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Borscht Recipe with Meat

A bowl of borscht with meat garnished with sour cream and dill in a blue bowl

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Finally, a borscht recipe with meat! I’m a borsch lover. To prove it, here’s my first borscht, my second borscht (an easier/quicker version of the first one), my superfood borscht and now this beef borscht for those of you who love a good piece of tender meat in your spoon :).

Borscht is originally Ukrainian but it is made by most Slavic people and is a very common food in Russia. If you didn’t make it to the Olympics in Sochi this year, you’ll still get a taste of Russia when you try this borscht. It will also help you to loosen up those tense shoulders as you watch the Olympics (it makes me so anxious to watch! You?). By the way, Borscht, Borsch, Borshch… potatoes, patawtos). 😉

Ingredients for Borscht with Meat:

(This list looks lengthy but the ingredients are simple) 
1 lb Beef: sirloin, stew meat, or whatever kind of beef you like, really (bone-in or boneless *see note)
14 cups cold water
1 Tbsp salt + more to taste
2 large or 3 medium beets, washed, peeled and grated
4 Tbsp olive oil
1 Tbsp vinegar
1 Tbsp sugar
2 Tbsp tomato sauce, or paste (or 3 Tbsp ketchup)
1 Tbsp butter
1 medium onion, finely diced
2 carrots, grated
2 large or 3 medium potatoes, peeled and sliced into bite-sized pieces
1/2 head of small cabbage, sliced
2 tomatoes, peeled and diced (**see note)
2 bay leaves
1/4 tsp freshly ground pepper
1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley + more for garnish
2 cloves garlic, pressed

Garnish: Sour cream and fresh sprigs of parsley or dill.

Meat Borsch

How To Make Borscht with Meat:

1. Wash meat in cold water, cut into 1″ pieces and and place in a large soup pot with 14 cups cold water and 1 Tbsp salt. Bring it to a boil and remove the foam as soon as it boils (if you wait, it will be hard to get rid of the foam as it integrates into the broth and you’d have to strain it).

Lower the heat, partially cover and cook at a low boil 45 minutes – 1 hr, periodically skimming off any foam that rises to the top. Sorry, I forgot to take a picture of the foam. Maybe we’re better off??

A small wooden bowl with salt

2. Grate beets on the large grater holes (the food processor works amazingly well). Place them in a large heavy-bottom skillet with 4 Tbsp olive oil and 1 Tbsp vinegar and saute for 5 minutes, then reduce heat to med/low and add 1 Tbsp sugar and 2 Tbsp tomato sauce Mix thoroughly and saute until starting to soften, stirring occasionally (about 10 min). Remove from pan and set aside.

Two photos of grated beet being seasoned for borscht

3. In the same skillet (no need to wash it), Saute onion in 1 Tbsp butter for 2 min. Add grated carrot and sautee another 5 min or until softened, adding more oil if it seems too dry.

Three photos of carrots and onions being sautéed

4. Once the meat has been cooking at least 45 min, place sliced potatoes into the soup pot and cook 10 min, then add cabbage, sauteed beets, onion & carrot, and chopped tomatoes. Cook another 10 minutes or until potatoes can be easily pierced with a fork.

Three photos one of diced potatoes, one of grated cabbage and one of a pot of borscht

5. Add 2 bay leaves, 1/4 tsp pepper, and more salt to taste (I added another 1/2 tsp salt).

Meat Borsch-12

6. Chop parsley and pressed garlic then stir them into the soup pot, immediately cover and remove from heat. Let the pot rest covered for 20 minutes for the flavors to meld.

Meat Borsch-13

Serve hot with fresh sprigs of parsley or dill and a dollop of sour cream if desired. Sometimes I do, sometimes I don’t. 🙂

A must try this Ukrainian borscht recipe with beef for those of you who love a good piece of tender meat in your spoon. Serve with dollop of sour cream.

NOTES:

*P.S. Pork can be used also. And if your meat has a bone in it, place it in the water whole. After it boils for 45 min to 1 hour, remove it from soup, cut away and discard the bone and cut meat into 1″ pieces).
**To peel whole tomatoes, blanch them in boiling hot water for 30-45 seconds, then transfer to cold water and the skin should peel right off. 

Borscht Recipe with Meat

4.95 from 168 votes
Prep Time: 30 minutes
Cook Time: 1 hour 30 minutes
Total Time: 2 hours
A bowl of borscht with meat garnished with sour cream and dill in a blue bowl
Borscht is originally Ukrainian but it is made by most Slavic people and is a very common food in Russia. P.S. The list of ingredients looks lengthy but they are simple. Serve hot with fresh sprigs of parsley or dill and a dollop of sour cream if desired.
Author: Natasha of NatashasKitchen.com
Skill Level: Medium
Cost to Make: $9-$12
Keyword: Borscht with Meat
Cuisine: Russian, Ukrainian
Course: Soup
Servings: 8 -10

Ingredients

  • 1 lb Beef: sirloin, stew meat, or whatever kind of beef you like, really (bone-in or boneless *see note)
  • 14 cups cold water
  • 1 Tbsp salt + more to taste
  • 2 large or 3 medium beets, washed, peeled and grated
  • 4 Tbsp olive oil
  • 1 Tbsp vinegar
  • 1 Tbsp sugar
  • 2 Tbsp tomato sauce, or paste (or 3 Tbsp ketchup)
  • 1 Tbsp unsalted butter
  • 1 medium onion, finely diced
  • 2 carrots, grated
  • 2 large or 3 medium potatoes, peeled and sliced into bite-sized pieces
  • 1/2 head of small cabbage, sliced
  • 2 tomatoes, peeled and diced (**see note)
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1/4 tsp freshly ground pepper
  • 1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley + more for garnish
  • 2 cloves garlic, pressed
  • Garnish: Sour cream and fresh sprigs of parsley or dill.

