Classic Ukrainian Borsch Recipe

Classic Borsch Recipe, just like mom used to make | natashaskitchen.com

After several requests for my borscht recipe, here it is.  Ukrainian Borscht… everyone knows what it is and many people enjoy it; Ukrainian or not.

My sister taught me how to make it this way. It’s a little time-consuming (at least 2 hours). Click here for my speedier borsch version. If you are pressed for time, shave off 1 hour by using canned beets with their juice. I used fresh beets from Mom’s garden.

I love the deep ruby color of this borsch! It’s so healthy and nutritious; packed with beans (protein), beets (iron), carrots (carotene), potatoes (vit C, potassium, Vit B6), cabbage (vit K, vit C, fiber, etc…), Can you tell I’m taking a nutrition class right now?? Hope you enjoy this recipe. 

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Ingredients for Classic Ukrainian Borsch:

2 large or 3 medium beets, thoroughly washed
2 large or 3 medium potatoes, sliced into bite-sized pieces
4 Tbsp of cooking oil
1 medium onion, finely diced
2 carrots, grated
1/2 head of cabbage, thinly sliced (see picture)
1 can kidney beans with their juice
2 bay leaves
10 cups water
6 cups chicken broth
5 Tbsp ketchup
4 Tbsp lemon juice
1/4 tsp freshly ground pepper
1 Tbsp chopped dill

Classic Ukrainian Borsch-2

How to Make Borscht:

1. Fill a large soup pot with 10 cups of water. Add 2 – 3 beets. Cover and boil for about 1 hour (some beats take longer, some take less time. It depends on how old the beets are). Once you can smoothly pierce the beets with a butter knife, remove from the water and set aside to cool. Keep the water.

Classic Ukrainian Borsch

2. Slice 3 potatoes, add into the same water and boil 15-20 minutes.

Classic Ukrainian Borsch-6

3. Grate both carrots and dice one onion. Add 4 Tbsp of cooking oil to the skillet and saute vegetables until they are soft (7-10 minutes). Stir in ketchup when they are almost done cooking.

Classic Ukrainian Borsch-7

4. Meanwhile, thinly shred 1/2 a cabbage ( I use a Zyliss Mandoline) and add it to the soup pot when potatoes are half way done.

Classic Ukrainian Borsch-8

5. Next, peel and slice the beets into match sticks and add them back to the pot (I use my mandolin slicer). When you peel beets, use a plastic bag over your hands unless you want red fingers.

Classic Ukrainian Borsch-9

6. Add 6 cups of chicken broth, lemon juice, pepper, bay leaves and can of kidney beans (with their juice) to the pot.

Classic Ukrainian Borsch-10

7. Add sauteed carrots and onion to the pot along with chopped dill.

Classic Ukrainian Borsch-11

8. Cook another 5-10 minutes, until the cabbage is done. Season to taste with salt and pepper. I usually don’t have to add any unless I use low sodium broth.

Classic Ukrainian Borsch-3

Serve with a dollop of sour cream or real mayo.

Classic Ukrainian Borsch-5

Classic Ukrainian Borsch Recipe

4.81 from 111 votes
Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 1 hour 40 minutes
Total Time: 2 hours
Classic Borsch Recipe, just like mom used to make | natashaskitchen.com
Author: Natasha of NatashasKitchen.com
Skill Level: Medium
Cost to Make: $6-$8
Servings: 10 -12

Ingredients

  • 2 large or 3 medium beets thoroughly washed
  • 2 large or 3 medium potatoes sliced into bite-sized pieces
  • 4 Tbsp of cooking oil
  • 1 medium onion finely diced
  • 2 carrots grated
  • 1/2 head of cabbage thinly sliced (see picture)
  • 1 can kidney beans with their juice
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 10 cups water
  • 6 cups chicken broth
  • 5 Tbsp ketchup
  • 4 Tbsp lemon juice
  • 1/4 tsp freshly ground pepper
  • 1 Tbsp chopped dill

Instructions

  1. Fill a large soup pot with 10 cups of water. Add 2 - 3 beets. Cover and boil for about 1 hour. Once you can smoothly pierce the beets with a butter knife, remove from the water and set aside to cool. Keep the water.
  2. Slice 3 potatoes, add into the same water and boil 15-20 minutes.
  3. Grate both carrots and dice one onion. Add 4 Tbsp of cooking oil to the skillet and saute vegetables until they are soft (7-10 minutes). Stir in ketchup when they are almost done cooking.
  4. Meanwhile, thinly shred 1/2 a cabbage and add it to the soup pot when potatoes are half way done.
  5. Next, peel and slice the beets into match sticks and add them back to the pot.
  6. Add 6 cups chicken broth, lemon juice, pepper, bay leaves and can of kidney beans (with their juice) to the pot.
  7. Add sauteed carrots and onion to the pot along with chopped dill.
  8. Cook another 5-10 minutes, until the cabbage is done. Season to taste with salt and pepper. I usually don't have to add any unless I use low sodium broth.

Serve with a dollop of sour cream or real mayo.

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natashaskitchen

Welcome to my kitchen! I am Natasha, the blogger behind Natasha's Kitchen (since 2009). My husband and I run this blog together and share only our best, family approved recipes with YOU. Thanks for stopping by! We are so happy you're here.

