The key to making amazing sourdough bread is knowing how to feed sourdough starter so it is healthy and ready to bake whenever you get the itch. Maintaining the starter only takes a few minutes and just two ingredients.

Once you have an active sourdough starter, whether you’ve grown it yourself (see our easy Sourdough Starter Recipe), purchased a starter, or received one as a gift, you’ll need to feed it to maintain and keep it alive. You’ll see how this quick process varies slightly depending on how often you bake sourdough bread or other goodies. Grab your starter and let’s get started!

how to feed sourdough starter using flour and water

This post may contain affiliate links. Read my disclosure policy.

What does it mean to feed sourdough starter?

Your established starter is a living ecosystem of wild yeast, and like any living thing, it gets hungry. You can maintain it easily by mixing in more flour and water, a process called “feeding.” Once it’s fed, the wild yeast eat the sugars in the flour releasing carbon dioxide that causes the starter to grow. Once the yeast has eaten the sugars, the starter begins to deflate, which means it’s hungry, so it’s time to feed again.

How Often to Feed Sourdough Starter

When maintaining a starter, first determine where to store it by deciding how often you want to use the starter:

  • Frequent baker (every day or every couple of days)—you’ll want to keep the sourdough starter at room temperature and feed it at the same time every day. 
  • Less frequent, casual baker (once a week or less)— you can keep your starter in the fridge and feed it once each week.

I cover both scenarios in this post because I think to truly enjoy sourdough baking, it’s important to fit your sourdough starter maintenance routine into YOUR lifestyle.

Natasha Kravchuk with jars of sourdough starter

How Much to Feed My Sourdough Starter

In this recipe, the feeding quantities will be enough to make 2 loaves of bread. This makes the amount of starter manageable in my favorite Weck Jar (more on this jar below). It also matches my baking needs, as I can bake bread without running out of starter.

You can scale your starter up or down depending on how much starter you want to maintain, just feed it a 1:1:1 ratio by weight using a kitchen scale to weigh the ingredients. You may see this referred to as 100% hydration in some recipes.

Sourdough Starter Feeding Ratio 1:1:1

  • 1 part starter (here, we use 100g or roughly 1/2 cup)
  • 1 part water (100g or roughly 1/2 cup in a liquid measuring cup)
  • 1 part flour (100g flour or roughly 1 scant cup)

A Note on Measuring: In sourdough baking, your best friend is a kitchen scale to measure by weight, and in my opinion, it’s non-negotiable. It is the most exact way of measuring. Most sourdough recipes are written in weight measurements because it’s the most accurate.

Using volume measurements (cups) isn’t as precise. If you do use cups to measure, be sure to measure your flour correctly.

Tools for Feeding a Sourdough Starter

Maintaining sourdough starter can go on as long as you want–indefinitely if you keep it up, so it’s worth the investment in these tools. I’ve listed my favorites here:

  • Clear Jar – 1 Qt Mason jar or 3/4 Qt Weck Jar with loose fitting lid – Weck jars are my favorite because they weigh exactly 400g (it’s much easier to measure by weight when the math is simple), the lid is loose fitting to avoid pressure building up inside, and the wide mouth makes for easy stirring.
  • Digital kitchen scale – most sourdough recipes use weight measurements. It also saves on dishes and cleanup since you won’t have to use measuring cups! It doesn’t have to be fancy, as long as it has grams, any scale will work
  • Stiff silicone spatula – The starter is so sticky, so silicone is easiest to clean. Wipe your spatula and discard any extra starter in the trash to avoid it building up in your plumbing.
Weck jar on kitchen scale weighs 400g

Ingredients

You only need two ingredients to feed a sourdough starter. Be sure to see our tips on measuring the ingredients above. You can scale the ingredients up or down for your needs, but be sure to keep the ratio 1:1:1.

  • Sourdough Starter – Stir down your active starter if using a cup to measure
  • Water – filtered, non-chlorinated, room temperature or lukewarm water. Bottled spring water can work too. For cooler homes, give the starter a boost by using lukewarm water that is 85 degrees or less (optional). Cold water can slow the yeasts’ growth.
  • Flour – I use organic, unbleached all-purpose flour because it’s what most people have stocked and it’s affordable. You can swap 1/4 to half of the flour with whole wheat flour or rye flour to help the yeast strengthen. Regardless of what flour you use to feed a starter, you can use any type of flour to bake.