Instructions

  1. Wash meat in cold water, cut into 1" pieces and place in a large soup pot with 14 cups cold water and 1 Tbsp salt. Bring it to a boil and remove the foam as soon as it boils (if you wait, it will be hard to get rid of foam as it integrates into the broth and you'd have to strain it later). Reduce heat, partially cover and simmer 45 minutes - 1 hr, periodically skimming off any foam that rises to the top.

  2. Grate beets on the large grater holes (a food processor works amazingly well). Place them in a large heavy-bottom skillet with 4 Tbsp olive oil and 1 Tbsp vinegar and saute for 5 minutes, then reduce heat to med/low and add 1 Tbsp sugar and 2 Tbsp tomato sauce Mix thoroughly and saute until starting to soften, stirring occasionally (about 10 min). Remove from pan and set aside.
  3. In the same skillet (no need to wash it), Saute onion in 1 Tbsp butter for 2 min. Add grated carrot and sautee another 5 min or until softened, adding more oil if it seems too dry.
  4. Once the meat has been cooking at least 45 min, place sliced potatoes into
  5. the soup pot and cook 10 min, then add cabbage, sauteed beets, onion & carrot, and chopped tomatoes. Cook another 10 minutes or until potatoes can be easily pierced with a fork.
  6. Add 2 bay leaves, 1/4 tsp pepper, and more salt to taste (I added another 1/2 tsp salt).
  7. Chop parsley and pressed garlic then stir them into the soup pot, immediately cover and remove from heat. Let the pot rest covered for 20 minutes for the flavors to meld.

Recipe Notes

*Pork can be used also. And if your meat has a bone in it, place it in the water whole. After it boils for 45 min to 1 hour, remove it from soup, cut away and discard the bone and cut meat into 1" pieces).
**To peel whole tomatoes, blanch them in boiling hot water for 30-45 seconds, then transfer to cold water and the skin should peel right off.

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Natasha Kravchuk

Welcome to my kitchen! I am Natasha, the blogger behind Natasha's Kitchen (since 2009). My husband and I run this blog together and share only our best, family approved and tested recipes with YOU. Thanks for stopping by! We are so happy you're here.

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Read comments/reviewsAdd comment/review

  • Allison Chamberlain
    August 29, 2022

    I have made your Borscht soup so many times I have lost count. It is so so Delicious. I have also made your Chebureki and OMG THEY ARE SO SO YUMMY!!!!

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      August 29, 2022

      Happy to know that you enjoyed those recipes, Allison!

      Reply

  • Raegan
    May 1, 2022

    What can I use as substitutes for the vinegar, sugar, tomato sauce (or paste or ketchup), and tomatoes? I’m about to start an elimination/AIP/Paleo diet (I believe I have a nightshade sensitivity and possibly autoimmunity problem).

    I figured ACV for the vinegar, and possibly “notmato” as a substitute (at least for the paste, ketchup or tomato sauce part) found here. http://savorynature.com/2014/02/14/notmato-paste-nightshade-free/

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      May 2, 2022

      Hi Raegan, those might work. However, I have not personally tested those substitute ingredients yet to advise. If you do an experiment, please share with us how it goes.

      Reply

      • Andrew
        June 24, 2022

        Try fermenting the beets. It will add requisite acidity in place of tomatoes or paste/sauce. Sautéing beets with some ACV also works but fermenting is the original and the best way for this.

        Reply

        • Natashas Kitchen
          June 24, 2022

          Thank you so much for sharing that with us!

          Reply

  • Helen
    April 2, 2022

    Can canned beets be used in the borsch recipe? Both your vegetarian and meat borscht recipes sound delicious. I am looking forward to making them.

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      April 3, 2022

      Hi Helen, I imagine that should work. But if using canned, I would suggest 2 (15 oz each) cans of beets.

      Reply

  • Susan
    March 9, 2022

    My grandmother’s parents were from Odessa, Ukrain, but my grandmother and two of her younger siblings were born in Scotland as her parents fled from the pogroms and they eventually sailed to America in 1913. As a little girl I remember my grandmother making borscht. I remember her borscht had chunks of beets and potatoes, Lima beans, and meat. I don’t remember what else was in the soup. I have never seen a recipe for borscht that included Lima beans. Do you think I could add them to your recipe? Could I cube the beets instead of grating them? Also, what do you think about using canned diced tomatoes instead of fresh to make it easier?

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      March 10, 2022

      Hi Susan, you can add beans! Beans go great in soup! We prefer shredded beats but cubbed will work also! Canned diced tomatoes work great in this recipe! Thank you for sharing your family in Ukraine and Scotland – isn’t it so special to have ties to those countries? I’m glad this borscht brought those memories back for you, Susan! Many blessings!

