This Sourdough Bread Recipe makes the most incredible loaf of bread with a crunchy crust, airy crumb, an impressive oven rise and ‘ear’ using the right scoring technique. Discovering the art of baking sourdough bread has been such a gift for our family and I hope this video tutorial inspires you to dive in as well.

After making hundreds of loaves, I am confident this staple recipe has all the tips and techniques you’ll need to succeed whether it’s your first time or if you’re looking to refine your bread baking skills.

Sourdough bread boule with blue and white tea towel

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Easy Sourdough Bread Recipe

Crusty sourdough bread is so beautiful, versatile, and crowd-pleasing. We love toasting a slice for breakfast with Honey Butter or Peach Preserves. It’s excellent for a BLT Sandwich for lunch, and paired with Soup Recipes. You can even cut it up for Homemade Croutons. With all these delicious possibilities, you can see why sourdough bread recipes have become so popular recently.

If you don’t already have a sourdough starter, you’ll be happy to know it only requires 2 ingredients to make one from scratch. See our tutorial on How to Make a Sourdough Starter.

Sourdough Bread Video

Watch Natasha make this easy sourdough bread recipe in just a few steps. Be sure to note the shaping and scoring techniques so your bread will look just as beautiful each time!

Why This Sourdough Bread Recipe Works

I love baking sourdough bread because it’s as fun as it is tasty. Here’s why we know you’ll love it as much as we do!

  • Beginner-friendly – If you’re new to sourdough baking, or just looking for a great, basic sourdough bread recipe, this is it!
  • Easy to double – this recipe makes 1 loaf of bread, but it’s easy to double which is what I do weekly (the bread freezes so well!)
  • Flexible timing – The final fermentation step before baking includes a long rest in the fridge (also called cold proofing). This final step gives you a 8 to 48 hour window to bake, making it easy to bake on your schedule.
crusty Bread slices with large and small bubbles

Ingredients

It’s amazing how simple the ingredient list is for this sourdough bread recipe since it has so much flavor and a nice chewy crumb.

  • Flour – we prefer organic flour, but regular will work as well. Bread flour has a higher percentage of protein than all-purpose flour, giving the bread a chewy texture, but both flours will work. My favorite is to order Central Milling Company Artisan Bakers Craft flour but I have also used Bob’s Red Mill Artisan Bread Flour with great results.
  • Rye, whole wheat, or whole grain flour (optional)– these give the bread more flavor. You can substitute this portion with bread flour.
  • Fine Sea Salt – this ingredient is so important! It aids in fermentation, gives flavor and color, and gives a good oven spring (rise in the oven).
  • Water – filtered, bottled or dechlorinated water is best and should be room temperature or lukewarm (85˚F). You may need to experiment with water quantities. This recipe was made in an Idaho kitchen which is in a dry climate. If you live in a high-humidity area, use less water.
  • Active Sourdough Starter – this is a starter that has been fed within the last 6-12 hours, has more than doubled in size, and is bubbly. See my post on How to Make Sourdough Starter if you don’t already have a starter and How to Feed Sourdough Starter once it’s established.
  • Rice Flour (optional) – for dusting the bread basket, or use bread flour.
Flour, whole wheat flour and rye flour bags on a counter

How to Make Sourdough Bread

Timing Tip: The process of making sourdough is mostly hands-off rising time. To help you gauge – if you start with step 1 in the morning, say 10am, you should be ready to mix the dough by 2pm and in the fridge by 6-7pm for overnight cold fermentation.

Step 1: Feed your starter

For a single loaf, mix 50g of starter with 50g of bread flour and 50g of lukewarm water (up to 85 degrees). Scrape the sides of the jar, loosely cover, and mark the height on the outside of the jar with a rubber band or dry-erase marker. Let sit at room temperature for 4-6 hours or until it has more than doubled in volume.

Step 2: Make the dough

In a large bowl, whisk the flours and salt until mixed. Add the water and active starter and stir using a wooden spoon then use your hands until thoroughly mixed. It will be a wet and sticky dough. Scrape down the sides of the bowl and cover with a clean kitchen towel.

