Homemade Sauerkraut Recipe (Kvashenaya Kapusta)

My mom has been making this homemade sauerkraut since I can remember. It is a classic Ukrainian/Russian tradition and it’s way easier than you might think! Did you know you could make a fantastic salad with it? It’s strangely delicious.

If you’ve tried a Slavic Kvashenaya Kapusta or Kysla Kapusta (our version of sauerkraut), you already know that there is nothing like a homemade sauerkraut. You can use it in anything that you’d put sauerkraut in (this is sauerkraut after all). Try it in the braised cabbage with beef … yum! I have two salad ideas detailed here, just for you. Because I like ya!

*A Note on the Cabbage: buy the ones that are light in color and NOT bright green (the light color indicates that it is a “late” in the year cabbage which works best for this recipe).
*The ones at the farmers market in Fall are best. Also, if you are using a soup pot for the fermenting process, don’t use aluminum.

OUR LATEST VIDEOS

Ingredients for Homemade Sauerkraut:

2 medium/large cabbages (2 1/2 kg or about 5 1/2 lbs) *See cabbage note above
2-3 medium carrots, grated
2 Tbsp fine sea salt
1 Tbsp sugar

Two ways to serve homemade Sauerkraut as a salad:

#1 Mom’s Classic Sauerkraut Salad:

1/2 small purple Onion, finely diced
2 Tbsp Sunflower Oil (preferred for more flavor), or olive oil

Homemade Sauerkraut-13

#2 Sauerkraut Apple Salad:

1/2 small purple Onion, finely diced
1/2 Apple (any kind; I used gala), diced
1/2 tsp sugar
2 Tbsp white grapes or dried cranberries
1-2 Tbsp extra light olive oil (not extra virgin)

Homemade Sauerkraut-12

How to Make Homemade Sauerkraut:

1. Remove the outermost leaves of the cabbage, cut it into quarters and shred cabbage finely (use a mandolin to do this if you know what’s good for you ;)). (discard the core, or trim it and eat it – it’s very tasty and good for you!). Grate the carrots.

Homemade Sauerkraut-3

2. In a large silver bowl, place cabbage, carrots, 2 Tbsp sea salt and 1 Tbsp sugar and scrunch and knead it together really well for the juice to be released from the cabbage (4-5 min). You don’t want it to be super juicy, just enough to cover the lettuce when you really pack it down in a jar.

homemade-sauerkraut

Scrunch it…

Homemade Sauerkraut-9

And scrunch it good…

Homemade Sauerkraut-10

See the juice? All a result of good scrunching.

Homemade Sauerkraut-11

3. Fill a glass jar with the cabbage mixture and pack it in very tightly so that the juice from the cabbage covers the cabbage completely. You want a jar big enough to be filled only about 2/3 full so it has room to expand

Homemade Sauerkraut-19

4. Make a press over the top of the cabbage by pushing down with a plate (or the lid from a large sour cream container). Top with a small jar of water, a super clean rock or whatever else would make a good weight.  Place the lid on the jar but do not tighten (this is just to keep bugs out). Its a good idea to keep the bottle in the sink or over a dish since there is risk of it overflowing (this is also why we only fill it 2/3 full; it grows!). Let stand at room temp for 4 days or until sour. It will stop fermenting/rising when it’s done

Homemade Sauerkraut-2-2

5. While it sits at room temperature, once each day: poke a few holes through the cabbage with the back of a wooden mixing spoon to release the gas that this process produces and pack the cabbage down tightly. I skipped a day with the poking and it was no big deal. If you are making a bigger batch, the poking process is more important to let the gasses escape.

Homemade Sauerkraut-4-2

6. After 4 days, refrigerate until ready to serve. Can be stored for a few weeks if kept very cold. Did you notice how the cabbage grew? Compare it to the photo in step 3.

Homemade Sauerkraut-3-2

And in the fridge it goes. Whoa is that our roasted salsa? Oh yes!