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  • Lauren
    May 8, 2018

    Hi Natasha! I just wanted to say that I love to reference your website when I’m passing on Ukrainian recipes; they are so easy to follow and the results have always turned out wonderfully for me. I learned to make Ukrainian food when I served in the Peace Corps in eastern Ukraine and often make it at home for my family of five and whoever might be a guest around our dinner table. Most recently, my book club met to discuss A Gentleman in Moscow and since I was hosting, I decided to serve a Slavic inspired menu. We even pulled the kitchen table into our living room and ate around the couch, just like we so often did in the Ukrainian homes we visited. Most of the recipes for the night came from your website but the borscht was hands down their most surprising favorite! I probably make this recipe three or four times a year and just freeze it in quart sized ziplock bags to pull out as needed for dinners (sans potatoes, of course!). So what I served that night had been made about a month or two beforehand and reheated with fresh potatoes; many of my guests had a preconceived opinion of what borscht was or that they wouldn’t like it because of the beets, but even the most beet loathing person among us finished her bowl and said it was good. I’d say that’s a rave review! One of our members is a book blogger and linked to your website on her blog for the recipes:
    http://www.thenovelendeavor.com/2018/05/book-club-a-gentleman-in-moscow-by-amor-towles/ Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      May 8, 2018

      Hello Lauren! I’m happy to hear how much everyone enjoys the recipes. Thanks for following and sharing your excellent review! I’m flattered! 🙂 Reply

  • Tracie
    May 2, 2018

    Thanks for the recipe I am 9 weeks pregnant and was craving Borsht so bad today! Probably will eat it all myself 😛 Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      May 3, 2018

      You’re welcome Tracie! I hope it hits the spot, thanks for sharing! Reply

  • Ginnea
    April 11, 2018

    I didn’t particulary like this recipe. For me it turned out bland in both taste and color. Also, it took a much longer time than another recipe that I used before where you grate the beets and saute with the carrots. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 11, 2018

      Hi Ginnea, the color of the borsch can be lighter if you use less or smaller beats and sometimes just the variety of beat can give off less color. Reply

    • David
      April 26, 2018

      I made it for the first time today. Used 2lbs of pork and boiled it for 1 hour and 30 mins, this was the stock for the soup. I feel it had a large impact on the flavor. Reply

  • Donalda
    March 31, 2018

    Can I cut this recipe in half?? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 31, 2018

      Hi Donalda, yes that should work great. Reply

  • Geri
    March 25, 2018

    You know that is always the best borscht, no one makes it as good as this one. Thank you so much for posting it. I too am Ukrainian and make the odd thing which my Mom made. I will never be able to recreate my Mother’s cooking, I try but that is life. Again, Thank you so much for all the recipes. Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      March 26, 2018

      My pleasure Geri! I’m happy to hear the recipe brings back fond memories. Thanks for following and sharing your great review! Reply

  • Marina L.
    March 13, 2018

    Hi,

    Thanks for posting this. I love Borsh but I don’t remember ever having beans in there. 0.0 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 14, 2018

      Hi Marina, the beans are a nice way to add protein without adding meat. We do have a beef borscht version as well. I hope you love it! 🙂 Reply

  • Mrs H
    March 10, 2018

    We live in the South Pacific and I can only get round beets not the longer ones that are pictured. Would I still only use 2-3? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 10, 2018

      Hi Mrs. H. 3 medium/large round beets would work great! They definitely don’t have to be the long variety. These were just the ones my Mother grew in her garden that year. There is no difference in flavor or texture to regular round beets. I hope you love the recipe! Reply

  • Linda
    February 28, 2018

    My grandmother and aunts always put beef in theres Reply

  • Brett
    February 27, 2018

    My first time trying Borsch was at home using this recipe and without a doubt it is the best soup I have ever had. Thank you for taking the time to share this with us. Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      February 28, 2018

      My pleasure Brett! I’m happy to hear how much you love the recipe. Thanks for sharing your fantastic review! Reply

  • Veronika S.
    February 27, 2018

    My favorite version of bortsh. I used to make mine slightly different, but have switched to this version. Loved the lemon for a tangy twist. Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      February 27, 2018

      I’m glad you enjoy the recipe as much as I do! Thanks for sharing Veronika! Reply

  • leon
    February 26, 2018

    excelent recipe 🙂

    greetings from Poland 🙂 Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      February 26, 2018

      I’m glad you enjoy it Leon, thanks for sharing! Reply

  • Sue
    January 30, 2018

    Has anyone tried this recipe with golden beets? Can’t find any decent red beets at my store right now. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 30, 2018

      Hi Sue, I honestly haven’t tried so I can’t say for sure. I think it would be worth experimenting. I hear golden beets are sweeter in flavor than reds. You would have a much different looking soup without that classic red coloring from red beets, but as far as flavor goes, I just haven’t tested it. Reply

  • Angie
    January 22, 2018

    Awesome!!
    I use the white kidney beans (cannellini) without the juice. I love the contrast in color. I also dice up two beet leaves and add to the pot for extra nutrients and color.
    Thank you 🙂 Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      January 22, 2018

      My pleasure Angie! Thanks for sharing your great review with other readers! Reply

  • Linda Kwarciany
    January 21, 2018

    I have everything on hand – borscht this week. Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      January 21, 2018