Pro Tip:

A kitchen scale makes the process so much faster, more precise (measuring in grams), and less messy – no need to clean any measuring cups. You’ll love sourdough baking more if you have a digital kitchen scale.

Step 3: Bulk Fermentation Stage

Rest the dough for a total of 4 hours, performing a stretch and fold routine after every hour. Stretch and fold: Wet your hands so the dough doesn’t stick. Stretch or pull up gently on one side of the dough without tearing it. Then fold it over itself, turn the bowl a quarter turn and repeat the stretch on the other 3 sides until all 4 sides are stretched. Cover and repeat each hour for 4 total stretches. It will be tougher to stretch towards the end as the dough develops.

Step 4: Shape the Loaf

After the 4th stretch and fold, lightly flour your work surface to shape the dough. Flour your hands, turn the dough out onto the surface, and gently stretch and shape the sourdough bread for your cooking pot.

  • Shape a Round Loaf: stretch the dough from the top down onto the center. Turn a quarter turn and repeat until all the sides are folded in.
  • Shape an Oval Loaf: Fold the sides of the dough alternating left and right from top to bottom. Then tightly roll the dough from the top to the bottom.

Step 5: Bench Rest

Let the dough rest for 20 minutes. First, turn the dough seam-side down. Then cover with a towel. After 20 minutes, if it seems to have loosened up too much, gently re-shape it using the same process as above.

Step 6: Tighten the Loaf

Flour your hands and cup the outsides of the dough. Then tuck the sides of the dough underneath. Slide the dough down the counter in a circular motion about 6 inches, using its slight stickiness to tighten the ball/oval. Don’t over-flour your surface and try not to tear the dough.

tightening the boule to make this easy sourdough recipe

Pro Tip:

A banneton is a bread basket made to hold dough as it ferments. It should be shaped to match your pot (oval for oval baking dish, round for round baking dish). Before your first use, season the basket or liner by lightly spraying it with water, dust generously with flour (preferaby rice flour for a nicer crust and less sticking), let it fully dry then scrape out any excess with a spatula. Always let it fully dry after use and scrape out excess flour before storage.

Step 7: Cold Fermentation/Proofing

Flour the banneton proofing basket, or tea-towel-lined bowl generously. Place the dough inside seam-side up and cover with a towel. Refrigerate overnight or for at least 8 hours. It can stay refrigerated for up to 48 hours until you’re ready to bake the sourdough bread. It will rise slightly but won’t double.

Step 8: Preheat Oven

Preheat the oven to 500 degrees. This may take 30 minutes or up to 60 minutes for some ovens. If using a combo cooker with low sides, cut a piece of parchment to cover the bottom. If using a Dutch Oven with higher sides, lay a piece of parchment on the counter. Put the Dutch oven/combo cooker into your oven to heat (without the parchment) at least 30 minutes before baking. Set your pizza stone on the bottom rack, if using (a pizza stone helps to keep the bottom of the bread from getting too dark).

Step 9: Score the Sourdough Bread

Remove the dough from the fridge. If using a combo cooker, place the parchment circle into the hot pan, and turn out the dough into the hot pot seam-side-down. If using a Dutch oven, turn the dough out on the parchment paper. Using the lame (A curved lame works best to get the distinctive ear) or a serrated knife, make a crescent shape cut from the base of one side of the dough to the base of the dough. Keep the blade at a 45-degree angle to the dough and cut 1/4 to 1/2″ deep (it’s ok to go over it a second time, just be confident).

Step 10: Bake the Bread

If using a Dutch oven, lift the parchment paper to place the dough (on the parchment) into the Dutch oven. Using hot mitts, cover the Dutch oven/combo cooker with the hot lid and place it into the oven. Reduce the heat to 450 degrees and bake for 20 minutes to allow the trapped steam to cook the crust of the bread. Then, remove the lid and bake uncovered for 20-25 minutes or until golden brown. Transfer the finished sourdough bread to a cooling rack and cool completely before cutting.

What is the Best Cooking Pot for Sourdough?

