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Paska Easter Bread Recipe (Kulich)

Paska (also known as Kulich) is a classic Easter Bread. It's a wonderful Easter tradition.

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Paska (also known as Kulich) is a classic Easter Bread. It’s a wonderful Easter tradition shared by Russian and Ukrainian people. This recipe comes from my aunt Tanya and cousin Lena; thank you so much!

Easter only comes once a year so don’t panic when I tell you how long it takes to make this. First I will tell you how soft and delicious it is. Then I’ll explain how you will feel like a domestic diva once you’ve got this under your belt. After that I’ll convince you that this bread makes for an incredible french toast (like really, really good!).

I’ll also mention that the active time for this recipe is about 30-45 minutes and the rest is oven/rising time. Then, and only then will I tell you that it takes basically half the day to rise. I made it a couple weeks early just so I could photograph it and share the recipe with you. I’m going to make it again for Easter. See, that means it was worth it.

Thank You Lena and Aunt Tanya for this wonderful recipe; It’s a keeper for sure. My parents and sister tried it and were raving about it.

Ingredients for the Kulich/Paska:

2 cups + 2 Tbsp warm milk (I used whole milk)
6 eggs, room temp
1 Tbsp active dry yeast
2 cups sugar
2 sticks unsalted butter, (1/2 lb or 226 grams), melted (if using salted butter, omit the salt)
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 cup sour cream
1 tsp vanilla
9 cups all-purpose Canadian flour, divided ** (measured correctly)
1 to 1 1/2 cups raisins (white or brown)

**On Flour Substitutions:

Canadian flour is made in Canada has a higher gluten content and produces a softer bread than American all-purpose flour. It is available in Cash and Carry, Winco and Canada of course! Several readers have reported great results with American all-purpose flour but because Canadian flour has a higher gluten content, you often need to use more American all-purpose flour, so keep that in mind if you substitute. Read helpful review below:

One of my readers, Natalia, shared this amazing review with her flour substitutions:

“I want to thank you for this wonderful Paska recipe. My family loved it. I made a half of the recipe, That was enough to make two medium and two small breads. I used the King Arthur’s bread flour (4 cups) and 1/2 cup of a/p flour (I was running short on bread flour). It turned out amazing. I’ve never made Paskas before, and it was a success from the first time. Thank you!!!”

Paska (also known as Kulich) is a classic Easter Bread. It's a wonderful Easter tradition. This bread also makes for an incredible french toast.

For the Topping:

2 cups powdered Sugar
3 Tbsp Lemon Juice

What you’ll need:

3 Large Panettone Paper Molds (4.8″H x 6.75″ W); we purchased them on Amazon (you can also buy the mini ones and make baby paskas; I Imagine those would be adorable, but you’d need to adjust the baking times for sure). My husband actually discovered these molds and they were great!

Paska Easter Bread Recipe-2

How to Make Paska Easter Bread Recipe (Kulich):

1. In a large Mixing bowl, whisk together 2 cups + 2 Tbsp warm milk, 6 eggs, 1 Tbsp yeast, 2 cups sugar, 2 sticks melted butter (just warm, not hot!), 1/2 tsp salt, 1/2 cup sour cream and 1 tsp vanilla. Whisk in 4 cups flour. Your batter will be thick like sour cream. Cover bowl with plastic wrap and let it rise in a warm place or a warm oven (about 100˚F) for 2 hours.

Note: Do not put the mixture in a hot oven or it will deactivate the yeast and it won’t rise; yep we learned this the hard way and an entire batch ended up in the garbage can. So either put it in a warm 100˚F oven or put it in a warm spot in the sun. 

Paska (also known as Kulich) is a classic Easter Bread. It's a wonderful Easter tradition.

Paska (also known as Kulich) is a classic Easter Bread. It's a wonderful Easter tradition.

Paska Easter Bread Recipe-5

Paska Easter Bread Recipe-6

2. Add 5 more cups of flour; one cup at a time or until the dough no longer sticks to your hands (it will still feel sticky but won’t stick to your fingers). I find it’s easiest to stir in the flour with a stiff silicone spatula. Dough should be soft. Stir in 1 to 1 1/2 cups raisins. Cover and let dough rise another 2 hours in a warm oven (100˚F).

Paska (also known as Kulich) is a classic Easter Bread. It's a wonderful Easter tradition. This bread also makes for an incredible french toast.

Paska (also known as Kulich) is a classic Easter Bread. It's a wonderful Easter tradition. This bread also makes for an incredible french toast.

3. Divide dough evenly into the three paper baking molds; try not to mix it or stomp it down too much. Let dough rise uncovered in a warm 100˚F oven for an additional 2 hours or until the molds are almost full. Remove from the oven and preheat oven to 350˚F.

Paska (also known as Kulich) is a classic Easter Bread. It's a wonderful Easter tradition. This bread also makes for an incredible french toast.

4. Bake at 350˚F for 30-35 minutes in the middle of the oven until the top is golden brown. Let cool to room temp or just warm and then tear off the wrapper.

Paska (also known as Kulich) is a classic Easter Bread. It's a wonderful Easter tradition.

5. Once the Breads are at room temperature and wrappers are off, get your frosting ready. In a medium bowl, whisk together 2 cups powdered sugar with 3 Tbsp lemon juice. Add a little water if it’s too thick or a little more powdered sugar if it’s too runny. Pour the glaze over each cooled Easter bread.

Top with sprinkles, which just make these seem so traditional and festive. I remember having lots of sprinkles growing up. I’ll put sprinkles on my next one and post it.

Paska (also known as Kulich) is a classic Easter Bread. It's a wonderful Easter tradition.

Paska (also known as Kulich) is a classic Easter Bread. It's a wonderful Easter tradition.

Paska Easter Bread Recipe (Kulich)

4.87 from 124 votes
Prep Time: 6 hours 30 minutes
Cook Time: 35 minutes
Total Time: 7 hours 5 minutes
Traditional Paska Easter Bread Recipe a.k.a. Kulich has been made by our family for generations.
Author: Natasha of NatashasKitchen.com
Skill Level: Medium
Cost to Make: $5-$8
Keyword: Kulich, Paska Easter Bread
Cuisine: Russian, Ukrainian
Course: Dessert
Servings: 3 large paska breads

Ingredients

  • 2 cups + 2 Tbsp warm milk I used whole milk
  • 6 large eggs room temp
  • 1 Tbsp active dry yeast
  • 2 cups sugar
  • 2 sticks unsalted butter (1/2 lb or 226 gr), melted (if using salted butter, omit salt)
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/2 cup sour cream
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 9 cups all-purpose Canadian flour divided
  • 1 to 1 1/2 cups raisins white or brown

For the Topping:

What you'll need:

  • 3 Large Panettone Paper Molds; we purchased them on Amazon

Instructions

  1. In a large Mixing bowl, whisk together 2 cups + 2 Tbsp warm milk, 6 eggs, 1 Tbsp yeast, 2 cups sugar, 2 sticks melted butter (just warm, not hot!), 1/2 tsp salt, 1/2 cup sour cream and 1 tsp vanilla. Whisk in 4 cups flour. Your batter will be thick like sour cream. Cover bowl with plastic wrap and let it rise in a warm place or a warm oven (about 100˚F) for 2 hours.
  2. Add 5 more cups of flour; one cup at a time or until the dough no longer sticks to your hands (it will still feel sticky but wont' stick to your fingers). I find it's easiest to fold flour in with a silicone spatula. Dough should be soft. Stir in 1 to 1 1/2 cups raisins. Cover and let dough rise another 2 hours in a warm oven (100˚F).
  3. Divide dough evenly into the three paper baking molds; try not to mix it or stomp it down too much. Let dough rise uncovered in a warm 100˚F oven for an additional 2 hours or until the molds are almost full. Remove from the oven and preheat oven to 350˚F.
  4. Bake at 350˚F for 30-35 minutes in the middle of the oven until the top is golden brown. Let cool to room temp or just warm and then tear off the wrapper.
  5. Once the Breads are at room temperature and wrappers are off, get your frosting ready. In a medium bowl, whisk together 2 cups powdered sugar with 3 Tbsp lemon juice. Add a little water if it's too thick or a little more powdered sugar if it's too runny. Pour the glaze over each cooled Easter bread. Traditionally, these are topped with colorful sprinkles before the glaze sets.