      I hope you love it Linda! Please let me know what you think! Reply

  • Ronda Leitch
    January 12, 2018

    Delicious! We used our own garden vegetables! Your recipe will be our go to from now on! Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      January 12, 2018

      Yum, I bet that tasted amazing! I’m glad you enjoy the recipe Ronda, thanks for sharing! Reply

  • richard schmidt
    December 19, 2017

    I see you use Better Than Bullion-I do too but I’m vegetarian can I use the vegetable variety for this? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 19, 2017

      Hi Richard, I do think a good vegetable broth will work great 🙂 Reply

      • richard schmidt
        December 19, 2017

        thank you-otherwise im not changing a thing Reply

  • Ken
    December 14, 2017

    I just made this soup for the first time. Glad I did, its great. Thanks for recipe. Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      December 14, 2017

      You’re welcome Ken! I’m happy to hear how much you enjoy the recipe. Thanks for sharing! Reply

  • Kat
    December 9, 2017

    Can this be made ahead of time and stored in a mason jar. My father-in-law is polish, we are visiting them at Christmas and I thought I would make a gift basket as put this in the basket, but curious how long it keeps Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 9, 2017

      Hi Kat, this will keep well in a jar refrigerated up to 5 days. It should only be stored in the refrigerator though and not at room temperature. Reply

  • Brianne Toma
    November 20, 2017

    This recipe is the only one I trust. All other styles are bland and not very home-like. Thank you. This is my holiday traditional soup. My husband’s Polish and he gobbles this up. I’m German and I just take his portions. 😀 hahahahaha I kid I kid. …almost. Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      November 20, 2017

      I’m glad the recipe is a HIT in your home! 🙂 Thanks for sharing your excellent review with other readers! Reply

  • Stephen
    November 19, 2017

    As a third generation Ukrainian I wanted to continue the beautiful traditions for January 6th Christmas Eve after my mother passed away and made this borscht recipe last year. It was a huge hit and will be on the menu every January 6th Christmas Eve. Thank you. Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      November 20, 2017

      You’re welcome Stephen! I’m sorry to hear about your mother. I’m glad you and your family enjoy this recipe and can continue family traditions! God Bless Reply

  • Ramon Ayre
    November 8, 2017

    Was craving Borscht, so I made my first batch using this recipe. Excellent recipe, made cooking Borscht much easier than I thought! Freezes well.Thanks! Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      November 8, 2017

      You’re welcome Ramon! I’m so glad to hear how much you love the recipe! Thanks for sharing your great review! Reply

      • Naureen
        November 20, 2017

        Hi Natasha,

        Not to take away from your recipe but is there a ketogenic version you could reccommend? Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          November 20, 2017

          Hi Naureen, I don’t believe beets are on the ketogenic diet so that would be really difficult to substitute since it’s not borsch without them. 🙁 You could sub the potatoes for cauliflower and the ketchup for tomato sauce if needed but there’s just no simple sub for the beets. Reply

  • Tim Noveroske
    November 5, 2017

    Hi Natasha,
    I am Polish and love all foods using beets cabbage ,etc. This is a wonderfull Borsch recipe and will make this ofen. My wife also loves the ethnic foods I cook and this will be a favorite . Thank You again for sharing.
    Tim Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      November 6, 2017

      It’s my pleasure Tim! I hope you both love the recipe! 🙂 Reply

  • Marko
    November 3, 2017

    Ahh, bortch is one of my favorite soups! This fall I’ve tried all sorts of slavic soups, yesterday made some rassolnik! 🙂

    Otherwise very similar to my recipe, but beans!? No way! You do not live in Ukraine anymore, do you 🙂

    And hi from Finland btw 🙂 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 3, 2017

      Hi Marko! We add beans to incorporate some protein in the borsch, but you can absolutely omit them if you prefer 🙂 Reply

  • Jollean
    October 28, 2017

    Made this and my husband and I both loved it. Thanks for sharing. Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      October 29, 2017

      You’re welcome Jollean! I’m so glad to hear that! Thanks for sharing! Reply

  • Kathy
    October 28, 2017

    My husband and I agree this is the best borscht we have ever eaten! I am looking forward to the leftovers of this soup. All of the veggies I used were from my garden. What a great way to get some of them used up! Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      October 29, 2017

      I’m happy to hear that Kathy! Thanks for sharing your fantastic review! Reply

  • Lorne
    October 12, 2017

    Thanks Natasha for sharing this recipe.
    Made it today for dinner for the wife and I, and still plenty left over. We both enjoyed it very much. Will make again.
    Great recipe. Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      October 13, 2017

      My pleasure Lorne! I’m glad to hear you both love the recipe! Thanks for sharing your great review! Reply

  • Lucy
    September 26, 2017

    do you have to put the kidney beans? I’ve never heard of this before. I’ve never eaten borscht with beans before either. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 27, 2017

      Hi Lucy, you can omit them if you wish, it is just a nice way to add protein to the borscht. Reply

  • Karen
    September 23, 2017

    This recipe is just delicious! The best I have ever had Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      September 25, 2017

      Oh wow, that’s quite the compliment! I’m glad to hear how much you love the recipe Karen! Thanks for sharing 🙂 Reply

  • Madeline
    September 20, 2017

    Fantastic recipe, loved by all! (Well,
    Most.. sadly my younger siblings demand MEAT in their meal, of which I eat little of.. is there any meat that could be incorporated with this dish??)