You can use a variety of pots. Either a 5 1/2 qt cast iron Dutch Oven or cast iron combo cooker with lid are great options. My combo cooker is my favorite because the lower sides make it easier to score in the pot, but you can score the bread on the counter and transfer the dough ball into a dutch oven using parchment paper

Pro Tip:

Dust the banneton with rice flour for a prettier, crispier crust. My cousin Enna introduced me to this idea, and while it’s not necessary, it makes for a beautiful loaf. The extra flour just brushes away after it’s baked. See the bread flour on the left and the rice flour on the right in the photos, below.

dusting with Rice flour vs bread flour in Sourdough bread recipes

How to Get the Best Oven Spring

Oven spring is the rise the dough gets when it’s in the oven, mostly occurring in the first 10 minutes. Here’s how this sourdough bread recipe creates the best rise:

  • Covering the pot – A Dutch oven or combo cooker helps trap the steam to create a good rise.
  • Bulk Fermentation and cold fermentation help to prevent over-proofing (exhausting the yeast), so the yeast has plenty of life left for a burst of activity as the oven heats the dough.
  • Tightening the dough is a critical step in getting the best oven spring. You want the outside of your dough to be taught to trap the air bubbles but not to tear it.
  • Scoring the bread is also important to help it open up and rise properly
  • Salt helps the yeast slowly ferment, creating a better crumb with more big and small bubbles and better oven-rise
Baked Sourdough with great oven spring on a cast iron pan

Do I need to “Slap and Fold?”

Some sourdough bread-makers will slap the dough against the counter and then fold it onto itself right after the dough comes together. This is called the ‘slap and fold’ and is supposed to tighten up the dough. I used to do it but found it to be unnecessary. It just makes you counter messy and the ‘stretch and fold’ during the bulk fermentation tightens up the dough without this extra step. 

Can I Bake Right Away?

You can skip the slow fermentation in the refrigerator but your bread won’t have as much sourdough flavor. If you prefer to bake right away, you can cover and let it proof at room temperature for 1 to 2 1/2, depending on the room temperature, or until it is puffed but not doubled in size then score and bake as directed.

Close up photo of airy sourdough bread crumb from our sourdough bread recipe for beginners

How to Serve Sourdough Bread

Sourdough bread is so versatile! Use it in place of sliced bread for sandwiches, or as a crusty bread with soups. Here are some of our favorite dishes to serve with sourdough bread.

Make-Ahead

Sourdough bread keeps well on the counter for up to a week wrapped in a bread bag, beeswax wrap, zip-top bag, or plastic wrap.

  • To Refrigerate: This is not necessary, but if you do, be sure to wrap it in an airtight container so it won’t dry out
  • Freezing: Wrap the boule (sourdough bread round) in foil. Then place in a freezer zip-top bag and freeze for up to 3 months.
  • To Reheat: Thaw on the counter
Baked sourdough bread on a blue and white kitchen towel

Our sourdough bread recipe is as easy as it is fun! You’ll love how this crusty, chewy bread looks like a work of art and tastes like one too. Share your creations with us in the comments and on social media. We’d love to hear how your baking went and see photos of your finished loaves.

More Homemade Bread Baking Recipes

Once you try baking this sourdough bread, you’ll be hooked on homemade bread! Try these delicious recipes.

Natasha's Kitchen Cookbook

Sourdough Bread Recipe

5 from 25 votes
Author: Natasha Kravchuk
Close up photo of finished sourdough bread on tea towel
Whether you’re new to sourdough or an experienced baker, our sourdough bread recipe is the perfect go-to recipe to make an amazing artisan loaf. You’ll love the beauty of this crusty and chewy bread, and the timing is flexible to work into your schedule. After the bulk ferment for just 4 hours, you will cold proof in the refrigerator for 8-48 hours then bake when you're ready. It’s also easy to double the recipe to make two loaves.
Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 40 minutes
Resting Time: 16 hours 20 minutes
Total Time: 17 hours 20 minutes