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Natasha Kravchuk

Welcome to my kitchen! I am Natasha, the blogger behind Natasha's Kitchen (since 2009). My husband and I run this blog together and share only our best, family approved and tested recipes with YOU. Thanks for stopping by! We are so happy you're here.

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Read comments/reviewsAdd comment/review

  • Katrina
    May 27, 2020

    BEST. PASKA. EVER!!!
    First time using this recipe and it’s already become the ONLY one I’m going to use from now on!!!

    I also steeped some saffron in the warm milk first, because I always had saffron flavoured paska growing up. The flavour is lovely, and the texture is amazing!

    Thank you!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      May 27, 2020

      That’s just awesome! Thank you for sharing that with me, Katrina! I’m so glad you enjoyed this recipe!

      Reply

  • Katrina
    May 20, 2020

    Do you use Instant (quick) yeast? Or active dry yeast?

    My Baba’s recipe requires the yeast to be proofed in warm milk with sugar first, but you don’t do that, so now I’m curious!

    Thank you!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      May 20, 2020

      Hi Katrina, we used active dry yeast for this recipe.

      Reply

      • Katrina
        May 21, 2020

        Thank you! So it’s the little tiny round balls of yeast? I thought you have to proof it first. On the package it says to proof it separately in 1/4cup warm milk to activate it before adding it to your mixture.
        (Kind of new to baking, just want to make sure so I dont waste ingredients)
        Thank you again!

        Reply

        • Natasha
          May 21, 2020

          Hi Katrina, you want to make sure the package says “active dry yeast” and it will proof in that first step as it rests.

          Reply

          • Katrina
            May 22, 2020

            Gotcha! Thank you so much! I am going to make it next week and let you know!

          • Natashas Kitchen
            May 22, 2020

            We look forward to your feedback.

  • Jan
    April 20, 2020

    Tried it yesterday and it went great! Because I did not read the recipe carefully enough before I started I finished 11pm, but that’s ok
    I did not use frosting and just started eating it fresh from the oven. SO good! Rich but super-fluffy, just the right amount of sweet and lovely yeast and butter flavors.
    By the way: I did not have paper molds, so I just used a loaf tin and two small cooking pots instead, which I pre-coated with butter and flour, so that they wouldn’t stick. Worked absolutely well. Thanks for the recipe!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      April 20, 2020

      I’m so glad you enjoyed it Jan! Thank you for that great review!

      Reply

  • Tanya K
    April 19, 2020

    Another well written recipe. I gently pre warmed my kitchen and bowls to help the rising – which went berserk. Made 12 small pasky! Subbed cranberries for the raisins, and used what’s called Instant Dried Yeast in Australia. My narrow and/or short shapes only needed 20min in the oven. Thanks, Natasha. This is the 3rd traditional recipe I’ve done of yours, and feel so confident in your writing and advice.

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      April 19, 2020

      You’re welcome, Tanya. Thanks for giving this recipe a try and for sharing your experience with us. I appreciate it!

      Reply

  • Seraphima
    April 19, 2020

    Dear Natasha! Spasibo bolshoe for this wonderful recipe! My husband from Piter was over the moon! I have to share now the recipe with all the Russian neighbours from my MIL 😉 Thanks again and happy Orthodox Easter to you!
    As I was too late to order a kulich form, I used my Austrian Bundt cake form. So it was a sort of joint venture:)

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      April 19, 2020

      Thanks for sharing that and for giving this recipe an excellent review. I hope that you ad your husband will love every recipe that you’re going to try!

      Reply

  • Jason Scandling
    April 19, 2020

    I’m making this Kulich recipe right now, I got started a little late, maybe too late to get help…

    The language in the recipe and the ingredient list both say to use 6 eggs. Thinking my batter looks a little runny. Looking back over the recipe I noticed in the recipe photos it looks like only the egg yolk is being added. Which is correct?

    Reply

    • Natasha
      April 19, 2020

      Hi Jason, 6 whole eggs is correct. Make sure to use large eggs and not extra-large to keep the proportions the same. That could also happen when using a different kind of flour that has less gluten or protein content and in that case you would need to add more flour.

      Reply

  • Natalia
    April 18, 2020

    I made it again! This is my 6th or 7th year using this recipe. I wish I could add a picture of it! Thank you!!!

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      April 19, 2020

      Love it! Sounds like this is one of your favorite recipes! You can share photos of your creation on our Facebook page or group.

      Reply

  • Mary S
    April 18, 2020

    The dough turned out great! Kulichi kame out looking nice. I made 2 big ones and a bunch of babies. Thank you

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      April 18, 2020

      I’m so glad you enjoyed it!

      Reply

  • Julie
    April 18, 2020

    I made this for Easter and everyone loved it. I used King Arthur Bread Flour and it came out perfectly. The only issue I had was that when I cut it, the frosting cracked and some of it fell off. Did I do something wrong? Anyway, I will definitely make this again next year. Thank you for this great recipe.

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      April 18, 2020

      Hi Julie! I’m so glad you enjoyed this recipe! This frosting does harder quickly so it may crack when cutting the bread.

      Reply

  • Deline
    April 18, 2020

    Hi all! I am making kulich right now and so far they look yummy and the smell around my house is glorious…. I will update you on the result

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      April 18, 2020

      Yum! That sounds delicious! I hope you love this recipe!

      Reply

  • Elka
    April 17, 2020

    I was a little disappointed with the taste. Recipe was easy to make, but taste is plain. Too bad.

    Reply

    • Natasha
      April 17, 2020

      Hi Elka, I haven’t had anyone report this tasting plain. I’m not sure if you’ve had a paska before but it should taste like sweet bread, not a cake.

      Reply

      • Elka
        April 17, 2020

        Natasha, I have made lots of your recipes and I love them. And yes, I have had kulich before, I am from the old country. So, all I am saying I will make it again, but will maybe soak raisins to enhance the flavor.

        Reply

  • Sasha
    April 17, 2020

    Best recipe! I did not have sour cream so I substituted it for vanilla yogurt. I also did not have active dry yeast so I replaced it with instant yeast (but change to 3/4 tbs). It is THE best kuleech I have ever had in my life! Thank you so much for sharing this recipe!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      April 17, 2020

      That’s so awesome! Thank you for sharing those tips with us Sasha! Our readers will find that helpful!

      Reply

  • Lana
    April 16, 2020

    Hi, Natasha! I am about to make those beauties, but I have a couple a questions, since it is going to be my very first paskas.
    Hope you will be able to help me:
    1) I am going to half the recipe and bake 3 of them in 1lb molds (which is half smaller than your molds). How do you recommend to adjust baking time?
    2) my oven doesn’t stay at 100F. Also it is going to be a rainy day this Saturday, so I won’t find a sunny totally warm spot. I found that some people rise dough in instant pot on yogurt setting, which seems like around 110F. Would it be too hot? Maybe any other ideas how can I rise it properly? Don’t want to mess it up
    3) when I half the recipe, do I half all ingredients equally or some of them should stay on a bigger side to keep the texture of the dough? If so, which ingredients?
    So sorry for so many questions.
    Thanks for your help!

