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Plum Jam Recipe (No Peel, No Pectin!)

This two-ingredient plum jam recipe is really a cross between plum jam and plum preserves. It's awesome paired with breakfast pancakes or crepes.

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We’re on a canning spree this week. The air is crisp and the mornings are cool. We’re surrounded by a fiery array of leaves that rustle in the warm afternoon breeze. Fall is in the air and canning just feels right this time of year.

I could eat this plum jam by the spoonful; paired with a hot mug of tea (I’m totally day dreaming here)… Our tiny plum tree overproduces the most amazing little plums every year. I wish I could name this variety; anyone recognize these little beauties?

This recipe is really a cross between plum jam and plum preserves. It still has some of it’s preserve-like plum chunks, but it’s nice and thick and spreads beautifully. It’s awesome paired with breakfast pancakes or crepes. Oh and this would make the sweetest Christmas gift!

This two-ingredient plum jam recipe is really a cross between plum jam and plum preserves. It's awesome paired with breakfast pancakes or crepes.

Home Canning Tools:

How to Make Plum Jam:

Cooking the Preserves:

1. Cut 12 lbs of plums in half, pit them and place in a large mixing bowl. Drizzle well with 4 1/2  cups sugar. Using a large spoon, stir plums with sugar until all are coated. If your plums are overripe or already very sweet, you may only need 4 cups of sugar total. You can add more sugar to taste while its cooking. Let plums sit at room temp with the sugar for about 1 hour, or until sugar is somewhat dissolved.

Plums on a cutting board, some halved and some whole

Halved plums in a large bowl

Sugar poured on top of halved plums in a large bowl
2. Transfer plums/sugar mixture in to a large cooking pot. Place it on the stove uncovered and bring to a boil, stirring occasionally. Make sure if you see a light boil to stir because the whole pot may not be boiling, just the center. If it stops boiling after you stir it, continue boiling until everything is uniformly bubbling, then simmer for 10 minutes and turn off the heat. Let the pot stand uncovered until it is just warm to the touch or reaches room temp.

Plum jam in a large pot

3. As soon as it cools, repeat step 2 the same way – simmering 10 minutes. You will bring it to a simmer a total of 4 times, stirring to prevent scorching the bottom. This is why it takes 2 days to make. It’s really easy though and so worthwhile! There’s no “set” waiting time between boilings. If 2 days doesn’t work for you, by all means, take 3 days. Preserves have plenty of sugar so they won’t spoil at room temp if you leave it on the counter overnight. If you want the preserves to have an even thicker consistency, you can boil it 5-6 times if you wish.

(Note: the fourth time you boil, bring it to a boil over a little lower heat and stir a few extra times to prevent scorching. Also, it thickens more as it cools. If using a different type of plum, I suggest adding sugar to taste in case they are more tart)

4. The last time you bring it to a boil you will want to transfer it to sterilized jars while it’s boiling hot.

To sterilize the jars:

1. Start by washing your jars and lids with warm water and soap then let them dry in the oven at 215 for about 20 min or until completely dry. Boil the lids 5 min.

Jars and lids on the table

2. Transfer your boiling hot jam to the jars using a glass measuring cup and a funnel (least messy method) leaving about 1/2″ space.

3. Screw the lids on enough to keep a tight seal in place but don’t over-tighten them since air bubbles need to be able to escape.

Current Canning Guidelines:

Get up to date on the most recent canning guidelines here. It’s a great resource to answer frequently asked canning questions. Current guidelines recommend the following process (instead of oven canning):

  1. Place packed cans into the canning pot and cover with 1-2 inches of water. Bring to a boil and process 15 minutes.
  2. Remove from the pot and leave at room temperature undisturbed for 12-24 hours. You may hear a pop when the jars fully seal.
  3. After 24 hours, check that the seal has formed by pushing down on the center of the lid – it should not move at all. If the seal does not form, refrigerate jam and enjoy within 3 months.

This two-ingredient plum jam recipe is really a cross between plum jam and plum preserves. It's awesome paired with breakfast pancakes or crepes.

Now don’t you want to curl up with a jar of that?

This two-ingredient plum jam recipe is really a cross between plum jam and plum preserves. It's awesome paired with breakfast pancakes or crepes.

Plum Jam Recipe (No Peel, No Pectin!)

4.78 from 117 votes
Prep Time: 2 hours
Cook Time: 1 hour 30 minutes
Total Time: 3 hours 30 minutes
This two-ingredient plum jam recipe is really a cross between plum jam and plum preserves. It's awesome paired with breakfast pancakes or crepes.
Author: Natasha of NatashasKitchen.com
Skill Level: Easy
Cost to Make: $7-$12
Keyword: No Pectin, Plum Jam
Cuisine: American
Course: Condiments
Calories: 74 kcal
Servings: 80 (makes 8 pint-sized jars

Ingredients

  • 12 lbs sweet ripe plums rinsed
  • 4 1/2 cups white sugar
  • 8 pint-sized jars with lids.

Instructions

  1. Place pitted and halved plums into the mixing bowl & drizzle with 4 1/2 cups of sugar. Stir plums until all coated with sugar. Let them sit for 1 hour then transfer the mixture into a large cooking pot.

  2. Bring it to a boil uncovered, stirring occasionally. Boil until the mixture is bubbling uniformly. Simmer for 10 minutes then turn off the heat. Cool to room temperature.

  3. Repeat step 2 a total of FOUR times. Last time bringing it to a boil at the lower temperature, stirring frequently to prevent scorching.

To Sterilize Your Jars:

  1. Start by washing your jars and lids with warm water and soap then let them dry in the oven at 215 for about 20 min or until completely dry. Boil the lids 5 min.

Filling and processing your jam:

  1. Transfer your boiling hot jam to the jars using a glass measuring cup and a funnel (least messy method) leaving about 1/2″ space.
  2. Screw the lids on enough to keep a tight seal in place but don't over-tighten them since air bubbles need to be able to escape.

  3. Place packed cans into the canning pot and cover with 1-2 inches of water. Bring to a boil and process 15 minutes. Remove from the pot and leave at room temperature undisturbed for 12-24 hours. You may hear a pop when the jars fully seal. After 24 hours, check that the seal has formed by pushing down on the center of the lid - it should not move at all. If the seal does not form, refrigerate jam and enjoy within 3 months.

Nutrition Facts
Plum Jam Recipe (No Peel, No Pectin!)
Amount Per Serving
Calories 74
% Daily Value*
Potassium 106mg3%
Carbohydrates 19g6%
Sugar 17g19%
Vitamin A 235IU5%
Vitamin C 6.4mg8%
Calcium 4mg0%
Iron 0.1mg1%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

Recipe updated in 2019 to reflect new canning standards. Previously we used the oven method: screw the lids on enough to keep a tight seal in place but don’t over-tighten them since air bubbles need to be able to escape and place in the oven at 350˚F for 15 min then carefully remove from oven, flip upside down and let cool to room temperature.

Signs of Spoiled Canned Food:

With any type of canning, we follow this advice: “When in doubt, throw it out”
Discard and do not eat or taste any canned food if you notice any of the following:

  • the jar is leaking, bulging, or swollen
  • the jar looks damaged, cracked, or abnormal
  • the jar spurts foam or liquid upon opening
  • the canned food is discolored, moldy, mushy, slimy, or smells bad

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Natasha Kravchuk

Welcome to my kitchen! I am Natasha, the blogger behind Natasha's Kitchen (since 2009). My husband and I run this blog together and share only our best, family approved and tested recipes with YOU. Thanks for stopping by! We are so happy you're here.

Read more posts by Natasha

Read comments/reviewsAdd comment/review

  • Rizza0810@yahoo.co.uk
    August 6, 2020

    Santa Rosa plum

    Reply

  • Jill Cunningham
    July 30, 2020

    I was wondering if I could add blackcaps or other berries to this recipe.

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      July 30, 2020

      Hi Jill, I haven’t tried that yet to advise. If you do an experiment, please share with us how it goes.

      Reply

  • Oviya Nila Muralidharan
    July 29, 2020

    Hey Natasha,

    I absolutely love this recipe. I did a much more scaled down version, but it works perfectly and tastes like heaven.

    My only concern was that my jam was quite thick with a completely reduced pulp by the third round of simmering. Is that normal, is it because of the smaller quantity?

    Reply

    • Natasha
      July 30, 2020

      Hi Oviya, it is likely due to the smaller batch since the surface area would be higher for releasing steam.

      Reply

  • Debra Torres
    July 23, 2020

    I accidentally scorched the plums while cooking them. Is there any hope for them? Can they be saved?

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      July 23, 2020

      Hi Debra, having the pot over too high of heat and a thinner bottom pot is most susceptible to scorching. I was going to say if you haven’t stirred it already, you can salvage it (do not stir), but just pour it into a second pot. If you stir, the whole batch will have a burnt taste. I recommend finding a heavy-bottomed pot. I hope that helps!

      Reply

  • Brooke Arnold
    July 19, 2020

    This is the fifth season that I’ve made this jam – It is my go to recipe and it never stops being an exciting item for my kids. Thanks for this simple, flavour-preserving recipe!

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      July 19, 2020

      That is awesome! Thank you for your great review, Brooke. We appreciate it!

      Reply

  • Nidia
    July 15, 2020

    I’ve made the recipe before but never canned. I am going to make it again today and plan on canning. I have the old recipe version, with the oven canning method. Is that still ok to use? Do I have to use the water bath method?

    Reply

    • Natasha
      July 16, 2020

      Hi Nidia, our family canned that way for years but the standard and recommended way now is to use the canning method.

      Reply

  • Michele
    July 12, 2020

    This is a fantastic recipe. I love that it has no added pectin, and it makes the most gorgeous color. i added a bit less sugar, and it’s very bright/tangy with a natural sweetness. Going to try next with pluots! (bought a case at the farmer’s market today). Thanks!

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      July 12, 2020

      So nice to hear that you enjoyed this recipe. Yes, that sounds like a good plan, please share with us how you liked that too.

      Reply

  • Leslie
    July 8, 2020

    Another question! It feels like maybe buildup on the bottom of the pot. Did I definitely scorch it? Is it ruined?

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      July 8, 2020

      Hi Leslie, if you are feeling build-up that is possible.

      Reply

  • Lidia R Lopes
    July 7, 2020

    Can this recipe be used with yellow plums? They ate less meaty and have more juice than those you used.
    Thank you,
    Lidia

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      July 7, 2020

      Hi Lidia, are those the small yellow plums? I believe I had a reader write in about using something similar and they said the plums were very juicy and needed additional boil-downs to get to a thick enough consistency.

      Reply

  • Carissa
    July 6, 2020

    This recipe sounds wonderful! I am going to try it. This is my first time attempting canning/making any jam/jellies! When you boil it do you add any water or just the fruit and sugar mixture?
    Thanks so much!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      July 6, 2020

      Hi Carissa, we did not add water to the plums. I hope you love this recipe!