      Reply

  • sarah wilson
    March 1, 2022

    I’m going to make this tomorrow! Thinking of you all in Ukraine xxx

    Reply

  • Geoff
    February 27, 2022

    This was my first time trying Borscht, let alone cooking it. I absolutely love the color and flavor of this dish. I had thought that the beetroot would overpower other flavors but, of course, this well-tuned recipe delivered a great balance. Can’t wait to make it again! God bless Ukraine.

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      February 27, 2022

      Hello Geoff, thank you for your good comments and feedback. I’m happy to know that you enjoyed this recipe, thank you for thinking of us.

      Reply

  • Jim
    February 21, 2022

    My Ukraine grandfather came to the US in 1910. I had Borsch with meat many times at his farmhouse, he made it when I visited because he and I were the only people that would eat it other than my mother and her sister. I don’t know why because I thought it was gourmet food. The only difference is he always added a tablespoon of bacon fat also.

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      February 21, 2022

      Thank you so much for sharing that with me, Jim! I love how much history comes with classic recipes.

      Reply

    • Lena
      August 9, 2022

      Can you speed up the process by cooking the meat in a pressure cooker before transferring to a pot and continue with recipe?

      Reply

      • NatashasKitchen.com
        August 9, 2022

        Hi Lena! I have not tested this to advise. If you experiment, please let us know how it turns out.

        Reply

      • Renata
        August 21, 2022

        Hi, Lena
        I have done exactly that- used pressure cooker to get the meat tender, then continued with the recipe. I have also replaced one tbsp of tomatoe paste with red pepper paste (home made) and it worked perfectly. Great recipe, easy to make!

        Reply

        • Natashas Kitchen
          August 21, 2022

          Thank you so much for sharing that with us, Renata!

          Reply

  • Arielle
    February 16, 2022

    I cook this recipe at about twice a month! I use my instant pot. Now that I’ve got it down I’m more loose with method and measurements but my goodness, it NEVER FAILS. This is a phenomenal recipe and soup. Thank you so much for sharing!! 🙏🙏

    Reply

    • NatashasKitchen.com
      February 16, 2022

      You are so very welcome! Thank you for sharing. I am happy you enjoy this recipe. It really is delicious.

      Reply

  • Myrtle
    February 9, 2022

    Hi! There are carrots in the picture but not in the recipe. Should it be made with or without carrots?

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      February 9, 2022

      Hi Myrtle it is actually in step 3.

      Reply

  • Cathy
    January 10, 2022

    Hello Natasha, as a very young girl I was taught how to make Borscht by a Russian woman who immigrated to the US somewhere between WW 1 and WW 2. Her name was Mary Miskow, if she were still alive she would be well over 100 years old. Your recipe is great and pretty much close to hers. I love your page and all your recipes. I have been cooking in the kitchen for close to 65 years and I continue to learn new food things.

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      January 10, 2022

      Aww, that’s the best! Thank you so much for sharing that with me. I’m all smiles

      Reply

  • Clair
    January 6, 2022

    I always use this recipe during the cold Kansas winters and my husband is never disappointed. It’s a great recipe for Americans who want to try something authentic.

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      January 6, 2022

      Hello Clair, totally agree. The recipe is perfect for that type of weather, I’m glad your husband enjoyed it!

      Reply

  • Christal
    January 6, 2022

    This was the perfect dish to eat on a snowy day with some warm sourdough bread. I had never tried borscht before but something about the snowfall compelled me to try this recipe. It was absolutely perfect and I will definitely be making this again.

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      January 6, 2022

      We love this on a snowy day! No better way to warm up!

      Reply

  • Lavinia Lipp
    December 26, 2021

    I make this all the time. I make it with meat. I have never used beans so will try that some time. I use potatoes, beets, carrots barley, tomato soup. onion, bay leaf, salt and pepper and vinegar. If i have celery I will use it but mostly make it without.

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      December 27, 2021

      Sounds good! I hope you’ll love all the recipes that you will try.

      Reply

  • Elizabeth Lyashevskiy
    December 8, 2021

    I just have to leave a comment. As an American who did NOT grow up eating this, it is a very special recipe to me for a different reason. I married into a Russian family, and started to learn to cook when I first got married. I greatly impressed my husband and his family by learning to make this dish. It meant so much to them that I learned to cook Slavic-style foods. So you really helped me by making recipes like these readily available and easy to follow. From the bottom of my heart I thank you. I always like to leave reviews as-is, and I have to say I made it 2 days ago exactly as written, and I give 5 stars with zero changes. Today, I noticed it’s disappearing quickly so I’m going to try and make it again with some time-saving adjustments. (I’m pregnant with our 3rd and it’s hard for me to stand and cook for hours). I’m going to peel/wash whole beets, potatoes, and cook them together at a simmer for 30+ minutes with the meat, then set aside. I hope this will help retain some more of the beets’ nutrients and save me just a little time. Also, I like to leave my soup pot out until it cools before I put it in my fridge, and in that time, the potatoes turned to mush from the residual heat alone. I hope cooking them to almost doneness and adding later at the end will help prevent this.

