Paska Easter Bread Recipe (Kulich)

Paska (also known as Kulich) is a classic Easter Bread. It's a wonderful Easter tradition.

Paska (also known as Kulich) is a classic Easter Bread. It’s a wonderful Easter tradition shared by Russian and Ukrainian people. This recipe comes from my aunt Tanya and cousin Lena; thank you so much!

Easter only comes once a year so don’t panic when I tell you how long it takes to make this. First I will tell you how soft and delicious it is. Then I’ll explain how you will feel like a domestic diva once you’ve got this under your belt. After that I’ll convince you that this bread makes for an incredible french toast (like really, really good!).

I’ll also mention that the active time for this recipe is about 30-45 minutes and the rest is oven/rising time. Then, and only then will I tell you that it takes basically half the day to rise. I made it a couple weeks early just so I could photograph it and share the recipe with you. I’m going to make it again for Easter. See, that means it was worth it.

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Thank You Lena and Aunt Tanya for this wonderful recipe; It’s a keeper for sure. My parents and sister tried it and were raving about it.

Ingredients for the Kulich/Paska:

2 cups + 2 Tbsp warm milk (I used whole milk)
6 eggs, room temp
1 Tbsp active dry yeast
2 cups sugar
2 sticks unsalted butter, (1/2 lb or 226 grams), melted (if using salted butter, omit the salt)
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 cup sour cream
1 tsp vanilla
9 cups all-purpose Canadian flour, divided ** (measured correctly)
1 to 1 1/2 cups raisins (white or brown)

**On Flour Substitutions:

Canadian flour is made in Canada has a higher gluten content and produces a softer bread than American all-purpose flour. It is available in Cash and Carry, Winco and Canada of course! Several readers have reported great results with American all-purpose flour but because Canadian flour has a higher gluten content, you often need to use more American all-purpose flour, so keep that in mind if you substitute. Read helpful review below:

One of my readers, Natalia, shared this amazing review with her flour substitutions:

“I want to thank you for this wonderful Paska recipe. My family loved it. I made a half of the recipe, That was enough to make two medium and two small breads. I used the King Arthur’s bread flour (4 cups) and 1/2 cup of a/p flour (I was running short on bread flour). It turned out amazing. I’ve never made Paskas before, and it was a success from the first time. Thank you!!!”

Paska (also known as Kulich) is a classic Easter Bread. It's a wonderful Easter tradition. This bread also makes for an incredible french toast.

For the Topping:

2 cups powdered Sugar
3 Tbsp Lemon Juice

What you’ll need:

3 Large Panettone Paper Molds (4.8″H x 6.75″ W); we purchased them on Amazon (you can also buy the mini ones and make baby paskas; I Imagine those would be adorable, but you’d need to adjust the baking times for sure). My husband actually discovered these molds and they were great!

Paska Easter Bread Recipe-2

How to Make Paska Easter Bread Recipe (Kulich):

1. In a large Mixing bowl, whisk together 2 cups + 2 Tbsp warm milk, 6 eggs, 1 Tbsp yeast, 2 cups sugar, 2 sticks melted butter (just warm, not hot!), 1/2 tsp salt, 1/2 cup sour cream and 1 tsp vanilla. Whisk in 4 cups flour. Your batter will be thick like sour cream. Cover bowl with plastic wrap and let it rise in a warm place or a warm oven (about 100˚F) for 2 hours.

Note: Do not put the mixture in a hot oven or it will deactivate the yeast and it won’t rise; yep we learned this the hard way and an entire batch ended up in the garbage can. So either put it in a warm 100˚F oven or put it in a warm spot in the sun. 

Paska (also known as Kulich) is a classic Easter Bread. It's a wonderful Easter tradition.

Paska (also known as Kulich) is a classic Easter Bread. It's a wonderful Easter tradition.

Paska Easter Bread Recipe-5

Paska Easter Bread Recipe-6

2. Add 5 more cups of flour; one cup at a time or until the dough no longer sticks to your hands (it will still feel sticky but won’t stick to your fingers). I find it’s easiest to stir in the flour with a stiff silicone spatula. Dough should be soft. Stir in 1 to 1 1/2 cups raisins. Cover and let dough rise another 2 hours in a warm oven (100˚F).

Paska (also known as Kulich) is a classic Easter Bread. It's a wonderful Easter tradition. This bread also makes for an incredible french toast.

Paska (also known as Kulich) is a classic Easter Bread. It's a wonderful Easter tradition. This bread also makes for an incredible french toast.

3. Divide dough evenly into the three paper baking molds; try not to mix it or stomp it down too much. Let dough rise uncovered in a warm 100˚F oven for an additional 2 hours or until the molds are almost full. Remove from the oven and preheat oven to 350˚F.

Paska (also known as Kulich) is a classic Easter Bread. It's a wonderful Easter tradition. This bread also makes for an incredible french toast.

4. Bake at 350˚F for 30-35 minutes in the middle of the oven until the top is golden brown. Let cool to room temp or just warm and then tear off the wrapper.

Paska (also known as Kulich) is a classic Easter Bread. It's a wonderful Easter tradition.

5. Once the Breads are at room temperature and wrappers are off, get your frosting ready. In a medium bowl, whisk together 2 cups powdered sugar with 3 Tbsp lemon juice. Add a little water if it’s too thick or a little more powdered sugar if it’s too runny. Pour the glaze over each cooled Easter bread.

Top with sprinkles, which just make these seem so traditional and festive. I remember having lots of sprinkles growing up. I’ll put sprinkles on my next one and post it.

Paska (also known as Kulich) is a classic Easter Bread. It's a wonderful Easter tradition.

Paska (also known as Kulich) is a classic Easter Bread. It's a wonderful Easter tradition.

Paska Easter Bread Recipe (Kulich)

4.83 from 86 votes
Prep Time: 6 hours 30 minutes
Cook Time: 35 minutes
Total Time: 7 hours 5 minutes
Traditional Paska Easter Bread Recipe a.k.a. Kulich has been made by our family for generations.
Author: Natasha of NatashasKitchen.com
Skill Level: Medium
Cost to Make: $5-$8
Servings: 3 large paska breads

Ingredients

  • 2 cups + 2 Tbsp warm milk I used whole milk
  • 6 eggs room temp
  • 1 Tbsp active dry yeast
  • 2 cups sugar
  • 2 sticks unsalted butter (1/2 lb or 226 gr), melted (if using salted butter, omit salt)
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/2 cup sour cream
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • 9 cups all-purpose Canadian flour divided
  • 1 to 1 1/2 cups raisins white or brown

For the Topping:

  • 2 cups powdered Sugar
  • 3 Tbsp Lemon Juice

What you'll need:

