Chicken Stock (Chicken Bone Broth) 3 Ways!

Learn how to make the healthiest, nutrient dense Chicken Stock! You can make chicken bone broth in an instant pot, slow cooker, or on the stovetop.

Chicken bone broth is a natural way to heal your gut and improve our health. There’s a reason why people have been making chicken soup for ages when they aren’t feeling well, and if that chicken soup is a bone broth, it is truly a healing food. We use this chicken broth to make Easy Chicken Noodle Soup.

Chicken stock bone broth in mason jars

Chicken Stock Recipe:

I’ve been incorporating bone broth into my diet throughout the week, using it in my cooking for recipes that call for broth or stock and the depth of flavor in bone broth just makes everything taste so much richer. I also love to ladle it into a mug, sprinkle with salt, pepper and some freshly chopped parsley and just drink it hot like tea. It makes ‘ma belly feel so good!

Friends, this is our first Instant pot recipe!! To be honest, the Instant Pot (affiliate link) bone broth was my favorite method. The broth had the richest flavor and it was the clearest broth since a pressure cooker is the hands off approach. There was no skimming required, and it was the fastest method of all (2 hours of pressure cooking vs 15 hours in the crockpot or stovetop). It was amazing! I was so impressed and just completely fell in love with my Instant Pot.

Note: We included Amazon affiliate links below to our favorite kitchen tools.

Steamy chicken stock made of chicken bone broth in a bowl garnished with parsley

Ingredients for Chicken Stock (Chicken Bone Broth):

2 1/2 lbs of chicken bones (from 2 chickens), roasted*
1 Tbsp cider vinegar
1 tsp salt
1 medium onion, peeled and halved
2 ribs/sticks of celery (cut into thirds, with leaves attached)
2 medium carrots, peeled and halved
2 smashed garlic cloves
1 bay leaf, optional, but nice
Filtered Water (stock pot: 16 cups, 6Qt Slow Cooker: 12 cups, Instant Pot: 10-11 cups)

Ingredients for chicken stock with whole chicken carcass

*Roast the Bones (for all bone broth methods):

If bones are from a cooked chicken or turkey, skip this roasting step. If using a whole raw chicken, watch this tutorial on how to cut a whole chickenPlace raw bones on a lined rimmed baking sheet and roast at 400˚F for 20 minutes. Transfer bones and any pan juices to your pot. Many recipes call for just raw bones which is ok, but roasting will really enhance their flavor.

How to roast chicken bones

Stovetop Method (15 Hours of Slow Cooking):

The stovetop method is best if you have a huge stock pot and want to make a double batch, otherwise, it required the most babysitting and the temptation to check on it to make sure it wasn’t boiling like crazy was definitely there! The liquid does evaporate the most which is why more water is required for this method.

Pro Cooking Tip: Bone broth is best when it is cooked until you can easily break a chicken bone in half with your hands. This means the amazing nutrients from the marrow are in your broth. You also know if you cooked it long enough when it thickens after refrigeration – which is totally normal. The broth turns to liquid again when it is heated.

Slow Cooker Method (15 Hours on Low Heat):

This is the set it and forget it method! Start with warm or hot water to jump start it for heating up then set it and forget it. The slow cooker can gently simmer while you sleep. The resulting bone broth is rich in color and flavor since the broth is not stirred and never vigorously boiled in the slow cooker. This method is EASY!

Homemade chicken stock served in a bowl

Instant Pot Chicken Bone Broth (2 Hrs):

1. Place roasting bones and accumulated pan juices into a 6Qt instant pot.

2. Add onion, celery, carrots, garlic, bay leaf, 1 Tbsp cider vinegar and 1 tsp salt.

3. Add 10-11 cups water or until you reach the 2/3 max fill line in the pot.

How to Make Instant Pot Chicken Bone Broth

4. Select soup/broth and set the time to 2 hours (120 minutes). It will warm up then cook on high pressure for 2 hours (120 minutes). When cooking is complete, wait 30 minutes for it to naturally depressurize then release pressure (I always use an oven mitt for safety in case the valve sputters).