Pro Tip:

Many cities use chlorine to clean tap water, but the chlorine can hurt yeast growth. To dechlorinate tap water, boil and cool the water, or you can also leave a jug of water on the counter for a day while the chlorine evaporates.

How to Feed a Sourdough Starter

The process for feeding sourdough starter is so simple and takes only a few minutes. For refrigerated starters, feed once a week and start with step 1, but for room temperature starters, feed once a day and start at step 2 (or 3).

  • Bring to Room Temperature – put the cold starter on the counter for a few hours or overnight to come to room temperature.
  • Feed the Starter– Stir room temperature starter, then discard all but 100g (1/2 cup) of starter. Use a kitchen scale to measure 100g (1/2 cup) of water and 100g (1 scant cup) of flour. Stir into the starter until completely mixed.
  • Clean and Cover – use a silicone spatula to scrape down the sides of the jar and cover loosely with a lid or plastic wrap. Use a rubber band or dry-erase marker to mark the height of the starter and the date, so you can track its growth. Store the jar on the counter or fridge (if feeding for refrigeration, let it sit at room temperature for 1-2 hours to jump-start the process then refrigerate).

Pro Tip:

You do not need to change the jar for each feeding, but it’s good to clean every 1-4 weeks to help keep bad bacteria from contaminating the starter.

Do I have to discard sourdough starter every time I feed?

Technically no. Once it’s established, you can just feed it, but it will become very acidic over time since you aren’t discarding some of the waste/acid left over by fermentation, and the sheer volume would be hard to manage. You don’t have to waste the discard though.

Sourdough discard is just an unfed starter. To use it, try baking a sourdough discard recipe, sharing it with a friend (put it in a new jar, and feed it to make a second starter), frying it like a savory pancake, or refrigerating it in a separate jar until ready to bake.

Troubleshooting: Sourdough Starter Maintenance Tips

Maintaining a healthy starter sometimes depends on a variety of conditions: the humidity in your area, the temperature in your home, the type of flour used, the age of the starter, etc. Here are a few tips for getting the healthiest starter:

  • My sourdough starter is not doubling – continue to feed each day at the same time to help the starter gain strength. If the room temperature is below 70-75 degrees, consider moving the starter to a warmer spot. Try switching to bottled water if using tap water. Overall—patience is so important! Your yeast will grow if it’s in the right environment.
  • There’s a gray liquid on top of my starter -If you notice a dark liquid on the top (like in the picture below), don’t worry—that’s called hooch, the byproduct of fermentation. It means your starter is hungry. Pour it off or stir it in, discard half and feed.
  • My starter smells like rubbing alcohol – if there aren’t any colored streaks in the starter, this means it’s hungry. Discard and feed.
  • I forgot to feed/discard/stir my starter – don’t worry! Wild yeast is forgiving. Continue to discard and feed, and your starter should recover.
  • There are pink streaks in my starter – If you notice pink, green, or orange streaks, or green fuzz, bad bacteria has contaminated your starter. Throw it away, thoroughly wash your jar, and begin again.
bubbles from wild yeast fermentation in a glass jar with hooch on top

Pro Tip:

How to know if a sourdough starter is healthy: Well-maintained sourdough starters can live indefinitely and take on slightly different tastes depending on the environment. If your starter is healthy, you’ll have bubbles, consistent growth, and a pleasant sour/yeasty smell.

Sourdough starters are so forgiving, as long as you don’t bake it or pour in boiling water by accident! Discard and feed, and your starter should bounce back.

How to Dry Sourdough Starter

If you need to take a break from baking for several weeks or months, you can dry your starter and store in the pantry. This is also a good idea to keep as a backup starter. Simply spread a small bit of starter thinly on a Silpat mat or parchment paper. Leave at room temperature until dry and flaky. Store in a dry jar.

How to Use Sourdough Starter to Bake Bread

Healthy starters should grow and double in size in about 4-6 hours. A recipe will call for “active sourdough starter”, meaning the starter is bubbly, has more than doubled and has been fed in the past 12 hours.