  • 3 Large Panettone Paper Molds; we purchased them on Amazon

Instructions

  1. In a large Mixing bowl, whisk together 2 cups + 2 Tbsp warm milk, 6 eggs, 1 Tbsp yeast, 2 cups sugar, 2 sticks melted butter (just warm, not hot!), 1/2 tsp salt, 1/2 cup sour cream and 1 tsp vanilla. Whisk in 4 cups flour. Your batter will be thick like sour cream. Cover bowl with plastic wrap and let it rise in a warm place or a warm oven (about 100˚F) for 2 hours.
  2. Add 5 more cups of flour; one cup at a time or until the dough no longer sticks to your hands (it will still feel sticky but wont' stick to your fingers). I find it's easiest to fold flour in with a silicone spatula. Dough should be soft. Stir in 1 to 1 1/2 cups raisins. Cover and let dough rise another 2 hours in a warm oven (100˚F).
  3. Divide dough evenly into the three paper baking molds; try not to mix it or stomp it down too much. Let dough rise uncovered in a warm 100˚F oven for an additional 2 hours or until the molds are almost full. Remove from the oven and preheat oven to 350˚F.
  4. Bake at 350˚F for 30-35 minutes in the middle of the oven until the top is golden brown. Let cool to room temp or just warm and then tear off the wrapper.
  5. Once the Breads are at room temperature and wrappers are off, get your frosting ready. In a medium bowl, whisk together 2 cups powdered sugar with 3 Tbsp lemon juice. Add a little water if it's too thick or a little more powdered sugar if it's too runny. Pour the glaze over each cooled Easter bread. Traditionally, these are topped with colorful sprinkles before the glaze sets.

natashaskitchen

Welcome to my kitchen! I am Natasha, the blogger behind Natasha's Kitchen (since 2009). My husband and I run this blog together and share only our best, family approved recipes with YOU. Thanks for stopping by! We are so happy you're here.

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Read comments/reviewsAdd comment/review

  • victoria
    May 21, 2018

    first attempt using my mother-in-laws cans…coffee, and juice…even the smallest ones took 40 minutes to bake the large close to an hour…2nd time today…used the panettone wrappers…again 45 minutes…is this really baking in 35 minutes for everyone else? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 21, 2018

      Hi Victoria, when using panettone molds, are you using the same size of molds? If you use deeper ones, it may take longer to bake. Not all ovens are created equal but if it is 10 minutes longer, I suspect it may be due to using a different size mold or maybe opening the oven too often? I hope that helps! Reply

  • Lisa Becka
    April 10, 2018

    I made your paska recipe 3 days in a row. Each day I made 3 large paskas and 2 small paskas. They were all delicious! That’s why I kept making them, they were so easy to make and there was “no kneading”! I’m Ukrainian and I have been baking paskas for over 40 years. This year because of serious rotator cuff pain to my right shoulder I would not be able to use my usual recipe, because I could not knead the dough. When I realized your dough did not require kneading, I couldn’t wait to try making it. I gave several paskas away to family. They all loved it. I eat a slice every morning and every night (it tastes so good, I don’t even use butter!). I put the slice in the microwave for about 7 seconds, it tastes just fresh. The texture of the paska is beautiful, just the right sweetness, and economical to make. I did not have Canadian flour, I used bread flour. Every one who has tasted my paska wants the recipe. Thanks so much for sharing the recipe. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 10, 2018

      That’s wonderful! I am so happy to hear that! Thank you for sharing your amazing review 🙂 Reply

  • Jerry Rimac
    April 9, 2018

    Isn’t the active dry yeast supposed to be dissolved in warm water first. I’ve tried this recipe several times and it never quite works out well. You state just trough yeast in with everything. Are you sure about this?? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 10, 2018

      Hi Jerry, it actually proofs during the initial resting time of 2 hours when your mixture is like a thick sour cream. I wonder if maybe your yeast is no longer fresh? We store our yeast in an airtight container in the refrigerator (a cold, dark place) to improve it’s longevity. I hope that helps to troubleshoot the problem! Reply

  • Kira Kellerman
    April 6, 2018

    Pascha or Paska as you wrote it is the sweet cheesecake that goes with Kulich. Kulich is the bread. No one ever calls Kulich as Pascha unless they don’t actually celebrate Pascha (Easter). Reply

    • Vera
      April 7, 2018

      In most parts of Russia, this is kulich. But in Ukraine, it is almost always paska, because that’s the word for it in Ukrainian, and its name doesn’t depend on whether a person is religious or not. In my experience even Russian speakers in most regions of Ukraine call it paska. (паска, с буквой К, не Пасха как праздник). In Ukraine the cheese dessert when made would usually be called “cheese paska” (сырная паска), although this isn’t traditional to western regions of Ukraine.

      But an Easter bread by any other name tastes just as delicious!!! Yum 🙂 Reply

      • Kira Kellerman
        April 7, 2018

        Thank you Reply

  • Nicky Harvey
    April 5, 2018

    Hi Natasha …. this looks so good ! I am going to make some tomorrow but am unsure of the measurements … are the cups ‘American cups ‘ ( slightly different for instance to English cup measurement) and how much is a ‘stick’ in ounces or kilos ?
    So hoping there will be a reply before I start ! Thank you so much .
    Nicky Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 5, 2018

      Hi Nicky, it depends on what you are measuring. This post on how we measure different ingredients should help 🙂 Reply

  • Erika Berezutski
    April 4, 2018

    What is the best way to preserve these? I’ll be sending one to relatives about 4 days after making them. Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      April 4, 2018

      He Erika! We usually let it reach room temperature and then cover and store at room temperature overnight. If shipping them, I think it would be smart to freeze them and send them frozen. Here is some good information on sending breads in the mail. Reply

  • Lena
    April 1, 2018

    These are amazing! (We’re going to try them right now)

    5…4…3…2…1…SO DELICIOUS! Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      April 1, 2018

      Awesome! I’m glad you love them Lena, thanks for sharing your great review! 🙂 Reply

  • Rodica
    March 31, 2018

    Love the recipe!
    I wonder why my glaze is see-through on the bread, not solid white like yours 🤔 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 1, 2018

      Hi Rodica, it could be a difference in the proportion of powdered sugar used – a see-through glaze usually indicates you need to add more powdered sugar. Reply

  • Emily
    March 31, 2018

    I’ve made this recipe for several years now and love it. So tasty! It reminds me of Ukraine 🙂

    Unfortunately, some of the times I’ve made this, the paska has developed large holes during the final rise (in the panettone molds). It looks like 2 of my 3 paski this year have holes inside. Any idea what is making my dough do this?

    Happy Easter! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 2, 2018

      Hi Emily, I haven’t had that experience but it may be due to letting the bread rise at too high of heat – it would rise faster and taller which could possibly cause gaps. Reply

  • Diana
    March 31, 2018

    Hi again! Can I use bleached flour for this recipe? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 31, 2018

      Hi Diana, that should still work fine. Reply

  • Kate Nation
    March 31, 2018

    Hi! Can’t wait to try your recipe! Will be using the panettone paper molds for the first time. Is it necessary to spray the inside of the molds with Pam before putting in the batter? Thanks so much.
    Kate Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 31, 2018

      Hi Kate, these are like parchment paper so they have some non-stick properties. I do not grease them and it works well 🙂 Reply

  • Vira
    March 30, 2018

    Natasha, how would you advice to store already glazed Easter bread for a few days?
    **Thank you so much for your amazing recipes. I have used many of your recipes and the outcome is always a delight** Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 30, 2018

      Hi Vira, if it is already glazed, cover loosely but fully with a plastic bag (or place in a cake container so you don’t have anythng rubbing against the glaze) and store at room temperature overnight. Reply