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      December 8, 2021

      Aww, that’s the best! Thank you so much for sharing that with me. I’m so glad you gave this recipe a try!

      Reply

  • Samaza
    December 4, 2021

    I loved your vegetarian borscht recipe so I can’t wait to give this one a try! I am on the AIP diet and can’t eat tomato or bell pepper. Do you think this would still be good without tomatoes or tomato paste?

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      December 4, 2021

      Hi Samaza, we love it with the tomatoes, it truly helps the flavor, but one of our readers mentioned that they “omitted chopped tomatoes and simmered the veggies a little longer in the broth.” I hope that helps.

      Reply

  • Jennifer S.
    November 17, 2021

    I just made this tonight and it is delicious! I was a little skeptical about adding the raw garlic at the end but followed your instructions and the soup was perfect. Once the 20 minutes was up after the garlic add and it was ready to try, there was no pungent garlic flavor. And I can’t believe how tender the beef got! The most tender beef I have ever had in a soup or stew (I used sirloin steak). Thank you for a delicious recipe!

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      November 18, 2021

      Hi Jennifer, thanks for your awesome comments and feedback. I’m happy to know that you loved this recipe!

      Reply

  • Nick S.
    October 17, 2021

    I love this recipe. The only other recipe I had was a vegetarian Borscht. I like adding sliced seared kielbasa to ours. Since there is only 2 of us, I end up freezing most of this. Instead of potatoes, I use barley. The barley holds up a little better after freezing for us. Now that the temperature is dropping here in North Dakota, I think it’s time to make a big batch of this awesome borscht! I love your recipes and videos 🙂

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      October 17, 2021

      Glad you loved this recipe, Nick! Thank you for sharing that with us.

      Reply

  • Harrygorilla
    October 12, 2021

    Delicious! Needs more meat though. I would double the meat. I also used mushroom broth seasoning…took out some of the tang.

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      October 12, 2021

      Thank you for your review and suggestion, glad you enjoyed the recipe!

      Reply

  • Mango
    October 2, 2021

    Thank you for your recipe. I can finally taste russian/ukranian food. Interesting thing is the sour cream (i use yogurt) balance the taste of beet real well. So sour cream is a must to make it 5 star *****
    I actually don’t like the soup but dunno.. i keep adding it to my bowl.. hahaha

    Reply

    • Natasha
      October 2, 2021

      I definitely love it with sour cream. Thank you for your review!

      Reply

  • Leon
    August 30, 2021

    Hi Natasha,

    I was wondering how would the cook time be adjusted if I used an instant pot. I’ve cooked this recipe before and I love it.

    Thanks,

    Leon

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      August 30, 2021

      Hi Leon, that is a great question! Honestly, I have only made this on a stovetop so I can’t really recommend a method of using the Instant pot for this. If you experiment I would love to know how you like it!

      Reply

    • Catherine
      December 3, 2021

      use the steps from a high rated instant pot recipe online using this one instead.

      Reply

  • Big Al
    August 24, 2021

    Great recipe. First time I’ve made borscht and it was fantastic. Shared it with our neighbours and they also loved it. Made a few minor changes to suit my personal taste, but will definitely make this again.

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      August 24, 2021

      Great to hear that you enjoyed the first time that you tried borscht! Glad you chose this recipe to try.

      Reply

  • Dave
    July 31, 2021

    My wife and I made this soup with pork and 6 cups of homemade chicken broth added after it became apparent we needed more liquid (We used more cabbage and beets than perhaps called for. I have a hard time with “medium” and other non specific measurement quantities. No criticism intended. Clearly experience is important in these matters.) The soup is beyond wonderful, both on the first day and later when thawed out and reheated. We make soups in bulk and freeze the leftovers. This is a huge addition to our mainstay recipes perhaps even eclipsing the bratwurst and kale. I’ll be back to try more of your creations. You have a gift! Thank you.

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      August 2, 2021

      Thank you so much for sharing that feedback with me, Dave. I’m so glad you enjoyed it!

      Reply

  • Bree
    July 27, 2021

    This Borscht has become a staple in our Russian/American home! Your wonderful recipes have become a part of our family 🙂 Thank you Natasha and team!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      July 27, 2021

      Aww, that’s the best! Thank you so much for sharing that with me, Bree.

      Reply

    • Irakli
      December 2, 2021

      It’s just perfect.
      I loved borscht as a child and now I’m so glad that I can make the best version of it myself.
      Need to save this recipe, for my children maybe.

      Reply

      • Natasha's Kitchen
        December 2, 2021

        I’m glad you loved this recipe! I hope you just found your new go-to recipe for Borscht.

        Reply

  • Zory
    May 8, 2021

    Hi Natasha. I love your classic borsch recipe. Is there a way I can just make the meat separately then add it so I can just cook the borsch using the classic recipe?

    Reply

    • Natasha
      May 10, 2021

      Hi Zory, if you cooked the meat separately, you would lose a lot of the flavor trying to add it to a different pot later. I would just start with cooking the meat and then add the other ingredients per the classic recipe.

      Reply

      • Jacob Comer
        May 10, 2021

        FWIW, I have this issue when I make this recipe for my Russian mother in law. She is sensitive to the fat in the beef broth, but doesn’t mind the meat in the borsch. I have found that if I make the meat separately, this particular recipe loses some of its richness; however, I gain a lot of it back if I substitute some vegetable cooking stock for a portion of the water.