How to Strain and Store Chicken Stock:

1. When done, strain through a fine mesh sieve into a second pot, extracting as much liquid as possible. Discard the solids. Cool strained stock to room temperature then cover and refrigerate.

2. The following day, it will thicken and you can scrape the fat off the top and continue to store in the fridge for 3-5 days or transfer to freezer safe containers and freeze up to 3 months (if freezing, leave space in containers for expansion).

Chicken Stock (Chicken Bone Broth) 3 Ways!

5 from 12 votes
Prep Time: 25 minutes
Cook Time: 2 hours 30 minutes
Total Time: 2 hours 55 minutes
How to make nutrient rich, flavorful chicken stock (bone broth) in an instant pot, slow cooker, or stovetop. Use homemade chicken bone broth in any recipe. | natashaskitchen.com
Learn how to make one of the healthiest, nutrient dense chicken stocks! You can make chicken bone broth in an instant pot, slow cooker, or on the stovetop*
Author: Natasha of NatashasKitchen.com
Skill Level: Easy
Cost to Make: $5-$7
Calories: 14 kcal
Servings: 8 cups bone broth

Ingredients

  • 2 1/2 lbs of chicken bones from 2 chickens, roasted*
  • 1 Tbsp cider vinegar
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 medium onion peeled and halved
  • 2 celery ribs cut into thirds, leaves attached
  • 2 carrots peeled & halved
  • 2 smashed garlic cloves
  • 1 bay leaf optional, but nice
  • Filtered Water Stock Pot: 16 c., 6Qt Slow Cooker: 12 c., Instant Pot: 10-11 c.

Instructions

*Roast the Bones (for all methods):

  1. If using bones from a cooked chicken or turkey, skip this step. Place bones on a lined rimmed baking sheet and roast at 400˚F for 20 minutes.

Stovetop Method (15 hours simmering):

  1. Place roasted bones and any accumulated pan juices into your 8 qt stock pot. Add 16 cups (or 4 Qts) filtered water along with 1 Tbsp cider vinegar and 1 tsp salt. Bring to boil then reduce heat to a simmer. Skim off impurities that rise to the top. Cover and simmer on low heat 6 hrs then add onion, celery, carrots, 2 smashed garlic cloves and 1 bay leaf.
  2. Continue cooking on a low simmer another 9 hrs for a total of 15 hrs simmering time. You can turn it off overnight if needed and continue the following day. Be careful not to bring it to a hard boil or the broth will look foggy.

Slow Cooker Method (15 hours on low):

  1. Place roasted bones and any accumulated pan juices into 6 Qt Slow Cooker. Add 12 cups warm or hot water along with 1 Tbsp cider vinegar and 1 tsp salt. Set to low heat for 15 hrs.
  2. After 6 hours on low heat, add onion, celery, carrots, 2 smashed garlic cloves and 1 bay leaf. Continue cooking on low simmer another 9 hrs for a total of 15 hours cooking time. You can let it go longer if needed overnight and strain the next day.

Instant Pot Method (2 hours pressure cooked):

  1. Place roasting bones and accumulated pan juices into a 6Qt instant pot.
  2. Add onion, celery, carrots, garlic, bay leaf, 1 Tbsp cider vinegar and 1 tsp salt.
  3. Add 10-11 cups water or until you reach the 2/3 max fill line in the pot.
  4. Select soup/broth and set the time to 2 hours (120 minutes). It will warm up then cook on high pressure for 2 hours (120 min). When cooking is complete, wait 30 min to naturally depressurize then release pressure (use an oven mitt for safety in case it sputters).

How to Strain and Store Chicken Stock:

  1. Strain through a fine mesh sieve into a second pot, extracting as much liquid as possible. Discard solids. Cool strained stock to room temp then cover and refrigerate.
  2. The following day, it will thicken and you can scrape the fat off the top and continue to store in the fridge for 3-5 days or transfer to freezer safe containers and freeze up to 3 months (if freezing, leave space in containers for expansion).