    Reply

    • Natasha
      April 17, 2020

      Hi Lana, those are all great questions and I will do my best to help. I haven’t baked at that size so it would have to be an experiment. I also haven’t tried rising in an instant pot on the yogurt setting – I think that is a good idea if you have a very large instant pot but 110˚F is definitely the warmest you would want to heat it to. You could also preheat your oven to the lowest setting and turn it off before it reaches that temperature then prop the door open with a wooden spoon and set the bowl on a towel or hot pad so it isn’t directly over the hot oven rack. I would cut the recipe exactly in half if making half of the recipe.

      Reply

      • Lana
        April 17, 2020

        Thank you so much for your tips! I will let you know how it turns out. Happy Easter!

        Reply

        • Natashas Kitchen
          April 17, 2020

          You’re welcome! I hope you love this recipe!

          Reply

          • Lana
            April 18, 2020

            Natasha, if I do rise it in instant pot, I will still need the same amount of time or less?
            Also, the very last question (sorry!!) but how much the dough should rise every time? How do I know that it is time to move to the next step? I couldn’t find anything in the recipe to figure that out. I will highly appreciate your reply!
            Happy Easter!

          • Natasha
            April 19, 2020

            Hi Lana, I honestly have not tried making this dough in the instant pot but you would need a large instant pot. Usually rising in a warm environment (100˚F) will make the dough rises almost twice as fast as room temperature.

  • yuliya
    April 16, 2020

    Hi Natasha, have you tied any European flours for this recipe or Russian flour, i wonder if they would be as good as Canadian flour for this recipe, i searched for Canadian flour here in Arizona since the last year without any luck so i bought all purpose flour from Europe and will try it tomorrow. i used combination of all purpose and bread flour last year and they turned out amazing, and it was my first time baking kulich so hopefully European flour will produce good results as well.

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      April 16, 2020

      Hi Yuliya, it is very possible but I have not tested that to advise. If you experiment, please let me know how you like the recipe.

      Reply

    • Daria
      April 18, 2020

      Very good recipe! Only additions I made was adding orange and lemon zest and soaking my raisins in gin (I had no rum).
      Thank you and XB!

      Reply

      • Natashas Kitchen
        April 18, 2020

        I’m so glad you enjoyed that! Thank you for sharing that with us, Daria!

        Reply

  • Oksana
    April 15, 2020

    Hi , Natasha! Can i use fresh yeast (red star brand)? How much I need to use for this Easter bread recipe?

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      April 15, 2020

      Hi Oksana, I haven’t tried this recipe with fresh yeast. This article from Cook’s Illustrated does a good job comparing the different yeasts and offers a good substitution ratio of 2:1 when using fresh yeast instead of active dry yeast. They recommend using one small cake (0.6 oz) compressed fresh yeast instead of 1 packet active dry yeast (.25 ounces). 1 packet of active dry yeast has 2 1/2 tsp of active dry yeast. I hope that helps!

      Reply

  • Theadore Eschuk
    April 15, 2020

    Good Day Natasha.
    Great recipe. After the first rise, the fragrance of the dough was divine and the texture was what I anticipated.
    I began to add and mix the second amount of 5 cups of flour, and the dough was kneading well, however, after the last cup, the consistency was still very sticky and I had to continue to add a fair amount of flour before I was able to successfully handle it.
    I split the dough and retarded it overnight and baked it up fresh the next morning.
    It turned out wonderful.
    My concern: why was the dough so sticky?
    Thanks for sharing your experiences with us all!!
    sent with love from Italy.
    Theadore Eschuk.
    (p.s. if you could send me an email directly that would be awesome.)

    Reply

    • Natasha
      April 15, 2020

      Hi Theadore, the dough should be sticky after adding the flour – that is normal. I’m glad you enjoyed the paska Easter bread.

      Reply

      • Sophia
        April 18, 2020

        I also made the dough and after adding the 5 cups of flour it was still extremely sticky, like to stick to your hands not consistency of paska dough sticky. I put it out onto the table and went in with my hands adding flour until it got to the right consistency. Definitely calls for way more than 9 cups of flour. I used bread flour which has a higher protein content. If i was not an experienced Baker i would have thought i did something wrong and threw it out.

        Reply

  • Angela
    April 14, 2020

    Hi Natasha!

    I’m hoping to make this for this weekend but all shops I’ve been to are totally sold out of active dry yeast – only instant dry yeast. I managed to pick up some fresh yeast though, will this work and how should I go about it?? Thank you !!!

    Reply

    • Natasha
      April 14, 2020

      Hi Angela, I haven’t tried this recipe with fresh yeast – that is a bummer that it’s sold out everywhere right now. This article from Cook’s Illustrated does a good job comparing the different yeasts and offers a good substitution ratio of 2:1 when using fresh yeast instead of active dry yeast. They recommend using one small cake (0.6 oz) compressed fresh yeast instead of 1 packet active dry yeast (.25 ounces). 1 packet of active dry yeast has 2 1/2 tsp of active dry yeast. I hope that helps!

      Reply

  • Kristina
    April 13, 2020

    Hi!! Love all your recipes and looking forward to baking the Paska for Easter this coming weekend. Is there an alternative to the molds because I can’t seem to get any and Amazon is showing it won’t be shipped til May. Can I use my hands to make it into a round shape?

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      April 13, 2020

      Hello Kristina, thank you for trying out my recipes and that sounds like a good plan. You can also use parchment paper if you don’t have molds

      Reply

    • Daria
      April 16, 2020

      What you can use are old coffee cans for larger ones or smaller cans for smaller kulichi, if you have any! (The metal ones – just remove all paper!)

      Reply

  • Lorretta Stembridge
    April 13, 2020

    Hi Natasha! I’m going to try this tomorrow to give as gifts here in the Republic of Georgia. I’ve seen recipes that call for soaking the raisins and some that use other dried fruits. What do you recommend?

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      April 13, 2020

      Hi Loretta, I haven’t tested that but one of my readers wrote: “I added some lemon extract, and soaked the raisins in rum – it was delicious!!!” I hope this helps.

      Reply

      • Lorretta Stembridge
        April 15, 2020

        Great! One more question– how large are the molds? Here they can vary in 3 sizes; small medium and large.

        Reply

        • Natashas Kitchen
          April 15, 2020

          Hi Lorretta, see this note in the recipe We used “3 Large Panettone Paper Molds (4.8″H x 6.75″ W)” I hope that helps.

          Reply

  • Irena
    April 12, 2020

    Thank you for this recipe. It looks easy and we love easy! One suggestion is to add more information to the recipe about how much in volume it needs to raise each time. Thank you

    Reply

    • Natasha
      April 13, 2020

      Hi Irena, thank you for the suggestion. We did include specific rising times in the recipe – I’m not sure if you missed those. It can vary depending on your room temperature though. If someone left it at room temperature fo 75˚F, it would rise twice as slow as someone who left it in a warm 100˚F oven. I hope that helps to clarify.

      Reply

  • Allie
    April 11, 2020

    Have made this two years in a row. Last year turned out awesome, used only high protein flour. This year ran out and had to use some all purpose. I’m not sure where I went wrong but it kind of sank in the middle when baking. I added flour until less sticky although felt like I was adding too much. Easily over an extra cup. Could not get it to not stick to me but it was close so I stopped adding. Is that probably what made it sink? Too much? Is it better to let it be tacky?

    Reply

    • Natasha
      April 13, 2020

      Hi Allie, it should still be tacky/sticky when you put it into the liners. It might be too much flour.

      Reply

  • Mary
    April 11, 2020

    I halved this recipe as our family is small and as soon as it came out of the over, realized big mistake! It’s soo delicious, it may not make it to tomorrow! I substituted the sour cream for low fat Greek yogurt and milk for almond milk because it’s what I had on hand and the kulich is still super fluffy and delicious. Thanks for a great recipe!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      April 11, 2020

      That’s so great! It sounds like you have a new favorite & you may just need to make one more for tomorrow!