        Reply

  • Rose
    March 22, 2021

    I’m Armenian and I grew up eating Borscht. It’s one of my all time favorite comfort soups. My mom never got a chance to show me how she’d make it and when I saw your recipe, it looked similar to hers so I decided to give it a try and it is sooo amazing! Brought back many memories from my childhood. Absolutely delicious!! Thank you for sharing!

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      March 22, 2021

      Perfect! I’m so happy that you were able to recreate your mom’s recipe, Rose. Good food indeed brings back good memories!

      Reply

  • Julia
    February 16, 2021

    I’ve made this many times ans it is delicious! I am wondering if you ever tried freezing it? Would it freeze well?

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      February 16, 2021

      I’m so glad you enjoyed that! Yes, borscht does freeze well. I hope you love it!

      Reply

  • JoyceK
    January 31, 2021

    Was getting ready to make this recipe for the 12th or 14th time since I found it; it is excellent!( I use a bone in pork chop) Would like to suggest you replace the work “crud” with “foam”in the recipe…a little less graphic word when cooking, and it implies something not good, when foam is just the liquid from the meat as it cooks. “Crud” is somewhat off-putting. lol. Thank you again for this excellent recipe!

    Reply

    • Natasha
      February 1, 2021

      Thank you for the tip. I have made that change.

      Reply

    • Dave
      July 28, 2021

      If I saw that “foam” on my beer I’d definitely wonder where all the crud came from.

      Reply

  • GG
    January 18, 2021

    Easy to make (after all that vegetable prep😅) and very tasty. Thanks for teaching me how to peel a tomato that trick is awesome!

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      January 19, 2021

      You are very welcome! I’m glad you’re learning a lot from my content.

      Reply

  • Patti
    January 17, 2021

    Hi: I made your borscht today!! Delicious!! My husband and I truly enjoyed it!!

    Quick question? Can I freeze some of the soup?? That would be great – but, we’ll just use up the rest!!

    Thanks for a great recipe!!

    Patti

    Reply

  • angela
    January 7, 2021

    I want to make this, but 14 cups of water sounds like it would make a ton of soup and pretty watery at that. Is there a reason why you don’t use cut up stew meat, brown it, and simmer with beef broth? That’s how other soup recipes I have made are done (like beef barley).

    Reply

    • Natasha
      January 8, 2021

      Hi Angela, you can use less water or even replace it with broth for a richer flavor. You need to cook the beef for a long time to tenderize it which is why we use this cooking method.

      Reply

    • JoyceK
      January 9, 2021

      Why don’t you start your own soup blog…so many good ideas.

      Reply

  • Debra
    January 5, 2021

    Trying to stay away from potatoes so I used turnip in its place and was excellent substitute
    Also added cooked hot Italian sausage for a bit of zip and dill instead of parsley .
    Will be a favorite Borsch for sure 😁

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      January 5, 2021

      Wonderful! Thanks for sharing the substitute ingredients that you used, so helpful, Debra!

      Reply

  • Inga
    January 3, 2021

    My go to borscht recipe. Comes out perfect every single time. I’m not sure how some readers come out with a flavorless or watery finale, this recipe always renders a hearty and quite flavorful end product if you follow the instructions. Sautéing the veggies is quite important, veggie proportion and of course adding cabbage is a must. Thank you for this recipe.

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      January 4, 2021

      You’re welcome! I’m so happy you enjoyed it, Inga!

      Reply

  • Natalia
    December 6, 2020

    Thank you. My family and I love this recipe. It was a big hit.

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      December 7, 2020

      Very nice, Natalia. Thanks for sharing your good comments and feedback with us!

      Reply

  • Brandy
    December 4, 2020

    Can this be made in an instant pot? If so, any changes you’d make or recommendations? Love all your recipes!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      December 4, 2020

      Hi Brandy, That is a great question! Honestly, I have only made this on a stovetop so I can’t really recommend a method of using the Instant pot for this. If you experiment I would love to know how you like it!

      Reply

  • Bethany B
    December 2, 2020

    I saved this recipe a while ago hoping to try it. Do you think canned beets would work?

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      December 2, 2020

      Hi Bethany, I imagine that should work. But if using canned, I would suggest 2 (15 oz each) cans of beets.

      Reply

      • Bethany B
        December 3, 2020

        Thanks, Natasha! I used one and it wasn’t enough. I’ll know for next time.

        Reply

  • Cindy
    November 9, 2020

    This was an excellent recipe! Thank you for sharing. It’s hard to find good authentic recipes. This is a winner.

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      November 9, 2020

      Hi Cindy! I’m so glad you enjoyed that! That’s so great!

      Reply

  • Russell
    October 23, 2020

    Thanks so much for this recipe, I have been making it since I last visited Kiev and it is outstanding. Only change is I also chop an equal amount of fresh dill to parsley (it needs dill!) The cabbage I use 50/50 fresh cabbage to sourkraut. Instead of water I always use a good homemade chicken stock that has simmered for 24 hours and I use 12 cups and then add 2 cups of beet kvass. I also prefer beef ribs on the bone. This has now become by perfect borscht! Thanks for sharing!