Homemade Sauerkraut-5-2 

To serve, drain the amount of cabbage that you would like to eat by firmly squeezing out the excess juice with your hands. Add in your salad ingredients, mix well and serve. Easy peasy!

homemade-sauerkraut-1
homemade-sauerkraut-3
Enjoy!

Homemade Sauerkraut Recipe (Kvashenaya Kapusta)

4.95 from 19 votes
Prep Time: 30 minutes
Total Time: 30 minutes
Author: Natasha of NatashasKitchen.com
Skill Level: Easy
Cost to Make: $5-$7
Servings: 8 cups

Ingredients

Ingredients for Homemade Sauerkraut:

  • 2 medium/large cabbages 2 1/2 kg or about 5 1/2 lbs
  • 2-3 medium carrots grated
  • 2 Tbsp fine sea salt
  • 1 Tbsp sugar

Two ways to serve as a salad:

Mom's Classic Sauerkraut Salad:

  • 1/2 small purple Onion finely diced
  • 2 Tbsp Sunflower Oil preferred for more flavor, or olive oil

Sauerkraut Apple Salad:

  • 1/2 small purple Onion finely diced
  • 1/2 Apple any kind; I used gala, diced
  • 1/2 tsp sugar
  • 2 Tbsp white grapes or dried cranberries
  • 1-2 Tbsp extra light olive oil not extra virgin

Instructions

How to Make Russian Sauerkraut:

  1. Remove the outermost leaves of the cabbage, cut it into quarters and shred cabbage finely (use a mandolin to do this faster and discard the core.
  2. In a large silver bowl, place cabbage, carrots, 2 Tbsp sea salt and 1 Tbsp sugar and scrunch and knead it together really well for the juice to be released from the cabbage (4-5 min). You don't want it to be super juicy, just enough to cover the lettuce when you really pack it down in a jar.
  3. Scrunch it until juices start to come out.
  4. Fill a glass jar with the cabbage mixture and pack it in very tightly so that the juice from the cabbage covers the cabbage completely. You want a jar big enough to be filled only about 2/3 full so it has room to expand.
  5. Make a press over the top of the cabbage by pushing down with a plate (or the lid from a large sour cream container). Top with a small jar of water, a super clean rock or whatever else would make a good weight. Place the lid on the jar but do not tighten. Its a good idea to keep the bottle in the sink or over a dish since there is risk of it overflowing (this is also why we only fill it 2/3 full; it grows!). Let stand at room temp for 4 days or until sour. It will stop fermenting/rising when it's done.
  6. While it sits at room temperature, once each day: poke a few holes through the cabbage with the back of a wooden mixing spoon to release the gas that this process produces and pack the cabbage down tightly.
  7. After 4 days, refrigerate until ready to serve. Can be stored for a few weeks if kept very cold.

To serve, drain the amount of cabbage that you would like to eat by firmly squeezing out the excess juice with your hands. Add in your salad ingredients, mix well and serve.

Recipe Notes

*A Note on the Cabbage: buy the ones that are light in color and NOT bright green (the light color indicates that it is a "late" in the year cabbage which works best for this recipe).
*The ones at the farmers market in Fall are best. Also, if you are using a soup pot for the fermenting process, don't use aluminum.
Start to finish, recipe takes 4 days.

natashaskitchen

Welcome to my kitchen! I am Natasha, the blogger behind Natasha's Kitchen (since 2009). My husband and I run this blog together and share only our best, family approved recipes with YOU. Thanks for stopping by! We are so happy you're here.

Read more posts by Natasha

Read comments/reviewsAdd comment/review

  • Melissa
    June 1, 2018

    Hi Natasha!! I love all your recepies; they are delicious ❤

    I just have a question regarding the “sour cream lid” used for the press… Do you leave that lid in there through the entire fermenting process or do you just use it to push the cabbage down? Reply

    • Natasha
      June 2, 2018

      Hi Melissa, we keep the press on while it ferments so the cabbage stays submerged, otherwise it rises and goes above the level of the liquid. Reply