      Reply

  • Jesse
    July 6, 2020

    Why do you bring it to a boil 4 times? I think I messed up on the 3rd boil and it boiled too long as I was dealing with my toddler – oops! Other recipes I have read just have you simmer the plums for 45-60 min before canning.

    Reply

    • Natasha
      July 7, 2020

      Hi Jesse, a single simmer for that long may discolor your plums and they would probably be pretty thin and juicy at that point without adding pectin.

      Reply

      • Leslie
        July 8, 2020

        Hello! First time canning or making jam. I just finished my 4th round of boiling and cooking and the mixture is very thin still, like soup. Is this normal? What is the consistency supposed to be before canning? I do t want to waste time canning if it’s ruined some how. Thanks in advance!

        Reply

        • Natasha
          July 9, 2020

          Hi Leslie, to check what the texture will be like, transfer a small amount to a plate and let it cool. If it still too thin, boil it down again but stir often so it doesn’t scorch. Some plums are quite a bit juicier than others. Also, if you use a taller pat with a narrower top, there is less surface area for steam to escape so it may take an extra time.

          Reply

  • Rachel
    July 6, 2020

    The jam came out great! I love that I don’t have to peel or add pectin. I made blackberry jam with the same method and also came out great. Holiday gifts, check. Thank you!

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      July 6, 2020

      You’re so welcome, Rachel. I am so glad you enjoyed and loved the jam!

      Reply

    • Patti Bartholomew
      July 14, 2020

      Made the plum version but since I only cut plums in half they were bigger pieces than I want. My plums are huge like apple sized. I ended up pureeing for plum butter version. Came out fantastic. If your plums are big make sure you cut them up a bit.

      Reply

      • Natashas Kitchen
        July 14, 2020

        Thank you for sharing those tips with us, Patti! I’m so glad that was helpful!

        Reply

    • Nidia Rosa
      July 15, 2020

      Did you use 12 pounds of blackberries?

      Reply

  • Wynette
    July 6, 2020

    Great recipe! We didn’t have enough plums, so I added seedless red grapes, cut in half. The grapes and plums all boiled down smoothly, with a great jam texture. I also think it is important to include the 12 pounds=30 cups detail in the recipe.

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      July 6, 2020

      That’s a great idea! Thank you so much for sharing that with me!

      Reply

  • Wynette
    July 5, 2020

    Great recipe! We didn’t have enough plums, so we also added some seedless red grapes (each cut in half) and the jam tastes great! Yes, it would be helpful to have the conversion of 12 pounds to 30 cups within the recipe to make it easier for people to use.

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      July 6, 2020

      Thanks for your great review! I am so glad to hear that you loved the taste of this jam.

      Reply

  • SARAH A SZEWCZYK
    July 4, 2020

    Hello! I’m on my third boil for this recipe and the taste is rather prune-y! What could be the issue? Have I cooked it too long? It’s not set yet so I think I need a fourth boil/simmer but the flavor has changed from that bright, sweet, fresh plum taste to stewed prunes. Thanks for any advice, I’ve got more plums so I can try another batch.

    Reply

    • Natasha
      July 4, 2020

      Hi Sarah, I haven’t had that experience – I wonder if it’s maybe due to the type of plums used? Also, make sure it’s not getting to a rapid boil which can burn the bottom and alter the flavor.

      Reply

      • Sandra
        July 29, 2020

        Can we use yellow plum instead of pruns in this reciepie

        Reply

        • Natashas Kitchen
          July 29, 2020

          Hi Sandra, I believe I had a reader write in about using something similar and they said the plums were very juicy and needed additional boil-downs to get to a thick enough consistency. If you experiment, please let me know how you like that.

          Reply

          • sandra
            July 31, 2020

            Just wondering is color stays the same after canning yellow plums jam as your receipe

          • Natashas Kitchen
            July 31, 2020

            Hi Sandra, it depends on the type of plums used but also, the longer fruit is boiled, the more it darkens in color which is why we bring it to a boil several times rather than just one very long boiling time. Also, are you referring to the the smaller yellow plums? I believe I had a reader write in about using something similar and they said the plums were very juicy and needed additional boil-downs to get to a thick enough consistency.

  • Danielle
    July 3, 2020

    Does your plum tree have sharp spikes or spines on it? If so it is a type of heirloom plum – most likely either a cherry plum or a blackthorn

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      July 4, 2020

      Thank you for sharing that Danielle! I’ll have to take a closer look next time!

      Reply

  • Susie
    July 3, 2020

    Can I add some orange juice and reduce the sugar? Seems like it might require an extra boil due to the extra liquid. Would that work?

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      July 3, 2020

      Hi Susie, I haven’t tested that but I think it could work. If you experiment, let me know how you liked the recipe.

      Reply

  • Alane
    June 28, 2020

    I followed the recipe as written plus 1.5 cups more sugar and it turned out great! I’m ready to run with a second batch but want to add spices: cinnamon, nutmeg, and clove. At which stage can you add spices? Prior to boiling? During any of the boiling or should it be after boiling the last time? Thank you!

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      June 28, 2020

      Awesome, thanks for your great review! Spices and herbs may be added near the end of cooking for more distinct flavor, or at the beginning for more blended flavors.

      Reply

  • Adrienne
    June 23, 2020

    Natasha ~ my pits are impossible to remove. Can I simmer the plums whole for (5) min and then remove pits or not. Maybe it would create too much juice?

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      June 24, 2020

      Hi Adrienne, without testing that is hard to say. If you give it a try please let m know how it works out for you.

      Reply

    • Adrienne
      June 27, 2020

      Natasha ~ I just finished and it worked and probably saved me a good bit of time. I washed and put plums in a small amount of simmering water until the skins split. Drained most of the water and used a hand mixer on the lowest speed which loosened the meat from the pit and I then used my fingers to remove the pit. A bit of the meat sometimes clung to the pit. No big deal. I found the idea online. My plums are rather small and NOT freestone. Thank you for getting back to me.

      Reply

      • Natashas Kitchen
        June 27, 2020

        That’s a great idea! Thank you so much for sharing that with me Adrienne!

        Reply

        • Adrienne
          June 28, 2020

          My pleasure!

          Reply

      • Tracy
        August 3, 2020

        I am using the small yellow plums from my friends tree. I used a cherry pitter to remove the pits. Worked pretty good! 🙂

        Reply

    • Pam
      July 15, 2020

      I used a melon baller to get my pits out. Worked well.

      Reply

      • Natashas Kitchen
        July 15, 2020

        Thank you so much for sharing that with us!

        Reply

  • Stephanie
    June 22, 2020

    Hello!

    I am pitting the plums tonight and hope to start tomorrow. Do you have any idea how this freezes? I don’t know how to properly can things so I usually cook small batches and eat right away, but I have WAY too many plums to do that so I’m hoping to freeze some.

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      June 23, 2020

      Hi Stephanie, I think it could work as a freezer jam. Be sure to leave 1/2″ space at the top for expansion in the freezer. If you test it out, let me know how you like it as a freezer jam

      Reply

  • itzmitz
    June 18, 2020

    I think the plum variety is El Dorado. The color on my computer may be off, but the flesh for that variety is more orange than yellow.

    Reply

  • Bonnie
    June 16, 2020

    I just realized my blunder. I read it as, “no peel” as in there are no peels in the recipe. Now I get it, I don’t have to peel them. No peel. I get it! Sorry about that

    Reply

  • Bonnie
    June 16, 2020

    We have a plum tree full to brimming right now and we’re going to make some jam! I have a question though. The recipe is called no peel no pectin but it doesn’t state what to do with the peels. I read the whole recipe and notes and I’m not sure about the peels. Do you peel the plums at some point or do they just become incorporated during the cooking? Thanks!

    Reply

    • Natasha
      June 16, 2020

      Hi Bonnie, the peels add great texture and there is no need to remove the skins.

      Reply

  • Todd
    June 6, 2020

    Mine came out GREAT! I had 35-40 very ripe plumbs (golf ball size) left on my tree that were going to fall and rot, so I decided instead to try this recipe. I probably had only 3 lbs, so cut the sugar to around 1 cup. After de-pitting, I blended the pulp briefly to break up the skins. I produced a single 12 oz jar of jam. I think I messed up the final canning stage bc a tiny bit of jam leaked out of the lid while the jar rested upside down after oven sealing method, but we are eating it over the next 2-3 weeks so no big deal. It may be the best jam I’ve ever had.

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      June 6, 2020

      Thank you so much for sharing that with me Todd! I’m so glad you enjoyed this recipe.

      Reply

  • Russell Wright
    June 5, 2020

    Hello,

    I saw 3 lb bag of red plums and I immediately thought I’m gonna try to make Mama’s plum jelly. She would make 20 or 30 jars and paraffin seal them, no pectin and it tasted amazing. 40 years later Mama’s gone but I do cook like her so why not try to replicate her magic. I brought the bag of plums home and got to work. I googled and lucky me! I found this recipe. Somehow it eluded me at first that this is a JAM, not a JELLY recipe but I’m glad I didn’t catch that right away as I may have skipped over this recipe. Glad I didn’t. I was able to make something more versatile. I was able to modify this and get about a 14oz jar of jam. It not only has that same plumminess and homemade love taste like Mama’s but because it’s a jam it has texture and stands up well as a mix-in to my breakfast bowl of steel-cut oats, or in plain yogurt. Today, I tossed some toasted oats in brown sugar in butter, cooked for a few minutes in the oven, put some of the plum jam in the bottom of a small ramekin, added a dab of butter, microwaved for few seconds on top added the toasted instant quick dessert fix in a small tasty portion-controlled way. What next? Pum tarte tatin? The sky’s the limit! I am definitely a fan of this site and have subscribed!

    Reply

    • Natasha
      June 6, 2020

      Thank you so much for sharing and for subscribing!

      Reply

      • Russell Wright
        June 20, 2020

        Hello, thanks for the personal response. Just made a pluot same from this very same recipe. So the gift keeps on giving!

        Reply

  • david v.
    April 26, 2020

    hi my name is dave and want to substitute sugar for monk fruit . is there a ratio to follow in plum jam prep.?

    Reply

    • Natasha
      April 26, 2020

      Hi Dave, I haven’t tested that and don’t have any experience with monk fruit in canning. You might have to google if that is a safe substitution to preserve jam.

      Reply

  • Jeff Munroe
    April 11, 2020

    I have a tree that is loaded with plums, I don’t know the variety. small, almost black with sweet meat but bitter skins. I want to can but would like it to last longer than 3 months. Is there a way for long term storage and use?

    Reply

    • Natasha
      April 11, 2020

      Hi Jeff, if properly canned, jam can last at least a year on the shelf.