      Reply

  • Luba
    April 11, 2020

    Hi Natasha! I have. I am baking in a new oven this year, and would like to achieve best results with my paska. The oven has a feature of convect bake and (regular) bake. Which one would you suggest using? Also, the oven is part of double oven, and not the biggest. If i keep the oven rack in middle, I am afraid paskas will touch the top of oven as it rises. Can i keep the rack on lowest? Thank you for your time and for beautiful recipe!

    Reply

    • Natasha
      April 11, 2020

      Hi Luba, you would definitely want to use the regular bake mode (not convection). If your oven is smaller, I would suggest setting the rack so that the actual paska is in the center of the oven and if that is the lower rack for you, then that sounds like a good idea.

      Reply

      • Luba
        April 11, 2020

        Natasha, thank you! They turned out amazing! Haven’t tried them yet, but they smell and look amazing!❤ wish I could post a picture of them here😊

        Reply

        • Natasha's Kitchen
          April 12, 2020

          I’m sure you will love this. Please do share your photos you can share it in our Facebook group or page.

          Reply

  • Innessa
    April 11, 2020

    I am in Arizona and it’s my first time making it. I do bake on a regular basis and I followed your recipe with measuring cups and everything to the T… I will have to say it came out AMAZING!!! I did use regular Bleached All purpose flower 9 cups just like you stated I didn’t need more I also left the dough overnight in my oven for warmth… the oven was OFF and I used aluminum tall cans with parchment paper for baking. It was delicious Thank you!!!! I wish I can post pictures.

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      April 11, 2020

      That’s just awesome!! Thank you for sharing your wonderful review, Innessa!

      Reply

  • Alla
    April 10, 2020

    Thank you again Natasha. Just made it. It came out really nice, soft and fluffy, it was so easy to make the dough, just follow the recipe exactly. The only thing I changed is frosting, I used egg whites, sugar and a bit of lemon juice and made it a bit thicker but I think this part is to your taste. I used different sizes of containers and we ate three small ones already. Will make again next week for our Easter. Very good recipe. P.S. making Creamy Chicken Madeira on Sunday, I heard it’s delicious.

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      April 10, 2020

      That is one of our most popular recipes! Thank you for sharing that review with me, Alla!

      Reply

  • Alisa
    April 10, 2020

    Hi, Natasha. My paskas were beautiful before they started to bake. Then the middle caved in. Why?

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      April 10, 2020

      Hi Alisa, Just a few troubleshooting things: was your yeast fresh and did you use regular yeast and not quick rise or instant yeast? Also, you might try slightly less flour next time and be sure not to let the dough rise in an oven that is hotter than 100˚F which will ruin the yeast and stop the rising process – the same thing with not using hot butter – it can harm the yeast’s rising process. I hope that helps!

      Reply

  • Carol
    April 10, 2020

    Hi! I just made these today and all went well until I peeled off the paper mold. A lot of the crust stuck to it so I was wondering if I should spray the molds with oil before putting the dough in. Also, the sides that were touching each other when put in the oven seemed to be undercooked so I’m putting them back in one at a time to brown up the sides. Thanks for the recipe, it smells and looks good!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      April 10, 2020

      Hi Carol, I wonder if it was the type of mold – I haven’t had them stick on me before – it should peel off pretty easily but I don’t think it would hurt to spray the molds if yours got stuck. I hope they still looked beautiful!

      Reply

  • Anneta
    April 10, 2020

    Hello, i dont have any big paper molds or empty metal cans. Do u think it would work if i use muffin pan so basically it would be mini pasachki. Any suggustions for bake time?

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      April 10, 2020

      Hi Anneta, I haven’t tested that myself but one of our readers reported the following helpful review: “These came out awesome! I decided to make individual ones for my church’s function and they were a hit! I purchased: Kitchen Supply Paper Muffin/Cupcake Molds, Set of 25 from Amazon. I had to adjust baking to about 20-23 min., and ended up needing to make extra topping but that was expected since it came out to 32 individual servings.”

      Reply

  • Kimberly
    April 10, 2020

    Can I leave the paski in the oven while I’m preheating it or will It be ruined?

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      April 10, 2020

      We recommend against that. They will more than likely turn out dry and the bake time will need to be adjusted.

      Reply

      • Kimberly
        April 11, 2020

        Okay so I made them yesterday and I did leave them in while preheating the oven and turned out that I needed to bake them longer then actually written on the recipe.

        Reply

    • Christine
      April 13, 2020

      Hi Natasha,
      Are we meant to use an egg wash before putting the bread in the oven.
      Thank you,
      Christine

      Reply

      • Natashas Kitchen
        April 13, 2020

        Hi Christine, we did not use an egg wash before had but you are welcome to if you’d like that effect.

        Reply

  • Olga
    April 10, 2020

    Hi,natasha. This looks good. I really want to make this but I don’t have the wide & long forms to bake it in. Can I use like bread forms?

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      April 10, 2020

      Hi Olga, that should work. One of our readers reported great results using a bread pan in the comments.

      Reply

  • Stella
    April 10, 2020

    Hi Natasha! I love your blog and recipes! I’ve been using your paska recipe for 3 years now.. I’m Armenian/Russian… for some reason this Easter it turned out more like “Bulki”like light airy bread rather than dense paska… what did I do wrong? Hope to hear from you.

    Reply

    • Natasha
      April 10, 2020

      Hi Stella, I’m not sure as I haven’t changed anything about the recipe. Did you possibly use a different kind of flour or different kind of yeast?

      Reply

  • Nataliya
    April 9, 2020

    Hi Natasha! I am planning on using your recipe to bake Paska. My grandma used to make mini Paskas for us kids so I want to make mini once as well. What temperature/time would you suggest for the form about 3 to 4 inches wide and about 5 inches tall? I will very much appreciate your reply.

    Reply

    • Natasha
      April 10, 2020

      Hi Nataliya, unfortunately, I haven’t tested that specific size to advise on exact baking time. One of my readers reported making these as cupcake-sized breads and it took 20-23 minutes at the same temperature. I imagine 23-25 minutes might work, but that is just my best guess. Let me know how you like it!

      Reply

  • Dasha
    April 9, 2020

    Hi! This is my second year making this recipe and I love the flavor and how it rises. However, second year in a row it gets burned. Top and edges and bottom. I baked it for 30 minutes and checked it was still raw inside. It took 10 more minutes to have it done. Do you have any ideas or suggestions? Thank you!

    Reply

    • Natasha
      April 10, 2020

      Hi Dasha, are you possibly baking on convection mode? That would bake it faster on the outside without giving it a chance to bake through inside.

      Reply

      • Mila
        April 10, 2020

        I have convection oven as well. Any tips?

        Reply

      • Dasha
        April 18, 2020

        No, I am not using convection mode. I wonder if mine are taller than yours and that’s why it takes longer to cook.

        Reply

  • Carol
    April 9, 2020

    This recipe sounds very similar to one my mom used to make, but the instructions were not very clear. I’m excited to try it tomorrow but have a few questions. Is it safe to put the bowl in the oven with plastic wrap? I guess it must be since you do it! Also, do I need to oil the panettone papers before I put the dough in?

    Reply

    • Natasha
      April 10, 2020

      Hi Carol, I did not grease the panettone liners. Also, it is safe if the temperature is at 100˚F. I wouldn’t put it in an over hotter than that. I hope you love the recipe and Happy Easter!

      Reply

  • Krista Lepp
    April 9, 2020

    Can I make this recipe with a sourdough starter?

    Reply

    • Natasha
      April 9, 2020

      Hi Krista, I haven’t tested that so I really can’t provide instructions for that but it probably would not work with the flavor profile since this is normally a sweet bread.