  • Barbara Bergeron
    March 30, 2018

    This looks so good, and a very traditional. My grand mother mad a similar recipe. They did not put frosting on top, Think it was brushed with butter and honey. Grand mom also, put the finished bread, hardboiled eggs and the ham to church to be blessed. We had this bread every yr at Easter.
    Have a beautiful and blessed Easter Sunday. I love all you do
    Barbi/ AKA A J Jones Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      March 31, 2018

      I love how some recipes bring back the fondest memories! Thanks for following and have a great Easter Barbara! 🙂 Reply

  • Melissa Schalbs
    March 30, 2018

    My oven temperature wont get any lower than 170 degrees F. Do you have any suggestions on what I should do? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 30, 2018

      Does your oven show the temperature as it is preheating? If it does, you can shut it off before it gets above 100. If it doesn’t, heat it to 170˚F then turn oven off and prop the door open for a few minutes. Set the pan on the oven rack over a towel so it doesn’t get too hot from the rack, then prop the door open with a wooden spoon and let rise in the warm oven. Reply

      • Mary Aigler
        April 2, 2018

        I have found that raising bread is best done in a small room, like a guest bathroom, with a space heater! It should feel like a sauna. Reply

        • Natasha's Kitchen
          April 2, 2018

          Great tip Mary, thanks for sharing! 🙂 Reply

  • Tatyana
    March 30, 2018

    Just finished baking these, I used one large, one medium and 6 small molds. Dough is so soft and delicious! Thank you Natasha for great recipes! Happy Easter! Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      March 30, 2018

      You’re welcome! I’m glad to hear the recipe was a great success. Thanks for sharing your great review and have a wonderful Easter! Reply

  • Nick
    March 29, 2018

    Hello! Great recipe; love the authenticity of it. Question though: is it possible to reserve some of the dough to make a small braided cross to bake on top of it? Any tips for this option? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 30, 2018

      Hi Nick, I think that could work to reserve some of the dough. You might use toothpicks to keep the cross design in place so it doesn’t shift and get misshapen. This video from Martha Stewart (around the 3 minute mark) shows some cool tips on the design. Reply

  • Carolina
    March 29, 2018

    Hello Natasha! I just made this paska for this Easter Sunday dinner. What is the best way to store it for the next three days? Plastic wrap? Will it keep on the shelf? Should I wait to frost it on Sunday? Thank you! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 29, 2018

      Hi Carolina, it might be easiest to store them unglazed. I would wrap them unglazed and keep at room temperature then glaze on Sunday and keep uncovered after glazing. Reply

  • Ksenia
    March 29, 2018

    Hi Natasha!
    I made my Easter breads using this recipe the the other day. Oh boy, the rising process takes all day! Besides vanilla extract I added lemon extract to the dough, as well as raisins, chopped dried apricots and a little bit of pecans (Yes, I like my Easter breads full of flavors)
    So, the dough turned out tasty – I love the combination of vanilla and lemon. But the texture of the bread didn’t turn out very well. The dough is WAY too dense. No volume or airness. Did you ever run into this problem? Thinking, I should have added some baking powder, or maybe less flour… Followed the recipe carefully.
    I used slightly smaller paper cups, but I also reduced baking time for at least 5 minutes.
    Anyway, thanks for the recipe! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 29, 2018

      Hi Ksenia, I haven’t had any issues with this being too dense. A couple of things – Make sure your yeast is fresh. Also, it is important to make sure not to use milk that was too hot or keep the dough to rise in an area greater than 100˚F. If the mixture gets too hot, it can deactivate the yeast and then it will not rise or bake up properly. Reply

  • Diana
    March 28, 2018

    Hi Natasha! Do u use bleached or unbleached Canadian flour? Thank you! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 28, 2018

      Hi Diana, I believe it was bleached. Reply

  • Alina
    March 28, 2018

    Hi Natasha! I really want to make this recipe on Saturday. And I know all of ur recipies turn out great but I have a question do u have to put all together like in the first step- milk and eggs and let it rise for 2hrs? Eggs won’t go bad? Like it ur poppy seed rolls recipe it’s milk yeast and sugar and let it rise… I just wanna make sure I won’t mess up by putting eggs and keeping them for so long in there to rise Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 28, 2018

      Hi Alina, no worries, its pretty typical to have egg in the dough that requires rising. I never had health concerns with that. I have another Easter recipe coming up today so stay tuned. Reply

      • ALINA
        March 28, 2018

        Thanks! I don’t have health conserns just looked weird haha

        Yay thnks for posting new reciepies! HOWs ur progress with the cook book? 🙂 Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          March 28, 2018

          Hi Alina! We are going to put more focus on the cookbook once we are settled in our new house so the photography and everything is consistent in one location and because life is a whirlwind right now 🙂 Reply

  • Kimberly Milone
    March 26, 2018

    I love this recipe it’s practally foolproof. I’ve tried other Easter Bread recipies and failed several times. It’s easy and delicious. I put lemon extract as well as the vanilla extract. I used loaf pans and devided the tough into four equal parts. Came out great. Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      March 26, 2018

      I’m glad to hear how much you love this recipe Kimberly! Thanks for sharing your fantastic review with other readers! Reply

  • Helen
    March 26, 2018

    Hi Natasha, love all your recipes! I have Russian all purpose flour is that ok and can I use orange appeal and orange flavor thanks in advance Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 26, 2018

      Hi Helen, I’m not sure what the difference is in Russian all-purpose flour – I haven’t experimented with it so it is difficult to guess how that would affect the texture. I think orange peal and extract should work fine 🙂 Reply

  • Gabrielle
    March 25, 2018

    I made this, put dough in pans I had available, filled half way and they all came out great! I let others try and they commented that this was way better then what they make. So, nice complements from good bakers. Thank you for a great recipe. Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      March 26, 2018

      My pleasure Gabrielle! I’m happy to hear the recipe is a hit. Thanks for sharing your excellent review! Reply

  • Danielle
    March 24, 2018

    Hi Natasha, I am the designated kulich maker in the family. My mother’s recipe calls for 20 yolks and no sour cream. The texture is pretty dense but moist. We also add cardamom and saffron to the milk, and almonds with the raisins. I think I will try adding some sour cream this year. I’m also going to combine the ingredients like you did, adding more flour after letting it rise… Thank you! Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      March 24, 2018

      You’re welcome Danielle, please let me know what you think of the recipe! Reply

  • Christina
    March 23, 2018

    My mother baked hers in a coffee can and used parchment paper to extend the top a bit. It worked great. Also, her family way was to have citron and currants rather than raisins and cranberries. I’m sure each family developed their favorite way over the years. For those who haven’t had it before, try it because it is richer than Panettone and with a denser texture so does better with butter and jam, as french toast and of course with pashka. Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      March 24, 2018

      Really great tips Christina, thanks for sharing! Reply

      • Debra
        March 28, 2018

        what do you use to cover the dough with while rising in a warm oven?