      Reply

      • Patti Bartholomew
        July 14, 2020

        I have entered food preservation contests at the State Fair for years. The Master Food Preservers judge and your entries can be up to 3 years old and considered safe for consumption and delicious.

        Reply

        • Natashas Kitchen
          July 14, 2020

          Thank you so much for sharing that with me.

          Reply

  • Leighann Hutchinson
    January 27, 2020

    I cooked mine 4 times over two days….. didn’t jam up. my dad says I have ice cream toppings not jam.

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      January 27, 2020

      Hi Leighann, did it thicken as it cooled? I’d be happy to troubleshoot, was anything altered in the recipe?

      Reply

  • sharon e
    November 6, 2019

    Hi Natasha I bought a big box of holiday variety plums and I want to try your recipe, I have a couple of questions. my plums seem a little firm will that matter? Should I let them ripen some more? Also the plum skins feel waxy, should I use some sort of fruit wash on them?
    I cant wait to try this recipe thank you, Sharon, St Leon Indiana!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      November 6, 2019

      Hi Sharon, it is best if they are ripe, if they are too firm the plum might not break down into a jam as well. Yes, I do recommend cleaning off the waxy coating.

      Reply

  • Lois Bigham
    November 3, 2019

    Made the jelly and it turned out perfect! We love it!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      November 4, 2019

      I’m so glad you enjoyed that!

      Reply

  • Rose
    November 3, 2019

    I am making jam with red plums that have the yellow inside and the jam mixture is cooking up brown. Is that normal?

    Reply

    • Natasha
      November 4, 2019

      Hi Rose, it could be the type of plums used but also, the longer fruit is boiled, the more it darkens in color which is why we bring it to a boil several times rather than just one very long boiling time.

      Reply

  • Cyndi
    October 15, 2019

    Hi. I am on my 4th boil and decided to taste. It is not near sweet enough. Can I add more sugar now. It tastes like cranberries so very tart.

    Reply

    • Natasha
      October 17, 2019

      Hi Cyndi, some plums can be more tart depending on the variety and how ripe they are. You can definitely add more sugar, just be sure to bring it to a uniform simmer after adding sugar.

      Reply

  • Amy
    October 4, 2019

    Hi, I’m in the process of making this. Curious about the process and wish I could learn more about this approach…
    Guessing, is the 1 hour of sugar/plum soaking a process of breaking down fruit?
    Is the heating/cooling process a way of thickening?
    Thank you!

    Reply

    • Natasha
      October 5, 2019

      Hi you are correct on both things. I hope you love the jam!

      Reply

      • Amy
        October 5, 2019

        The taste and texture are fabulous! Tomorrow morning is my last boiling, then canning. Thrilled with this recipe. It is such an unusual approach, so curious about it and if its done with other fruits as well (the heating/cooling/heating approach). Is there a name for this technique? Thank you!

        Reply

        • Natashas Kitchen
          October 6, 2019

          Yay! You’re almost there! Not that I’m aware of, Amy.

          Reply

  • Cat
    September 27, 2019

    Hi there. Approximately how many cups of prepared fruit equals 12# plumbs?
    Don’t have a scale, picked from my tree. Thanks much!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      September 27, 2019

      Hi Cat, I didn’t measure the plums that way, but just to give you a rough idea: 1 lb for me was about 6-8, two-inch-wide plums. I want to say it was about 30 cups… maybe?

      Reply

  • Jacqueline
    September 26, 2019

    My question is, the title says
    No peel No pectin! I understand the no pectin, but every picture in the recipe shows clearly that the peel is still on the plum. So what does No Peel represents in this recipe? Just wondering

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      September 26, 2019

      Hi Jacqueline, this is a no peel recipe and no need to remove the skins.

      Reply

      • Lion
        September 27, 2019

        I had the same thought as Jacqueline. Maybe it should say “no peeling” to avoid confusion, because to me it also seemed to imply that the plum peel would not be in the jam.

        I’m giving it a try. I love jam recipes that don’t require pectin, as I find it hard to work with without it getting lumpy.

        Reply

      • Terry
        September 30, 2019

        A great recipe. Perfect amount of tart and sweet balance. I only had to boil three times to get a nice consistency.

        Reply

        • Natashas Kitchen
          September 30, 2019

          I’m so glad you enjoyed it Terry! Thank you for sharing that great review!

          Reply

      • Lisa
        October 11, 2019

        Do the skins break down or are there wads of skin in the jam?

        Reply

        • Natashas Kitchen
          October 12, 2019

          Hi Lisa, it really depends on the variety of plums. There are some plums with thicker skins but I think the skins add nice texture to the jam. It would be ok to mash it if you wanted it to be more of a puree consistency but we prefer it slightly chunk. I like seeing the pieces of fruit in my jam I hope you LOVE it!

          Reply

  • elena
    September 23, 2019

    I am worried that this is not enough sugar to can safely. But only because other recipes seem to have so much more. Are my concerns unfounded? Also, could i use this recipe, but not do the three cooks/? What if i just heated it to rolling boil and stirred for 20 minutes, then canned?

    Reply

    • Natasha
      September 24, 2019

      Hi Elena, this method is different in that it boils down the plums several times and concentrates the sugars as it thickens. If you wanted to do the boiling for 20 minutes and then canning, you would need to add pectin and more sugar.

      Reply

    • Jakub
      September 24, 2019

      I cooked the plums down three times and the jam set up perfectly with no pectin .

      Reply

  • JJ
    September 23, 2019

    Wait. Didn’t your oven canning method (previously described here) call for starting the jars in the oven upside down, then turning them right side up after removing from the oven? Now it says to turn them upside down after removing them from the oven.

    Reply

    • Natasha
      September 24, 2019

      Hi JJ, It was the other way around previously – right side up in the oven and then turn upside down. The current guidelines recommend processing in the water bath and then keeping them right side up until they form the seal and reach room temperature. We updated the recipe to match current guidelines.

      Reply

      • Cassie
        September 29, 2019

        I am making this now, so far so good! I didn’t read every comment, but in case no one said this, I believe your plums are damsons, which in my opinion are the very best plums!

        Reply

        • Natashas Kitchen
          September 30, 2019

          Thank you for sharing that with us, Cassie!

          Reply

  • Marilyn
    September 23, 2019

    When I was little my Grandmother had this type of plum tree in her back yard. She called them Damson plums. She would make jam very similar to your recipe but also kept the pits in. She said that helped to thicken it. Then she scooped the pits out before jarring it.
    So this morning my friend called and offered me some damson plums which I jumped at on the condition she took some of my pears. I am now getting ready to make your recipe. I can almost taste it and see the gorgeous rub purple colour of the finished product

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      September 23, 2019

      That’s just awsome, Marilyn! Thank you so much for sharing that with me! I hope you love this recipe.

      Reply

  • Jakub Przedzienkowski
    September 18, 2019

    Do the plums need to be soft? Just bought 30 lbs and will make Powidlo/Jam. and it was suggested to smash them before putting sugar on them so they can soak it up

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      September 18, 2019

      Hu Jakub, our plums were ripe but not overly soft. I recommend taking a look at the images on the recipe blog post for a guide as to what our plums looked like.

      Reply

      • Jakub Przedzienkowski
        September 18, 2019

        Thanks will take a look.

        Reply

        • Jakub Przedzienkowski
          September 20, 2019

          Made the plum jam today. 12 lbs pitted plums, Stanley, 4.5 C sugar. Made 10 and 1/2 pints. Cooked the plums twice yesterday then this morning a third time. Then put it in the jars. Mashed the plums with a potato masher

          Reply

          • Natashas Kitchen
            September 20, 2019

            Thank you so much for sharing that with me.

  • Lorri
    September 13, 2019

    I made this and loved it when I was jarring it up. I just opened a jar and it seems a bit too tart. Can I reprocess with a bit more sugar?

    Reply

    • Natasha
      September 13, 2019

      Hi Lorri, I haven’t tried reprocessing so I’m not sure about the food safety aspect of doing that. I would suggest adding more sugar and then keeping it refrigerated once it has been opened. Since all plums are a little different in sweetness and ripeness at the time they are canned, I highly recommend tasting the jam before canning so you can add more sugar at that point.

      Reply

  • Carolyn Price
    September 12, 2019

    Hi Natasha,
    Can a sugar alternative be used in this recipe/ something like swerve, monkfruit, or zylitol sweetener? I was going to try a half recipe doing 1/2 real and half alternative sweetener. Any suggestions?

    Reply

    • Natasha
      September 13, 2019

      Hi Carolyn, I honestly have never tried using a different sweetener so I can’t make any suggestions for that substitution.

      Reply

      • Chris
        October 12, 2019

        I didn’t let it cool all the way to room temperature before I heated it up again. Is that going to affect anything? Texture seems to be good.

        Reply

        • Natasha
          October 13, 2019

          Hi Chris, no worries – you won’t harm anything by doing that.

          Reply

  • LaDonna Jo Neill
    September 12, 2019

    Hello my name is LaDonna I have the answer to your question as to the name of your little plums in my opinion they are the best ones for making jam and the hardest to find in stores they are Italian prune plums the ones they dry for prunes they are my favorite I envy you for your tree enjoy

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      September 12, 2019

      Thank you so much for sharing that with us, LaDonna!!

      Reply

    • Bill Alston
      September 18, 2019

      Hi,
      Our neighbors have about 50 Italian trees. U-pick, Dundee Oregon. Hope you are close so you can enjoy their splendor!

      Reply

  • Joan Keyser
    September 6, 2019

    I made this using a slow cooker! 2 hours on high covered, 1 hour on low uncovered, 2 hours on high covered, and finished with 1 hour on low uncovered. I told you I would let you know how it worked. It is a great way! I let plums and sugar stand at room temperature overnight, great results!

    Reply

    • Natasha
      September 6, 2019

      I’m so glad to hear that! Thanks for sharing your results and great review!

      Reply

  • PatD
    September 6, 2019

    Is it OK to add sugar right up to the final boil if required? I was not clear by the mention of adding sugar to taste whether you meant only during the initial prep of the plums.

    Reply

    • Natasha
      September 6, 2019

      Hi Pat, it is ok to add sugar at the end and just make sure it comes to a full boil after adding the sugar to give it a chance to dissolve and reach a safe temperature.

      Reply

  • Conni Townsend
    September 6, 2019

    They look like our Mount Royal plums!! We have an over abundance this year!!! Yummy jam!! Thanks for the recipe!!!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      September 6, 2019

      That’s just awesome!! Thank you for sharing that with us!

      Reply

  • Laura Stahmann
    September 5, 2019

    My jam burnt. I thought I followed instructions to a T. Where did I go wrong? To high of heat when bringing up to a boil? Help!