  • Room temperature starter: watch for your starter to reach its peak. Remove the amount of starter needed for the recipe, and feed the remaining starter. 
  • Refrigerated starter: remove the jar of starter the night before baking to bring it to room temperature. Discard and feed. Once the starter has reached its peak, remove the amount of starter needed for the recipe. Feed the remaining starter, label it with the date, let it sit at room temperature for 1-2 hours to jump-start the process and return the jar to the refrigerator.

Pro Tip:

The amount of time it takes for a starter to rise can vary depending on the environment, the flour used, and the strength of the starter. Watch for these signs to determine when the starter is ready to be used: has doubled in size, has bubbles and a pleasant smell, and passes the Float test (drop a bit in water, if it floats, it’s ready!). Use it to make dough within 1-2 hours of hitting its peak height.

Bubbles from fermentation after feeding sourdough starter

Let us know how your starter is doing! Share your sourdough experience in the comments, and feel free to ask any questions you may have. 

Once you learn how to feed sourdough starter, it’s simple to maintain your starter around your baking schedule. Now that you have a thriving starter, it’s time to bake! Start with our beginner-friendly Sourdough Bread Recipe

More Bread Baking Recipes

If you’re excited about making homemade bread, then you should try these delicious bread-baking recipes. P.S. Before long, we’ll have a variety of sourdough recipes to share. Let me know if you have any sourdough recipe requests.

Natasha's Kitchen Cookbook

How to Feed Sourdough Starter

5 from 10 votes
Author: Natasha Kravchuk
how to feed a sourdough starter tutorial
You'll love this easy recipe on how to feed sourdough starter because it's tailored to your schedule and baking needs. Before you begin, determine how often you want to bake with your sourdough starter. For frequent bakers (every day or every other day), store your starter on the counter and feed once a day at the same time. For casual bakers, store your starter in the refrigerator and feed ir once a week.
The proportions below will be enough to make 300 grams of active starter for 2 loaves of bread and you should end up with 100 grams of leftover starter after making 2 loaves. You can easilly scale it up or down depending on how much active starter you need, just keep a 1:1:1 proportion with feeding. So if you need less, use 50 grams starter, 50 grams flour, and 50 grams water.
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Total Time: 5 minutes

Ingredients 

Instructions

How to Feed Sourdough Starter:

  • Bring Starter to Room Temperature: If your starter is refrigerated, remove it from the refrigerator a few hours or the night before to come to room temperature. If your starter is at room temperature, you’ll want to feed it daily or at least every other day to keep it bubbly and happy.
  • Feed the Starter: Using a kitchen scale to weigh in grams, discard all but 100 grams of your starter in your glass jar. Add 100 grams flour and 100 grams water and stir thoroughly with a silicone spatula to combine (see note 3)
  • Let it Rise: Scrape down the sides of the jar, cover with a loose-fitting lid, place a rubber band on the jar to track how far the starter has risen, and let it grow at room temperature (70-75 ̊F). Once it has at least doubled in volume (4-6 hours – see note 4), it is considered 'active sourdough starter' and you can use it to make sourdough recipes. Once it falls and is no longer active, you can repeat the feeding process in step 2.

To Refrigerate the Starter:

  • To Refrigerate the starter: Once you have used the amount of active sourdough starter needed for your recipe, feed the starter again using the same proportions as in step 2 above. Optional: Let it sit at room temperature for 1 hours to jump-start the process then refrigerate. Feed weekly to keep it alive -(see note 5).

Notes

(1) Note on Water: Use filtered non-chlorinated water or spring water. Chlorine can hinder the growth of the yeast and bacteria. To dechlorinate your water, you can boil and cool or set your water into a vessel and leave it on the counter for 1 day to naturally dechlorinate and come to room temperature. Don’t use water that is too warm or you will deactivate the yeast. If you have a warm house, use room-temperature water. If you keep your house cooler, use lukewarm water (85 ̊F) to give it a boost. Avoid cold water which will slow the growth.
(2) Note on Flour: We commonly use organic all-purpose flour, but you can substitute 25-50% of the all-purpose flour with whole wheat or rye flour to help increase starter activity.
(3) A Weck Jar is my favorite because it weighs exactly 400 grams without the lid so the math is easy, and it has a loose-fitting lid which is important to prevent pressure buildup. To save time, keep a note of the weight of your empty jar. You can zero out the scale before adding each ingredient for easy measuring. 
(4) Rise Time: The time it takes for the starter to double depends on the starter’s strength, the feeding ratio, the type of flour used, water temperature, and room temperature. You want to use it within 1-2 hours of being fully risen before it starts to drop back down from its peak levels.
(5) Maintaining a Refrigerator Starter: If you’re feeding your refrigerated starter only to keep it alive and aren’t planning to bake with it, you don’t have to bring it to room temperature before feeding. Feed and let it sit on the counter 1-2 hours (if time permits), then return to the fridge.
(6) Clean your jar occasionally (every 1-4 weeks) or when there’s too much built-up gunk on the sides to prevent mold growth.