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      October 25, 2020

      Awesome! You are most welcome and it’s my pleasure, Russell. I’m so glad you enjoyed this recipe!

      Reply

  • Beth
    October 7, 2020

    We chopped the carrots and beets Since that’s how we prefer it, and used red cabbage as my grandmother did.
    Also mixed some horseradish into the sour cream.
    It was delicious ! Thanks.

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      October 7, 2020

      You’re welcome, Beth! Thank you for sharing this awesome review with us!

      Reply

  • Deborah Heus
    September 30, 2020

    The recipe seem daunting at first however it was super easy and absolutely delicious and quick. I will definitely be making this again thank you

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      September 30, 2020

      I’m so happy you enjoyed this recipe, Deborah!

      Reply

  • jana
    September 26, 2020

    Super tasty! Loved it

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      September 26, 2020

      I’m so glad you enjoyed that Jana!

      Reply

  • Di
    September 24, 2020

    Great recipe Natasha! So yum!
    Was fun to make, didn’t realize how easy it was to make. I love my borscht extra tangy, so I added in sauerkraut + juice 🙂

    Reply

    • Natasha
      September 24, 2020

      Wow that sounds super yummy with sauerkraut. Thank you for sharing!

      Reply

  • Bonnie
    September 20, 2020

    Bland and watery. I even had my Ukrainian friend check behind me and the recipe. Why? The reviews are good. I followed the recipe, grated the beets, and the only thing I did on my own was use 4 cups of beef broth to replace four of the cups of water. That should have helped with some flavor.

    Reply

    • Natasha
      September 21, 2020

      Hi Bonnie, this is normally supposed to be hearty and very flavorful. You might re-read the recipe to see if any of the seasonings were missed and that correct proportions were used.

      Reply

    • San
      September 26, 2020

      I agree. Was missing some more flavor

      Reply

  • Lyuba K
    September 13, 2020

    Come out very good, but little bit sour, next time i will use much less vinegar.

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      September 13, 2020

      Sounds good! I hope it becomes perfect for you next time, Lyuba. Thanks for trying this recipe!

      Reply

  • Mary Ann Dutchak
    September 12, 2020

    Hello Natasha
    Well I did not have any luck on that website. Didn’t you use to have an archives website? I am pretty sure that is where I found it

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      September 12, 2020

      Mary Ann, are you pasting “https://natashaskitchen.com/borscht-recipe-with-meat/” into the search window?

      Reply

  • Liz Einsig Wise
    September 11, 2020

    Delicious! Very clear instructions. I did use a bit less water as I like a thicker soup, and added 1T dried dill at the end with the bay leaves. So happy to have discovered your blog!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      September 11, 2020

      I’m so happy you enjoyed that Liz! Thank you for this wonderful review!

      Reply

  • Mary Ann Dutchak
    September 8, 2020

    Hi Natasha
    Where can I find your original recipe for borscht that you saute the carrots and cabbage and add red kidney beans?

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      September 8, 2020

      Hi Mary Ann, the new borscht recipe is the only one we have on the site. We updated it because we felt it was a significant improvement. You can search for sites like this: https://web.archive.org/ and plug in the URL to view the old version of the recipe. I hope that helps!

      Reply

  • Karen Sanders
    September 1, 2020

    This Borscht With Meat recipe was an excellent experience
    My husband was really impressed and ate two large bowls. Thank you so much Natasha for this recipe and every recipe I’ve tried
    on your site
    Blessings and gratitude to you.

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      September 1, 2020

      You’re welcome! I’m so happy you found our blog and are enjoying our recipes! Blessings to you Karen!

      Reply

  • Joshua Samuel Brown
    May 7, 2020

    Sorry – forgot to add one thing. Our cat loved the beef foam I skimmed off the top of the pot. (She’d have eaten it all if we’d let her!)

    Reply

  • Joshua Samuel Brown
    May 7, 2020

    Amazingly happy with how this turned out. I was pretty faithful with your recipe, with my own alterations being apple cider vinegar and brown sugar. Complicated recipe, but definitely well worth it. Ate it hot for dinner, then had a bowl cold before bed. Excellent both times. Thanks again!

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      May 7, 2020

      So great to hear that, Joshua. I’m so glad that you loved this recipe, thank you for giving it a wonderful feedback!

      Reply

  • Patricia
    April 22, 2020

    Chop an onion with no tears. Hold the onion under cool running water as you peel. Then cut onion almost all the way through, both ways for a checkerboard pattern that falls apart into a dice. (keep that cool water running while you do all this. A variation: peel, slice and dice the onion holding it under cool water in a large bowl. The water gets rid of those noxious fumes.

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      April 22, 2020

      Love it! Thanks for your tip.

      Reply

  • Alexa
    April 15, 2020

    I love this recipe. I make it almost every week. Kids and husband love it! They always get excited when I make it! Also, I’ve tried a lot of your recipes. You’re definitely my go to when I look for something to make.
    Thank you!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      April 15, 2020

      Awww that’s the best! Thank you so much for sharing that with me! I’m all smiles!

      Reply

  • Alex
    April 5, 2020

    Hello Natasha,

    I am a complete amateur in the kitchen but love this recipe so much; definitely reminds me of my mother’s and grandmother’s cooking.