    Reply

    • Natasha
      September 5, 2019

      Hi Laura, yes that is the usual culprit is having the pot over too high of heat and a thinner bottom pot is most susceptible to scorching. If you haven’t stirred it already, you can salvage it (do not stir), but just pour it into a second pot. If you stir, the whole batch will have a burnt taste. I hope that helps!

      Reply

      • Laura Stahmann
        September 5, 2019

        Thanks Natasha! What is a good pot to make jam in then? (and I already stirred…tastes like burnt plums…sigh)

        Reply

        • Natashas Kitchen
          September 5, 2019

          Hi Laura, yes that is the usual culprit is having the pot over too high of heat and a thinner bottom pot is most susceptible to scorching. I was going to say if you haven’t stirred it already, you can salvage it (do not stir), but just pour it into a second pot. If you stir, the whole batch will have a burnt taste. I recommend finding a heavy bottomed pot. I hope that helps!

          Reply

  • Rimma
    September 3, 2019

    Natasha! I love your recipes. It’s a lot of fun watching your videos. The plum from your tree called Italian plum in US. In Russia and Ukraine it was called венгерка. We always used it for preserves, jams and pies.

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      September 4, 2019

      I’m so glad you enjoyed that! Thank you for sharing that with me.

      Reply

  • Joan Keyser
    September 2, 2019

    I’m going to try this recipe. I wondered whether you can use a slow cooker?

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      September 3, 2019

      Hi Joan, I’ve never tried it in a slow cooker so I’m not sure if it would work. They cook on the stovetop without a lid so I’m not sure if they would scorch or how long it would take in a slow cooker. Some slow cookers can have hot spots. If you test that out, let me know how you like it

      Reply

      • Joan Keyser
        September 3, 2019

        I will!

        Reply

  • DENNIS BECK
    September 2, 2019

    Convert 12lbs plums to how many cups?

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      September 3, 2019

      Hi Dennis, I didn’t measure the plums that way, but just to give you a rough idea: 1 lb for me was about 6-8, two-inch-wide plums. I want to say it was about 30 cups… maybe?

      Reply

    • Christine Proulx
      September 9, 2019

      Hi Natasha. Just in the process of preparing plum to make this jam. Is the weight of the plums before putting? Or after? I’m going to double this recipe.
      Thank you

      Reply

      • Natashas Kitchen
        September 9, 2019

        Hi Christina, we used “12 lbs sweet ripe plums rinsed” They are fresh plums

        Reply

  • Patricia
    August 31, 2019

    Hi Natasha. Thanks for your site. Just found it! It’s in my favorites now

    So I’m trying the plum jam recipe, hoping it is better than others we buy at markets or specialty country stores. I find most are like jelly with no real plum.

    I’m a bit confused though with your recipe. I’m ready for boil #4 but the plums are still large pieces. I was expecting them to break down (similar to cranberries when you cook them). So question is, should I use my hand blender to smash them up a bit. It would be hard to funnel it into the jars the way it is – likely was going to scoop it anyway though, but for jam I’d like the pieces smaller.

    I never seem to get recipes right, though I keep on trying. So any advise you can give me is truly appreciated!

    Thanks
    Patricia

    PS looking forward to trying more of your recipes

    Reply

    • Natasha
      September 1, 2019

      Hi Patricia, there are some varieties of plums that don’t break down as much as others. It would not hurt to use an immersion blender or even a regular blender to break up the plums to your desired consistency.

      Reply

  • Doug Maines
    August 27, 2019

    Ok. I’m a guy. We have a plum tree. Plums were starting to fall off. I found this recipe online and figured I’d try it. Not only is it super easy but it’s awesome! I (your recipe) even received the stamp of approval from my wife who is an exceptional cook. Yup, i canned them too. Don’t tell my biker friends.

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      August 28, 2019

      That’s just awesome!! Thank you for sharing your wonderful review, Doug!

      Reply

  • Jennifer Lee
    August 26, 2019

    Do you need to add water to cook the plum?

    Reply

    • Natasha
      August 27, 2019

      Hi Jennifer, we did not add water. The plums release plenty of liquid naturally.

      Reply

  • Barb
    August 26, 2019

    I have tried this recipe a few times with mixed results. The first time is was very dry, the second time I only did two boils but the second was much longer – that one was good, and the third I just finished (four boils) finished so we’ll see. The one thing I find really confusing about this recipe is the two different methods of the last step – oven versus boiling. I did the boiling since that seemed to be recommended, but I also flipped the jars upside down since the description of the boiling method didn’t indicate whether or not to flip the jars. I think this recipe would be greatly improved if the “oven” method (and any associated photos) were removed completely so it is clear.

    Will my jam be harmed by having flipped the jars upside down after boiling?

    Reply

    • Natasha
      August 27, 2019

      Hi Barb, the jam should not be harmed, just check that the seal has formed and the lids don’t pop when you push down in the center. I updated the recipe to make it more clear and thank you for your feedback!

      Reply

      • Barb
        August 31, 2019

        Thanks for confirming. I have another question: The first batch I made was very dry (I didn’t realize how much it would thicken after it cooled). Is there any way to “fix” those jars of jam? Would it make sense to address the problem each time we open a sealed jar, by heating it a bit and adding water?

        Thanks!

        Reply

        • Natasha
          September 1, 2019

          It does thicken when it cools so it’s a good idea to chill a small amount to see how thick it will be and add some water if necessary before canning it. Once it is canned, I would not open the cans to fix it at that point but address the jars as they are opened.

          Reply

          • Barb
            September 1, 2019

            Yes, agreed – I don’t want to “re-can” them all. So to fix each jar as we open it, what should I do? Should I just add water, or would it be better to add water and heat the jam again to get the desired result? Thanks!

          • Natasha
            September 1, 2019

            Hi Barb, that is correct, add water and bring back to a light boil.

  • marcia l. mccarty
    August 24, 2019

    Do you think this recipe would work for freezer jam? If I follow all the steps up until putting it in glass jars? Just pop each pint size freezer container right into the freezer?

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      August 24, 2019

      Hi Marcia, I think it could work as a freezer jam. Be sure to leave 1/2″ space at the top for expansion in the freezer. If you test it out, let me know how you like it as a freezer jam

      Reply

  • Valerie Zandona
    August 24, 2019

    Hello Natasha, I have around 2 kilos of plums – i.e. about 4.4 lbs. Reducing the amount of sugar proportionately means I would only use around one cup, which sounds hardly anything, given that most oother plum jam recipes call for almost equal amounts of fruit to sugar. How much sugar do you think I should use? Thank you.

    Reply

    • Natasha
      August 24, 2019

      Hi Valerie, we have a handy tool to help you scale the recipes up or down. Click on the servings in the recipe card and then you can adjust the servings until you see about 4.4 lbs and you will see the sugar is about 1 1/2 cups. I would add that much and then add more to taste. Keep in mind there is no pectin because the jam becomes concentrated and has enough natural pectin to thicken so it is a more concentrated jam than the jam recipes that have added pectin.

      Reply

      • Valerie Zandona
        August 26, 2019

        Hi Natasha, Many thanks for your helpful reply. I used a little more sugar from the beginning and have just bottled the jam – which is delicious and really to my taste – not too sweet. I shall be making a second batch soon.

        Reply

        • Natashas Kitchen
          August 26, 2019

          You’re so welcome! I’m glad that helped. Thank you for sharing your wonderful review, Valerie.

          Reply

  • Nicole
    August 23, 2019

    Hi Natasha,

    I made this and my family and my husband’s family absolutely love it! I have a ton of fresh peaches and was thinking of doing the same thing with the peaches(maybe less sugar and add lemon juice) , but I was wondering if you ever made peach jam the same way? If so did you add a certain amount of lemon juice or what was your strategy?

    Much appreciated!

    Nicole

    Reply

    • Nicole
      August 23, 2019

      Sorry also meant to give it 5 stars!

      Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      August 23, 2019

      Hi Nicole, The method is slightly different with various fruits. We have this recipe for Peach Preserves you may like.

      Reply

  • Cindy
    August 22, 2019

    Hi Natasha~ I made my plum jam and it turned out DELICIOUS! Sad thing is I only had four pounds of plums:( I was only able to get three pint jars of jam:(
    So for an all day process I wish I would have done at least four times that amount.

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      August 22, 2019

      It does seem more worth when there are more, I agree. I hope you enjoy these to the fullest.

      Reply

  • Yoly
    August 19, 2019

    Any mango jelly recipes?

    Reply

  • Cindy Cafaro
    August 17, 2019

    Hi Natasha- you don’t need to add lemon juice? What about botulism?

    Reply

    • Natasha
      August 17, 2019

      Hi Cindy, there is ample sugar to preserve the jam but if that is a concern for you, you can add lemon juice, but you will need more sugar to balance the flavors. I wasn’t able to find a recommendation for this – if you have come across something specifically for plums in the official canning guidelines, can you link it here? Thank you!

      Reply

  • Jen
    August 15, 2019

    Hi, I want to make this but I dont have a scale to measure out 12lbs. How many cups would that be approximately?

    Thanks!

    Reply

    • Natasha
      August 15, 2019

      Hi Jen, I didn’t measure the plums that way, but just to give you a rough idea: 1 lb for me was about 6-8, two-inch-wide plums. I want to say it was about 30 cups… maybe?

      Reply

      • Diana Sponsler
        August 19, 2019

        A pint’s a pound the world around… Roughly 2 cups (1 dry pt) per pound is a good estimate.

        Reply

    • Karyn
      August 25, 2019

      You can also step on a scale and then pick up the fruit and calculate the difference.

      Reply

    • Kelly
      September 15, 2019

      Jen, you don’t need to bother with trying to measure out the fruit in cups. I have a kitchen scale. Like Natasha, I am using standard U.S. grocery store red plums about 2-inches wide. It came out to 6 plums per pound. So, 72 individual plums = 12 lbs.

      Reply

  • Margaret Oliver
    August 14, 2019

    Can this recipe be done with frozen plums?

    Reply

    • Natasha
      August 15, 2019

      Hi Margaret, I haven’t tried that but it should work just fine with frozen plums.

      Reply

  • Liz M.
    August 12, 2019

    Hi Natasha,
    I love the results I got with 4-stage boiling/cooling. Wonderful! I left my batch super-tart. My question is: what’s the purpose of the oven step? Couldn’t I just fill the jars with boiling jam and go straight to the water bath, as I do with other recipes? I hope the oven step isn’t mandatory, because I already skipped it! But I’m still curious 🙂 Thanks for your delicious website!

    Reply

    • Natasha
      August 12, 2019

      Hi Liz, you can go straight to the water bath and skip the oven step. New canning guidelines recommend the water bath (please see instructions for that in the post above).

      Reply

  • Becky
    August 11, 2019

    I have a question: do you put the filled jars in a water bath canner after you have let them cool over night? I have a friend who just flips them and does not can them in a canner.
    At the end of canning guidelines it talks about pickles, so I’m not sure if you were just giving general guidelines or if you are suppose to can the jam in the canner.