Recipe Notes

*cooking time listed at top of print-friendly recipe is for instant pot

Nutrition Facts
Chicken Stock (Chicken Bone Broth) 3 Ways!
Amount Per Serving
Calories 14
% Daily Value*
Sodium 309mg 13%
Potassium 94mg 3%
Total Carbohydrates 3g 1%
Sugars 1g
Vitamin A 51.9%
Vitamin C 3%
Calcium 1.4%
Iron 0.4%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

If you make this recipe, I’d love to see pics of your creations on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter! Hashtag them #natashaskitchen

Enjoy this in any of your favorite recipes that call for broth or chicken stock. I find myself craving this simple and flavorful chicken stock served just like this. I hope you love it as much as we do!

How to make nutrient rich, flavorful chicken stock (bone broth) in an instant pot, slow cooker, or stovetop. Use homemade chicken bone broth in any recipe. | natashaskitchen.com

P.S. Our next post will be related to this one and will be a fun one with a real live chicken! Stay tuned for Friday’s video!! Oh and PPS. If you do buy an instant pot, you’ll be so glad you did. I am completely smitten with it and I see why it has all the incredible reviews on Amazon. I have an instant pot recipe coming that will get you all kinds of excited!!

Have you been experimenting with your instant pot? I’d love to hear about your ideas and recipes below!

How to make nutrient rich, flavorful chicken stock (bone broth) in an instant pot, slow cooker, or stovetop. Use homemade chicken bone broth in any recipe. | natashaskitchen.com

natashaskitchen

Welcome to my kitchen! I am Natasha, the blogger behind Natasha's Kitchen (since 2009). My husband and I run this blog together and share only our best, family approved recipes with YOU. Thanks for stopping by! We are so happy you're here.

Read more posts by Natasha

Read comments/reviewsAdd comment/review

  • Donna
    November 27, 2018

    I am making bone broth for the first time! I just cooked a whole chicken in my Instant Pot. I am going to debone the chicken and use the carcass to make bone broth. I am curious – should I use the chicken broth from just now cooking the chicken as part of the water for the bone broth recipe? Reply

    • Natasha
      November 27, 2018

      Hi Donna, I would totally use any drippings from cooking your whole chicken – it will make for a more flavorful chicken stock. Reply

    • Lee Thayer
      December 15, 2018

      Hi Donna, say for instance you are cooking a whole chicken with the intent to use the chicken shredded in a recipe, like a chicken salad or a soup, what I do is if I want say 2 quarts of broth, I add 2 quarts and maybe 1 cup more, and add the onion, celery + tops, carrot, and some black peppercorns never hurt. Cook on pressure for 7 minutes, allow natural release, boom, now you have 2 quarts of broth and chicken for a salad, etc. Reply

      • Natashas Kitchen
        December 15, 2018

        Thank you for sharing this, Lee! Reply

      • December 15, 2018

        Let me make a correction. A whole chicken, 20 minutes, for bone in pieces like legs and thighs, 7-8 minutes. After you have stripped off the meat, now you have bones for broth. And just a tip, once the pressure releases, remove the lid and leave the chicken in the pot with the broth until room temp, this will make and even more juicy chicken for you. Reply

  • Tatiana
    November 26, 2018

    Hi Natasha! I’m a big fan of your blog, it’s always open on my tablet. Had a question about this recipe. I used my brand new IP for first time to make this bone broth from a turkey carcass. When my IP reached the pressure, it acted like a humidifier for 1.5 hours making me nervous if that was even normal. After my patience reached its limit I turned it off and looked inside when it let me open the lid. There was at least twice as less liquid comparing to the beginning. The liquid was much darker than it looks in your pictures. It looked overcooked to me. I used the “broth/soup” settings. Do you have an idea what might have gone wrong? Thank you! Reply

    • Natasha
      November 26, 2018

      Hi Tatiana, it sounds like maybe you didn’t switch the knob at the top to seal the pressure in, especially if you are describing it as a humidifier. There should only be steam coming out of the top momentarily just before it seals. I would highly, highly recommend reading the instruction manual if it is your first time using it – also to make sure you are using it safely since the pressure cooker can be a dangerous tool if not used correctly. Reply

      • Tatiana
        November 27, 2018

        Thanks for getting back to me, Natasha! We had gone through the manual several times, and the knob was in the right position… We even cancelled and restarted the program after my husband checked all the knobs… At least, now I know that it should not be like that! Anyways… Thank you for your amazing recipes and entertaining posts! Please keep them coming! Reply