Ingredients 

Servings: 1 loaf

Instructions

  • Feed your sourdough starter 1 or 2 times before making your sourdough bread, depending on how healthy it is. For a single loaf, (using a kitchen scale to measure) mix 50g of starter with 50g of bread flour and 50g of lukewarm water. Cover with a loose fitting lid and let it rise at room temperature until more than doubled in size, about 4-6 hours.*
  • Make the Dough: In a large mixing bowl, whisk together bread flour, rye, and salt. Add water and sourdough starter and stir together with a wooden spoon then use your hand to thoroughly mix together, pinch the dough as you mix to make sure it's very well combined. It will be a very sticky dough. Scrape down the bowl, cover with a clean kitchen towel, and let the dough rest at room temperature for 4 hours in a warm spot (bulk fermentation).
  • Bulk Fermentation Stage: After every hour, do a round of “stretch and fold” – with wet hands to prevent sticking, gently lift up on one side of the dough and stretch it upwards (avoid tearing the dough), and then fold it over onto itself. Rotate the bowl a quarter turn and continue to stretch and fold about 3 more times or until the dough resists pulling. Keep the bowl covered with a towel between your stretch and fold rounds. After 4 hours, you’ll stretch and fold the dough for the fourth and final time to tighten it up.
  • Shape the Loaf: Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface (cut it in half if you’ve doubled the dough for 2 loaves). With floured hands, gently stretch out the dough then shape the dough to match the shape of your banneton (bread basket) and pot.(*see notes below)
  • Bench Rest: Turn the dough seam-side down, cover it with a towel, and let it ‘bench rest’ for 20 minutes.
  • Tighten the Dough: If it loosens up too much during the bench rest and loses shape, gently re-shape it again to tighten the loaf. With floured hands, cup your hands around the sides of the dough and tuck the sides underneath. Pull the dough down the counter towards you in a circular motion to tighten up the shape.
  • Cold Fermentation: Transfer the dough seam-side up into your floured banneton.* Cover with a tea towel and refrigerate for at least 8 hours or up to 48 hours.
  • Preheat the Oven: At least 30 minutes before baking, set the Dutch oven or combo cooker into your oven (set your pizza stone on the bottom rack if using*) and preheat the oven to 500 ̊F.
  • Score your Bread: Turn the bread out into a parchment lined combo cooker or onto a sheet of parchment paper if using a Dutch Oven. Using the bread lame, score the bread starting at the base on one side, (keeping at a 45-degree angle and making a 1/4 to 1/2" deep crescent shape) cut around the top of the bread, from one side to the other. If using a Dutch Oven use the parchment to transfer your dough into the pot.
  • Bake: Using oven mitts, cover with the hot lid and put it into the oven. Immediately reduce heat to 450 ̊F, and bake for 20 minutes covered. Remove the lid and bake another 20-25 minutes uncovered or until it reaches your desired color.

Notes

*Feeding your starter – Whether you store your starter at room temperature or in the refrigerator, see our post on how to feed sourdough starter for a detailed tutorial. 
*Water quantities – You may need to experiment with how much water you need for the dough. This recipe was made in an Idaho kitchen which is in a dry climate. If you live in a high-humidity area, use less water. 
*Shaping the dough – For a round loaf, starting at the top, fold the dough onto itself, gently pressing down in the center, give it a slight turn, and fold over the next section, repeat until all 4 sides are folded in. For an oval banneton, alternate folding in the sides from left to right all the way down then starting at the top, tightly roll the dough from top to bottom.
*Baking Tips – I set my top rack in the middle of the oven and the bottom rack right below it. If you have a pizza stone, set it on the bottom rack which will keep the bottom of your bread from turning too dark.
*Banneton Maintenance – Before using, season the liner or the basket itself (whichever you choose to use). To do this, spray it lightly with water and use flour to generously cover. Shake and scrape out the extra with a spatula. Once you use the bread basket, be sure to dry it out completely and then scrape the extra flour from the basket before storing it. Rice flour works best, but you can use all purpose or bread flour.
Course: Bread
Cuisine: American
Keyword: sourdough bread, sourdough bread recipe
Skill Level: Medium
Cost to Make: $

Natasha Kravchuk

Welcome to my kitchen! I am Natasha, the blogger behind Natasha's Kitchen (since 2009). My husband and I run this blog together and share only our best, family approved and tested recipes with YOU. Thanks for stopping by! We are so happy you're here.