      • Melissa
        June 4, 2018

        Great! Thanks! 🙂 Reply

  • sue
    March 14, 2018

    Natasha hi, I am making 2d one. After 2d day it became slimy and smells funny… Any ideas? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 14, 2018

      Hi Sue, did you make sure your sauerkraut was submerged in the liquid before leaving it to ferment? Did you use any substitutions in the recipe? Reply

  • Llinda
    February 12, 2018

    Fresh home made sourkraut is full of healthy probiotics! Don’t cook it as this will kill the little good guys to n there! Reply

  • Natalya Shemchuk
    November 10, 2017

    Why kvashena kapusta became slimy? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 10, 2017

      Hi Natalya, that can occur if you do not have the top layer submerged in the liquid – this is why I create a press to keep it pushed down. Also, be sure to store in the refrigerator when directed in the recipe Reply

  • Tatiana Jackson
    September 10, 2017

    Natasha, thank you for the recipe. I love your website and use it a lot.
    Just made the sauerkraut, packed it tightly and decided against the weight on top. Will wait and see what will happen. Your little tips are very helpful- like placing the jar on a plate to prevent overflow spills. Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      September 10, 2017

      Hello Tatiana! Thanks for following! Please let me know how it turns out! Reply

  • Amy
    August 4, 2017

    Delicious and easy way to add fermented food to my diet. I am really loving every recipe I have tried from your website. Thanks! Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      August 5, 2017

      My pleasure Amy! I’m glad to hear you love the recipes! Thanks for following and sharing your great review! Reply

  • Lena
    June 10, 2017

    Perfect!! Left it to ferment for 4 days and it came out PERFECT. Very crunchy and great tart taste without an overpowering vinegar scent to it like storebought. Thanks so much. Reply

    • Lena
      June 10, 2017

      Aye, I meant to put down 5 stars Reply

      • Natasha's Kitchen
        June 10, 2017

        Thank you!!!! <3 Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      June 10, 2017

      My pleasure Lena1 Thanks for sharing your wonderful review! Reply

  • Vic
    May 12, 2017

    I’ve never used sugar when making sauerkraut and I’ve never scrunched it either, although my mother does scrunch hers. I simply fold the salt in and then pack it down well. It doesn’t take long before the salt draws the moisture out. I check it every now and then and if the liquid hasn’t covered the cabbage, I simply add more weights until it does. We also add some chopped fresh dill to the Classic Sauerkraut Salad. Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      May 13, 2017

      That’s great Vic! Thanks for sharing your tips! 🙂 Reply

  • Elena
    May 9, 2017

    Is it possible to do it without sugar? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 9, 2017

      Hi Elena, I just checked with my Mom to be sure and she said yes! Her mother used to make it without any sugar at all. I hope you love it! Reply

  • masha
    February 28, 2017

    Hi Natasha, have to comment on your kapusta recipe. THANK YOU and SPASIBO. Kapusta turned out totally super great, sour, crispy …. perfect. Thanks. Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      February 28, 2017

      You’re welcome! Thanks for sharing your review!! 🙂 Reply

  • deb
    February 21, 2017

    How do you get rid of the gas that follows when eating cabbage? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 21, 2017

      lol. I don’t have an easy answer for that. Stand against the wind I guess. Lol. 🙂 Reply

  • Tanya
    January 3, 2017

    Will this recipe work with store bought cabbage? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 3, 2017

      Hi Tanya, yes, please see the note at the top of the post about selecting the right kind 🙂 Enjoy!! Reply

  • Marilyn
    October 13, 2016

    I have made sauerkraut for 50 years and I use coarse salt and caroway seed. Unique taste for sure. After making cabbage rolls I cover them with sauerkraut and tomatoes. Baked for 1 1/2 hours Freezes very well. I bought a fermenting/burping crock today and will make it fresh all winter. I usually use my very large crock which makes 75 ibis of sauerkraut and process it to can for the winter. Everyone wants a quart or five. Lol. Super food for sure. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 14, 2016

      I’ve never even heard of a fermenting crock. I’ll have to look into it! 🙂 Reply

  • Ogi the Yogi
    May 16, 2016

    This капуста came out perfectly used the same jar worked great as it has a wide mouth opening! Thanks! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 16, 2016