        • Natashas Kitchen
          November 27, 2018

          I hope you can figure that out soon, Tatiana! Reply

  • Sophie
    October 31, 2018

    Amazing! We can’t buy instant pots within New Zealand but I got something similar just this month and I’m so happy with this recipe! It makes such a quick flavourful clear stock without all the skimming.
    I made chicken breast in the pressure cooker yesterday which did not work well. Pink in the middle dry everywhere else 😅 but made some more stock today and poured it over soba noodles and chopped up dry chicken and everyone was happy. Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      October 31, 2018

      I’m so happy you were able to make this recipe, Sophie!! Thank you for the wonderful review! Reply

  • Katie
    October 8, 2018

    Hi Natasha – just curious why the vegetables and aromatics aren’t added right away. Reply

    • Natasha
      October 9, 2018

      Hi Katie, In the instant pot version, everything goes into the pot together including the vegetables and aromatics. The other long-cooking methods, the vegetables turn to mush and are difficult to strain since it cooks for so long so we don’t add them right away. Reply

      • Ashley
        October 29, 2018

        This recipe turned out amazing!! I didn’t peel any of my vegetables, leaving the paper on the onion, so mine turned out much darker than yours, plus, I added a generous handful of dried shiitake mushrooms for more flavor. I also used the bones from 2 store bought rotisserie chickens.

        Apparently, I picked the perfect day to make it too, because I’ve come down with a nasty head cold. This will be really good right now. Thank you for the recipe! Worth every second it took to make it! Reply

        • Natashas Kitchen
          October 29, 2018

          I’m so happy you enjoyed that Ashley!! Reply

  • Alena
    October 6, 2018

    Natasha, I was thinking of making holodets in IP. Do you have any suggestions how I would go about it? 🤔 Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      October 6, 2018

      cHi Alena! That is an interesting idea. I honestly haven’t tried that. If you experiment with that I would love to know the process! Reply

  • Connie
    July 2, 2018

    Hi Natasha. I want to make your bone broth for my husband since he is having surgery. I have been cooking my chickens and saving the bones. Can I also put some of the crispy skin in with the bones or will that make the broth murky? Thanks so much for such delicious recipes and for an awesome blog. Reply

    • Natasha
      July 2, 2018

      Hi Connie, you can add the skin and bones and it will work great :). Reply

  • Nellie
    March 5, 2018

    This might be an odd question, but what do you do with the chicken meat after the pressure cooker? Discard? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 5, 2018

      Hi Nellie, yes, you can discard the bones and vegetables since all of the nutritive value will be in the broth. Reply

  • Rita
    January 31, 2018

    So excited you got the pot! Looking forward to the recipes!
    I really liked how clean the broth turned out. I used chicken backs from Whole Foods and unfortunately it never got thick/jello like.. what could be the reason? I also heard from farmers that people use chicken legs 🙈 to make broth since that’s a good source of gelatin.. sounds unpleasant but… just wanted to mention 🙂 I also crack the drumsticks if I use those to let the goodies come out. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 31, 2018

      Hi Rita, I also heard that about chicken legs. Adding wings or bones from drumsticks can definitely help. Reply

  • Zina P
    January 30, 2018

    Awesomeness! I’m addicted to my Instant Pot and hope you will add more recipes for it. I’m also curious about sous vide….I am a sucker for kitchen “toys.” Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 30, 2018

      Hi Zina, that is a tool that I am unfamiliar with (the sous vide) although I spotted a cookbook for it at Costco today which got me curious! 🙂 Reply

  • Thomas Mercks
    January 16, 2018

    Method 4. At least for a starter. I bake a lot of chicken on the bone, usually quarters, where there is more fat. I usually bake 4 leg quarters at 400deg for about 1 hour. There are plenty of drippings. Capture/drain all this in a cup. Leave in the fridge for a night. The broth will separate from the fat. Scrape off the white fat from the top – which can be used making candles or soaps (see the internet) as in the old days. The gelled chicken bone broth is in the bottom of the cup. I freeze these “hockey pucks” (as my daughter calls them) for use in soups, stews, gravies, even as a water flavoring for boiling up mashed potatoes. Not a bad idea to add the celery, carrots, onion, etc when baking the chicken covered with foil. Uncover to finsh and crisp up the last ten minutes or so. I keep a few hockey pucks in the freezer all the time and use for concentrated flavoring. Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      January 16, 2018