    The only thing to note was that in the instructions is that I feel that the terms ‘sliced’, and ‘chopped’, could be swapped for one another 🙂

    Thank you. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 20, 2017

      Hi Madeline, we do have a borscht with meat that you might enjoy :). Also, thanks for the tip! 🙂 Reply

  • Margrith Broger
    August 31, 2017

    I live in Catalonia, Spain, and all of my friends, local and foreign agree that they have never tasted a better borscht. The time investment is well worth while.
    As a matter of fact, these days I’ll make a 20 liter pot because I’ve discovered it freezes beautifully. You have no idea about how many friends I’ll make happy.
    Thank you very much! Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      August 31, 2017

      You’re welcome! I’m glad to hear how much everyone enjoys the recipe! Thanks for sharing your excellent review! 🙂 Reply

  • Kasey
    August 30, 2017

    Love this recipe but I can never get my beets clean enough to save the beet water. Should I use a brush or something? I scrub them and scrub them but always wind up with gross brown water with lots of dirt :\ I don’t want to peel them first as it’s so much more work than after boiling them but I’m almost inclined to to save the water. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 30, 2017

      Hi Kasey, I do use a brush to scrub the beets but you can also peel the beets before boiling if that is easier for you. It will still work 🙂 Reply

    • Meg
      August 30, 2017

      I always scrub my root vegetables with a stiff vegetable brush and it does the trick! Reply

    • Jack
      September 3, 2017

      If you are not using young beets I can see having brownish broth; however, as to the dirt problem I would recommend first soaking the beets in cool water for an hour, scrub them with a brush, rinse and then cook. I would save the water the beets were cooked in regardless of the color. When you add the beets later the color will change. Reply

  • Meg
    August 26, 2017

    This was delicious! I’ve made different versions of borscht before, but this one is the best. Only changes I made were to cook the beets in a pressure cooker so I didn’t have as much beet water. I made up for it with vegetable broth and also replaced the chicken broth with vegetable since we’re vegetarians. Good stuff! Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      August 27, 2017

      Awesome! I’m glad to hear how enjoy the recipe Meg! Thanks for sharing your fantastic review! Reply

  • Kris
    July 13, 2017

    You recipes are amazing! Do you happen to have a recipe for Shurpa? Reply

  • Sam
    July 11, 2017

    I’ve made Borsch quite a lot but the bay leaves and lemon juice I hadn’t used before and added a really nice flavour – thanks! One thing I do differently though is to peel and grate the beetroot before cooking – it cuts down the cooking time a lot! Not sure if this would make any difference to the flavour though? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 11, 2017

      There are a variety of ways to prep the beets and they all seem to work well. 🙂 Reply

      • sharon
        August 11, 2017

        I cook mine in the pressure then pull off skins Reply

        • sharon
          August 11, 2017

          I cook mine in the pressure cooker then peel off skins. Leave a small piece of stem @ the top of the beet. Reply

    • AL CATRAZ
      July 29, 2017

      better to peel than have sand in your soup! Reply

  • Edna Roberts
    July 11, 2017

    Can this soup be frozen? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 11, 2017

      Edna, I never tried freezing it but it should freeze just fine. Reply

      • Bob
        September 2, 2017

        Hi I cant wait to try this recipe, this soup, other versions I’ve made freeze very well. Reply

        • Natasha's Kitchen
          September 2, 2017

          Please let me know what you think of the recipe Bob! Reply

  • Janna
    June 19, 2017

    I have made borsch several times & this is by far my favourite recipe. Thank you so much for sharing all this goodness. The only change I make is omitting the beans. Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      June 19, 2017

      I’m so happy to hear that Janna! Thank YOU for sharing your wonderful review! 🙂 Reply

  • Candice
    June 14, 2017

    Just made this tonight for my family for supper. My first time making borscht and I am so glad I found this recipe. Took me right back to my Great Grandmother’s place. So good and very authentic. I was sceptical about the ketchup and almost left it out but I wouldn’t change a thing! Thank you for the great recipe! Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      June 15, 2017

      You’re welcome Candice! I’m so glad you love it! Thanks for sharing 😀 Reply

  • Brigitte
    June 3, 2017

    Thank you Natasha..my hubby is Polish and really like to make this soup in memory of his mother I added speck to it as I remember babcia did, also loved your baked piroshki , keep those recipes coming 😊 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      June 4, 2017

      Brigitte, you are very welcome and thank you for the encouragement 😬 Reply

      • June 24, 2017

        I have made your recipe many times and it is fantastic, delicious, and hearty. I am about to make yet another pot full of this delicious yummy healthy goodness. Reply

        • Natasha's Kitchen
          June 25, 2017

          Yes, I’m so glad to hear that Bridgette! Thanks for sharing your wonderful review! Reply

  • Emily
    June 1, 2017

    Very good! I used vegetable broth and skipped adding beans because I didn’t have any.