    Reply

    • Natasha
      August 12, 2019

      Hi Becky, I went ahead and clarified in the post that the new canning guidelines are instead of the oven step. The pickles were a typo. Fixed and thanks for catching that!

      Reply

  • Denise
    August 10, 2019

    Thank you for this great Plum recipe. Turned out perfectly.

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      August 12, 2019

      I’m so glad you enjoyed it!

      Reply

  • Cristina
    August 7, 2019

    Okay. I have a friend who has a beautiful organic orcard. I picked all the plums that were so heavy with friut and decided to make a jam. The plums were of different snd varied sizes…that i decided to not de- seed. (I de seeded later. )0Way more than the amont of plums ypu recommend.
    I have added the four cups of sugar. I have tasted the plum jam. It is heavenly. I am now doing the final step. Thankyou for your input and info. It has been wonderful. I did use less sugar ( diabetic family members) and it is wonderful. (The taste) .thankyou so much for your site!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      August 7, 2019

      Thank you so much for sharing that with me.

      Reply

    • Melanie
      April 5, 2020

      This is my very first time trying out a jam. I thought I had mason jars, but unfortunately I do not. I blame it on the cats. Is it possible to just use Tupperware and leaving them out overnight?

      Reply

  • Selina Cearley
    August 6, 2019

    Hi Natasha ! I have a timing question for you . I started my second simmer and am almost through that . I won’t have time to do the third until after work tonight at ten pm …perfect because the jam will be cooled by then ! and so tomorrow is Wednesday and I will be able to do two more simmers before I go to work at 5 pm…after work on Wednsday night I have to get right to sleep and get up very early for a double shift on Thursday…so no time on Thursday to do anything with my jam …I should have done FOUR simmers by then and cannot adres it again until Friday morning …can leave it on the counter from Wednesday afternoon until Friday morning where I plan to do a fifth possibly sixth simmer and then can and finish in the oven ??? Or do I need to stick the pot in the fridge after it has cooled on Wednesday night ?

    Reply

    • Natasha
      August 6, 2019

      Hi Selina, I would keep it covered after it reaches room temperature to keep bugs or dust out, but I have taken 3 days to make jam before and it has plenty of sugar to keep it from spoiling.

      Reply

    • Selina Cearley
      August 6, 2019

      Thank you : ) I’m super pleased with the taste and consistency so far : )

      Reply

      • Natashas Kitchen
        August 6, 2019

        I’m so glad you enjoyed it!

        Reply

  • Selina Cearley
    August 6, 2019

    Hi Natasha …I am a first time jam maker and am using your recipe and so far so good …I am on the second simmer and I think it is going well …I has 18 lbs of plumbs and ( 135 plumbs ) I used 4 cups of raw sugar …now that I am tasting it …I feel it needs a little more sugar …so I have some brown sugar on hand that I may add otherwise, I’ll go get more raw sugar to add at the last simmer : ) I am cooking my batch on very very low heat …I love the way it looks and tastes and smells …I am on the right track !!! Thank you for this easy recipe …I can’t wait to try it finshied …P.S. I am going to add some fine chopped jalapeno to a few of the jars : )

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      August 6, 2019

      Thank you for sharing that with us!bI hope you love this recipe.

      Reply

    • LeeAnn
      August 21, 2019

      At what stage would you add the jalapeno?

      Reply

  • Silvia
    August 6, 2019

    This is such a great recipe. Thank you! Next step to swirl it into a coffee cake.

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      August 6, 2019

      I’m so glad you enjoyed it!

      Reply

  • Andrea
    July 28, 2019

    Hi there, just finished everything, oddly enjoyed one flipped jar is still bubbling away (over an hour now), any thoughts? It’s not near the stove or anything, it’s quite bizarre, I don’t think that’s normal!? They they great though, I used wild yellow plums, can’t wait to try it tomorrow! Do I freeze the jars or not? Thanks for the recipe!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      July 29, 2019

      Hi Andrea, without being there it is hard to say, was that jar possible more centered or have a more direct heat source that the others?

      Reply

    • Shannon
      August 9, 2019

      When I took the jam out of the oven and flipped over 1 jar the jam seeped out of the lid creating a mess. I’m afraid to flip over the rest as I don’t want to ruin the seal on all of them. Will they seal if I don’t flip them?

      Reply

      • Natashas Kitchen
        August 10, 2019

        It’s hard to say without being there Shannon, I recommend seeing all the tips in the recipe post and comments to be sure a step wasn’t missed.

        Reply

  • Jan
    July 24, 2019

    My jam is not getting thick ??? I’m on my 4th cook series . I don’t know what else to do at this point ???

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      July 25, 2019

      Hi Jan, I’m more than happy to troubleshoot. Allowing it to cool and re-warm helps for the jam to thicken naturally without requiring pectin.

      Reply

  • Leslie Bryant
    July 21, 2019

    I was looking for a plum jam recipe that didn’t call for a ton of sugar, and even though this looked labor intensive I was willing to give it a shot. I shouldn’t have. The end result is yummy but it took over 12 hours to get there. And it never set, so I have chunky plum syrup. And I don’t mess around with funky canning methods so I let the jars cool overnight and placed them in the freezer; botulism is not worth the risk.

    All in all, The recipe tastes great but is WAY too time consuming for syrup. Not worth it.

    Reply

    • Natasha
      July 21, 2019

      Hi Leslie, this natural plum jam is time-consuming but easy since it’s very little active time. It would be syrup after just 12 hours. I would suggest completing all of the steps for a more desirable jam consistency.

      Reply

  • Aiko
    July 15, 2019

    How long should the can stay upside down? Thanks for the recipe!

    Reply

    • Natasha
      July 16, 2019

      Hi Aiko, you want to keep them upside down until they reach room temperature. We usually just leave them overnight to cool completely.

      Reply

    • Sue
      July 17, 2019

      Down to my last boil, it will be sitting overnight im going to finish it in the morning, I have tasted it and it has a delicious flavor, my question is do you know if this process can be used with any fresh fruit?

      Reply

      • Natashas Kitchen
        July 17, 2019

        That’s so exciting Sue! It’s really difficult to guess without making a batch with specific fruit and measuring exactly and it also depends on how sweet your fruit is.

        Reply

  • jeff
    July 13, 2019

    look like victoria plums to me

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      July 13, 2019

      Thank you for sharing that with us!

      Reply

  • Nidia
    July 8, 2019

    I made the jam 2 days ago, using this recipe, but I did not can it. It’s currently in my fridge. Am I able to can it now?

    Reply

    • Natasha
      July 9, 2019

      Hi Nidia, at this point, it would be best to keep it refrigerated or frozen if you made too much to consume within about 6 months.

      Reply

      • Jerry Kaidor
        July 21, 2019

        I think these might be Cherry Plums ( Prunus Cerasifera ). We have several of these trees in the yard. They are very generous producers. Every year, I make cherry plum wine. There are red cherry plums, and yellow ones. The yelllow ones are the tastiest.

        Reply

        • Natashas Kitchen
          July 21, 2019

          Thank you so much for sharing that with me.

          Reply

  • Dorothy Rackley
    July 4, 2019

    I was wondering why you do four distinct boilings of the fruit? What does this do? Could you just cook the fruit for a longer period of time? Thank you.

    Reply

    • Natasha
      July 4, 2019

      HI Dorothy, if you boil the mixture for too long, it will darken in color. Also, allowing it to cool and re-warm helps for the jam to thicken naturally without requiring pectin.

      Reply

  • Christine
    June 2, 2019

    How many cups of cut up plums make a pound. I don’t have scale to weigh plums coming from our tree.

    Reply

    • Natasha
      June 3, 2019

      Hi Christine, you don’t necessarily need a kitchen scale – a rough measure on a bathroom scale would also be a good way to double check since not all scales are created equal. You can get on the scale with the empty bowl then get on the scale with the filled bowl of plums and find the difference to get a rough weight. I didn’t measure them in cups but just to give you a rough idea: 1 lb for me was about 6-8, two-inch-wide plums. I want to say it was about 30 cups… maybe?

      Reply

  • Peter
    June 1, 2019

    Fantastic recipe!
    I tweaked it ever so slightly.
    Cooked a total of 5 times (including the last round) but added more plums during the 4 boil. These did not break down as much so I’ve got chunks of plum in the preserves. I also added mint which brought a wonderful addition to the tartness of preserves.

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      June 1, 2019

      I’m so happy you enjoyed that. Thank you for sharing that with us, Peter!

      Reply

    • Jordan
      August 6, 2019

      Taste very good. So i put them in the oven, and when I took them out they popped and sealed. Does this mean I don’t have to use my pressure canner pot?

      Reply

  • Marj
    January 11, 2019

    Hi, this recipe sounds great, is there any possibility of having the measurements in grams please? Our cups measurements are different in Australia. Thank you!

    Reply

    • Natasha
      January 11, 2019

      Hi Marj, I added the measurements in grams just for you 🙂 We are slowly but surely getting through the recipes to add gram measurements 🙂

      Reply

  • Mark
    November 5, 2018

    I am a diabetic and was wondering if I could use a non-sugar sweetener for this recipe. As well, I’ve never canned jam before, so say a prayer! Haha!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      November 5, 2018

      Hi Mark! I haven’t tried that bu our readers have reported that working well. Here is what one of them said: “I am type 2 diabetic too and I make not plum jam but the traditional Polish version called “powidla”. There is no sugar added. It agrees with my diabetes just fine. As many traditional recipes, this one takes a lot of time and work but very little ingredients. Basically plums, preferably late autumn ones, small and sweet, but any other ripe plums will do.
      You just have to cook pitted plums for 3-4 days (more juicy plums take longer), about 4 hours a day – bring to boil that turn to low heat. Than let it cool in between.
      At some point it’s more frying than cooking. Takes a lot of stirring, because from day 2 it can burn easily (if it burs, transfer to another pot avoiding scraping the burned bits from the bottom, they will be bitter).
      Sounds tiring but it’s worth all this work.
      At the end, when it’s all cooked, you may add some sweetener. I suggest stevia. Powidla are sweet and tart, stewia is a bit insipid, goes well together.
      But sucralose is fine too.
      Don’t use acesulfam K or aspartam – it gives the worst aftertaste to plums. I’ve made that mistake once. 5 kilos of plums into the drain. Uneatable.
      When it’s cooked and sweetened, just bring it to the boil one last time, transfer searing hot to the jars, close lids very tightly and stand upside down on a kitchen towel until they are cool.

      Than enjoy”

      Reply

  • Gertie
    October 10, 2018

    What is the shelf life for this? And does t need to be refrigerated? I want to send some to my friend in Holland but shipping takes about 7 days. Thank you!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      October 11, 2018

      Hi Gertie! if they are canned, their shelf life is a year or more.