Nutrition Per Serving

455kcal Calories95g Carbs13g Protein1g Fat0.2g Saturated Fat0.4g Polyunsaturated Fat0.1g Monounsaturated Fat8mg Sodium107mg Potassium3g Fiber0.3g Sugar18mg Calcium5mg Iron
Nutrition Facts
How to Feed Sourdough Starter
Amount per Serving
Calories
455
% Daily Value*
Fat
 
1
g
2
%
Saturated Fat
 
0.2
g
1
%
Polyunsaturated Fat
 
0.4
g
Monounsaturated Fat
 
0.1
g
Sodium
 
8
mg
0
%
Potassium
 
107
mg
3
%
Carbohydrates
 
95
g
32
%
Fiber
 
3
g
13
%
Sugar
 
0.3
g
0
%
Protein
 
13
g
26
%
Calcium
 
18
mg
2
%
Iron
 
5
mg
28
%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.
Course: Bread, How to
Cuisine: American
Keyword: how to feed sourdough starter
Skill Level: Easy
Cost to Make: $
Calories: 455

Natasha Kravchuk

Welcome to my kitchen! I am Natasha, the blogger behind Natasha's Kitchen (since 2009). My husband and I run this blog together and share only our best, family approved and tested recipes with YOU. Thanks for stopping by! We are so happy you're here.

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Comments

  • Glenda Laverty
    March 31, 2024

    I’m not having much luck. I started with the whole wheat flour and then started feeding with the King Arthur AP flour. I live in Boise and it’s cold right now so my first attempt it didn’t do very good. 2nd try, I bought a seeding mat to put the jar on and it liked it alot the first day or two and then the 3rd night it didn’t grow at all. I’ll feed it again today but my first batch did the same thing and didn’t grow for 4 days straight. Not sure what I’m doing wrong if anything.

    Reply

    • Natasha
      April 1, 2024

      Hi Glenda, if your home is cooler, it would help to feed it with lukewarm water. With my own, in a couple of my tests, on day 3 or 4, it looked like it stopped growing (almost as if it took a pause), but keep feeding it and it will turn around.

      Reply

      • Glenda
        April 8, 2024

        I finally got my starter active, it took 9 days. I made my first loaf, and it came out good. It doesn’t have that sour taste like bread I’ve bought. Is there something you need to do to get that flavor?

        Reply

        • Natasha
          April 9, 2024

          Hi Glenda, the overnight slow fermentation helps develop the sourdough flavor. If you want it to taste even more like sourdough, you can let it sit in the fridge for 48 hours, but I would recommend putting it inside a huge zip-top bag or covering it somehow so it doesn’t dry out.

          Reply

  • Lisa Kouwenhoven
    March 30, 2024

    Hello Natasha! I have been enjoying your recipes for a long time now, and received your cookbook as a Christmas gift!

    I started my sourdough 8 days ago. Day 2 or 3 I thought it was gonna overflow. Since then, it hasn’t grown an inch. I am reserving 100 grams, feeding 100 grams of all purpose flour and 100 grams room temperature filtered water. How many more days do I keep discarding and feeding before I give up? I’m getting frustrated since there is no sign of life in my starter. I tried yesterday to put a heating pad in low underneath it, no difference. Do you have any advice?

    Reply

    • Natasha
      April 1, 2024

      HI Lisa, did you possibly have it rising in too warm of a place? That has happened to me in one of my tests – I put it in a warm oven to try to encourage it to develop and it sure did but way too quickly and it exhausted the yeast and failed. I had to start over. The next time, I patiently let it rise at room temperature and it was a very happy starter by days 6/7. I hope that his helpful. Check out my post on How to Make a Sourdough Starter and read through that one to see if you can identify what you are doing differently.

