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Russian Hron Horseradish Recipe

Learn how to make you own Russian horseradish (Hron). Hren pairs really well with meat, particularly turkey and it's awesome on any kind of kielbasa.

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So, what is Hrеn (Hron)? Hren means “horseradish” but it refers to a horseradish relish. It pairs really well with meat, particularly turkey and it’s awesome on any kind of kielbasa.

As it is, hren is easy, even if you do cook your own beets.  It’s potent stuff (I guess it depends on whose Hren you try). The one made by Maria for church dinners usually makes your eyes water, just like a nice punch of wasabi!


Ingredients for Russian Hren Horseradish (hron):

1/4 cup  of Cream-style Horseradish (we used extra-hot version, we like it HOT)
2 large beets
1/4 tsp sugar
1 Tbsp vinegar for boiling beets PLUS 1/2 tsp vinegar for final product
3/4 tsp salt for boiling beets PLUS 1/8 tsp salt for final product

Learn how to make you own Russian horseradish (Hron). Hren pairs really well with meat, particularly turkey and it's awesome on any kind of kielbasa.

How to make Russian/ Ukrainian Horseradish Hren:

1.  Place washed beets in the medium pot and cover with enough water to just cover the top of the beets. Add 1 Tbsp vinegar and 3/4 tsp salt to the water and boil about 1 hour, or until beets are easily pierced with a knife (cooking time for beets depends on what kind of beets you have).

Learn how to make you own Russian horseradish (Hron). Hren pairs really well with meat, particularly turkey and it's awesome on any kind of kielbasa.

2. Once beets are done, let them cool to room temperature. Use a plastic bag or gloves to remove skin from beets. If you don’t use gloves, your hands and nails will stain a bright pink. Finely grate beets using fine grater.

Learn how to make you own Russian horseradish (Hron). Hren pairs really well with meat, particularly turkey and it's awesome on any kind of kielbasa.

3. Once beets are grated, add 1/4 tsp sugar, 1/2 tsp vinegar and 1/8 tsp salt and mix. Than add 1/4 cup of horseradish  or to taste. If you like it super HOT, use less of the beets and more horseradish, just make sure you warn your dinner guests.

Learn how to make you own Russian horseradish (Hron). Hren pairs really well with meat, particularly turkey and it's awesome on any kind of kielbasa.

(You can also add more salt, vinegar or sugar to taste).
There you have it.

Russian Hren Horseradish Recipe (Хрен)

5 from 4 votes
Learn how to make you own Russian horseradish (Hron). Hren pairs really well with meat, particularly turkey and it's awesome on any kind of kielbasa.
Author: Natasha of NatashasKitchen.com
Skill Level: Easy
Cost to Make: $5
Servings: 2 cups

Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup of Extra Hot Cream-style Horseradish
  • 2 large beets
  • 1/4 tsp sugar
  • 1 Tbsp vinegar + 1/2 tsp
  • 3/4 tsp salt + 1/8 tsp

Instructions

  1. Place washed beets in the medium pot and cover with enough water cover the top of the beets. Add 1 tbsp vinegar and 3/4 tsp salt to the water and boil about 1 hour, or until beets are easily pierced with a knife.
  2. Cool cooked beets to room temperature. Use gloves to remove skin from beets. Finely grate beets using fine grater.
  3. Once beets are grated, add 1/4 tsp sugar, 1/2 tsp vinegar and 1/8 tsp salt and mix. Than add 1/4 cup of horseradish or to taste. You can also add more salt, vinegar or sugar to taste.

Recipe Notes

Regular Horseradish can be used, just add more.

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natashaskitchen

Welcome to my kitchen! I am Natasha, the blogger behind Natasha's Kitchen (since 2009). My husband and I run this blog together and share only our best, family approved recipes with YOU. Thanks for stopping by! We are so happy you're here.