    I thought there wouldn’t be enough dill and almost added extra without tasting – but it was great just as the recipe suggested! Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      June 1, 2017

      I’m happy to hear you enjoy the recipe Emily! Thanks for sharing your review! Reply

  • sherry watson
    March 30, 2017

    this recipe was the best! I added alittle garlic to mine. I was just curious though if you knew how many calories is in this soup???? Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      March 31, 2017

      I’m happy to hear how much you enjoy the soup Sherry!
      Due to time constraints, I don’t typically include nutritional info, but check out this nutrition analyzer – you can plug in the ingredients from any recipe, select the serving size and it will give you nutritional info, calories, etc. I hope that is helpful to you! Reply

  • Manuela
    March 22, 2017

    Kidney beans and ketchup???? Must be an American version of the soup. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 22, 2017

      Hi Manuela, we add the beans to give the soup some protein and the ketchup really enhances the flavor. We do adapt our traditional dishes to the ingredients we have available and I do think these 2 add-ins definitely improve on the flavor of the soup. If you’ve never tried them, I hope you give them a whirl! 😉 Reply

  • Sara
    March 15, 2017

    16 cups of liquid sounds scary! There’s just me & I don’t necessarily want an entire freezer full of leftover borscht. Suggestions? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 16, 2017

      Hi Sara 🙂 We’re used to making this and enjoying it throughout the week so I always make a big pot. You could cut the recipe in half or if you wanted a heartier borsch, you could start with 6 cups water and 6 cups broth, totaling 12 cups and then season with salt to taste. You’ll probably need a little less lemon juice and ketchup as well. Reply

      • Sara
        March 19, 2017

        Thank you for the prompt reply!!! This was my first time making “borscht” & your recipe was the one I used the most as my, well, experiment! I used vegetable stock, chickpeas, & apple cider vinegar instead. And also used red cabbage rather than green. Added a tiny bit of sugar, too. I also put horseradish & dill in my sour cream topping.

        Not entirely sure what traditional Borsht is supposed to taste like, but mine tuned out pretty dang good! 🤘

        Still had MORE than enough and ended up with a little over 32 oz to freeze and at least a weeks worth in the fridge.

        Thank you so much Natasha for your simple guide & prompt advice!!! Reply

        • Sara
          March 19, 2017

          Oh, also no ketchup, used 1 tiny can of tomato paste (hence the need for sugar…). Reply

        • Natasha's Kitchen
          March 20, 2017

          Yum! That sounds great! I’m happy to help and to hear how much you enjoy the recipe Sara. 🙂 Reply

        • Sherrill Jeter
          April 11, 2017

          We’ve never had any left to freeze or throw away. I suggest you do the recipe first and improve it later. Likely will work better. Reply

  • Mike
    March 14, 2017

    Nice one but wait…no meat(pieces of beef)? Reply

  • Lidia Bayliss
    March 6, 2017

    Natasha, loved this quicker version of borscht after making these changes: add garlic! Borscht isn’t authentic without it! Also I used beef stock or broth for a deeper flavor. One question too: 1/2 a head of cabbage? This is too vague as my cabbage head was large so I ended up with too much.
    Best regards from a fellow Ukrainian
    Fellow Ukrainian Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 6, 2017

      I absolutely love that suggestion!! Lately, my Mom has been squeezing in a clove of garlic into every soup in the last 5 minutes of cooking and it completely improves it! Next time I make this, I’ll have to add that 😉 Reply

  • Franny
    February 24, 2017

    My mother (from Poland) made this all the time and I loved it, .. Unfortunately never wrote the recipe down. All I remember in the soup was shredded beets, red cabbage, potatoes .. AND the soup was PINK which she mixed in sourcream. Anyone ever had the soup pink? And maybe lemon with a lot of College Inn chicken broth. Any suggestions? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 24, 2017

      Hi Franny, it does turn pink when you stir the sour cream in. It sounds alot like this recipe 🙂 Reply

    • judy
      March 26, 2017

      yes! My grandmother used to beat in an egg yolk just before serving. The soup turned pink. I do that now and it is delish. I also strain in chopped canned tomatoes for extra taste. Reply

  • Kim
    February 19, 2017

    This is the best recipe I have ever tried!!!
    I make it again & again! Thank you so much! The fresh lemon is key) I replace the ketchup with a can of tomato paste… Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      February 20, 2017

      That’s great Kim! I’m glad you love the recipe! Reply

    • Sara
      March 15, 2017

      Can I use canned beets? Should I strain them or use the “juice”? & how many cans? Reply

      • Natasha
        natashaskitchen
        March 16, 2017

        Hi Sara, I still think it’s best with fresh beats but if you wish to substitute, use 2 cans with their juice 🙂 Reply

  • Linda
    February 16, 2017

    I made this pretty much the way it was described. I pressure cooked the beets which took way less time and saved the broth for the potatoes, etc. Also I didn’t have a lemon but I did have a lime😬Hope that wasn’t too sacreligious. And had to use dried dill. Here’s the thing. I wanted more “heavyiness” so I threw in some meatballs, cause it was easy:/ And it was to die for!
    I’ll send a picture if I can figure out where to do it:) Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 16, 2017

      lol sacreligious. That made me laugh. I’m so happy you sent a picture! Thanks again for sharing that with me! 🙂 Reply

  • Joy Shewan
    February 8, 2017

    What about salt and pepper? To taste? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 8, 2017

      Hi Joy, You can definitely season to taste with salt and pepper. I usually don’t have to add any unless I use low sodium broth. I added that note at the end of the recipe. Great question! Reply