      Reply

  • Molly
    April 9, 2020

    Hello.
    Is there anything else we can use besides a paper mold to bake this in? I ordered some from amazon but they won’t arrive until after Easter. Thank you!
    P.S. My kids love watching your videos with me. They think you’re sweet and funny.

    Reply

    • Molly
      April 9, 2020

      I just saw the comment you wrote below answering this for someone else. Thank you

      Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      April 9, 2020

      Hi Molly, our readers have tried that with parchment paper and that worked.

      Reply

  • Adriana
    April 9, 2020

    Do you use whole eggs or just egg yolks? The recipe and pictures are different so I just wanted to make sure!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      April 9, 2020

      Hi Adriana, we used 6 full eggs. Per the recipe: “In a large Mixing bowl, whisk together 2 cups + 2 Tbsp warm milk, 6 eggs, 1 Tb..” I hope that helps.

      Reply

  • Mariya Ralph
    April 9, 2020

    I made this paska lastYesterday it tasted very good But it’s hard as a rock I do not know what I did wrong please help

    Reply

    • Natasha
      April 9, 2020

      Hi Mariya, I haven’t had that experience, but it could be several different things. I would suggest reviewing our post on how we measure ingredients. Also, make sure not to warm your dough too hot while rising or it can deactivate the yeast and cause it not to rise and be dense/hard at the end. Also, overbaking can be a culprit. Make sure you bake on conventional and not convection. I hope that helps!

      Reply

  • Natalie Acevedo
    April 9, 2020

    Hello! Another problem. All of the grocery stores here in Chicago are sold out of bread flour. If I have to use only a/p flour, what are the adjustments to all of the ingredients including the a/p flour?
    Thank you!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      April 9, 2020

      Hi Natalie, My mom used all purpose bleached Pillsbury and it worked great too.

      Reply

  • Galya
    April 8, 2020

    I was hoping to make mini- Easter cakes, using a regular sized cupcake batter to give some away to my American church friends. How much do you think this would make approximately? And would you bake it the same time as most cupcakes?

    Reply

    • Natasha
      April 9, 2020

      Hi Galya, I haven’t tested that myself but one of our readers reported the following helpful review: “These came out awesome! I decided to make individual ones for my church’s function and they were a hit! I purchased: Kitchen Supply Paper Muffin/Cupcake Molds, Set of 25 from Amazon. I had to adjust baking to about 20-23 min., and ended up needing to make extra topping but that was expected since it came out to 32 individual servings.”

      Reply

      • Galya
        April 10, 2020

        Natasha, thank you so much for the tip! I will try that and come back here to share how mine turned out.

        Reply

  • Natalie Acevedo
    April 6, 2020

    Hello. I am in the US. If I would like to make the entire recipe, would I use 9 cups of bread flour or is there a proportion of bread flour to a/p for the full recipe? Thank you.

    Reply

    • Natasha
      April 7, 2020

      Hi Natalie, one of our readers wrote in sharing how much she loved the results substituting with bread flour. She wrote: “I used the King Arthur’s bread flour (4 cups) and 1/2 cup of a/p flour (I was running short on bread flour).”

      Reply

      • Stephanie
        April 8, 2020

        I’m looking forward to making this on my own in lieu of the traditional family paska baking day. Typically with active yeast you would activate it with 110degree milk and sugar, but I see that here you are activating it with several ingredients. How do you ensure that the temp is correct in that mix? Could I activate it in the milk and then add other ingredients? My oven’s lowest temp is 150 degrees.

        Reply

        • Natasha
          April 8, 2020

          Hi Stephanie, if you follow the temperature guidelines (warm milk, melted butter), the overall mixture will be warm enough to proof in a warm spot, especially since it is proofing for 2 hours. I would turn on the oven to 150 then turn off the oven, set the bowl on a hot pad inside the oven (keep it off the hot rack), then prop the oven door open with a wooden spoon and let it proof in the warm oven. Propping it open will ensure that the oven isn’t too hot for proofing.

          Reply

  • Beth
    April 6, 2020

    Natasha,
    I just wanted to THANK YOU for this recipe! My Baba was Russian, and didn’t speak good English. This was a Good Friday tradition, to spend the day in her kitchen making this…sprinkles and all! Many years ago, my mom had my dad translate what my Baba was doing, and rough measurements (she really just knew the recipe and didn’t measure), so her Paska could continue on when she was gone. My mom just recently gave me the recipe and I was going to try my hand at it this year, but the way it’s written is hard to follow. I’m grateful for your recipe because it gives structure to my Baba’s, and they are very similar! I feel confident I will be able to pull off making it, looking at the recipe I have, and referencing yours for clarity. Many thanks for helping me carry on a lost childhood tradition!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      April 6, 2020

      Awww that’s the best! Thank you so much for sharing that with me, Beth! We love traditions – I’m all smiles!

      Reply

  • Valentina Radion
    April 6, 2020

    I can do just 1 paska?if so how?

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      April 6, 2020

      Hi Valentina, you sure can, you would need a larger container and an increased bake time.

      Reply

  • Valentina Radion
    April 6, 2020

    I have a question can I just do some how one paska?

    Reply

    • Natasha
      April 6, 2020

      Hi Valentina, I always make the full batch, but I think you could cut down this recipe successfully.

      Reply

  • Natalie Acevedo
    April 5, 2020

    Help! What if we don’t have the paper molds. We are with only grocery stores open. Any ideas? Thank you!

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      April 5, 2020

      Hi Natalie, one of my readers, Elli, wrote that they used a nine inch cake pan, and 12 cup bundt pan stating “I did grease them very well! I think it was exactly 35 min for both, though my circled “paska” came out a little darker than my perfectly golden “bundt” paska, but thats ok because i just covered it up with the glaze and way too many sprinkles lol”

      Reply

    • Tanya
      April 10, 2020

      You can always go the “old school “ like they did in good olden days:) … use cans from corn or peas for small ones and bigger 15oz cans for bigger Paska … Use butter or spray to grease the molds and add parchment paper if needed:)

      Reply

  • Nina
    April 4, 2020

    Question.
    Natasha please help, as you know during these days I have hard time to find active dry yeast all I found is instant yeast. Can instant yeast be used instead in making paska aka Easter bread. Thanks a lot.

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      April 4, 2020

      Hi Nina, I use active dry yeast (not instant yeast). I haven’t tested this recipe with instant yeast and maybe you don’t need as much rising time with the instant. Without testing it, I can really only recommend the regular yeast.

      Reply

  • Tanya
    March 25, 2020

    Hi Natasha!

    I have a question regarding glaze. Is it supposed to be sour and not sweet? I had to add one extra Tbsp of lemon 🍋 juice to the powder, but the glaze overall is very sour. I am ok with that but my husband got used to the glaze made of eggs and sugar and says it’s not what it supposed to be. So just checking if my extra spoon made it taste like this or if it is how you meant to be?…

    Thank you!

    Reply

    • Natasha
      March 25, 2020

      Hi Tanya, it normally isn’t very sour at all – so it’s most likely due to adding more lemon juice.

      Reply

  • Linda
    March 18, 2020

    Natasha,
    My husband’s Ukrainian mother made Paska all the time. This is the first time for me that the dough did NOT rise for the first rising. Followed directions and never had a problem before. What could I have done wrong?

    Reply

    • Natasha
      March 18, 2020

      Hi Linda, could it be that your yeast is expired or maybe it got too hot while proofing (this can happen in an overly hot environment or if the liquids were hot and deactivated the yeast).