        Thank you,

        Debra Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          March 28, 2018

          Hi Debra, I used plastic wrap over the top of the bowl. Reply

  • Andrey Korobovsky
    March 21, 2018

    Natasha,
    Thank you very much for posting! I have not had kulich in about 30 years! After I left the house, my mother started to buy pantone for Pascha, but it never was quite the same. And all those childhood memories I have of Mom, and my Aunt Shura, making kulich in coffee cans just days before Pascha, were wonderful. I even found Orthodox themed molds on ebay! Although not an expert cook or baker, I’m fairly confident can make these this year, and impress my Irish descended bride, and 7 year old son, Aleksei!
    Thank you again…
    Andrey Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      March 21, 2018

      My pleasure Andrey! I’m glad the recipe brings back fond memories. Please let me know what you think of it! Reply

  • Mischa
    March 20, 2018

    If using a dark spring form mold how should I alter the cook time and heat? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 21, 2018

      Hi Mischa, I haven’t tested these out in a springform but I’m assuming it would work well. One of my readers reported great results using a round springform cake mold but did not state if any adjustments needed to be made in baking time. A wider and shorter paska would need less baking time though than a taller narrower one. Reply

      • Mischa
        March 27, 2018

        Thank you! I’ll let you know how it goes. Will King Arthur Brand bread flour work or should I use AP? Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          March 28, 2018

          I haven’t experimented with so can’t make a recommendation. If you try it, let me know how it goes. Reply

  • Ksenia
    March 19, 2018

    Hi Natasha,

    Thanks for the recipe. I’m from Russia, and grew up having Kulich every Easter. I’m going to try your recipe this year. What is the best way to store it? How long does it stay fresh? I’m thinking of making one for my in-laws from out of state. It will likely take a few days to get there. Will it stay fresh? Can I make the breads in advance and freeze them? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 19, 2018

      Hi Ksenia, we usually let it reach room temperature and then cover and store at room temperature overnight. If shipping them, I think it would be smart to freeze them and send them frozen. Here is some good information on sending breads in the mail. Reply

  • Marina
    March 16, 2018

    I want to try this recipe in smaller molds. How full should each mold be at the beginning, before it rises again? I’ve seen some recipes fill their molds about 1/3 of the way. Does that sound right for your recipe as well? Thanks! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 16, 2018

      Hi Marina, you will have to experiment since I’m not sure what sizes you have and I haven’t tested with varieties of sizes to be honest. I was hoping to do that before Easter this year but am not sure I will get to it. I would probably fill them about halfway in the molds. Sorry I can’t be more helpful! 🙂 Reply

      • Marina
        March 26, 2018

        Thanks for the tip. Filling the molds half way worked perfectly. I reduced the bake time to 25 minutes, as many readers suggested (I used 28 oz cans as the baking molds). I made these over the weekend, and they turned out great. Reply

        • Natasha's Kitchen
          March 26, 2018

          You’re welcome Marina! I’m happy to hear that, thanks for sharing! Reply

  • Barbara
    March 14, 2018

    Natasha, I am planning to try this year. I’ve never used the panettone paper molds, how large is large? The largest I’ve seen online are 7″ in diameter. Is that large? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 14, 2018

      Hi Barbara, I have the dimensions and direct link to the ones I purchased on Amazon under the “What you’ll need:” section. I hope you love the recipe! Reply

  • Lesia
    March 13, 2018

    Natasha,

    I’m preparing to bake my mother’s paska w/24 yolks. What is the texture with your recipe? My mother has never put sour cream in her paska and I’m wondering what the difference is. Is your paska dense like pound cake or light? Thank you. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 13, 2018

      Hi Lesia, it is somewhere in the middle between heavy and light – similar to a pound cake but a completely different crumb. It isn’t terribly dense or dry like some I’ve tried. I’m curious about the 24 yolks though – thats alot! 🙂 Reply

  • Kate Pigula
    March 10, 2018

    Natasha.is Paska the same as Babka bread? We get Babka at our church bake sale during Easter I was just wondering what the difference is. One day I’m going to try this recipe.Thank You. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 10, 2018

      Hi Kate, we typically refer to this babka recipe when making babka :). This Paska dough is a little too moist/wet of a dough to shape it into a babka without some modifications 🙂 Reply

  • Fr. Simeon B Johnson
    March 7, 2018

    Natasha,

    Blessings for doing this.

    I am looking for a Kulich recipe to go with the Cheese Paska that I make. I love the suggestion for using Panettone Paper Molds! Getting these out of a coffee can has been what spooked me off of making these in the past.

    Fr. Simeon
    Holy Theophany Orthodox Church, Colorado Springs (OCA) Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      March 8, 2018

      I’m happy you find the recipe helpful! Please let me know what you think if you decide to try it! Reply

  • Elisabeth
    March 7, 2018

    With my Russian/Austrian heritage, I grew up eating Kulich every Easter & can remember my Mother baking it in metal coffee cans. They always turned out perfectly; so pretty & tall. Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      March 7, 2018

      I’m glad the recipe brings back fond memories Elisabeth! Thanks for sharing! 🙂 Reply

  • Rhoda
    February 19, 2018

    Hi Natasha!
    Thank you for this lovely recipe, I added some lemon extract, and soaked the raisins in rum – it was delicious!!!
    Since I’m in Canada, do you think next time I should try making these with canadian bread flour, or should I stick to AP? I dont know what will the affect of bread flour be.

    Thank you!
    Rhoda Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 19, 2018

      Hi Rhoda, any flour that says “made in Canada” will work best in this recipe. From my research, Canadian flour has a slightly higher gluten content so it requires a little less flour and the dough is softer. If you can get Canadian flour easily, I would suggest that 🙂 Reply

  • Gaby
    February 7, 2018

    Buongiorno Natasha volevo farti i complimenti per il tuo blog e chiederti alcune cose riguardanti la ricetta del pane Pasquale,amo molto sperimentare nuove ricette specialmente quelle di famiglia con una tradizione mi trasmettono gioia.Ora veniamo a noi il quesito è sulla farina io ti scrivo dall’italia e la farina canadese da noi non la trovi come posso sostituirla?ultima domanda le tazze di farina a quanti grammi corrispondono?(9 tazze di farina canadese per tutti gli usi, divisa)cosa intendi?mentre per il lievito posso usare quello di birra fresco oppure quello disidratto?Grazie ancora per le tue bellissime ricette ti auguro una splendida giornata.Gaby Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 7, 2018

      Hi Gaby, I did my best to translate your comment but some of it may not have translated correctly so here goes! 🙂 I haven’t tried any bread called “bread Pasquale” so I’m not sure about that one. All-purpose flour generally is useable in recipes that call for Canadian flour, but the amount required will be a little more since Canadian flour is higher in gluten than American All-purpose flour, but I’m not sure about the gluten content of Italian flour to be honest. Here is our post on measuring where I linked to a good chart of conversions. Reply

      • Beatrice Wytkin
        March 19, 2018

        Pasquale means Easter in Italian How much higher is the gluten in Canadian flour as i can’t get this in Australia Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          March 20, 2018

          Hi Beatrice, I honestly do not know the exact gluten content. I might have to be a google search. I hope you are able to find that answer and sorry I can’t be more helpful. I think I need to retest and make this work with All-purpose flour! 🙂 Reply

  • Alka
    November 22, 2017

    Made them today, amazing taste, light and fluffy. Used all ingredients per recipe. Wow, just like you said worth the wait time! Thanks! Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      November 23, 2017

      Awesome, I’m happy to hear how much you love the recipe! Thanks for sharing your fantastic review! Reply

  • Junei Voo
    November 2, 2017

    hi Natasha, thank you for sharing all these wonderful recipes and I stumble on this bread recipe while searching for panettone. your paska bread use all-purpose flour, can I substitute it with bread flour instead and if I use bread flour, do I need to knead it till the gluten developed ? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 2, 2017