      That’s wonderful!! Thank you so much for your awesome review! 🙂 Reply

  • Pamela Shell
    April 10, 2016

    I’ve been dying to get my hands on a recipe like this. Thanks a million. Look forward to making it. Seashalia Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 10, 2016

      I hope you love it!! We grew up eating this. 🙂 Reply

  • Ogi the Yogi
    March 29, 2016

    What size jar are you using for this amount of cabbage? Is it a 32oz or a gallon size jar! Thank you so much for your recipe. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 29, 2016

      It’s about 2 liters, and you are welcome 😄. Reply

  • Barnabas
    March 7, 2016

    Hi Natasha,
    Thank you so much for the recipe – I had some Ukrainian cabbage at a Church pot-luck made by my Ukrainian friends who gave me virtually the same recipe without your instructions – yum- cannot wait to make some tonight! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 7, 2016

      Welcome to the site Barnabas 😀. Let me know how it turns out and I hope that you’ll find many more favorites. Reply

  • Jim Kopanko
    February 2, 2016

    Hi Natasha, GREAT blog. I have a quick question. I’m making the sauerkraut. It’s been sitting out for 3 days now and I’m noticing more bubbles around the edges, like in your picture where the jar is in the refrigerator. When I removed the weight and the plastic lid from the surface to poke through it with the spoon I noticed that the liquid seems to be slightly viscous (like boiled okra, but not so much). The foam kind of clings to the spoon when I skim it off. Is this a normal development, or does this indicate there’s a problem with it? It smells normal, and looks pretty much like your pictures. Thanks in advance for your feedback! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 2, 2016

      Hi Jim. Thank you! 🙂 I haven’t had the experience of the liquid becoming viscous. Was your cabbage submerged in the liquid? Were you poking holes daily to release the gases? The foaming is normal but I’m not sure about it being viscous. Did you use a different kind of cabbage possibly? Reply

      • Jim
        February 14, 2016

        Hi Natasha,
        Just wanted to let you know, this condition, which was only just noticeable, seemed to improve after I refrigerated the batch. It still looked and smelled fine, so we sampled it and it was delicious–fully soured and no strange or “off” tastes at all. We’ve since used almost all of it uncooked as salads. I’m making more–great recipe! Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          February 14, 2016

          Oh that’s great! Thanks Jim 🙂 Reply

  • Nellie
    October 16, 2015

    Natasha , you mentioned in your recipe 2 tbs of sea salt . There are so many kinds of salt now and they all have different level of saltiness . I use kosher salt for everyday cooking , but probably it will be to mild for this recipe . Can you please suggest right kind of salt for this recipe ? I assume it has to be a coarse salt , right?

    Thank you in advance . You blog is wonderful and my place to go for ideas and recipes. Reply

  • Oksana
    October 6, 2015

    I should have made a double batch. I finally made it, and it went in the fridge yesterday. Today morning, my husband ended up eating some for breakfast with his bacon and eggs. He liked it that much.
    Thanks to you, now I won’t have to go begging my mom for some kvashenaya kapusta every time I’m craving that salad or the kapustnyak soup 😉 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 6, 2015

      Oksana, thank you for the great review on the sauerkraut and I’m looking forward to trying your recipe for kapustnyak! 🙂  Reply

  • March 7, 2015

    Privet Natasha! Thank you for such a wonderful sauerkraut recipe! I made and fermented it 3 days, used only 1 carrot, it’s perfect! Will try it with apples and raisins! Thanks again and Happy March 8th! God bless! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 7, 2015

      Thank you so much Cher 🙂 Reply

      • March 17, 2015

        made it again this afternoon, we love, LOVE, lOVe it!!!! Can’t wait, 3 days seem forever! Thank you!!! Reply

  • Mindy Allensworth
    September 29, 2014

    Do you know if it would be able to be frozen to keep longer then a few weeks? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 29, 2014

      Mindy, I never tried freezing it before, it would have to be an experiment :). Reply

  • Tatiana
    August 24, 2014

    My Ukrainian mother used her homemade sauerkraut as a filling for a vegetarian version of stuffed peppers. It would be served at room temp., though personally I loved it straight out of the fridge as a cool summertime snack. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 24, 2014

      It’s amazing how our parents and grandparents came up with all kinds of recipes, while using just a few ingredients :). Reply

    • Victoria
      November 21, 2015

      Hi!