      Reply

  • cmb
    October 4, 2018

    Hi Natasha — so you don’t add any water to the mixture when you first put it on the stove? And how long does it take to get to that first boil? I’ve never canned before, but I can’t imagine how 12 lbs of plums come to a boil without any liquid…how do you do this?

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      October 4, 2018

      No water needed at all. The plums will release a lot of water. It’s hard to say but watch it closely. Type of pan used makes a difference

      Reply

      • Lynne
        October 4, 2018

        It definitely works without adding water. I started on the lowest heat and stirred quite a bit in the beginning. As the plums started to release their liquid, I tweaked the heat up (medium low was the highest) to get it come to a boil once there was some liquid. In subsequent boils, you’ll need to be even more careful with the temp to not scorch.

        Reply

      • cmb
        October 16, 2018

        yes! it did work without water. only issues now are that for some of the jars, some jam came out of the lid when the jars were in the oven. did that ruin the seal? also, now that i’ve turned the jars back right side up, the jam isn’t sinking to the bottom of the jar. any thoughts? thanks!

        Reply

        • Natasha
          October 16, 2018

          Hi, if jam has come out of the lid, it sounds like they may have been overfilled – make sure to leave space at the neck when filling the jars. If the lids are sunken in and do not make a popping sound when pressed in the center, most likely the seal has formed but if you are concerned about any of them, it’s always best to refrigerate and enjoy those jars first. If the jam is not sinking back to the bottom, the jam probably was thicker and this can be due to a variety of factors such as cooking time (reducing down the jam longer would make it thicker, or using a plum that releases less juice). I hope that helps!

          Reply

          • cmb
            October 16, 2018

            it does! only concern is that i can’t be sure if the top isn’t moving because there is jam in the top or because it’s actually sealed. will the jame eventually sink back down?

          • Natashas Kitchen
            October 16, 2018

            If there is room for it to sink, but if it’s overfilled there is no where for it to go really. If you are not sure I recommend leaving it in the fridge and using that jar first.

          • Jacob
            July 13, 2019

            Very well done recipe. I added 1/2 cup red wine… because to me, everything is better with a little vino. 😃

          • Natashas Kitchen
            July 14, 2019

            That’s a great idea, Jacob! Thank you for sharing that!

  • Hope Moore
    September 28, 2018

    Are the skins suppose to break down completely?

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      September 28, 2018

      Hi Hope! It really depends on the variety of plums. There are some plums with thicker skins but I think the skins add nice texture to the jam. It would be ok to mash it if you wanted it to be more of a puree consistency but we prefer it slightly chunk. I like seeing the pieces of fruit in my jam 🙂 I hope you LOVE it! 🙂

      Reply

  • Gena
    September 26, 2018

    I am about to try this recipe and am very excited! I am new to canning so can you tell me do I add water to bring the plums to a boil and if so how much. Thank you

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      September 26, 2018

      Hi Gena! No water is needed in this recipe since the plums release juice while they stand with the sugar and also while cooking.

      Reply

  • Gladys
    September 16, 2018

    Could it possibly be mount royal plum tree? We have one in our yard which bears a lot of small plums, skin is not tart or sour and the flavor is sweet and meat is yellow and it looks just like the picture. The tree is not very big. I live in colorado.

    Reply

    • Natasha
      September 17, 2018

      My parents never kept any of their tree tags but that does look like some of the plums they have in their yard.

      Reply

  • Angela Freemantle
    September 15, 2018

    I decided to make this because of the positive reviews I followed the instructions but ended with scorched plums on day three and it hadn’t even thickened up and I had to toss the whole thing including my pan. I have quite bit of canning and this is the first time I had throw anything out. I feel like it should be noted in your recipe how closely you need watch the process to avoid scorching.

    Reply

    • Natasha
      September 15, 2018

      Hi Angela, the type of pot you use (heavy bottomed is best to distribute heat evenly), and cooking over lower heat (not all stoves are created equal, so keep an eye on that and titrate as needed). It is tempting to turn up the heat to get the pot to heat up quickly but because the mixture is thick, it can scorch quickly over higher heat which is why I recommend starting on lower heat. If you do get scorching, transfer the jam to another pot (do not stir or your whole pot will taste scorch) and continue in the new pot. I hope that helps!

      Reply

  • Sandi Froemming
    September 12, 2018

    I used your procedure with much smaller plums. It worked great except that the skins were slightly bitter and now the finished product leaves an almost dry, unpleasant aftertaste in my mouth. Is there anything I can add to get rid of that taste? It doesn’t need anymore sugar.

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      September 12, 2018

      Hi Sandi. I’m not sure adding more sugar will fix that. One of our readers has tried that before and said it didn’t help the dry bitterness all that much. I would recommend having sweet ripened plums to avoid that. If you experiment in any other way I would love to hear the result!

      Reply

  • Karla
    September 9, 2018

    Excellent plum jam…..Mount Royal plums are the name of my tree & yours look to be the same variety.

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      September 9, 2018

      Thank you for the wonderful review! I’m so happy you enjoyed this recipe, Karla!

      Reply

  • Lynne
    September 7, 2018

    When is a good time to check if there is enough sugar? My plums aren’t as sweet this year as other summers.

    Reply

    • Natasha
      September 7, 2018

      Hi Lynne, I would add sugar to taste just before the last time you bring it to a boil.

      Reply

  • joan s
    September 4, 2018

    I’m using big, fat black plums- so juicy and sweet. The plums are simmering away now-looking good!!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      September 4, 2018

      That’s so great! Thank you for sharing that with us, Joan!

      Reply

  • Debbie Long
    September 2, 2018

    Hello. It’s been a long time since I have canned. But, I love this recipe so far. I am actually making plum preserves at this very moment. Thank goodness I am a night owl. I am at the “let the plums and sugar set for an hour. Thank you as I have lots of gifts, this being one of them for the Holidays.

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      September 2, 2018

      This would be perfect for the holidays! Don’t stay up too late, Debbie 🙂

      Reply

      • Karman So
        July 17, 2019

        Hi. Can I cook the plums without pitting them then strain the jam to remove the pits after? Will that change the flavour of the jam?

        Reply

        • Natasha
          July 17, 2019

          Hi Karman, I haven’t tried it that way so I can’t say for sure. I assume it would be ok, but you might double-check to see if you can find any other tutorials using the same method before proceeding.

          Reply

  • LeAnne DiTirro
    August 28, 2018

    That was the easiest & best tasting preserves I have ever tasted they are called “Italian plums” here where I come from! And our tree was LOADED this year :)They bring back very pleasant memory’s from my childhood ❤️ Can’t wait to share the jam with all my friends & family😍

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      August 28, 2018

      Thank you so much for this thoughtful review, LeAnne! I’m so happy you shared this with me!

      Reply

  • Kuba
    August 19, 2018

    They look like Stanley or Damson plums. Are they? They are difficult to find in the South.

    Reply

    • Natasha
      August 19, 2018

      Hi Kuba, I’m not sure specifically what variety this is. I wish I knew!

      Reply

  • Amber
    August 17, 2018

    What happens to the skins? I reread the recipe like 3 times to see when the skins were removed, but couldn’t find anything.

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      August 17, 2018

      This is a no peel recipe and no need to remove the skins 🙂

      Reply

      • Nancy
        September 3, 2018

        Do the skins and halved plums break down, or do you get a big skin in your pbj?

        Reply

        • Natashas Kitchen
          September 3, 2018

          It will break down just fine.

          Reply

  • nadya skene
    August 8, 2018

    I canned plumbs last year and my kids don’t eat them. Can I use my canned plums the same way for this recipie?

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      August 8, 2018

      Hi Nadya! That is a great question. I honestly haven’t tried that. I would assume there is some adjusting that would need to be done. IF you experiment I would love to hear your results!

      Reply

  • Emily Ryan
    August 7, 2018

    Hi, I just finished a large batch of the plum preserves-I added a bit of ginger and meyer lemon to one pot, and some cardamom to another, varying the sugar…and it all seems to taste great! It was a very fun process, regardless, so thank you. As this is my first time EVER making any kind of jam, I have a question about sterilizing. I both boiled the filled jars and then put them in the oven for 15 mins on 350. The jam is boiling in the lidded jars (not surprising), still, after at least 30 minutes lid down. Will it taste burnt? I managed to get all the way through with minimal scorching, so I will be very sad if I ruined it at the last minute. Thanks, Natasha!

    Reply

    • Natasha
      August 7, 2018

      Hi Emily, so long as the heat was off and it didn’t scorch to the bottom you should be ok. You can sample a spoonful after it is done cooking on the stovetop and get a very good sense of how it will taste. Placing the jars in the oven would not cause them to scorch so there is no concern there :).

      Reply

  • Lee Sundquist
    July 19, 2018

    Can you do peaches the same way, or combine them?

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      July 19, 2018

      Hi Lee, The method is slightly different with various fruits. We have this recipe for Peach Preserves you may like.

      Reply

  • Grace Jones
    June 27, 2018

    These plums are probably purple damsoms. There is also a lighter greeny yellow color variety.

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      June 27, 2018

      Thank you for sharing that with us!

      Reply

      • Julian Duran
        June 8, 2019

        My tree has about 3 plumes that picked easily. They were still firm and after 3-4 days at room temperature they are getting soft. When do I pick the rest? after they pick easily? It seems like I have to pull harder right now that they are not fully ripe. The tree has about 29-30 plumes left.

        Reply

        • Natasha
          June 10, 2019

          Hi Julian, I would wait to pick the plums until they are ripe – they will be the sweetest then and most ideal for making jam.

          Reply

  • Myrna
    June 25, 2018

    I left the cover on while cooking plums down, removed lid stirring several times when letting it cool down overnight.

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      June 25, 2018

      Thank you for sharing that with us! I’m happy to hear that worked for you.

      Reply

  • Myrna
    June 20, 2018

    I’ve used my crockpot with great success to cook down plums and reduced potential of scorching!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      June 20, 2018

      Thank you for sharing that with us, Myrna!

      Reply

    • Diane
      September 8, 2018

      How long did you cook it in the crockpot and on high or low?

      Reply

      • Myrna
        September 9, 2018

        I cooked it on high 3-4 hours, let it cool down overnight sitting on rack on counter then repeated in crockpot until I had desired consistency. (I sprayed crockpot w/Pam prior to starting)

        Reply

  • Danette Hudson
    June 19, 2018

    can you use splenda ?