      Great tips Thomas, thanks for sharing! Reply

  • Natasha
    natashaskitchen
    January 12, 2018

    I’m so glad you love our site! Oh my goodness you’re right, I meant to put that in the slow cooker section. Thank you!! 🙂 Reply

  • Olga
    January 12, 2018

    Hi Natasha,
    I make chicken (and beef) broth the same way as you do, keeping aromatics and sodium at minimal. I prefer the stovetop method, barely simmering it for several hours. I also peel off the skin and remove any visual fat before roasting the pieces.
    What i wanted to share is my storing method. I sterilize quart sized (sometimes even half-gallon) jars, lids and mouth rings and after the broth is done i skim off any excess fat, and filter the broth of any impurities through fine mesh strainer and tighten up the lids. They seal properly, as when you’re canning. So this method keeps the broth in the fridge at least for two weeks (usually i use it earlier) without changing the taste and flavor. The key is to sterilize jars and lids and also that broth needs to be boiling-hot temperature.
    P.S. i use this method for storing broth, because can’t stand the flavor of defrosted one. I also doubt the benefits of homemade frozen broth🤔. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 12, 2018

      I LOVE LOVE LOVE your idea for storage!! Broth goes bad quickly otherwise and I will definitely be trying that next time I make a batch! Thank you for sharing your tips! 🙂 Reply

      • Liz
        January 15, 2018

        I was taught to never let the stock boil because it would go cloudy. How do you keep it clear? Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          January 15, 2018

          Hi Liz, this is why I prefer it in the slow cooker and instant pot – it sits mostly undisturbed whereas in the pot, if you turn on the heat to bring it to a boil, it can get to a fierce boil without you noticing (speaking from several experiences) 😉 Reply

        • Doris
          May 22, 2018

          Liz , my Grandmother told me to add to all stock pots a egg shell (just shell ) it keeps the broth clear . I have been doing this for 40 years and it seems to work on chicken and beef broth. Reply

  • Elena
    January 12, 2018

    I love your blog and have recommended it to probably hundreds of people at this point 😊I am so excited your have an IP! It’s an amazing piece of kitchen equipment. It’s been a dinner saver for my family counless times. There is a great FB group for IP recipes, join us 😉 – Instant Pot: рецепты, идеи, советы Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 12, 2018

      Thank you so much for sharing that with me! I will have to check it out! 🙂 Reply

    • Mariya
      January 15, 2018

      Elena, can you post a link to FB group for IP recipes? Thank you Reply

  • Lena
    January 11, 2018

    Hey, this looks good I should try it!!!! Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      January 11, 2018

      I vote yes!! 🙂 Reply

      • Lena
        January 11, 2018

        Really Good!!! Reply

  • saiba mais
    January 11, 2018

    Este site é excelente, sempre que visito tem novidades, deveria ter mais sites assim, parabéns. Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      January 11, 2018

      ¡Me alegra que estés disfrutando tanto de las recetas! ¡Gracias por seguir! Reply

  • Lana
    January 10, 2018

    How do you make chicken broth? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 10, 2018

      Hi Lana, I use this method whenever I make chicken stock or broth. The lengthier cooking time just makes it way healthier 🙂 Reply

  • Olya
    January 10, 2018

    Natasha you are my favorite blogger out there! Your recipes so easy to follow. Love love your blog!! I dont have a Instant pot but want to get one. Which one do you have or recommend? Also, the chicken in this recipe what did you Do to it? Buy a whole one and removed the meat? Thanks Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 10, 2018

      Hi Olya, you are so sweet! Thank you for that amazing compliment! I have a link to the Instant Pot I received for Christmas. I love it!! Also, I do buy a whole chicken and cut it into pieces. I’m so glad you asked! I have a tutorial on how to cut a whole chicken that I will be posting on Friday so stay tuned 🙂 Reply