      Reply

  • Linda Khaled
    March 29, 2024

    Note for everyone, for better results, sterilize your jar of choice prior to mixing your ingredients.
    1. Sterilize (after it’s been washed, pour boiling hot water in the jar, wait 10 second and empty)
    2. Let jar cool completely.
    3. Begin your journey
    Sterile jar for cleaner environment!
    I’m on attempt #2 with your recipe, Natasha! Attempt #1 , failed lol
    I’ve watched ALL and I am up
    -to-date of your recipes. You truly show your love and passion for food. It’s clear you have the love in your recipes. Keep up the great work! I’m still waiting for your croissant attempt 😊🙏

    Reply

  • Arlene J
    March 27, 2024

    Is there a best time of day that you recommend feeding the starter? I have been feeding my starter around 8-9 PM. I was seeing growth but not I am not seeing any. I’ve wondered if the growth is happening when I’m asleep. I have 2 starters trying to jump start. One is on day 13 and the other is on day 5. I tried the spoonful in water to see if floats method last night and they BOTH sunk to the bottom. I haven’t given up hope yet but definitely need some advice.

    Reply

    • Natasha
      March 27, 2024

      Hi Arlene, are you seeing evidence on the jar or residue where it appears to have risen and fallen? I feed mine in the morning, but the key is to remain consistent. 13 days is a long time though to not see any growth. You might try feeding it in the morning and watch for growth. Did you see progress along the way through the 13 days or has it done nothing the entire time? Did you possibly use chlorinated water or store it in a very cold environment? I suggest reviewing the “Troubleshooting: Sourdough Starter Maintenance Tips” section in the post above.

      Reply

      • Arlene J
        April 1, 2024

        I saw great growth day 2-4 and then it just stopped completely. I switched to feeding in the morning to keep a better eye on it. It does “feel” like I’m discarding a ton of starter with barely 1/4 on the bottom. I’m discarding about 3/4 cup of starter to get to 100 grams. I’m not giving up yet. I keep it on my counter. (shares a wall with the garage) but am wondering if I should keep it on the island. House temp is roughly 72 degrees.

        Reply

        • Natasha
          April 2, 2024

          HI Arlene, don’t give up! Every starter will behave differently based on environment and ingredients, temperature of the water, etc.

          Reply

  • Nancy Barrett
    March 11, 2024

    Hi Natasha – I love your recipes and have just received your cookbook. I started sourdough starter last week with organic rye flour. After Saturday’s feed it was growing before my eyes! I was thrilled. It reached a certain level then receded. On Sunday, I fed it and absolutely nothing has happened! Did I kill it? Should I start over? Can I revive it? I’m not sure what I did incorrectly. Any thoughts?

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      March 11, 2024

      Hi Nancy, it sounds like your started had an initial burst of “energy” if you will. Which can be normal after the first feed while the yeast and bacteria are establishing themselves. It’s also possible It was warmer that day and it rose quicker. Patience is definitely key with starter until you building up a strong starter, give it some time to develop and keep an eye out for signs of health such as bubbles, aroma, volume. If you’re you’re still concerned, I would discard an extra, start with just the amount you need and check your ratios again. also, try a bottled water in place of tap, some tap water could kill the started depending on what your city water is like. I hope this helps.

      Reply

  • Michelle
    March 9, 2024

    do you have sugggestions or recipes on using sourdough discard?

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      March 11, 2024

      Hi Michelle, I have more recipes to come, but yes we love to make pancakes, waffles, muffins, etc. I hope that helps.

      Reply

  • jerry
    March 8, 2024

    I am so confused ! What is this 1-1-1 and 1-2-2 or 1-3-3 ? I am new at this so I need clear and precise info. Where do I get sourdough starter or how do you make it ? Can you private message me at my e mail address, with any information ? I have made bread several times but this will be a first time try at Sourdough.

    Thanks you.

    Reply

    • NatashasKitchen.com
      March 8, 2024

      Hi Jerry! Please read the blog post from top to bottom, you’ll find very thorough and detailed information. In paragraph 2, I linked the Sourdough starter recipe (the red font words are links that can be clicked on). Also- a little further down into the blog post, you’ll see a pink block titled, “Sourdough Starter Feeding Ratio 1:1:1” and that explains the ratio.
      I hope helps.