    Can you clarify one thing for me —

    After I add the potatoes do I turn the heat up from a simmer? I’ve been finding that if I leave the heat low, the potatoes don’t cook but when I turned it up the meat overcooked. Also am I cooking the potatoes and veggies uncovered or covered?

    Thanks so much!
    Alex

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      April 6, 2020

      Hi Alex, we make sure itas lightly simmering when we add the potatoes. I’m so glad you enjoyed this recipe!

      Reply

  • Linda
    March 8, 2020

    At what point do you add the meat into the soup? Do you discard or use the meat broth? These 2 things are not in the steps.

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      March 9, 2020

      Hi Linda, the meat is the first item in the soup. We never took it out. That’s what cooks and makes the broth. I hope that helps.

      Reply

  • arlene heaps
    March 7, 2020

    Hi Natasha, Love your recipes and your videos. Love making borsht, but don’t know why my borsht looses it’s beautiful red colour. Any ideas why?

    Reply

    • Natasha
      March 9, 2020

      Hi Arlene, thank you for that awesome feedback! It could be either the preparation method or the type of beets – some beets give off a pink color while others give a deep ruby red.

      Reply

  • Patricia
    March 7, 2020

    Delicious! Perfect recipe! My family is from Moldova. All of the recipes are “a little bit of this, a few fingers of that…” Thanks for being so clear here!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      March 7, 2020

      You’re welcome! I’m so glad this recipe is helpful!

      Reply

  • Liliya s
    December 16, 2019

    I can’t find your borscht recipe #1. It’s my favorite and you removed it from your site… :-((((

    Reply

  • Layla
    October 28, 2019

    I used this and you classic borsht recipe as my base. The major change I made is that I made a bone broth with neck and marrow bones (pork) and used the meat from that. I love the richness of homemade bone both, though it is a pain to cook for 10-12 hours. Also, I added beans with the meat– like your classic recipe. But I used fresh cranberry beans for the beans, not canned. Even my husband, who is not a soup fan, loved it. Thank you. This is a keeper.

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      October 28, 2019

      Sounds like you found a new favorite, Layla! Thank you for that awesome review.

      Reply

  • Dya Dya Styopa
    October 18, 2019

    While not quite the same as what I had living in Russia, damn Nastya, this was a delicious recipe and gave me all the feels!!!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      October 18, 2019

      I’m so glad you enjoyed that!

      Reply

  • Manish Chugh
    October 10, 2019

    Perfect

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      October 10, 2019

      Thank you! I’m so glad you enjoyed that!

      Reply

  • Dina
    September 29, 2019

    I don’t like beets. We had all the items to make the borscht. I have never tasted this soup nor made it before. Stellar soup the broth was so tasty. Thank you for the veggie and bean version. I suffer from gout so red meat is out. I was really impressed.
    What is summer borscht? How is it different from the recipe I made today?

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      September 30, 2019

      Hi Dina, I’m so glad you enjoyed that. Summer Borscht is served cold.

      Reply

  • Krystal
    September 27, 2019

    I am absolutely in love with this soup! It was the first borscht recipe I tried and I will stick with it. Just made it and my Mom’s waiting on me to bring her a bowl. DELICIOUS!!!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      September 27, 2019

      That’s just awesome!! Thank you for sharing your wonderful review, Krystal!

      Reply

  • Denise
    September 26, 2019

    My mother-in-law is from Ukraine. This is almost identical to her borsch (There’s no” T”. That was an American addition to the name.). Hers does not call for meat, vinegar, bay leaf or parsley. She also does not use fresh tomatoes, but does use a 1/2 red bell pepper instead, which adds sweetness. Just like the recipe above, she adds about a 4 oz. can of tomato sauce and the carrots, cabbage, and potatoes.

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      September 26, 2019

      Thank you so much for sharing that with me.

      Reply

  • Iris
    September 14, 2019

    A question…Would it spoil the soup if I used a ham hock AND stew meat? That’s what I have on hand but don’t want to mess up the taste.

    Reply

    • Natasha
      September 14, 2019

      HI Iris, my Mother often changes up the meat and that sounds like it would work well.

      Reply

      • Iris
        September 14, 2019

        Hi, thanks for your reply…you mean she adds different types of meat in same batch? Like beef and pork together?

        Reply

        • Natashas Kitchen
          September 14, 2019

          Usually not in the same batch.

          Reply

          • Iris
            September 15, 2019

            Thank you!

  • Alicia Schultz
    July 7, 2019

    Hi, love this recipe! I just got back from a 3 month visit in Yuzhne, 30 minutes from Kharkiv. I think I tried over 20 different versions and this is the best hands down, don’t tell mother in law, lol. Anyway, question is can you freeze the leftovers? Making a big pot a don’t want to loose it. Thank you, Alicia

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      July 8, 2019

      That’s so awesome Alicia! Thank you for that amazing feedback and yes, I think this would freeze well.