  • Ella
    February 5, 2017

    Hello, I just made this soup which looks and tastes great, and I have enough to feed the army! Two questions – can it be eaten cold, or is that an entirely different endeavour. And can it be frozen? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 6, 2017

      Ha ha, that’s usually how our soups go – army size! lol. Yes, it can be frozen. Since it’s liquid, leave a little room for expansion in the freezer container you’re using. Reply

  • January 17, 2017

    Nice receipt but I do in different way Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 17, 2017

      I’d love to hear how you make yours! 🙂 Reply

  • Donna
    January 10, 2017

    Made this on Christmas Eve for my Polish friend (who doesn’t like Polish Barzcz – “red water” >:-))
    Only made 2 changes – we were having duck for Christmas dinner, so the legs and wings went in to make the stock for this first of all, which gave a lovely, rich base. Also used Savoy cabbage, simply because we like it.
    Everything else was followed to the letter, and I have to say, I really enjoyed making this; the various stages and chop-chop-chop preparation were SO relaxing!
    I let my Polish friend try it first – three large bowls later he said that was the best barszcz he’d ever tasted (and not to tell his mom that).
    A beautifully “compiled” dish, and I’m pretty sure I could feel it doing me good as I was eating it.
    Only thing I will change next time is half the amounts for the ingredients – this filled my terracotta soup pot, and he’s a giant!
    Thank YOU for this fantastic recipe – this is my go-to recipe for beet soup now. Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      January 10, 2017

      What a wonderful review Donna! Thank you for sharing!! 🙂 Reply

  • Gordon
    January 7, 2017

    I add a lb of beef. Your recipe is very very good tasting. Everyone loves it even the Moldovians. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 7, 2017

      Gordon, thank you for the wonderful review 😁…we just made another pot of borsch today! Reply

  • Lynn Newlin
    December 31, 2016

    Just love your recipes and authentic Ukrainian food.
    Do you have a favourite prune pierogi (pedaha) re ipe? Would so appreciate it.
    My Mom made it all the time but I failed to get it before she passed away! Really should have recorded everything she and my Dad did.
    Thank you! Reply

  • Denny
    December 28, 2016

    Making the Classic recipe today. I had prepared a pork loin roast for dinner recently. Do you thinking it wôuld be good cubed into this along with the beans, or would you do it differently? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 28, 2016

      Hi Denny, I think that could work well 🙂 Reply

  • Ben
    December 4, 2016

    I’ve gotten to the cabbage step and am not certain which pot to put it in and have already done the previous step all the way. If the cabbage was supposed to be added half way through the potatoe and carrot step it should have been half way through the instructions or in the same step. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 4, 2016

      Hi Ben, Add it to the soup pot with the potatoes. While the carrots are sautéing, you shred cabbage and it to the soup pot. I wrote out the steps in the way that I would make the soup. I hope that makes sense! 🙂 Reply

  • Francis
    November 15, 2016

    Do u add meat for this recipe? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 15, 2016

      Francis, in this particular recipe I used beans instead of meat but you can find Borscht recipe with meat by clicking hereReply

  • Grama K (Canada)
    November 5, 2016

    I am so happy to find your recipe – we love it and make it weekly. My husband was craving the recipe his Ukrainian mom used to make for him as a boy.

    Planning to can it (also have frozen it) – have you canned it for your family? Did you pressure can it or water bath it?
    Anyone else?

    Loving this recipe – perfect every time! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 5, 2016

      Hi 🙂 I have not tried canning. One of my readers canned it and stored it in the refrigerator for a month. Maybe someone else has more experience with canning borsch? Reply

  • Mayah
    October 11, 2016

    I just wanted to say this is my go to recipe for borscht and it turns out amazing every time! I do make two small changes: I add a little garlic to the carrot and onion mixture and I use tomato paste instead of ketchup and leave out the beans! It’s so amazing every time! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 11, 2016

      I’m so glad to hear it is your go-to recipe!! Thank you for sharing that with us 🙂 Reply

  • Judy
    October 6, 2016

    If you are going to can soup make sure the salt you use when preparing it is uniodized. If you use iodized salt it will always spoil after canning. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 6, 2016

      Thank you for sharing your tip! I usually purchase non-iodized salt but that is great to know! Reply

  • Jessica
    October 1, 2016

    Hello! This looks wonderful, cant wait to make it! But I don’t usually have ketchup at home anything you would sub it with? Thanks for the help =) Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 1, 2016

      Jessica, I would use tomato paste or half a can of (14 oz) stewed tomatoes. Let me know what you end up doing. Reply

  • Faith
    September 30, 2016

    YUM!!! Reply

  • Rick
    September 6, 2016

    Привет! Natasha, thank you so much for sharing your recipies. I made this tonight (my first attempt ever at making Борщ) It was wonderful. My daughter whom has never tried it and loved it. I can’t wait to start making some of your other dishes. Спасибо большое, очень вкусно! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 7, 2016

      На здоровье Rick and thank you for such a nice review 😀. That is the best when kids love what we parents make. That’s so great! Reply

  • Kay
    September 4, 2016

    I love this recipe! I am curious though as most times I try to can it in large jars, it goes bad. Is there a set time to process the jars or is it best not to can it ? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 4, 2016