    Reply

    • Natasha
      June 20, 2018

      Hi Danette, I haven’t tried that but one of my readers, Maddy, left a very helpful reply on that: “I am type 2 diabetic too and I make not plum jam but the traditional Polish version called “powidla”. There is no sugar added. It agrees with my diabetes just fine.
      You just have to cook pitted plums for 3-4 days (more juicy plums take longer), about 4 hours a day – bring to boil that turn to low heat. Than let it cool in between. At some point it’s more drying than cooking. Takes a lot of stirring, because from day 2 it can burn easily (if it burns, transfer to another pot avoiding scraping the burned bits from the bottom, they will be bitter).
      Sounds tiring but it’s worth all this work.
      At the end, when it’s all cooked, you may add some sweetener. I suggest stevia. Powidla are sweet and tart, stewia is a bit insipid, goes well together. But sucralose is fine too.
      Don’t use acesulfam K or aspartam – it gives the worst aftertaste to plums. I’ve made that mistake once. 5 kilos of plums into the drain. Uneatable. When it’s cooked and sweetened, just bring it to the boil one last time, transfer searing hot to the jars, close lids very tightly and stand upside down on a kitchen towel until they are cool. Than enjoy!”
      I hope that helps!

      Reply

  • Lori
    June 16, 2018

    I just made this and decided to make another batch with Apricots following the recipe. Love that it’s so easy and basic!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      June 16, 2018

      I’m so happy you enjoyed that, Lori. Thank you for sharing that with us!

      Reply

  • Barb
    April 20, 2018

    Hi
    My mother had a plum tree like this. She called them Italian Prune Plums. I hope this helps.
    Cheers, Barb

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      April 20, 2018

      Good to know Barb, thanks for letting me know!

      Reply

  • Lynn
    October 14, 2017

    I made a batch using 9 1/2 lbs very tart damson plums which yeilded 8 lbs 11oz fruit after the pits were removed. I only added 3 cups sugar because I wanted the finished product tart. I did the 4 times method and the peels pretty much broke down and yeilded 10 1/2 cups. Then processed in boiling water for 20 minutes which helped to further dissolve the peels. The final product has the consistency of apple sauce, not the gooey gel of jam. I think that’s due to the type of plum not having much natural pectin. It’s is awesome stirred into sweet vanilla or coconut yogurt or over ice cream. Also good on pancakes with a teeny bit of syrup. I will definitely make it again next year.

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      October 14, 2017

      I’m glad to hear that! Thanks for sharing your helpful review with other readers!

      Reply

  • Bubby Coffey
    October 8, 2017

    Thank you for the recipe. I made a half batch today.
    Cooking the fruit breaks it up. The steam reduced liquid. Because the fruit skins up, stirring is key to reducing liquid. I don’t think it would matter if you cooked it all in one setting vs. heat/cool.
    The recipe states to taste while cooking for sweetness – This is always crucial with fruit because it’s different from tree to tree.

    Reply

  • Sherri
    October 4, 2017

    Do you add water? To boil?

    Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 4, 2017

      Hi Sherri, no water is needed in this recipe since the plums release juice while they stand with the sugar and also while cooking.

      Reply

  • Sandra Miller
    October 1, 2017

    Have you ever tried freezing the jars instead of boiling?

    Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 2, 2017

      Hi Sandra, I think it could work as a freezer jam. Be sure to leave 1/2″ space at the top for expansion in the freezer. If you test it out, let me know how you like it as a freezer jam 🙂

      Reply

  • Hilda Schneider
    September 25, 2017

    Hi there! I made your plum jam and although the flavour is lovely, the jam is rather tough, almost as if I should have only cooked it twice! I even added water to thin it out, but it is super thick. What did I do wrong?

    Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 26, 2017

      Hi Hilda, it sounds like maybe it is due to the type of plums used. Some plums are more juicy than others.

      Reply

  • bb
    September 21, 2017

    great recipe but put the jam in jelly jars; a pint can mold in the fridgerator before it is used up.

    Reply

  • Wendy Gonzalez
    September 19, 2017

    Turned out pretty good but very sour despite adding extra sugar. We have mount royal plums that were pretty sweet this year. But the jam is canned and we had some this weekend and it’s tart. Wish it was sweeter. But now I know for next time to add more sugar

    Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 19, 2017

      Hi Wendy, I do suggest adding more sugar to taste for various plums since some can be more tart inside or even if a plum is sweet on the inside, it can be tart on the outside.

      Reply

      • Myrna
        September 19, 2017

        Something to keep in mind is that the sweetness of fruit varies each year. Tasting before and after adding sugar proves to be a good idea.

        Reply

        • Natasha's Kitchen
          September 19, 2017

          Great tip Myrna! 🙂

          Reply

    • Barb
      September 4, 2019

      I have always know them as Italian plums too. My mother had a tree that sent up volunteers and I transplanted one to my yard. It is a big tree now about 18 to 20 ft. and is loaded with plums every year. I give them away by the bags full and make plum butter out of therm with very little sugar and a pinch of cinnamon, added after butter has cooked down, to taste . Just like apple butter but made with plums. I cut them in half and seed them, cook until soft and run through a canning sieve, (some call it a ricer) See on Amazon.
      a couple of batches to get the skins out and turn plums into a puree. Cook the butter down in a large roasting pan in a 250° F oven, checking and stirring every once in awhile, until really thick. Can use a slow cooker set on low with no lid for small batches. Pack while hot into hot sterile jars, leaving a half inch of headspace. Screw on hot jar lids and bands and tighten firmly but do not over tighten. Place jars in a hot (simmering) water bath canner, return water to a slow boil and process for 15 minutes. Remove jars from canner with jar lifter and place on some folded kitchen towels, (never place hot jars on a cold or wet counter, they may break) right side up and let cool. You should hear the lids go plink, plink, plink one at a time as they finish sealing as they cool. Store in a cool dark place and the plum butter will keep a long time…

      I have never tried Natasha’s recipe for plum jam but I sure am going to give it a try. It sounds delish!!

      Reply

  • Beverly Occulto
    September 19, 2017

    I made the Plum Jam…it turned out great! It’s so delicious and worth the effort!
    Love your recipes!!!! 🙂

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      September 19, 2017

      I’m glad you enjoy the recipe Beverly! Thanks for following and sharing your great review! 🙂

      Reply

  • Barb Messere
    September 19, 2017

    This is the best plum jam! I made my first batch using the usual 7 1/2 cups of sugar and it was far too sweet for my taste. This recipe uses only half the amount and is sweet tart, just the way I like it. Hint: use very ripe plums to get the most flavor and follow the recipe exactly. I bottled my jam on the fourth boil. Thank you Natasha.

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      September 19, 2017

      My pleasure Barb! I’m happy to hear how much you enjoy the recipe! Thanks for sharing your tips and great review with other readers!

      Reply

  • Nattalie
    September 17, 2017

    Hey there, I am making this for the first time and am very excited about it! How long is there shelf life? I’m hoping to give these as little Christmas gifts!

    Thanks a ton,
    Nattalie

    Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 17, 2017

      Hi Nattalie, when they are canned, they can last up to a year or longer.

      Reply

  • Nina
    September 15, 2017

    Hi Natasha. I am making the jam. This is my fourth time boiling it. Is it necessary to put it in the oven after putting the jam into jars? What does it do for the jam?

    Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 15, 2017

      Hi Nina, putting them in the oven helps to seal the jars and kill any potential bacteria.

      Reply

  • Joanne
    September 14, 2017

    Hi, love this recipe and I’m making it now! If I want to add Amareto, or basil, when should I do that? I’m hoping you say on the last boil, lol.

    Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 14, 2017

      Hi Joanne, I haven’t tried adding those in but I would add it on the last boil and add it to taste.

      Reply

  • Lynn
    September 10, 2017

    1. Prune plums are larger and more oval (egg shaped) than the ones in the photo. I have both trees and the difference is obvious side by side but no so obvious when you see only one.
    2. Is this jam or preserves? Jam is fairly firm and preserves are more liquid sauce.
    3. Has anybody used a crock pot to make either jam or preserves? It would free up stove space for me.

    Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 11, 2017

      Hi Lynn, these are somewhere in the middle – they aren’t firm like jam so by your definition I guess they would be more of a preserve consistency. I’d be curious to now if anyone else has tried it in a crockpot!

      Reply

    • Myrna
      September 15, 2017

      I used a crockpot and it worked wonderfully. I coated it with a light coat of cooking spray then added plums and sugar. I turned it on high and let it go for about 4 hours, stirring occasionally, let cool and repeated 3x then used an immersion blender to make a smooth consistency before last heating. I love that I didn’t have to worry about it scorching. It came out fabulous!

      Reply

      • Natasha
        natashaskitchen
        September 15, 2017

        That is so great to know! Thank you for sharing!! 🙂

        Reply

      • Jill Rodich
        June 25, 2018

        When using the crock pot method, is that with the lid on or off? Doesn’t it need to cook down some? Wouldn’t the lid prevent that from happening?

        Reply

  • Wendy
    September 4, 2017

    We call these plums “prune plums” – believe they are European/Italian – thanks for the recipe – will definitely try – picked 1 bushel from our tree today! Approximately how many cups of fruit (raw) is 12lbs?

    Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 4, 2017

      Hi Wendy, 1 lb for me was about 6-8, two-inch-wide plums. I want to say it was about 30 cups… maybe?

      Reply

    • Marilyn Milbrodt
      September 5, 2017

      You are correct…..Prune Plums make wonderful plum dumplings!!! :0)

      Reply

  • Dieta
    September 4, 2017

    This is the third year I have been making your plum jam and we love it…I especially like the fact that I can control the sugar….before the last boil I use a handheld immersion blender which takes care of the skin beautifully….

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      September 4, 2017

      I’m glad you love it! Thanks for sharing your tip and great review! 🙂

      Reply

    • Jenny
      September 10, 2017

      A great recipe, two years in a row – thank you! I add about 20 sashes of Fee’s plum bitters at the last boil, which really rounds out the flavour even more.

      Reply

      • Jenny
        September 10, 2017

        Sorry, that should read ‘dashes’!

        Reply

    • Liz
      September 10, 2017

      How long do these last in the pantry using your baking method? Or are they only to be refrigerated? And how long? I’m attempting to make it now , fingers crossed!

      Reply

      • Christina
        September 8, 2018

        Hi Liz, did you ever get an answer to your question about the shelf life? If they need to be refrigerated? I am making this recipe now and would love to know!

        Reply

  • Wendy Gonzalez
    September 4, 2017

    I am in the process of making this. I think I messed it up. We put the sugar on but life got busy and I was not able to start cooking for 24hrs. I am on the 3rd boil and it not thick like Jam. More like a sauce. Help. Should I add pectin? Can I add pectin? Did I destroy it by the long sugar soak time?

    Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 4, 2017

      Hi Wendy, It’s possible that your plums got overly juicy with the sugar or they may have been a very juicy/watery plum variety. I would suggest doing 1 extra boil if it still seems too watery and also keep in mind that it will thicken slightly when its cool.