Read more posts by Natasha

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Recipe Rating




Comments

  • Kayla
    April 15, 2024

    Hi! If I’m only using bread flour do I use 400g or 455g? Thanks!

    Reply

    • Natasha
      April 17, 2024

      Hi Kayla, there is some experimentation needed with changing the amount of flour and it depends on the environment that your bread is made in. I would start with replacing the same amount of flour (455 grams total) and if the dough seems too wet, you can add more.

      Reply

  • Masha
    April 15, 2024

    Hi Natasha. I used your sourdough start and bread recipe. It was easy and fun to do. I did follow your detailed instructions to a T including getting the electronic scale. It did make the process easy and virtually mess free.
    I made 3 loafs each one better then previous. Number Four is cold fermentating for a bake tomorrow. Thank you so much for these. I’m definitely not a baker, I love to cook and usually just eye ball everything which can’t do with baking. You made it easy and I love your cheery videos. I have used your other recipes as well. Like cream puffs. You are my go to for recipes especially baked goodies.
    I named my starter “prostokvashino” hope you get a kick out of that name;)

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      April 15, 2024

      That’s awesome! Thank you for sharing your experience trying the recipe. I’m glad that you are enjoying it!

      Reply

  • Diane Moran
    April 14, 2024

    Hi Natasha, why is my bread not rising enough. I have followed the instructions exactly and have made 4 loaves but they do not rise very high.

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      April 14, 2024

      Hi Diane, did you possibly have too much flour? Be sure to measure by fluffing the flour first with a spoon then spoon it into a dry ingredient measuring cup and scrape off the top. If you push your measuring cup into a flour bin, you will get up to 25% too much flour. Also, do not tap the flour down in the measuring cup.

      Reply

  • Jim
    April 14, 2024

    I tried your sourdough recipe on the recommendation of a friend, but it didn’t come out like yours. I made several mistakes, I believe, but would like your feedback. First, after the 36 hour cold fermentation the dough came out of the Banneton crusty and didn’t seem to rise very much. Two, when I used parchment paper and transferred the bread to the Dutch Oven, the paper caused nasty folds in the baked bread, making it ugly to look at. Three, the bread was not crusty, despite following your baking guide. What to do next time? I have photos to send you, if possible.

    Reply

    • Natasha
      April 15, 2024

      HI Jim, I would suggest watching the video tutorial and also reading through this post which includes most of the common troubleshooting issues that I’ve seen over the years. The parchment will leave some small indents at the bottom of the bread and that is normal. You can purchase a bread transfer tool which can help.

      Reply

  • Maygan
    April 13, 2024

    I have a enamel Dutch oven and it say not to pre heat and then put something cold in it so what do I do

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      April 13, 2024

      Hi Maygan, if you plan on regularly making sourdough you may want to look into a dutch oven that will allow that, but a few steps may help you use this one. You can preheat the oven with the dutch oven inside of it, the parchment paper helps prevent the cold dough from direct contact with the hot enamel surface. Also, and while I haven’t tested this – you can lower the baking temperature & extend the baking time if you’re worried about it getting to hot.

      Reply

  • Bianca
    April 11, 2024

    Hi Natasha! I’m a huge fan of recipes ! I am a little confused on the starter. I already made my starter using your recipe. Am I taking 50 grams from that starter and making a new starter for this loaf? Sorry if this is a silly question! New to sourdough baking

    Reply

    • NatashasKitchen.com
      April 11, 2024

      Hi Bianca. Yes, you’re going to take 50g of your starter and you’re going to feed it with 50g flour, 50g luke warm water and let it sit at room temperature for 4-6 hours or until it has more than doubled in volume. Then it’s ready to use for the bread.