      Reply

  • Iryna
    September 24, 2019

    Hello Natasha, your Paska looks delicious and most important to me (since I never baked Paska before) seems relatively easy to make.
    I only have a couple of questions, just to be on a safe side and make sure I’m doing everything 100% correctly.
    I will probably try to bake only a half of your recipe and I’m always measuring ingredients by weight. According to KING ARTHUR FLOURS Ingredient Weight Chart you linked here, the amount of flour (AP, Bread or mix of both) in your recipe (half of it, 4.5 cups) should be something about 19.125 oz (or probably just 19 oz) is that correct?
    Other ingredients are easy to measure, convert to oz and divide, but flour is important and I’d like to confirm directly from you, what do you think?
    Thank you Natasha for doing all hard work, tests and explaining everything. I like your recipes, videos and your happy mood & attitude while doing it:)))

    Reply

    • Natasha
      September 24, 2019

      Hi Iryna, the weight measurement would be about 550 grams flour when cutting the recipe in half. I added a metric button in the recipe card which might make the weight conversion easier.

      Reply

  • Nancy Ratti
    May 25, 2019

    Just out of the oven, the whole house smells great, just like my grandmother’s. This was by far much easier. I did an egg wash prior to baking as did my Grandmother. No icing or sprinkles
    For us. Did purchase the paper holders from amazon.

    Reply

    • Natasha
      May 25, 2019

      I’m so glad you loved the recipe! Thanks for sharing that with us!

      Reply

  • Diane R.
    May 2, 2019

    I have tried many different kulich recipes over the years, and this recipe is magnificent! Using King Arthur bread flour, the dough comes out silky and smooth, and the loaf comes out of the oven moist and stays delicious for days. Perfection! My only modification was adding citron and blanched almonds to the raisins to give a nod to my Babushka’s paskhas and our family’s palate. Thank you, Natasha, for sharing this most excellent recipe! I will make it again, and again.

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      May 3, 2019

      I’m so happy you enjoyed this recipe Diane! Thank you so much for your wonderful review and great feedback!

      Reply

  • Natalia Mendlik
    April 28, 2019

    This is my third year making it. Thank you. My family and our church community loves it!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      April 29, 2019

      That’s so great! Sounds like you have a favorite! Thank you for sharing that with me Natalia!

      Reply

  • Nicole
    April 27, 2019

    It is many years since I made Kulich and I could not remember the correct processes when working with yeast.
    I knew there was something wrong with this the minute I cut it because the texture was not right. Most of the Kulich were a bit sunken in the centre too, which I have never seen before.
    I think I must have done something wrong. I suspect it is because I did not knead it. I notice someone else asked when you knead this so I am not the only one who didn’t understand your recipe.
    Your instructions say to mix this with a spatula and to make sure the mixture does not stick to your fingers – no mention of kneading – so I just touched it to check. I think at this stage I should have kneaded it rather than mixing it with a spatula.
    Other kulich recipes online involve lots of kneading, which I discovered too late.
    I think you should clarify when and how much kneading is necessary and maybe include a photograph of this process. Currently you only show photos of the dough in the bowl.
    Also, despite having two cups of sugar I did not find this sweet enough.
    I used fresh yeast as I prefer it, and mixed it with warm milk at the beginning. It might be nice to include the correct process for those who wish to use fresh yeast.
    This makes a huge amount and Even though I divided the mixture into two large bowls, it kept overflowing. Lively fresh yeast. I think halving the amount would be plenty unless you are feeding dozens of people. 🙂

    Reply

    • Nicole
      April 27, 2019

      I don’t know if I can edit my original post, but having tasted the Kulich again, I have changed my mind and think it IS sweet enough. 🙂

      Reply

    • Natasha
      April 28, 2019

      Hi Nicole, if you felt like the dough needed kneading then most likely you used too much flour. The dough would be too soft to knead at that point normally. I highly suggest this post on how to measure ingredients for cooking. I hope that helps!

      Reply

  • Natalia LoPresto
    April 26, 2019

    I am not new to backing. I have done different kulich recipe.
    I was exited to try this recipe because it has sour cream i it. I am thinking that this will make it moist . Just mixed it and realized that I need 6 h to rise the dough. Its late, I will end up backing it at 2 am((Can I put this in the fridge to rise overnight? I know I can do this with bread dough. But this is different, its sweet dough.

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      April 26, 2019

      Hi Natalia, to be honest I haven’t tried it so I can’t say for sure. If you test it out, please let me know how it goes. It should be ok as long as you let it come to room temp again and rise per the recipe again.

      Reply

      • Natalia LoPresto
        April 29, 2019

        I did put it in the fridge for over night to rise. Next morning, I just let it to warm up to room temp and put it in the oven 100F for 2h. I basically followed your recipe. After 2h I put 5 cups of flour and let it rise again. They were delicious and beautiful. The beauty part as important for as taste! Thank you for sharing this recipe with us.

        Reply

        • Natashas Kitchen
          April 29, 2019

          That’s so great Natalia! Thank you for letting me know that works!

          Reply

  • Inna
    April 26, 2019

    Hi Natasha! I would like to halve the recipe—would you halve the amount of yeast as well? Thanks!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      April 26, 2019

      Hi Inna, I haven’t tested that but I belive you would halve all ingrediants. Here’s what one of our readers wrote “I halved the recipe and followed the instructions exactly and it made 12 of the cutest little breads! With the mini molds it only took 17 minutes for them to be completely cooked and perfectly golden!” I hope that helps!

      Reply

    • Svetlana
      April 26, 2019

      I halved this recipe and used half the amount of yeast and it worked out perfect 🙂

      Reply

      • Natashas Kitchen
        April 26, 2019

        That’s so great! Thank you for the update!!

        Reply

    • Inna
      April 29, 2019

      Thank you both! It came out beautifully! With half the recipe I made 1 big one and 6 little ones; the big one took more like 40 minutes to bake and got a bit dark on the outside (but still delicious!), and the little ones had perfect texture, so I probably should have put less dough in the big mold and made more little ones.

      Reply

      • Natashas Kitchen
        April 29, 2019

        That’s so great Inna!

        Reply

  • Erika
    April 23, 2019

    Hi Natasha! I am doing paska for this weekend. And I only have 4 cups of Canadian flour. I can’t find any Canadian flour locally. What other flour can I use to complement? Bread flour or all purpose flour?
    Thank you!!!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      April 23, 2019

      Hi Erika, we purchased Canadian flour at our local store. I don’t recall the exact brand. Here is what one of our readers wrote “I used the King Arthur’s bread flour (4 cups) and 1/2 cup of a/p flour (I was running short on bread flour). It turned out amazing. I’ve never made Paskas before, and it was a success from the first time. Thank you!!!” I hope that helps!

      Reply

  • Ina
    April 22, 2019

    Made this recipe this weekend. My first time trying to make this)) absolutely loved it! Thank you so much for the great recipes

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      April 23, 2019

      I’m so happy you enjoyd that Ina! Thank you or that great review!

      Reply

  • Lena
    April 22, 2019

    Made this recipe this weekend. My first time trying to make this)) absolutely loved it!! Husband is usually not a fan of paska bread, but he loved this one! Btw, I used aluminum foil bread pans, turned out great without needing to adjust cooking times:) Thank you Natasha again for making recipes so easy to follow!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      April 22, 2019

      You’re so welcome, Lena! I’m so happy you enjoyed this recipe!

      Reply

  • Miranda
    April 21, 2019

    I made this a couple of days ago and it turned out wonderful. I halved the recipe and used Robin Hood All Purpose flour (I’m in Canada). It rose like a charm and has a really delightful texture.
    Just to cause further confusion with the name – the part of western Ukraine my family is from would call this Babka (with paska being the less sweet, flatter Easter bread). Thanks for the recipe!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      April 21, 2019

      I’m so happy you enjoyed that. Thank you for sharing that with us!