      Hi Junei, thank you for that nice compliment :). One of my readers wrote in with the following review: “I did not have Canadian flour, so I used half bread flour (King Arthur) and half all purpose (King Arthur). The dough rose nicely, paskas tasted great. Everyone loved them!” I hope that helps! I haven’t tested it with only bread flour so it’s difficult to say how it would affect the overall consistency. I think it’s worth experimenting though. Canadian flour has a higher gluten count as does bread flour. Reply

  • Rachel
    May 4, 2017

    Forgive me if I missed it somewhere in the answer to questions, but in the recipe I don’t see where the recommended amount of kneading time is given, only to keep adding flour and set aside to rise several times. But I assume this recipe does need to be kneaded, no? I should have written sooner; I’m in the middle of making it right now so I’m really hoping I do this right. It looks so delicious. I’m in Israel and I have a dear Russian friend and her father here I wish to share one of the loaves with. Your site is very beautiful and I’m thrilled to have discovered it. Many thanks! Rachel Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 4, 2017

      Rachel, thank you for writing in 😀. There is no kneading time required, just allowing the dough to rise in the warm temperature. Reply

      • Rachel
        May 4, 2017

        I ended up doing as you said, by default, because I could sort of tell it shouldn’t be kneaded by the time I reached the later part of the instructions. So I went ahead and baked three small cylinders and one large pyrex bread loaf. All came out beautiful and I am duly impressed! Thank you so much for this delicious recipe and for your very prompt reply. I grew up in Wenatchee, Washington, not so far from where you live. It’s a small world. Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          May 4, 2017

          I am so glad you enjoyed the recipe!! 🙂 Thank you for the awesome review and I agree, it is a small world! 🙂 Reply

  • Tatiana
    April 25, 2017

    Perfect recipe! Just like in my childhood memories. It was delicious and it’s not near as complicated to make as I thought it would be. It was my first time baking with active dry yeast so you know it is fairly easy to make. I followed the recipe exactly except I used my own bakeware which I brushed inside with organic coconut oil. The only thing that didn’t turn out like in the photos was the icing – it was not nearly as white but that wasn’t a problem. I sprinkled on top of it some powdered sugar and sprinkles and it turned out beautiful! My grandma would have been proud. Can’t wait to make it again! My husband loved it. Thank you Natasha! Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      April 25, 2017

      My pleasure Tatiana! Thanks for sharing your awesome review!! 😀 Reply

  • Yulia
    April 17, 2017

    Natasha – I love your recipes because they are adjusted to the US / Canada products, everything I have made so far was great (blueberry lemon cake, storybook cake roll and paska). Paska came out exceptionally well. I ordered the same molds you used (and I did have a little issue with it sticking, too, so I might spray it next time, but no big deal). I did not have Canadian flour, so I used half bread flour (King Arthur) and half all purpose (King Arthur). The dough rose nicely, paskas tasted great. Everyone loved them! Thank you, love your website! Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      April 17, 2017

      You’re welcome Yulia! Thanks for following and sharing your wonderful review! Reply

  • Natalia
    April 16, 2017

    Happy Easter Natasha! I want to thank you for this wonderful Paska recipe. My family loved it. I made a half of the recipe, That was enough to make two medium and two small breads. I used the King Arthur’s bread flour (4 cups) and 1/2 cup of a/p flour (I was running short on bread flour). It turned out amazing. I’ve never made Paskas before, and it was a success from the first time. Thank you!!! Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      April 17, 2017

      You’re welcome Natalia! Thanks for sharing your wonderful review! 🙂 Reply

  • Tonya Waldron
    April 15, 2017

    I made this recipe today for Easter and it tastes delicious but it did not rise as much as I think it should have. It’s kind of a heavy dense loaf but very tasty. I’ve been making bread for years so I don’t think it was my technique. The only thing I can think of is maybe it was the flour I used. I used Arrowhead Mills organic unbleached all purpose flour. The dough only took 41/2 cups of flour on the second addition. I would like to try it again using the flour recommended. This is the only Paska recipe that I’ve come across using sour cream. I truly love the flavor. I also love many of the other recipes on this website. Especially the Borchst! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 15, 2017

      Hi Tonya, I’m so glad you liked it!! Just a few troubleshooting things: was your yeast fresh and did you use regular yeast and not quick rise or instant yeast? Also, you might try slightly less flour next time and be sure not to let the dough rise in an oven that is hotter than 100˚F which will ruin the yeast and stop the rising process – the same thing with not using hot butter – it can harm the yeast’s rising process. I hope that helps!! 🙂 Reply

  • Katherine
    April 15, 2017

    Hi Thanks for sharing this recipe. I am excited to try it. I have a few questions… 1st: have you ever cut the recipe in half? I know some recipes don’t seem to do well with that for some reason.
    2nd: Can this recipe be used for the braided top bread I see pictures of or if that a different kind of bread.
    3rd: I can’t find Canadian flour but have bread flour and all purpose. Would you suggest one over the other or a mix of the two?
    Thanks Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 15, 2017

      Hi Katherine, this one should work fine with cutting the recipe in half. Also, it won’t work well as a braided bread because the dough is too sticky to braid. I would suggest this Easter bread dough for braiding. Also, that braided Easter bread recipe that I have posted uses all-purpose flour if that makes your life easier :). For this one, the best substitute will be Bread Flour followed by all-purpose flour but the measurements might be a little different since you typically need more all-purpose or bread flour versus Canadian flour. Reply

      • Katherine
        April 15, 2017

        Thank you so much for the help! Have a wonderful Easter 🙂 Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          April 15, 2017

          You’re very welcome and I hope you have a Happy Easter also!! Reply

      • Junei
        November 2, 2017

        hi Natasha, thank you for sharing all these wonderful recipes I am aware that substituting bread flour to Canadian flour is possible for this recipe. but, do you care to share the measurement for bread flour ? thank you so much Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          November 2, 2017

          Hi again! Without running the test myself, it would be difficult to guess. I was scrolling through comments a bit more and another reader wrote in with the following which should help: “I made a half of the recipe, That was enough to make two medium and two small breads. I used the King Arthur’s bread flour (4 cups) and 1/2 cup of a/p flour (I was running short on bread flour). It turned out amazing.” I realize I have the most amazing, sharing readers! 🙂 Reply

  • Elena
    April 15, 2017

    Thanks for clarification in the active yeast amount. One more question please, I did not spray the paper molds and when I removed them they came off with the sides of paskas. Should I have sprayed the paper molds? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 15, 2017

      Hi Elena, I wonder if it was the type of mold – I haven’t had them stick on me before – it should peel off pretty easily but I don’t think it would hurt to spray the molds if yours got stuck. I hope they still looked beautiful! Reply

  • Anya
    April 15, 2017

    Hi Natashenka! I love your website! I use your recipes all the time!! I have a question about the active yeast , is it ok if I use bread mashine yast or rapid rise yeast in this recipe? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 15, 2017

      Thank you! I’m so glad you like the recipes! I have not tested the other two as this recipe is intended for regular active dry yeast. Reply