      Reply

  • Gosia
    April 9, 2024

    Hi Natasha! Great and looking easy recipe..
    But here is my problem,, the dough was sticky even at the forth stretch and fold and at the shaping point right before putting in the benneton it could keep it shape,, it’s 3 td time it happened, I used 50 g less water and still to sticky,, what could be the reason? TIA

    Reply

    • Natasha
      April 10, 2024

      Hi Gosia, it’s still a somewhat sticky dough through that process and I do have to get my hands wet with every time I stretch and fold. If you live in a more humid climate or are changing the flour, you could experiment with using less water. Your environment can have alot to do with how much water your dough needs.

      Reply

  • Laura
    April 6, 2024

    Is the bulk fermentation total time 4 hours including stretch and folds? Or do you let it sit for 4 hours and then perform stretch and fold over an additional four hours? Thank you!

    Reply

    • NatashasKitchen.com
      April 7, 2024

      Hi Laura! Yes, you’ll perform a stretch and fold routine after every hour (total of 4 hrs).

      Reply

  • Hannah
    April 2, 2024

    If I used this recipe to make two smaller loaves, how long would I bake it for? (and what temperature?) my sourdough came out perfect but I prefer smaller loaves instead of one big one!

    Reply

    • Natasha
      April 4, 2024

      HI Hannah, I haven’t tested this since I usually bake the full loaf, then cut it in half and freeze half for later. A smaller loaf will bake up faster so keep an eye on it and the color formation on the crust. If you have a thermometer, you want to bake until the center reaches an internal temperature of 200˚F to 210˚F.

      Reply

  • Sharon zeger
    April 1, 2024

    Sorry if it’s a repost lol. Didn’t see my comment so I figured I’d try again. This recipe was so easy and came out amazing!! Thank you so much for sharing❤️❤️

    Reply

    • Natasha
      April 1, 2024

      I’m so happy you loved the sourdough bread recipe. Thank you for sharing your wonderful review.

      Reply

  • kelly Correia
    April 1, 2024

    How long will a fresh loaf last on the counter before it dries out and loses its crunch?

    Reply

    • NatashasKitchen.com
      April 1, 2024

      It will last several days if stored well but to enjoy that crispy crust it is best enjoyed within the first day or two.

      Reply

  • Keith Peterson
    March 29, 2024

    I made this bread today, and my wife and I just love it. Came out perfectly — your instructions were very clear. I had big holes in the crumb and the crust was crunchy, but tender. Thank you so much for sharing this recipe — the cold fermentation is a must!

    Reply

    • NatashasKitchen.com
      March 29, 2024

      I’m so glad to hear that, Keith!

      Reply

  • Christa
    March 27, 2024

    I have made your recipe and froze one of my loaves. How do I thaw and have success with eating it like it were fresh? Thanks.

    Reply

    • NatashasKitchen.com
      March 27, 2024

      Hi Christa! See my make ahead note above. I just let it thaw on the counter.

      Reply

  • Jacqui
    March 27, 2024

    Natasha, I have a question. After step 7 and before step 8, does the cold dough have to come to room temperature before baking? This will be my first time baking sourdough bread, so I’m clueless 🤔☺️

    Reply

    • NatashasKitchen.com
      March 28, 2024

      Hi Jacqui! You can bake it right away, you do not need to wait for the dough to come to room temperature. I hope you love this recipe!

      Reply

  • Glen
    March 27, 2024

    Hi Natasha…what size Banneton should I use for this recipe? 9″ or 10″…..or does it matter?
    Thanks in advance

    Reply

    • NatashasKitchen.com
      March 27, 2024

      Hi Glen. The one I linked in this recipe blog is 9”.