  • Heather
    January 10, 2018

    Do you have a recipe for vegetable broth/stock? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 10, 2018

      Hi Heather, I don’t yet but that would be a great one to add! It would take quite a bit less time since you don’t have to wait for bones to soften. Thanks for the tip! 🙂 Reply

  • Megan
    January 9, 2018

    I tried feijoida tonight and my husband, me, and oldest really liked it. Our favorite thing we have made since we got it at Christmas was meatloaf and potatoes…so good! Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      January 10, 2018

      That sounds yummy! I’m loving my instapot as well! 🙂 Reply

  • Marina
    January 9, 2018

    I am SO excited for your first Instant Pot recipe, this means I have more (IP recipes) to look forward to!:)
    Making bone broth in the IP has been my favorite method since I got my appliance. I make it pretty much the same but I do omit the carrots since carrots give the broth a sweetness which I’m not fond of. But we all have our preferences!
    Looking forward to your next post, I know it’ll be great! Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      January 10, 2018

      I’m happy to hear that Marina! I’m loving my instapot too! Thanks for following Marina! Reply

  • Tatyana S.
    January 9, 2018

    Looks so perfect and delicious👌🏻

    I have to try this instant pot method, I got excited when I seen that u have that method. I love my instant pot so I’m definitely looking forward to more recipes that u will come up with so I can use it even more😄 Thank you once again!

    Love how rice turnsout in the instant pot, jasmine rice or basmati rice is one of my favorite rice. I don’t have to count, how long I have cooked my rice on the stove or is it done already.?! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 9, 2018

      You know I haven’t tried rice yet but was definitely planning on it! I was going through the manual and was shocked at how quick that cooks! And especially brown rice – it’s like 1/3 of the time! I imagine the instant pot will save me so much time in life and in my work with cutting down my prep time in case I need cooked rice for a recipe 😉 Let me know what your favorite recipes are for the instant pot so far! I’m so eager to try more! 🙂 Reply

      • Tatyana S.
        January 10, 2018

        Plov recipe: I go by your recipe for the ingredients. For the instant pot method just fry the meat to brown and then cook for about 25mins meat setting(in the instant pot), it’s nice that it has the sauté function, then I fry onions and carrots a little, add the basmati rice and water( by the instructions in the book for basmati rice) also I add all the spices and garlic, and cook for 6 mins if I’m not mistaken for (basmati). ( the key is to turn off the pressure cooker right away when it’s done cooking ur rice for plov( since it cooks rice so quick, if u leave it on warm button right away, it might make the rice mushy, ( that’s what my mom found best way is to unplug it right away when it’s done cooking), the plov sure Will stay hot for a good bit)
        My mom likes to make plov Sunday morning before she heads to church when it beeps that it’s done she just unplugs it and heads to church…

        She also uses the pressure cooker for her braised potatoes recipe which basically cooks the
        Meat first which is pork or baby ribs, fry
        The onions, adds the potatoes and spices, and the ajvar spread(from Russian store) instead of tomato paste, it adds delicious flavor, and she says that Idaho potatoes are the best for braised potatoes* after all she cooks that for 10 mins but for instant pot mine takes 8mins on soup mode* ( she has different namebrand pressure cooker that’s why hers takes little longer) and also unplug the pressure cooker right away after it’s done cooking… the braised potatoes are one of my favorite and when she taught me how to make them fast in the pressure cooker, I love them even more. It’s nice to have a recipe that can be made quickly for lunch or dinner when ur short on time😊 Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          January 10, 2018

          That is so awesome of you to share!! I’ve been working on a plov in the instant pot where you only have to set it once and I’ve almost got it nailed down :). I can’t wait to try your braised potatoes recipe! Thank you! Thank you!! Reply

  • Marina
    January 9, 2018

    I’ve been making bone broth in my instant pot for several years now. It’s so delicious! I always add peppercorns all red pepper flakes if I want it a little spicy, it’s the best remedy for cold or flu!! Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      January 9, 2018

      Thanks for sharing your tip with other readers Marina! Reply

Add comment/review

Leave a comment

As Featured On

Never Go "Hangry" Again!

Get weekly updates on new recipes, exclusive giveaways plus behind the scenes photos.