      Reply

  • Vika
    April 28, 2019

    My mom and grandma always made the soup for us, I really missed the soup since we moved state side and couldn’t master my moms because she could never really tell me the exact amounts and I kept messing something up! Then I found your your recipe and made it today and got it right and I am crying because I love it so much, a taste of home was so much needed, thank you for this delicious recipe! I would give 10 stars if I could

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      April 29, 2019

      Wow! Thank you so much for the TEN STARS!!! You just made my day! I’m so happy you enjoyed this recipe Vika!

      Reply

  • Hannah Beecher
    March 12, 2019

    Hello, Natasha! Thank you for posting this lovely recipe! We had a lovely neighbor who was Moldovan and would bring us big pots of Borscht every couple of months or so!

    If you don’t mind I’m going to link to your recipe in my upcoming post on my blog 🙂 the post is about gardening and I find that many Americans don’t like beets, but I think they would like them more if they made your borscht! 😉 Thanks again for a great recipe!

    Reply

    • Natasha
      March 13, 2019

      Hi Hannah, that would be wonderful if you linked back and thank you so much! 🙂

      Reply

  • Scott Erb
    March 11, 2019

    I’ve made Borscht before, but never with this recipe. In the past I had the beets and carrots in chunks, not grated, and only the onions was sauteed. I really like the way flavor of this Borscht and will use this recipe again! It was also very clear and easy to follow. I am definitely going to look at more of your recipes!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      March 11, 2019

      I’m so happy you enjoyed this recipe, Scott! Thank you for sharing that awesome feedback with me!

      Reply

  • Tom
    March 4, 2019

    Delicious!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      March 4, 2019

      I’m so happy you enjoyed that, Tom!

      Reply

  • Katie
    February 25, 2019

    Hi Natasha,
    Another great recipe! You have helped me so much with learning how to cook Russian food! My fiancé, and his family (who are Russian) are always so impressed!! I have you to thank for that ☺️

    This Borsch was AMAZING!! We ate it all in 2 days and now I am craving more! The perfect meal for the cold winters in Minnesota! Your meals are always so good, and I make over and over again!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      February 25, 2019

      Awww that’s the best, Katie! Thank you so much for sharing that with me :). I’m all smiles!

      Reply

  • Janis La Couvée
    February 15, 2019

    Natasha, I’ve never commented on a recipe site before, but I have to tell you–this borscht is superb. I grew up with the clear vegetarian Ukrainian borscht. This takes it to a whole other level. Thank you.

    I had some home-made vegetable stock that had some beet peelings in it which added another layer of complexity.

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      February 15, 2019

      That’s just awesome!! Thank you for sharing your wonderful review 🙂

      Reply

  • David Flink
    February 4, 2019

    Tried this recipe the only thing I did different, added a cup of Georgian Saperavi wine, I have had Borscht in Ukraine and home made in Georgia, and from a Ukrainian restaurant in Tbilisi . What I cooked was as good or better than those, and my hardest critic my Dad, said it was very delicious, we ate it for three days.

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      February 4, 2019

      I’m so happy you enjoyed that. Thank you for sharing that with us!

      Reply

  • Liana Ilyuk
    January 11, 2019

    I made this soup with chicken thighs (bought too much by accident for a different recipe) and although it does have a somewhat different taste, it still turned out good! Also, in our family, we use homemade tomato sauce (with garlic) in the onion/carrot mix, adding quite a bit into there instead of adding tomatoes into the soup. My dad also looooves spicy things so mom always added a hot chili pepper at the very very end for all those spicy-loving people! Make sure to take it out before serving, otherwise, someone may end up with a very hot surprise!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      January 12, 2019

      Thank you so much for sharing that with us, Liana!

      Reply

  • Kevin
    January 10, 2019

    This recipe and website got me started on Russian and Ukrainian food.

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      January 10, 2019

      I’m so inspired reading your review. Thank you!

      Reply

  • Kristina
    January 4, 2019

    I make this soup very often since it reminds me of my moms cooking. My husband and toddler say it’s their favorite!

    I do change the tomatoes up though- I add a can of diced tomatoes instead of fresh- it was a happy accident since I ran out of tomatoes but had canned and we liked it more this way. I also use pork instead of beef.

    Thanks for the recipe!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      January 5, 2019

      I’m so happy you enjoyed that. Thank you for sharing your changes with us!

      Reply

  • Basil
    November 27, 2018

    I usually make a different type of borscht that my father taught me to make. This one is very different and very delicious! I had to add a little more salt and garlic but wow the flavors were amazing!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      November 27, 2018

      Thank you for that wonderful review!!! 🙂

      Reply

  • Kelly Deis
    November 20, 2018

    This was a great recipe and sautéing the vegetables ahead of time heightens their sweetness. Will definitely make again.

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      November 20, 2018

      That’s so great! vI’m so happy you enjoyed that. Thank you for sharing that with us!

      Reply

  • Russell
    November 18, 2018

    Having been to Ukraine and Russia numerous times in the last few years I have become addicted to all types of traditional foods. Borsch, however, holds a very close place in my heart. This soup recipe is amazing, almost as good as the first bowl I had of my girlfriends family soup in Kiev. I like to use homemade chicken stock, beef ribs, and I replace a cup or two of the water/stock with beet kvass which in my opinion is the secret ingredient that made my girlfriends fanily soup the best. Thanks for sharing this amazing recipe!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      November 18, 2018

      Thank you for sharing this with us Russell!!

      Reply

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