      Reply

  • Terri Brodeau
    March 25, 2024

    Boy did I mess up !!!! I did not use a scale and used US measurements but was careful to measure correctly. My dough was not loose like yours but quite a bit stiffer. It did not seem to rise at all but I continued – every hour I folded it four times, and there is no difference from my first fold ??? I refuse to quit so will continue, refrigerate, etc and hope for miracles. If not, I will try again but ….help…. why was my dough thick instead of loose ? Starter took 7 days and looked good ?? I love all your recipies and have had so much fun and compliments making them. I love sourdough bread especially oungent San Francisco Sourdough but here in Ontario Canada I find bread too mild and want to make my own good sour stuff. Thanks, Terri

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      March 26, 2024

      Hi Terri, did you possibly have to much flour? Be sure to measure by fluffing the flour first with a spoon then spoon it into a dry ingredient measuring cup and scrape off the top. If you push your measuring cup into a flour bin, you will get up to 25% too much flour. Also, do not tap the flour down in the measuring cup.

      Reply

  • Karen
    March 17, 2024

    Hi Natasha,

    I just made your sourdough bread recipe and came out awesomely delicious and looked alot like yours. It was a beautiful one with the designs that I made from scoring like you showed in the video. Thanks for another great recipe! I wish you and the family a Happy St Patrick’s Day!

    Reply

    • NatashasKitchen.com
      March 17, 2024

      You’re very welcome, Karen!

      Reply

  • Lorraine tvrdik
    March 15, 2024

    I am making your wonderful sourdough bread to be baked tomorrow.
    I would like to use this recipe to make rolls which I remember eating as a young child going home from school.
    I will weight the dough and divide it by 80 grams so I know how many. At What temperature should I bake them. 450fegrees seems a bit high.
    Thank you. I love your videos. They are perfect for beginners and intermediate bakers.

    Reply

    • NatashasKitchen.com
      March 15, 2024

      Hi Lorraine! I’m sorry, I haven’t tested this in roll version to provide those exact instructions.

      Reply

  • Mark
    March 14, 2024

    What can I use other than a banneton ? I don’t have one of those handy This is my first try making sourdough

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      March 14, 2024

      Hi Mark, if you don’t have a banneton, you can use a bowl lined with cloth, just ensure the bowl shape is the shape you want your loaf to be, be sure to generously flout it. You can try a loaf pan for a more structured shape. I hope that helps.

      Reply

  • Debora Elliott
    March 13, 2024

    After I’ve made the bread-what do I do with the excess ‘starter’. If I’m not using it again right away, can I just cover & put in the frig or do I feed again & put in the frig??

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      March 13, 2024

      Hi Debora, great question, I address this under my How to Feed Starter post. I hope this helps.

      Reply

      • Emily
        March 28, 2024

        I’ve made two loaves now — my dough doesn’t rise. I’m using all the same stuff. I out in the fridge, but I feel like nothing happens with it in there. It looks exactly the same as it did 16 hours later. I’ve tried 8 hours and then 16 hours with the second loaf with the exact same results.
        I went head and baked the first loaf — it looked great, but after it cooled, the inside was not fully cooked. Baked at 450 for 20 min with the lid on Dutch oven, and then 25 with lid off. Outside looked beautiful, but inside not so good.

        Reply

        • Natasha
          March 28, 2024

          HI Emily, it normally does not rise very much in the refrigerator during the cold fermentation. Was your dough rising while you were doing the stretch and folds? Are you using an active starter at it’s peak of rising? If your house is cooler, it will help the dough proof in the oven with just the light on to give it just a little help. If it is underbaked after the proper cooking times, it sounds like maybe your oven wasn’t fully preheated or possibly the dutch oven was not preheated. Both should be preheated together fully for best results. Not all ovens are created equal. I suggest getting an oven thermometer to double check and ensure your oven is preheating properly. For example, my own oven doesn’t preheat fully by 25 degrees or more when it says it’s preheated. Lastly, make sure to never cut into a hot or even warm sourdough bread loaf. Let it cool to room temperature, otherwise the steam will escape and it will be gummy inside. I hope that helps for next time.

          Reply

    • ZP
      March 19, 2024

      Hi Natasha, could you please share the name brand of flour you recommend for this recipe? I have read that Kimg Arthur is the best, but what would you say is best one to try for a beginner and isbread flour better to use then regular? Thanks

      Reply

      • NatashasKitchen.com
        March 19, 2024

        Hi ZP! See my note in the blog above. I listed the flour brands that I use.

        Reply

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