      Another awesome recipe. I have been pickling cabbage Ukrainian style all my conscious life in pretty much the same way:) Just a couple of notes for first-time picklers in the US. You might have a problem where the cabbage is just refusing to ferment. This is due to preservatives that large stores add to produce to keep it fresh. Same problem with trying to get milk to sour – it just does not work like Ukrainian milk. I get my cabbage at the farmers’ market, it is adequate. DO NOT use the Cole slaw mix:) same reason Reply

  • Rose L
    July 18, 2014

    Natasha, Can this recipe be canned in a pressure caner? I’m looking for a good recipe for my pantry. Thanks! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 19, 2014

      To be honest, I haven’t tried that and I’m not sure it would work since it needs to get sour at room temp first. I don’t know how heating it up again to can it would change the flavor or texture of the sauerkraut. If you do experiment, let me know how it worked out. Sorry I can’t be more helpful. Reply

  • Mariya
    December 9, 2013

    Natasha what you think to do sauerkraut in oak barrel, like they used to do in old days? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 9, 2013

      I’ve never tried that method so I don’t know how it would change the flavor. We’ve always used glass or plastic but I prefer glass over plastic 🙂 Let me know if you try it. I wouldn’t even know where to find an oak barrel! 😉 Reply

  • Tatiana
    November 17, 2013

    Oh, I remember my mother making huge glass jars of this! She would use it as a stuffing for a Lenten version of stuffed peppers, served cold or at room temperature. It was one of my favorite vegetable dishes. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 17, 2013

      That’s awesome that it reminds you of something your mom made. Nothing beats homemade sauerkraut! Reply

  • Sarah Z.
    October 24, 2013

    hi Natasha,
    when you poke the kapusta with the wooden spoon, do you have to put the plate and the pressure back on? Made it yesterday and going to make some holes in it today. Thanks Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 24, 2013

      Yes keep the pressure in it the whole time, even when it goes in the fridge at the end. Reply

  • Yuliya
    October 19, 2013

    Thank you for this recipe, i made it this morning and cannot wait till its ready, i can see myself tasting it every day, hopefully I will have some left by the 4th day 🙂 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 19, 2013

      ha ha. It’s good stuff! 🙂 Reply

  • Alyssa
    October 4, 2013

    Hi Natasha,
    Can you please tell me what brand of mandolin are you using?
    Thank you! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 4, 2013

      It’s unbranded and I haven’t been able to find the same one anywhere because I’m not sure how to search for it. I do recommend one in the shop tab at the top of my blog. Sorry that is not super helpful. Reply

  • Lina
    October 4, 2013

    I’ve been craving it for a long time! I didn’t know how to do it, as you know our moms everything ” na glaz “. Now I’m so excited that ill be doing it my self!! My mom makes piroshki with them too they’re delicious!! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 4, 2013

      Does she mix it with anything else or is it just straight sauerkraut? Reply

      • lina
        October 4, 2013

        She do it half fresh cabbage and half sauerkraut. First sauté cabbage, diced onion and shredded carrot then add a little bit of tomato sauce or paste and then add sauerkraut (rinse sauerkraut in colander) and sauté that for I don’t know how long:) (mom said you will see when its ready) Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          October 4, 2013

          It’s kind of like the recipe I have for braised cabbage with beef. That sounds wonderful! Thank you so much for sharing. Reply

  • Zoya
    October 4, 2013

    Did you know sauerkraut is really great for your health? Heres an article: http://www.naturalnews.com/033659_sauerkraut_health_benefits.html&nbsp;Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 4, 2013

