and the roasted potatoes with bacon were also great. Two other salads graced our table: the Carrot Apricot and Pecan, and the Creamy Cucumber. I also baked the Apple Sharlotka cake and everything was all so yummm! Topped it all off with some Beluga vodka martinis! Thanks again for your tips and your amazing website. I’m going to try the borsch with pork next, and use a bone in the broth, and try those Ponchki (donut holes)… Janet

          • Natasha
            natashaskitchen
            May 18, 2016

            Thank you so much for the excellent reviews! I’m so happy to hear you are enjoying the recipes! That sounds like quite a feast!

  • Yulia
    April 18, 2016

    That’s exactly the way my dad does it and he is the KING of Borsch :)) one of my favorite soups ever, it’s so flavorful and with the meat it’s just that much more hearty:) By the way! If you don’t have raw meat replacing it with chunks of salami is GREAT (just use beef broth in that case). It’s definitely worth the mess (by that I mean my purple hands from grating beets)
    Thanks for posting the recipe! I sometimes really feel like making borsch but dad’s not home and can’t get his instructions, but this is exactly it, so now I can just print it and enjoy:)
    Dyakuyu/Spasibo or Thank you (not sure if you speak THE NATIVE language) πŸ˜‰ Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 18, 2016

      You’re so welcome!! I definitely speak the native language although it is a little rusty ;). Thank you so much for sharing the salami tip. I absolutely love salami! Reply

  • Anastassiya
    April 14, 2016

    made this borsch following the recipe from the website and I think that so far this is the tastiest borsch I have ever done in my life.

    Thank you, dear Natasha! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 14, 2016

      Thank you for such a nice review Anastassiya, that is quiet a compliment 😊. Reply

  • April 1, 2016

    Natasha, you’re really great. I can’t even imagine how much work you put into your blog. Recipes, photos, texts – everything is really perfect! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 1, 2016

      You’re so nice Katia, thank you! πŸ™‚ Reply

  • billy
    March 24, 2016

    Natasha, this was the first but not the last time i have cooked borsch, thanks for the wonderful recipe , it was even better the next day. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 24, 2016

      You’re welcome Billy! It sounds like you have a new favorite πŸ˜€ Reply

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