      Reply

      • kelly Correia
        March 18, 2024

        You said if my starter begins to deflate, the yeast is no longer active so feed it. What happens if it starts deflating and it’s only been 12 hours since you last fed it do I feed it again?

        Reply

        • Natasha
          March 20, 2024

          Hi Kelly, that depends on if you want to use the starter. If you want to bake something, you want to use the starter when it is at it’s active bubbly and tall stage before it starts to deflate. If you aren’t using it and you are just keeping it fed at room temperature, you can feed daily. If you are refrigerating, follow the instructions in the post above and feed weekly. I hope that makes sense.

          Reply

  • Leona
    March 8, 2024

    Hi Natasha, I have started your sourdoughs starter and is going real good 3th day ,its going great .This is my second try on making sour dough starter I hope this time I have much more luck than my first one so far so good .lots of thanks to you…. Leona So

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      March 8, 2024

      Thanks for sharing and I hope it becomes a huge success!

      Reply

  • Gabby
    March 7, 2024

    I am so excited that you’ve shared this sourdough starter recipe. I am ready to start the process. Do you have a sourdough bread recipe? Thank you.

    Reply

    • NatashasKitchen.com
      March 7, 2024

      You’re very welcome, Gabby! I’ll be posting one very soon.

      Reply

  • Jill Squires
    March 5, 2024

    Can’t wait for your sourdough bread recipe thanks Natasha .
    Love your recipes and videos

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      March 6, 2024

      Hope you’ll love it and the coming recipes that we will post!

      Reply

  • Kalyn
    March 5, 2024

    I had been wanting to try a sourdough starter on my own for quite some time but was way too intimidated. This recipe gave me the confidence I needed to try and it worked! Thanks!

    Reply

  • Erin
    March 5, 2024

    I’m totally bookmarking this for my husband! He’s the sourdough king in our house.

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      March 5, 2024

      That’s so great! You’ll have to let me know how he likes it!

      Reply

  • Samantha
    March 5, 2024

    This post was so helpful for a sourdough newbie like myself. Thanks for the tips and easy, step by step directions! Can’t wait to use my sourdough to make ALL THE THINGS! 🙂

    Reply

  • Angelina Fedchenko
    March 5, 2024

    Hi Natasha, I was wondering if you’d ever get into the sourdough world. I have learned that the main objective is to use the correct ratio for the time frame that you have.
    For this to happen accurately, time your starter to see how long it takes to peak at 1:1:1 at a certain temperature, then you can work out the other ratios.
    For example:
    My starter peaks (this is when it eats all the food) at 3 hrs at 22C if using 1:1:1, that means
    1:2:2 will be 6hrs
    1:3:3 9hrs
    1:4:4 12hrs and so on
    So if i have a 8hrs window and want to use the starter at peak, i would feed 1:3:3. Work out the time frame, then work out the ratio to use. It is impacted by temperature and the type of flour used. Warmth and wholegrain makes the starter more active.
    Under feeding and over feeding will make the starter acidic and weak.

    Reply

    • Natasha
      March 5, 2024

      Hi Angelina, thank you for sharing this. I love that you can control the timing this closely. I appreciate it! I’ve been in the sourdough world for awhile now, but am so excited to finally share it. It takes a ton of work to put out these tutorials (even though it’s actually not that complicated) – I wanted to be really thorough and share based on experience and not just research. I’m sure I’ve made hundreds of loaves by now.

      Reply

  • Guy Beedle
    March 5, 2024

    Hi, I leave my sourdough on the counter in a crock #2 ceramic feed it every night two cups of flour and lukewarm water mix and scrape down the sides. After a week wash the crock pot then put the sourdough starter back in the pot, When we want to take a break I put it in a plastic container and store it in the freezer.

    Reply

    • Natasha
      March 5, 2024

      That’s a very interesting process and I love how you make it work for you. How do you revive your starter from the freezer?

      Reply

  • Jane Yeasted
    March 5, 2024

    You are a delight! I love reading your tips for sourdough & I have made some of your wonderful recipes. Your tips on keeping a good starter are so simple to follow. Thank you so very much!!! 💖

    Reply

    • NatashasKitchen.com
      March 5, 2024

      I’m so glad to hear that, Jane!

      Reply

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