      Reply

    • Ina
      April 22, 2019

      My first time trying to make kulich, came out very good,absolutely loved it! Thank you so much

      Reply

  • Galina
    April 20, 2019

    My first ever attempt at making Kulichi. I must say I was a stressed mess the entire time although the recipe is so easy to follow. The pressure to make a beautiful and tasty Easter bread consumed me but ALAS!!! The bread turned out PERFECT! If you use all the correct ingredients (if you have a “russian” store in your area, most do sell Canadian flour) and follow the steps exactly, you will end up with a perfect Kulich! Thank you Natasha for another great recipe and for bringing a great Easter tradition into my home. My Russian siblings and Italian in-laws gave them a huge stamp of approval as well.

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      April 20, 2019

      I’m so happy to hear that! Thank you for sharing your great review, Galina!

      Reply

  • Anna Tysyachuk
    April 20, 2019

    Preveit, I am Ukraine, my family has been making it for Easter for years!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      April 20, 2019

      That’s just awesome!! Thank you for sharing that with me!

      Reply

  • Katya
    April 19, 2019

    Hi Natasha: I am making your Easter bread today. After I add the glaze, what is the best way to store it. We wont serve it until Sunday. I’m sorry if someone already asked…but there are so many comments. Thanks 🙂

    Reply

    • Natasha
      April 19, 2019

      Hi Katya, the glaze will dry on the bread and form a nice crust. If it is already glazed, cover loosely but fully with a plastic bag (or place in a cake container so you don’t have anything rubbing against the glaze) and store at room temperature overnight.

      Reply

  • Inna
    April 19, 2019

    First time this year decided to make Easter Bread, was little worry since I never cooked and usually I am not best at baking .. I used King Aurtur floor 1/2 bread and 1/2 all purpose ( I read in comments someone did it ), so bread turn out so so delicious soft and moist even my husband not Easter bread lover, he said this bread is so so good. thank you for your amazing recipe .

    Reply

    • Natasha
      April 19, 2019

      Hi Inna, thank you so very much for sharing that with me! I am so happy to hear that and I am sure it will be super helpful for others asking the same questions. Thanks again and Happy and blessed Easter to you!

      Reply

  • Mer
    April 18, 2019

    I made these for my Christian friends celebrating Easter. A fun way to get rid of all the chametz in my house before Passover begins! Absolutely delicious recipe, can’t wait to make this again next year. 🙂 Thank you as always, Natasha, for sharing your lovely recipes.

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      April 18, 2019

      I’m so happy to hear that! Thank you for sharing your great review!

      Reply

      • AK
        April 20, 2019

        Hi Natasha,

        I am almost never commenting on food blogs, but this time I felt obligated to do so given that this Kulich is such a well-tested and solidly built recipe.

        Ever since I have moved to North America, I have been searching for a nice Kulich recipe that would work every time I decided to use it. I have tried hundreds of Easter breads from numerous Russian food bloggers, and none of them was reliable. The description and pictures always look great; however, the results are often disappointing. The instructions are either super vague (add as much flour as it takes; eyeball the amount of flour; leave it to rise for 30 minutes or 8 hours, and etc.), or require hard to find in my area ingredients (fresh yeast, creme fraiche, plugra, whey). At the end, it always felt like I was brewing a love potion with no guaranteed results (the dough doesn’t like drafts, screams, unpredictable movements, bad weather, earthquakes). One of the recipes even suggested that I pray while kneading my dough.

        Anyway, eventually I gave up on Kulich, considering it a rocket science. And then, I found your recipe. No vague instructions, simple ingredients, no requirements to become a part of a certain religious denomination… it sounded like I was making an elaborate pizza dough, no magic at all.

        I gave it a try, and it was a dream of a perfectionist. “Leave it to rise for 2 hours” – this is exactly how long it took! Everything worked so great I could not even believe it! The next year, i made it again – same amazing results.

        Today, I have decided to make it again, and realized that I did not have enough regular flour, and substituted the last cup or so for whole wheat flour. It worked! The dough raised properly, the taste is even better with a little bit of nuttiness, which nicely emphasizes the delicacy and sweetness of this amazing bread.

        Thank you so much for this recipe, you literally saved my Easter, and keep saving it a third year in a row!

        Reply

        • Natashas Kitchen
          April 20, 2019

          You’re so welcome Alla! I’m so happy to hear you enjoyed this recipe! Thank you for that wonderful feedback!

          Reply

  • Clara
    April 18, 2019

    Natasha,
    I made these a few years ago using cans and they were ok, but I made them this week with mini molds. I experimented with filling, making total of 20. I could have had more, but filled some with a little extra to see time/baking difference. I baked them at 17-18 mins and let them sit. Beautiful golden brown and soft on the inside. The glaze was great. Brings back childhood memories of Ukraine. Thanks for sharing! I’m excited to try the large molds.

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      April 18, 2019

      You’re so welcome Clara! I’m so happy you enjoyed this recipe!

      Reply

  • Rafaela
    April 18, 2019

    Dear Natasha,

    i trust your recipes as they are really traditional, old school ones. Thank you! I would be really grateful to get the measurments for this recipe in grams and ml-s too – how much milk in ml-s, and how much yeast, sugar, sour cream, flour and raisins in grams. Would it be possible? Thank you!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      April 18, 2019

      Hi Rafaela, We are currently working on adding metric measurements to all of our recipes but it is taking some time as we have to add them one at a time. Thank you so much for being patient! In the meantime, check out our post on measuring which should help.

      Reply

  • Amanda M Bryant
    April 17, 2019

    I have one 9.5 inch spring form pan. I was planning on lining 6 inches above the pan with parchment paper to create the mold. Do you think I should half the recipe? Thank you!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      April 17, 2019

      Hi Amanda, I haven’t tested these out in a springform but I’m assuming it would work well. One of my readers reported great results using a round springform cake mold but did not state if any adjustments needed to be made in baking time. A wider and shorter paska would need less baking time though than a taller narrower one.

      Reply

    • Alex
      April 18, 2019

      My Mom always used round oatmeal containers.

      Reply

  • Janette
    April 17, 2019

    Hi Natasha.
    Thank you for sharing your experiences online.
    I’m preparing to make a few paskas for my family and friends and came across your recipe. I have a recipe from an old friend that I made last year and the paska was light, airy and delicious. I compared the ingredients from both your recipe and my friends and I noticed you use whole eggs where my friend uses 2 whole eggs and 5 yolks. Would you know how these difference might change the taste or texture of the paska?

    Thanks,
    Newbie Paska Maker

    Reply

    • Natasha
      April 17, 2019

      Hi Janette, I haven’t tried it that way but now I’m so curious. Also curious – what kind of flour did your friend recommend for hers?

      Reply

  • Lena
    April 9, 2019

    Just made them today, and they turned out amazing!!! I live in Florida and found Canadian flour in farmers store. In molds they rose up to the very top, within 1 hour and 15 minutes, but they turned out higher and so so so cloud like, so amazingly fluffy!! My whole family was amazed, thank you so much for this recipe!!!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      April 9, 2019

      That’s just awesome!! Thank you for sharing your wonderful review Lena!

      Reply

  • Milly
    April 9, 2019

    You are setting yourself up for failure if you use all-purpose flour in this recipe. Assuming that you live in the US and “Canadian flour” is not readily available, use bread flour. The loaf simply will not rise properly using all purpose flour.

    Reply

    • Natasha
      April 9, 2019

      Thanks for sharing and you are correct – it has to do with the higher gluten content of Canadian flour which is why I recommended that one. Bread flour does have a higher gluten content than all-purpose so that would work better than all-purpose.

      Reply

    • TanyaA
      April 13, 2020

      Actually, that’s not true, made them this weekend and all I have is all purpose flour( Golden Seal Un-bleached all purpose flour to be exact:)). The only way this would fail if you had bad yeast.
      First 1/2 batch I followed the instructions given( not to knead the dough) and it turned out ok, not great.
      Second 1/2 batch I did what actually needed to be done and kneaded the dough after adding second half of the flour and before placing into the molds and it turned out beautifully with light and airy crumb. Also, I used brown sugar and it gave it a caramel flavor and wasn’t too sweet( personally I think recipe calls for too much sugar).