  • Luda
    April 14, 2017

    Hi Natasha! Thank you so much for such a great and easy recipe!!! My Paskas are in the oven now and look great!!:) can’t wait to try them!! I had a question, after you put the glaze on and sprinkles, can you wrap it in plastic wrap? Or is it ok to put the glaze on the next day? I want to make sure they stay fresh and soft for Easter. Thank you:) Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 15, 2017

      Hi Luda, I like to put the glaze on and sprinkles the same day it is made but you can do it either way if you keep the bread wrapped in plastic wrap. If you do glaze first, make sure the bread is fully at room temperature and the glaze sets completely before covering in plastic wrap and leave the breads at room temperature overnight. Reply

  • Tecla
    April 14, 2017

    I use 46oz juice cans, but can’t wait to try your recipe version. I’ll just have to make sure it doesn’t overcook. We like the tall skinny shaped loaf because it is easy to slice! Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      April 15, 2017

      Please let me know what you think of the recipe if you decide to make it! Reply

  • Elena
    April 13, 2017

    How many grams of dry yeast in 1 tbsp? I used 1 packet and it was equal 1 tbsp, however on the back of the packet it said that one packet =2 x 1/2 tsp. Very confusing …. so I ended up with about 14 grams (almost 2 packets of dry yeast) and it kulich did not taste really good… Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 14, 2017

      Hi Elena, 2 packets is too much for this recipe – since yeast comes in different packaging – some in packets and some in bags, it’s easiest to just put in the measurement in measuring spoons. A Tbsp of yeast is about 8.5 grams. The packets of yeast that you have are 7 grams each. Reply

  • Laura Pankratz
    April 13, 2017

    You don’t specify what kind of yeast to use…….is it traditional, quick rise or rapid rise ?? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 13, 2017

      Laura, it’s traditional active dry yeast Red Star brand. Reply

  • Lilya
    April 13, 2017

    Hello Natasha, what would be an ok substitute for the panettone mold? Can’t get one fast enough for Easter but want to make paska! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 13, 2017

      Hi Lilya, if it helps, they do sell them in stores like Williams Sonoma :). I have had one of my readers report great results baking these in 4 loaf pans. The bake time might be slightly less since you’re dividing into 4. Some of my readers have reported baking them in metal coffee cans (definitely line with parchment in that case), Also, one of my readers Elli, wrote that they used a nine inch cake pan, and 12 cup bundt pan stating “I did grease them very well! I think it was exactly 35 min for both, though my circled “paska” came out a little darker than my perfectly golden “bundt” paska, but thats ok because i just covered it up with the glaze and way too many sprinkles lol” I hope that helps! Reply

      • Anita
        April 15, 2017

        My grandma uses an old Russian recipe, and we use all kinds of canned food bottles. We also make a different frosting. When it dries, (it dries very quickly, about 5-10 min) it’s very sugary. It is crunchy, because you don’t incorporate the sugar completely. It really complements the paska. Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          April 15, 2017

          I agree and thank you for sharing that with us! 🙂 Reply

  • Liubov Brooks
    April 12, 2017

    Hi, I’m wanting to make this this weekend. Am in the UK but have got the Canadian flour. I have always made one before in a large old coffee can/formula can. Do you think I can use this recipe and put it into one dish to make one – mine have been about 25 cms tall before? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 12, 2017

      Hi Liubov, I haven’t tried this recipe in the cans before so I’m not sure about how the bake time would need to be modified if at all – If the cans are the same width as the molds in this recipe and you divide into 3 cans, I imagine it would be a similar bake time. I wish I had a better answer but I really haven’t tested it that way. You might line the cans with parchment paper so it comes out easier. Reply

  • T
    April 12, 2017

    Hi! I make this recipe every year for Easter and it always comes out wonderful. However I always remember that my oven doesn’t go below 170 degrees. Any advice on what to do? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 12, 2017

      My previous oven was that way, so I do have a few things I could suggest. Does your oven show the temperature as it is climbing up? If it does, you can shut it off before it goes above 100. If it does not, you can heat it to 170 then turn the oven off and prop the door open for a few minutes, set the pan in the oven over a towel so they don’t get too hot from the baking rack, then prop the door open with a wooden spoon and let them rise in the warm oven. Reply

      • T
        April 15, 2017

        Thank you! That was very helpful!

        One last question. Should I leave it propped the whole two hours? Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          April 15, 2017

          No problem! Once the oven is just warm (no longer hot and at about 100˚F), you can close the oven door to keep the heat in better. Reply

  • Olya
    April 11, 2017

    Hi Natasha, i was wondering if you tried making this recipe with poppy seeds instead of raisins? thank you ! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 11, 2017

      Hi Olya, I love the raisins and the little tangy sweet pop of flavor that they add but I think you could make it work with dry poppy seeds maybe mixed in with the flour. Reply

  • PeachLily
    April 11, 2017

    Hi- I just wanted to know how to tell if the bread is ready when using different size pans- does the toothpick test work? I really want to avoid over baking! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 11, 2017

      The toothpick test does not really work when making bread. You will have to make a judgment call based on the size of the pan and bake longer if the bread is thicker and bake less for smaller sizes. There have been readers that have written in with various sizes and baking times over the years, so it may help to search through the comments. Reply

  • Carol- Ann
    April 10, 2017

    Ok I followed the recipe to the letter the only difference is I used coffee cans lined with parchment. It came out raw in the middle any suggestions? The cooked parts taste amazing. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 11, 2017

      Hi Carol, I wonder if you just need to bake a little longer if it is in the coffee cans vs in the paper molds. Depending on how raw it was, try adding maybe 10 minutes to your baking time. Reply

  • Mary Ann Hoffman
    April 10, 2017

    I don’t have time to order the paper you use to bake the Paska. Have you baked them in regular loaf pans? (I **hope** so!) I really want to surprise my family this year, and make my own. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 10, 2017

      I think that’s a great idea! I haven’t tried baking these in loaf pans but one of my readers reported great results baking in 4 loaf pans. The bake time might be slightly less since you’re dividing into 4. Reply

  • Lisa Becka
    April 10, 2017

    Regarding your recipe for Paska/Kulich, I didn’t see any instructions for kneading the dough. Does this dough rise without kneading? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 10, 2017

      Hi Lisa, yes once the flour is all well incorporated, it rises without kneading. Reply

  • Terri
    April 9, 2017

    Would it be possible to make mini-paskas? in cupcake cups? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 10, 2017

      Hi Terri, there were several people that reported great results making mini paska breads. One reader said she made 24 mini Paska with culinary parchment tulip cups and recommended baking at 350 for 15-20 min. Another reader said her larger 12-count mini breads were done at 17 minutes. Note they will probably not become the same deep golden brown since they won’t be in the oven as long – don’t overbake or they will be dry. You might check one of them for doneness. Reply

  • Amber Taylor
    April 9, 2017

    My first year in an Alaskan village and the Russian Orthodox people love their kulich! I baked this recipe substituting Greek yogurt for the sour cream (because that’s what I had on hand) and it turned out beautifully! I baked it in two cleaned out coffee cans. One for our family and one for my girls’ teacher. Thank you for your wonderful recipe: a new annual tradition! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 9, 2017

      Amber, thank you so much for sharing that with us, I’m so glad you liked the recipe 😀 Reply

  • Andrea
    April 8, 2017

    Hi Natasha!
    Thanks for this recipe! I made it last year and will make it again this year. I even made it into French toast afterwards 🙂
    I have one correction to make, the amount of time it takes is wrong on the “recipe card”. You have 6 hours 5 minutes for the total time but there is 6 hours of rising time and 30 minutes of baking time plus prep. I think it took me close to 8 hours last year. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 8, 2017

      I’m so glad you enjoyed it! Thank you for bringing that to my attention – I completely miscalculated. Thanks again! 🙂 Reply

  • Tania
    April 4, 2017

    Hi Natasha,
    Thank you for amazing recipe!
    l made your Pasha last year and it’s was really good.
    l have a question. Do you think l can make it without sugar or reduce amount of it? Or maybe Swerve or coconut sugar? l know yeast need sugar.
    Also can you post please ingredients in gramms? It will help a lot.
    Thank you. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 5, 2017

      Hi Tania, I’m so glad you liked it! I really haven’t tested this with less sugar or using any kind of sweetener substitute so you may have to experiment. Yeast definitely does need sugar but you could probably cut it down some and still have the yeast function properly. I’m just not sure what to suggest without testing that myself. Reply

  • March 31, 2017

    Hi Natasha.