      Hi Kay, I’ve never tried canning borsch so I can’t really advise on that. I recall a reader said she cans it and places it in the fridge and it keeps about a month but I haven’t tested borsch canning myself. Reply

    • bwz
      September 18, 2016

      Try freezing, works very well for my mother (with a different recipe, with meat), In my opinion it’s even better after being frozen. Reply

    • Mayah
      October 11, 2016

      I always use a can of tomato paste instead of ketchup and add a tbsp of sugar to it. It turns out great for me! Reply

  • Carl H
    August 19, 2016

    Is there a more traditional item besides ketchup that can be added? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 19, 2016

      Carl, you can add 1 cup strained tomatoes or tomato juice. Let me know how it turns out 😄. Reply

  • Jessy
    August 12, 2016

    My baba used to can her borscht. Should be ok. Looking forward to trying this recipe. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 12, 2016

      Hi Jessy, I’ve never tried canning borscht so I can’t say for sure, but I don’t think there is enough acidity, salt or sugar in this to keep it from spoiling at room temperature. One of my readers reported that their borscht stayed canned for 1 month in the refrigerator, but keep in mind that was in the refrigerator. Reply

  • August 6, 2016

    Would it be okay to add the beet tops in this amazing recipe which i am going to make this morning? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 6, 2016

      Yes! Check out how in this recipeReply

    • Mary Ann
      August 9, 2016

      thankyou so much for this recipe. made it and gave some to my neighbour she loved it it reminded her of her mother when she made it as well as mine she even noticed the beet tops lol once again thank you Reply

      • Natasha
        natashaskitchen
        August 9, 2016

        You are very welcome 😀. Reply

  • Katie Frye
    August 4, 2016

    How essential is dill to the flavor of the soup? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 5, 2016

      I always thought dill added great flavor but you can omit it if you don’t have it and the soup will still taste great 🙂 Reply

  • Christina
    August 3, 2016

    First time making borscht and it was delicious! Love how the recipe has step by step instructions that were easy to follow thank you! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 3, 2016

      I’m so glad you enjoyed the recipe and step-by-step instructions. That’s music to my ears 🙂 Reply

  • ivory
    August 2, 2016

    I’m wondering if the chicken broth you use is salt free or the added salt broth? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 2, 2016

      Hi Ivory, I have used both, but when I wrote out this recipe, I used regular chicken broth with added salt. If using low sodium, just add salt to taste 🙂 Reply

  • Tony
    July 22, 2016

    Can I pressure can this recipe.. sounds and looks amazing. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 22, 2016

      Hi Tony, I’m not sure this has enough acidity to preserve it for canning. I’ve never canned borsch before so I don’t know for sure but my guess would be that it wouldn’t can well. Reply

      • Tony
        July 22, 2016

        Thank you for your rapid reply. None the less I am making this recipe this weekend. I have all these ingredients in our garden. Thanks Reply

      • Lynn
        August 10, 2016

        I canned a couple of jars last year to see if it would work. Kept them in the fridge. Not sure how long it will last. The last jar we took out was in the fridge for 2 months and was still really good. I will be canning more this year to see just how long they will last. Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          August 10, 2016

          Oh wow that’s awesome to know that it works canned in the fridge! Thank you for sharing that with us! 🙂 Reply

  • Kate S
    June 11, 2016

    Hi Natasha,

    Delicious! I picked your recipe out of all the recipes I looked at online because you added a great pictorial. I did my beets in a pressure cooker first as they were enormous and round. I’ve just come out of hospital and this soup was so nutritional and comforting I actually feels so much better!
    God bless,

    Kate from Melbourne Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      June 11, 2016

      Kate, this is truly a feel good soup 😀. May God bless you for the speedy recovery. Reply

  • Gary
    April 30, 2016

    Since when did The Ukraine add kidney beans? I know I only lived and worked there for three years but I certainly never found it with beans or without smetana (sour cream) Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 30, 2016

      Hi Gary, we add the beans in our family for protein since there is no meat in this recipe. It’s one of the variations of borsch that our family makes. There are many different ways to make borsch and every family has their own twist on it. I do love it with sour cream also but my husband doesn’t. Reply

    • Phillip Ferrell
      May 1, 2016

      Anastasi puts mayonnaise in ours:-) Reply

  • Phillip Ferrell
    April 23, 2016

    It all looks really good. My woman, she just uses beef or chicken broth(no water)cooks the spuds and beets in the broth, then puts the cabbage in to cook, fries the onions along with bell pepper and what not in a skillet, then pours tomato juice and tomato paste in the skillet, then puts that in the pot along with beets, and yum yum. She’s stuck right now in Donbass in the DPR in donetsk. She can’t get out, and I can’t get in. Bummer. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 23, 2016

      Thank you for sharing her method with us! I’m always curious about how people make their borsch. That is a tough situation for you and I’m sorry to hear that :(. Reply

    • Andrea Robinson
      May 20, 2016

      My son has to make Borsch for his high school cooking class. He’s adopted from Donetsk, I lived there for a few weeks while I finished his paper work. Very depressed in that region. I have friend also stuck there. Putin. Bad news.
      We are making this tonight. But I ate Borsch in Ukraine almost every night for 6 weeks. Couldn’t get enough of it. Reply