      Reply

  • Annette
    April 9, 2019

    Very excited to try this. I’m using the mini panettone molds. How should I adjust the baking time?

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      April 9, 2019

      Hi Annette, there were several people that reported great results making mini paska breads. One reader said she made 24 mini Paska with culinary parchment tulip cups and recommended baking at 350 for 15-20 min. Another reader said her larger 12-count mini breads were done at 17 minutes. Note they will probably not become the same deep golden brown since they won’t be in the oven as long – don’t overbake or they will be dry. You might check one of them for doneness.

      Reply

  • Diana
    April 6, 2019

    Can you please take a pic of Canadian Flour you use?

    Reply

  • Svetlana
    April 3, 2019

    Are the little paper baking tins reusable?
    Growing up, my mom always made these in aluminum cans of different sizes and I remember always looking forward to her Easter creations! Since I don’t have any panettone paper molds at the moment, I’m thinking of trying them in a cupcake/muffin pan. I’ll just have muffin sized Easter paska bread! Hoping it works out and won’t be too dry or anything. Looking forward to trying this out!

    Reply

  • Yang
    February 20, 2019

    These easter bread look so cute! I will definitely be making this for Easter. They look really cute and simple! Problem is, I don’t have those paper molds. I will try to find a way to make my own molds tho. Thank you for this recipe!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      February 20, 2019

      You’re so welcome, Yang! We have the molds linked in the recipe, you can also follow this link here.

      Reply

    • Fr Simeon
      February 20, 2019

      Yang, in the old days, some of the babas I knew lined a (impeccably clean) old aluminum coffee can with parchment paper. Some of my Tlingit parishioners in Juneau, Alaska scoured second hand stores for rice cooker inserts and lined those with parchment paper.

      Fr S

      Reply

  • Lyubov gural
    February 13, 2019

    Natasha do you have video for Easter kulich.

    Reply

  • Marina
    February 1, 2019

    What’s the name and source of Canadian flour?

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      February 1, 2019

      Hi Marina, we purchased Canadian flour at our local store. I don’t recall the exact brand. Here is what one of our readers wrote “I used the King Arthur’s bread flour (4 cups) and 1/2 cup of a/p flour (I was running short on bread flour). It turned out amazing. I’ve never made Paskas before, and it was a success from the first time. Thank you!!!” I hope that helps!

      Reply

  • victoria
    May 21, 2018

    first attempt using my mother-in-laws cans…coffee, and juice…even the smallest ones took 40 minutes to bake the large close to an hour…2nd time today…used the panettone wrappers…again 45 minutes…is this really baking in 35 minutes for everyone else?

    Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 21, 2018

      Hi Victoria, when using panettone molds, are you using the same size of molds? If you use deeper ones, it may take longer to bake. Not all ovens are created equal but if it is 10 minutes longer, I suspect it may be due to using a different size mold or maybe opening the oven too often? I hope that helps!

      Reply

  • Lisa Becka
    April 10, 2018

    I made your paska recipe 3 days in a row. Each day I made 3 large paskas and 2 small paskas. They were all delicious! That’s why I kept making them, they were so easy to make and there was “no kneading”! I’m Ukrainian and I have been baking paskas for over 40 years. This year because of serious rotator cuff pain to my right shoulder I would not be able to use my usual recipe, because I could not knead the dough. When I realized your dough did not require kneading, I couldn’t wait to try making it. I gave several paskas away to family. They all loved it. I eat a slice every morning and every night (it tastes so good, I don’t even use butter!). I put the slice in the microwave for about 7 seconds, it tastes just fresh. The texture of the paska is beautiful, just the right sweetness, and economical to make. I did not have Canadian flour, I used bread flour. Every one who has tasted my paska wants the recipe. Thanks so much for sharing the recipe.

    Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 10, 2018

      That’s wonderful! I am so happy to hear that! Thank you for sharing your amazing review 🙂

      Reply

  • Jerry Rimac
    April 9, 2018

    Isn’t the active dry yeast supposed to be dissolved in warm water first. I’ve tried this recipe several times and it never quite works out well. You state just trough yeast in with everything. Are you sure about this??

    Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 10, 2018

      Hi Jerry, it actually proofs during the initial resting time of 2 hours when your mixture is like a thick sour cream. I wonder if maybe your yeast is no longer fresh? We store our yeast in an airtight container in the refrigerator (a cold, dark place) to improve it’s longevity. I hope that helps to troubleshoot the problem!

      Reply

      • Taylor
        April 9, 2019

        Hi Natasha! I grew up on “church lady” paska so I’m excited to try to make my own. I would like to make the dough the day before and cook the next day. Is this possible?

        Also – I will be making this on Holy Wednesday to be served on Easter Sunday. Should I refrigerate or freeze to ensure the bread doesn’t dry out?

        Thank you!!!

        Reply

        • Natasha
          April 9, 2019

          Hi Taylor, I haven’t tried making it ahead, but I think it could work to refrigerate before the last rise and then let them come to room temperature and make the last rise on the counter. Also, one of my readers, Diane, gave the following make-ahead suggestion: “I always bake ahead and freeze it, removing it from the freezer on Holy Saturday to defrost. I usually pop it into the oven to warm it for Easter breakfast. The recipe I use does not have the glaze, but I don’t see why you couldn’t freeze it un-glazed and glaze when you’re ready.”

          Reply

    • TanyaA
      April 13, 2020

      To make it work add yeast to warm milk and a 1TBSP of sugar and let it stand for about 5 min or until you can see bubbles rising up( that means that the yeast is active- if nothing happens after 10 min then you need new yeast). Then you can add the rest of ingredients.

      Reply

  • Kira Kellerman
    April 6, 2018

    Pascha or Paska as you wrote it is the sweet cheesecake that goes with Kulich. Kulich is the bread. No one ever calls Kulich as Pascha unless they don’t actually celebrate Pascha (Easter).

    Reply

    • Vera
      April 7, 2018

      In most parts of Russia, this is kulich. But in Ukraine, it is almost always paska, because that’s the word for it in Ukrainian, and its name doesn’t depend on whether a person is religious or not. In my experience even Russian speakers in most regions of Ukraine call it paska. (паска, с буквой К, не Пасха как праздник). In Ukraine the cheese dessert when made would usually be called “cheese paska” (сырная паска), although this isn’t traditional to western regions of Ukraine.

      But an Easter bread by any other name tastes just as delicious!!! Yum 🙂

      Reply

      • Kira Kellerman
        April 7, 2018

        Thank you

        Reply

      • Fr. Simeon
        April 18, 2019

        Well said, Vera. It is, from my research, merely a dialect thing. Russians have one word for the cheese (Paska) and another for the bread (Kulich).

        Reply

  • Nicky Harvey
    April 5, 2018

    Hi Natasha …. this looks so good ! I am going to make some tomorrow but am unsure of the measurements … are the cups ‘American cups ‘ ( slightly different for instance to English cup measurement) and how much is a ‘stick’ in ounces or kilos ?
    So hoping there will be a reply before I start ! Thank you so much .
    Nicky

    Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 5, 2018

      Hi Nicky, it depends on what you are measuring. This post on how we measure different ingredients should help 🙂

      Reply

  • Erika Berezutski
    April 4, 2018

    What is the best way to preserve these? I’ll be sending one to relatives about 4 days after making them.

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      April 4, 2018

      He Erika! We usually let it reach room temperature and then cover and store at room temperature overnight. If shipping them, I think it would be smart to freeze them and send them frozen. Here is some good information on sending breads in the mail.

      Reply

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