      Reply

  • Margaret Riccio
    September 4, 2017

    Could i use parifin on jars that aren’t mason jars

    Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 4, 2017

      Hi Margaret, I honestly have never worked with parafin in canning so I can’t really advise. Maybe someone else has insight into that? Thanks!

      Reply

  • Marilou Gibson
    August 29, 2017

    Hi and thank you for the recipe, it sounds amazing! I’m wondering what you think about adding some rhubarb to the plums to cook since I have about 9lbs of plums and I have some rhubarb on hand to make up the difference. I’d love to hear your thoughts on rhubarb plum jam! Any advice? Thanks!

    Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 29, 2017

      I wish I had a good answer for that but I’ve never tried adding rhubarb and truth be told, I have very little experience with rhubarb as it is something we did not eat growing up. One of my readers mentioned they had once tried a combination that worked well but if you do try it, you’ll likely have to add some sugar. Maybe someone else has some insight into that combination? Thanks in advance!

      Reply

  • Kacy
    August 27, 2017

    Can I strain this to get the skins out after it’s cooked a few times? I just finished step 2 for the first time and my boyfriend doesn’t like fruit skin in his preserves, but he will have to suffer if straining would ruin it.

    Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 28, 2017

      Hi Kacy, I don’t think there is an easy way to strain them out of there without losing a ton of jam in the process. I have found that by the 4th simmer, the skins incorporate pretty well into the jam and aren’t bothersome. Hopefully he will agree!! 😉

      Reply

      • Shannon Day
        August 30, 2017

        What about a food mill? It’s a sieve with a blade that scrapes, pressing the preserves through but leaving the skins. If this method still has too much skin for your bf to tolerate, you could try that and see if it works for you.

        Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          August 30, 2017

          Great suggestion! Thank you! 🙂

          Reply

    • Angela
      September 6, 2017

      I just made this recipe and felt it was a tad “lumpy” for me. So I took the batch and pureed it in my food processor and the results were smooth. A sprinkle sized flake of plum skin was here and there, but it was predominantly smooth in texture.

      Reply

  • Lynn
    August 24, 2017

    Those plums look like Damson Plums.

    Reply

  • Annette Hansen
    August 22, 2017

    In step 3, don’t you mean repeat step 2?

    Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 22, 2017

      Hi Annette, sorry for the mixup – yes, repeat step 2. I updated that. Thanks for asking! 🙂

      Reply

  • Dave Schwartz
    August 19, 2017

    Out here in western Oregon, these are known as Brooks plums (prunes domestica). They are typically ripe in late August or early September. In addition to jam, I’ve dried them and made wine, depending upon the productivity of the year.

    Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 19, 2017

      Hi Dave, thank you for sharing! I’ve never heard of plum wine – sounds so intriguing!

      Reply

    • Jeannie Ballard
      August 25, 2017

      I am intrigued by the idea of plum wine. Wound you have a recipe for that?

      Reply

  • Mirella
    August 15, 2017

    Hi Natasha,

    Can I use recycled jelly and peanut butter jars? I don’t have mason jars with the detachable center lid.

    Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 15, 2017

      Hi Mirella, for canning on the shelf, those types of jars are not recommended since the seal may not form properly. My mom recycled lids for a long time but we’ve since learned it isn’t best practice. If they are glass jars, you can use the jars and buy new lids but it may be challenging if they have different sized tops. If they are not glass jars, they should not be used for canning.

      Reply

      • Mirella
        August 17, 2017

        Thank you! Bought some today! How long do these last in the pantry?

        Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          August 17, 2017

          Hi Mirella, if they are canned, their shelf life is a year or more.

          Reply

  • Michelle
    July 26, 2017

    I don’t have a kitchen scale (or bathroom scale). How many small plums would you estimate are in one pound?

    Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 27, 2017

      Hi Michelle, it depends on the size of your plums. 1 lb for me was about 6-8, two-inch-wide plums.

      Reply

  • Deena
    July 25, 2017

    Can you use a water bath to can these plums

    Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 25, 2017

      Hi Deena, yes that would work to do a water bath.

      Reply

  • RENAE FREDERICKS
    July 8, 2017

    I am using 2lbs. instead of 12 lbs of plums and would like to know if one still cooks the 4 cups of jam for 10 minutes repeated four times?
    Thanks so much for an easy recipe!

    Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 8, 2017

      Hi Renae, it will probably thicken up faster and may be enough after 2-3 cooking times instead of 4. A smaller amount will evaporate liquid faster since there is more surface area to the total amount of plums. Be extra careful not to scorch the bottom.

      Reply

  • Tina Kaplun
    July 7, 2017

    Hi Natasha!
    Do you think this ratio of sugar to fruit would also work for sour cherries? I’ve used this method with the cherries before, but cannot remember what the ratio is. If I make the preserves, my Ukrainian mother-in-law will make the blinchiki. Yum!

    Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 7, 2017

      Hi Tina, I think it would work fine with cherries. You would have to add sugar to taste since not all cherries are equally sweet.

      Reply

  • Lee-Volker
    July 7, 2017

    Howdy Natasha!
    This will be my first time making jam or jelly. Eight pints is a little too much for me right now. If I use eight 8 oz jars do I just cut the amount of sugar and plums in half? Does the cooking/simmering time change? Thanks for your help!

    Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 7, 2017

      Hi Lee, yes, cut everything in half since you are making half the recipe. It may cook faster since it is a smaller batch so keep an eye on it so it doesn’t scorch on the bottom.

      Reply

  • Tanya
    July 3, 2017

    Hi would this wirk with cherries?

    Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 3, 2017

      Hi Tanya, I think that would work 🙂

      Reply

  • Julia Cummins
    June 30, 2017

    They are called prune plums.

    Reply

    • Ali
      August 20, 2017

      I think the shape here is too round to be the egg-shaped prune plum. I have smaller cherry sized plums with the same coloring that are cocheco plums I’m using this recipe for. Can’t wait to try it!

      Reply

  • Lynda Lott
    June 25, 2017

    I am wondering if you could use artificial sweetner such Splenda as I am diabetic.

    Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      June 25, 2017

      Hi Lynda, I haven’t tried that but one of my readers, Maddy, left a very helpful reply on that: “Kathy, I am type 2 diabetic too and I make not plum jam but the traditional Polish version called “powidla”.
      There is no sugar added. It agrees with my diabetes just fine.

      As many traditional recipes, this one takes a lot of time and work but very little ingredients. Basically plums, preferably late autumn ones, small and sweet, but any other ripe plums will do.

      You just have to cook pitted plums for 3-4 days (more juicy plums take longer), about 4 hours a day – bring to boil that turn to low heat. Than let it cool in between.
      At some point it’s more frying than cooking. Takes a lot of stirring, because from day 2 it can burn easily (if it burs, transfer to another pot avoiding scraping the burned bits from the bottom, they will be bitter).
      Sounds tiring but it’s worth all this work.

      At the end, when it’s all cooked, you may add some sweetener. I suggest stevia. Powidla are sweet and tart, stewia is a bit insipid, goes well together.
      But sucralose is fine too.
      Don’t use acesulfam K or aspartam – it gives the worst aftertaste to plums. I’ve made that mistake once. 5 kilos of plums into the drain. Uneatable.

      When it’s cooked and sweetened, just bring it to the boil one last time, transfer searing hot to the jars, close lids very tightly and stand upside down on a kitchen towel until they are cool.

      Than enjoy!”

      Reply

  • Heidi
    May 31, 2017

    Hi Natasha
    This recipe looks absolutely fabulous as I was given some frozen plumbs (that have defrosted & are still lovely & firm) so I will make some of your Jam & am looking forward to seeing the end result 🙂

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      May 31, 2017

      YUM! Please let me know how it turns out Heidi!

      Reply

  • Candice
    March 26, 2017

    Hi.
    Could you use this procedure for other fruits? I do not like to use pectin and I have tried making my grandmother’s strawberry preserves without pectin and so far I either undercook or overcook! Should have paid more attention instead of just waiting to devour them on freshly baked yeast rolls. Thanks.

    Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 27, 2017

      Hi Candice, it depends on what you’re making jam with. With strawberries, you probably could make that work but you might not have the nice chunky texture because of the lengthy cooking. Strawberries also release quite a bit of juice so you would have to cook it at a gentle simmer a few times. I haven’t tried with strawberries since we’ve never had a massive bumper crop of them but it sounds like a great idea!

      Reply

      • Candice
        March 30, 2017

        Thank you and it is worth a try to use this process. I do know that you want to use a few not completely ripe strawberries because under ripe strawberries have pectin as opposed to completely ripe strawberries and the strawberries need to be close in size. My grandma would also put the jam on jelly roll pans and place a tea towel over them and sit them in the sun for several hours. Not sure why but her preserves were out of this world good.

        Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          March 30, 2017

          Thank you so much for sharing your tips!! 🙂

          Reply

        • Emmanuel Leroy
          August 3, 2020

          Simple recipe, but a lot of misinformed recommendations here:
          Heating and cooling and doing it again 4x or 6x over 2-3 days is a waste of time and energy: just boil slowly for 1h30 and you’ll get the same result. The whole point of boiling is to evaporate the water in the mixture so it thickens, so just keep cooking it until it does.
          Saying there is a lot of sugar so it won’t spoil is also non-sense: sugar is what mold feeds on, but it would take days for any to develop once it’s cool. It’s heat that ‘preserves’ your jam until you seal it in the sterelized jar.
          As far as as sealing the jar: suggesting not to tighten too much because air bubbles need to get out is non-sense: if air can get out, it is not sealed. Air doesn’t ‘get out’, it just shrinks as it cools down, causing the jar lid to pop in. It needs to be air tight, or air would get in actually and your jar just won’t preserve.
          I picked this recipe because it showed the shortest time on the summary, and then it calls for taking 2-3 days. Misleading.
          This could be summarized in 3 lines: mix plums and sugar, wait til sugar is absorbed, boil until it thickens, and jar. Done.

          Reply

  • Milly
    March 9, 2017

    Just wanted to thank you for your recipe. I used it two years ago and loved it so much I made a second batch. The first batch was a little runny (such a good syrup though!), so the next one I cooked longer.

    I was grateful I made extra because the next year our tree got sick and we had to cut it to a stump. It looks good again and we hope to get a good crop again this year.

    Here’s a post I wrote with your recipe: makingmilly.com/things-i-dont-buy-anymore-unshopping-list/

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      March 9, 2017

      You’re welcome Milly! Thank you so much for sharing!! 😀

      Reply

  • Moniqa
    October 24, 2016

    Hi just made this recipe…my first jam canning experience but only my 2nd canning experience overall. I’m abt to put them in oven. I also added cinammon. I pureed it in blender after i picked out skins. My nephew who eats vry healthy is gonna be glad cuz i also used pure organic cane sugar. This reminds me of my gramma’s plum jam. Thanx

    Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 24, 2016

      You’re very welcome and I hope you love it! 🙂

      Reply

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