      • Phillip Ferrell
        May 21, 2016

        Yeah, I’ve been making it, trying to make it as good as she does, but you know there’s something about a woman’s touch we men just can’t seem to quite copy, lol, especially a Russian girl from Donets’k. You can get the latest news about the struggle by typing the day’s date, and then Doni News in your address bar. Thanks. Phil. Reply

  • Anthony Lamb
    April 4, 2016

    Hello Natasha

    I’ve just watched Poh (Poh’s Kitchen) make this and right at the end she blends it all together to make a thickish smooth soup. Have you made it this way? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 4, 2016

      Its definitely not the traditional way – blending the soup. I love the heartiness of borsch so I never blend it except for the baby to enjoy ofcourse 🙂 Reply

  • Lhyn
    March 3, 2016

    Hello.. Just now I try this recipe and my employer love it. Thanks Natasha… 😊 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 3, 2016

      I’m so happy to hear that! 🙂 Reply

  • Alicja Abela
    February 17, 2016

    Hi Natasha,
    Just made this and it was beautiful!
    I’ve made the Polish version previously but this recipe is quite easy to make and has extra ingredients I have never used before in this dish. Letting the soup stand for a few hours while still warm infuses the flavours. My husband enjoyed it very much. Thank you. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 17, 2016

      You are welcome 😁, I’m glad you liked it. I totally agree with you to have the soup stand for few hours. Reply

  • Kim
    February 8, 2016

    Can you suggest an alternative to ketchup for those of us who prefer to use non-processed foods? I don’t know about the States, but here in Australia, it’s full of sugar. Can I just add sugar and then some lemon juice for tartness?
    Cheerio! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 8, 2016

      Yes that would work fine as a substitute. You can also use a little tomato paste. Reply

    • Chris A Marcus
      February 22, 2016

      Tomato paste would probably work. Also you could substitute stevia for the sugar to make it healthier. Reply

    • Anthony
      April 4, 2016

      Here (across the ditch) in GodsOwn, Heinz Watties have a ketchup with 50% less sugar. Maybe they have it in Aussie too. Reply

  • John
    February 4, 2016

    i love how you tried to name it Ukranian even though original link clearly states correct version of the name 😉

    p.s. not a russian just realistic person from USA 🙂 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 4, 2016

      Ha ha, yes, after posting that recipe (6 years ago), it was too late to change the link because it would be broken all over the internet, but I came to find out that the origin of borscht is actually Ukrainian. And, I came to find out there are ALOT of people who are very passionate about that fact. 😉 Reply

      • David Odenwalder
        March 15, 2016

        followed this link for “Krashiy Borscht”. Krasniy is the Russian word for red and also means beautiful. Ukrainian uses the word chervoniiy for red. So the name is Russian- even if the recipe is not. Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          March 15, 2016

          Ha! Good point! 🙂 Reply

  • grant
    February 2, 2016

    I am looking to making this ‘peasant’ soup at the weekend, millions during WW2 cant be wrong! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 2, 2016

      I would love to hear how it turned out 😀. Reply

  • Dorothy
    January 23, 2016

    Hi Natasha,
    I just finished making this soup, love it!
    Instead of Kidney beans I used Chick peas! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 24, 2016

      Dorothy, thank you for the nice review, I’m glad you like it 😃. Reply

  • Phil & June Keicher
    January 23, 2016

    We loved this recipe. My wife June said it was “perfect”. We’ve never made borscht before but have always wanted to. We were inspired by this recipe and the fact that our dish was prepared with cabbage and beets taken directly from of our fall garden. We topped ours with creme fraiche which provided a nice taste accent. Thanks so much! We look forward to trying other recipes. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 23, 2016

      Thank you for sharing that with me :). I’m so happy you both enjoyed it! Reply

  • Tanya
    January 17, 2016

    Hi Natasha, this one looks so light and refreshing. And the color is so inviting! I was wondering is there a way to omit the onions but still have that onion taste? I have this huge problem with cooked onions and their texture. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 18, 2016

      Hi Tanya, you could put in the onion just peeled and cut in half and then fish them out and discard before serving the soup; that way you infuse the soup with onion flavor without the onion actually being in there. 🙂 Reply

  • maurizio
    January 17, 2016

    Natasha thanks for the idea.. I sub brussell sprouts instead of cabbage because i didn’t have it and i added some veal shank extract i had saved. it came out pretty good. First time for me with this delicious earthy soup. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 17, 2016

      Thank you for the nice review and great job improvising the recipe 😁. Reply

  • Joanna
    January 15, 2016

    I made your soup and I loved it! Couldn’t resist to add a polish touch to it (brown sugar) to make it a little sweeter. Thank you for the recipe 🙂 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 15, 2016

      That’s a great suggestion! Thanks for sharing! 🙂 Reply

  • Sharon
    January 12, 2016

    Dear Natasha, We made this version of your borscht last year and loved it! I would like to add beef to it…but still boil the beets as called for here. Any thoughts (or warnings) about merging this version with your Borscht with Beef recipe? Thank you! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 12, 2016

      I would probably just follow the borsch with beef recipe since that one is based on this one. 🙂 I hope you love it just as much! Reply

  • John
    January 11, 2016

    5 star recipe i substituted vinegar@ lemon juice made sour beet juice took longer was well worth the flavour the beans were a classic ingredient Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 11, 2016

      I’m so glad you liked it! Thanks John! 🙂 Reply

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