    Thank you for sharing this recipe! I have 2 questions:

    1) Regarding Step 2: when mixing in the additional cups of flour, are we mixing with our hands from the get-go? Or mixing with the whisk first, and then switching to hands?

    2) After letting the dough rise the second time, do we keep the bread inside the oven and then raise the oven temperature to 350 degrees?

    Thank you! I’m planning on making this for my church for Easter Sunday. Fingers crossed it’ll end up okay! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 1, 2017

      Hi Ruth, Both great questions and I just updated the recipe to clarify. In Step 2: I usually mix with a spatula at that point – I use a firm silicone spatula because it doesn’t stick to the spatula and is less messy but you can use your hands or a kitchenaid dough hook if you prefer. After the bread is done rising, remove from the oven and preheat oven to 350˚F. Reply

      • April 10, 2017

        Oh, I didn’t receive a notification that you replied! Thank you for clarifying 🙂 Reply

        • Natasha's Kitchen
          April 11, 2017

          Of course! Reply

  • Diane M.
    March 28, 2017

    While I have never made this Paska recipe, I have made my mothers recipe for 35 years. I always bake ahead and freeze it, removing it from the freezer on Holy Saturday to defrost. I usually pop it into the oven to warm it for Easter breakfast. The recipe I use does not have the glaze, but I don’t see why you couldn’t freeze it un-glazed and glaze when you’re ready. Also, I always make in round casserole dishes. The loaves are larger but not as tall. The paper molds are very cool…might have to try them! 😀 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 28, 2017

      Thank you so much for sharing! 🙂 Reply

  • maria keeton
    March 28, 2017

    well, i’m just wondering how anyone can possibly find time to make this during Holy Week. Do most people freeze it then thaw on Saturday afternoon? if so, are there any tips about freezing & thawing?
    Looks like a wonderful recipe! Thank you for sharing it! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 28, 2017

      Hi Maria, I haven’t tried freezing but I think that would work. Maybe someone else has insight into freezing kulich?… Reply

    • Natalia
      March 28, 2017

      Hi Maria,
      I know Holy week is absolutely packed with liturgies . I never froze it. I usually dedicate the Holy Saturday for baking it.
      I know our priest froze it and it was fine.
      Here is a picture from last year, my girls and I used Natasha’s recipe.
       Reply

      • Natasha
        natashaskitchen
        March 28, 2017

        Thank you so much for sharing that!! 🙂 Reply

  • iIrina
    March 20, 2017

    Hi Natasha!

    Never ever in my life I even attempted to make a Kulich but your recipe does not look complicated so I decided to give it a try this year. I have a question regarding flour. I do not have Canadian floor, instead I have bread flour and whole wheat pastry flour. What would be the best way to substitute Canadian flour? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 20, 2017

      I have tried with various recipes to substitute over the years and nothing is quite like it – I’ve tried bread flour and cake flour and all purpose flour with corn starch and I haven’t had success replicating it exactly. Your best bet is probably a bread flour since it does have a slightly higher gluten content than all-purpose flour and Canadian flour does have a higher gluten content from what I’ve read. The measurements of flour will likely be slightly different so follow the instructions per step #2 adding flour: “until the dough no longer sticks to your hands (it will still feel sticky but wont’ stick to your fingers). Dough should be soft.” Reply

      • Alla
        March 28, 2017

        How about self rising flour? I always making this recipe with self rising flour, or higher sort of flour from Russian store… Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          March 28, 2017

          Hi Alla, I haven’t experimented with that so I can’t say for sure. If you test it out, let me know. I checked the comments on this recipe and no one else has reported using it either. Sorry I can’t be more help! Reply

  • Natalia Mendlik
    March 10, 2017

    Hi Natasha!
    I used this recipe for two years in the row and will be using it again this year for Easter.
    Thank you, I love your website!
    Natalia Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      March 10, 2017

      You’re welcome Natalia! Thank you so much for following! 😀 Reply

  • February 28, 2017

    Natasha, can these be made a few days ahead? We won’t be home from a trip till Easter morning, but I would really love to have one of them on Sunday. Thank you! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 28, 2017

      Hi Nadya, yes these can be made ahead but as with any bread, they won’t be as soft as fresh. The closer you can make it to the time you’re going to enjoy it, the better 🙂 Reply

  • Alfreda Caudle
    February 27, 2017

    Hello,I’m going to try this for the 1st time for Easter,I ordered the Canadian flour and, some large panettone molds.Do the molds need to be oiled? also it says to rise the dough in the oven at 100 degrees but, the lowest my oven will go is 170 degrees what do I do I live in Alaska will that make a difference on how it will come out.I also seen on here that people are saying that there bread is not cooking all the way,what do I do for that.Thank you Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 27, 2017

      Hi Alfreda, If you use the same size and number of pannetone molds, you should not have an issue with the bread not cooking all the way. If you are concerned, you can bake an extra 5 minutes. I always try to troubleshoot with readers to try to figure out why something like that would happen but not everyone responds so I’m not sure why they would have that experience besides the wrong sized mold, baking on convection setting, .. it could be a number of things. You do not have to oil the bread. If your oven shows you the temperature that it is rising to, turn it off at 100˚F then put the bread in. If you have to heat it to 170˚F, turn off the oven, open the door for a few minutes, then put the bread inside with the door propped open with a wooden spoon. I hope that helps! Reply

    • February 28, 2017

      I am in Alaska too 🙂 What kind of Canadian flour did you get, and where from? Thank you! Reply

      • Natasha
        natashaskitchen
        February 28, 2017

        Hi Nadya, the package just has to say “made in Canada” – I think their flour has a higher gluten content so it works a little differently than US flour. You can find it online also. I found mine at Cash and Carry. Reply

        • Alfreda Caudle
          February 28, 2017

          Can you order the Canadian flour from cash and carry online? Reply

          • Natasha
            natashaskitchen
            February 28, 2017

            I’m not sure…

        • Susanna S.
          March 8, 2017

          I have made this recipe several times now (BEST Paska ever!!) and tried it with both Gold Medal All-Purpose unbleached flour and King Arthur’s bread flour. Came out great with both! Reply