      Very cool!! I had no idea there were special health benefits. Double cool! I’m excited. Thanks Zoya! 🙂 Reply

  • Nella
    September 30, 2013

    How big is that jar you put it into and where did you get it? Thanks for the recipe, I will be trying it soon! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 30, 2013

      I think it’s a 2 1/2 liter jar (kind of a strange size), it’s from TJ max and it came with a rubber ring to seal the lid, but I took that off since it’s not supposed to be airtight. You can use a regular 3 Liter jar. Reply

  • Oksana
    September 30, 2013

    Hi,
    Awesome post. My mom also makes this type of kvashenaya kapusta (I was never brave enough to try it). She also makes them in big buckets. Here’s an idea with the apples also. She would cut apples in quarters or eighths and bury them inside the ready made kapusta for few days. Take them out, and I know it sounds kind of weird, but the apples tasted really good, I can’t really describe the taste, but we all loved it.
    We love kapustnyak (saurkraut soup), made with beans that you actually have to soak overnight. I crave that soup anytime cold weather hits. And my husband has been asking for me (not our moms) to make saurkraut, because the store bought ones are overpriced, and don’t even come close to tasting homemade.
    I’ll have to make this soon. Thanks. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 30, 2013

      Oksana, yes it’s definitely less intimidating if you aren’t making an entire bucket of it! I’ll have to try the apple trick next time (we finished off the sauerkraut yesterday!). P.S. do you have a great recipe for kapustnyak you could share? I’d love to try your families version of it! Reply

      • Oksana
        September 30, 2013

        Sure, I’ll try to make the saurkraut first and than make the soup with it. I’ll write it step by step then. My mom’s version is a little bit of this, a handful of that. So I can’t remember to make it off the top of my head Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          September 30, 2013

          That’s why I love to cook next to my mom when she’s teaching me a recipe. I have no idea how to gauge a little bit of this and that 😉 Reply

  • September 30, 2013

    My family loves Sauerkraut. I adore the way it cuts through the richness of meat. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 30, 2013

      Very we’ll put! It’s awesome with meat and potatoes. Now you’ve got me craving dinner and I haven’t even had breakfast! (7:30am) 🙂 Reply

  • September 30, 2013

    I haven’t made this kapusta recipe for a while mostly because English fridges are SO small and I am always running out of space but I am set on making a small batch soon! Thank you for a good reminder. And you are so right Russian/Ukrainian sauerkraut is nothing like its German counterpart! I actually read that there is higher content of vitamin C in this recipe than in regular cabbage! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 30, 2013

      Oooh I didn’t know that it has a higher Vit C content! I do like that this makes a smaller portion and not the traditional bucket-sized kapusta that my mama makes. I really haven’t experimented much with German food, have you? Reply

      • October 1, 2013

        I never cooked German sauerkraut but I still have college memories of annual Octoberfest! It always seemed a bit too smelly and not as fresh as ours. That’s my very ethnocentric opinion. 🙂 Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          October 1, 2013

          Haha you’re funny. I like your opinion. 😉 Reply

  • September 29, 2013

    Never had with apple. Definitely will try. Looks good 😉 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 29, 2013

      It’s a nice add-in. We loved it! But I also love the easy version with onion and sunflower oil just as much! 🙂 Reply

  • Ирена
    September 29, 2013

    Thank you ! ! ! …. thank you to you and your mom…
    I’ll make this tonight 🙂

    Дякую – – – Спасибо Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 29, 2013

      You’re so welcome 🙂 Reply

  • September 29, 2013

    Natasha you have perfect detailed pictures, that’s why I love your site :). I made kvashenaya kapusta last year and I still have some in my fridge. It still tastes perfect in venigret. I never tried it with apple before but it sounds so good. I will give it a try.
    Thanks for sharing 🙂 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 29, 2013

      It’s great in the salad; adds some nice contrasting sweetness, plus the white raisins; yum!!! Reply

Add comment/review

Leave a comment

As Featured On

Never Go "Hangry" Again!

Get weekly updates on new recipes, exclusive giveaways plus behind the scenes photos.