          • Natasha's Kitchen
            March 9, 2017

            Thank you for sharing Susanna! 🙂

      • Alfreda Caudle
        February 28, 2017

        Hi,I got a 10 lb bag from a place called My Brands for $9.97 a bag I don’t remember where they are located. It is the Robin Hood brand. the the shipping was out of this world it was Almost $ 53.00 for the bag and shipping.Was cash and carry cheaper and, where are they located?I’m not a baker but,I love these breads,had them all my life but, never learned how to bake them,I want them to turn out good. It is so hard for people to give up there recipes here in Juneau. Reply

        • Rosemary
          April 6, 2017

          Hello Alfreda:
          If your local store doesn’t carry a canadian flour, just use your regular brand and buy a bag of ‘bread flour’, if available,which has a high gluten content and add a portion of that to the mix.
          If I were in your situation, I’d used whatever was available locally. It’s sure to turn out very well.
          Best regards,
          Rosemary Reply

  • Lana
    February 10, 2017

    I made Paska bread last year with your recipe. So good and so many compliments from my Orthodox Church people! The large one ended up not cooked all the way inside, so this year I will let it cook a bit longer and maybe test it with toothpick. Thanks! Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      February 11, 2017

      Thank you for sharing your review Lana! Reply

  • Sonya Moyer
    May 4, 2016

    Is their an alternative item to cook the Kulich
    I Don’t have a tin item to cook it in and I dont have any molds
    please let me know what i could cook it in Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 4, 2016

      Hi Sonya, one of my readers, Elli, wrote that they used a nine inch cake pan, and 12 cup bundt pan stating “I did grease them very well! I think it was exactly 35 min for both, though my circled “paska” came out a little darker than my perfectly golden “bundt” paska, but thats ok because i just covered it up with the glaze and way too many sprinkles lol” Reply

    • Susanna S.
      March 8, 2017

      I have made this before in both a glass and a metal (aluminum) loaf pan. Worked great! Reply

  • Oksana
    May 2, 2016

    I made this recipe 2 days ago. I made 2 large and 4 small paskas. The small ones were fine, just a little well done on the bottoms. The 2 large ones, however, were hollow on the inside, with hardened, damp, unrisen dough clumped in the center. Has this happened to anyone else? I used regular Pillsbury flour, about 10.5 cups and I baked the large ones for about 40 minutes. They both rose beautifully and the outsides were perfectly baked, but both were empty inside. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 2, 2016

      Hi Oksana, that does seem odd. Did you use regular yeast rather than quick-rise and allow the bread to rise fully for the recommended times? Reply

      • Oksana
        May 2, 2016

        I used Red Star Active Dry Yeast in packets, and measured out 1 tablespoon, so about 1.5 packets. The rising times and temps (100 degrees) were exact. I did a little research on this website: http://redstaryeast.com/products/red-star/red-star-active-dry-yeast/
        Here it states that 1 packet of Red Star can raise 4 cups of flour. Since I used 10.5 cups of flour, then maybe I should have increased the yeast to 2.5 packets? Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          May 2, 2016

          That really could be the reason. When making this recipe with American All-purpose flour, it does require quite a bit more flour than Canadian so it makes sense to modify with a little more yeast. That’s so smart!! Thank yo for sharing that with us! Reply

  • Denis
    May 1, 2016

    Natasha, one question. You said first mix it with 4 cups of flour. I did it, but it came two thin and not thick like a sour cream. I added 5th cup and it became thicker. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 1, 2016

      Hi Denis, what kind of flour did you use? I have found that if you use American all-purpose flour that you need more flour than Canadian due to the higher gluten content of Canadian. Reply

  • Marina Sarto
    May 1, 2016

    Ok, Natasha. How about your cheese pasta recipe.? The accompaniment to thr Kulich? Unless I make one myself there is nowhere inL A that I can find it made. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 1, 2016

      Hi Marina, I don’t have a cheese paska recipe posted – did you mean paska or pasta – if pasta, then I’m not sure I understand your question. Reply

  • Iryna
    May 1, 2016

    Khrystos Voskres!
    Dear Natasha, I just made these paskas for my family – the taste and texture are genuine. On recommendation from my mom I added a spoonful of brandy. A friend from Serbia said it is very similar to what her aunt makes. Thank you 🙂 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 1, 2016

      Voistiny Voskres!! I’m so happy you liked the recipe :). I love the idea of adding brandy for extra flavor. Thank you for sharing that tip with us! 🙂 Reply

  • Alexandra
    April 30, 2016

    Hello,

    This recipe is great, especially because I can use cups and not measure everything in grams.
    there is only one thing I don’t agree with you: in the first line you wrote paska, also known as kulitch. Or for me paska is a totally dfferent thing: farmer cheese, butter, eggyolks and sugar. Or the name of Easter in russian. But kulitch is kulitch, not paska ;o) Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 30, 2016

      I’m the same way, I measure most of my ingredients and only sometimes weigh them for certain recipes where it has to be super precise. We have always called it paska in our family so that is why I’ve called it that, but I do know what you’re talking about with the farmer cheese. By the way, do you make your cheese paska with raw egg? I’ve been wanting to try it but the raw egg makes me nervous! Reply

    • Denis
      May 1, 2016

      Yes, same here. I am from Moldova and we never made pas(h/k)as from farmer cheese.
      I think it is mostly in Russia there is pasha and kulich and it means two different things :). Reply

  • Lilia F
    April 30, 2016

    Hi from Japan .I am making one now to. It`s inside the oven ! This is second year i make this Paska recipe . Its very delicious .
    Thank you Natasha. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 30, 2016

      Hi from Idaho!! Wow Japan seems so far away. I’m so happy you love the recipe. Thanks for sharing that with us 🙂 Reply

  • Maria
    April 30, 2016

    Hi Natasha! Does the yeast go in dry or should i mix it with warm water first?
    Thank you!
    Maria Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 30, 2016

      Hi Maria, the yeast goes in dry and proofs inside the batter. Reply

  • Natalia Toukabri
    April 29, 2016

    Thank you for this recipe!!! My family loved it!
    Growing up in Russia, Easter is a big thing, but I don’t like to bake…every year I dread the day of making the Paska…no matter what I do, I don’t have “grandmas touch” 😩 So this year (for Easter in March) I googled some recipes and came across yours…it was AMAZING! My kids loved it! Now, I’ll be making it again tomorrow for “our” Easter.
    Thank you and HAPPY EASTER! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 30, 2016

      That is so awesome! Thank you for that glowing review 🙂 Reply

  • Tatiana
    April 29, 2016

    Hello Natasha. If I did not add vanilla from the very beginning, can I add it two hours later, after the dough would risen first time? Can I use liquid vanilla, not powder? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 29, 2016

      I don’t think it would incorporate well adding it later. It will still be ok even if you don’t end up adding it. It adds a little flavor but your paska isn’t ruined without it, don’t worry 🙂 Reply

  • Vera
    April 29, 2016

    Thank you so much for this recipe! As I miss celebrating pascha with my family, I’m hosting an Easter dinner for my friends this weekend, and am currently making these kulichi! They’re in the oven right now, so I can’t speak to the final product, but they’ve been rising beautifully over the past few hours, so I’m sure they will turn out delicious! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 29, 2016

      You’re so welcome! That’s tough to do holidays without family. I hope you and your friends enjoy this recipe! 🙂 Reply

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