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Read comments/reviewsAdd comment/review

  • Severian Monk
    December 27, 2018

    We always had this with kolbasa at the Paschal trapedza. Being a vegetarian as an adult I wonder if anyone has suggestions for what it can accompany that does not feature meat. Would it go with bliny and smetana for example? Fish?
    Which reminds me of another matter. On myasopustnaya we used to have a scrumptious but simple parish lunch after Liturgy that consisted mostly of fish solyanka and bliny with faintly sweet pink smetanya. Does anybody know what could be added to the smetanya to colour and flavour it? I’ve thought of grenadine, maraschino cherry juice, cherry extract with sugar and food colouring but I don’t know what is authentic. I am separated by thousands of kilometres and several decades from my childhood parish and there is no one I can ask. Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      December 27, 2018

      I hope some of our readers will share their tips with us! Thank you Severian! Reply

  • Chris J
    December 8, 2018

    My grandmother was Slovak and I have had her horseradish and beets for years. Not that I’m lazy but I started using sweet and sour jarred whole beets. I drain jar keeping liquid just in case. Run the whole beets thru food processor. Then add jarred horseradish (grated) to taste. We like it hot.
    I make this every Christmas and it would be missed if not on our table. Yes it does taste like Gram’s. Try it. MERRY CHRISTMAS!!!! Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      December 8, 2018

      I will have to try that!! I thank you for sharing this with me, Chris! Merry Christmas! Reply

  • Tim from upstate NY
    August 26, 2018

    I just found your site, and I love it so far.
    I found this recipe on another site:
    Russian Khren
    I assume it’s nearly the same as yours since the ingredients are similar.
    I’m going to try making it soon. It looks and sounds great! Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      August 26, 2018

      Hi Tim! I’m so happy you discovered our blog! Welcome! Reply

  • Elizabeth Palamarchuk
    November 20, 2017

    Can I use beets from costco cooked already. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 20, 2017

      Hi Elizabeth, I haven’t tried Costco’s pre-cooked beets (and I have never seen them before in Costco – are they canned?) I think a pre-cooked beet should work fine as long as it doesn’t have too many extra flavorings added that may conflict. Reply

  • liz
    October 2, 2017

    excellent with cabbage rolls and meat balls Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      October 2, 2017

      I’m glad you enjoy the recipe Liz! Reply

  • Evelyn Jepson
    May 9, 2017

    We call our version: Hryn…I use the hot horseradish, drained. 3 bottle of it. We don’t put vinegar or salt in the boiling of the beets. After they have been cooked and peeled, and riced, we add a pickle, consisting of vinegar, salt and pepper and sugar, brought to a boil, and poured into the riced beets, then the horseradish is added, and incorporated into the beet mixture. As mine is distributed around the family, its never really given a hot water bath as its eaten right away. Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      May 10, 2017

      That sounds great Evelyn! Thanks for sharing your tips! 🙂 Reply

  • Jeanette
    September 24, 2016

    Do you need to ‘hot water bath’ this relish if making a large quantity for winter use?
    PS.Thank you for the recipe! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 24, 2016

      Jeanette, we never attempted to can this recipe so I can’t offer any advice on canning. Reply

  • debi roberts
    August 10, 2016

    Just made it as i miss it so much since so far away from Ukranian family.. Love it the only thing i changed was i roasted the beets. Thanks so much and cannot wait to roast up a prime rib roast for sunday dinner. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 10, 2016

      I’m so glad you enjoyed the recipe! 🙂 Reply

  • Carol
    July 14, 2016

    Because I love beets, I just made this.
    Could u give me a few examples on what to serve this with? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 14, 2016

      Hi Carol, it’s really good with turkey meat, any kind of kielbasa or pork meat. Reply

      • Carol
        July 14, 2016

        Thank you, if I find something else it goes with, I will let u know! Reply

    • susan
      August 20, 2016

      i serve this with ham – ham sandwiches pork – goes with any meat like a relish or side – my kids eat it with anything!! It is fabulous couldn’t find my old recipe so used thi one – just as fabulous!! I can 24 jars a year and it isn’t enough as everyone wants some!!! Reply

      • Natasha
        natashaskitchen
        August 20, 2016

        Hi Susan! What method do you use to can/preserve hren? Do you do anything differently in the recipe? Reply

  • cameron
    March 2, 2016

    this is a fabulous condiment but i think the proportions are way out of kilter. more sugar and vinegar and less horeradish for only 2 beets. also it doesn’t cost $5 for these ingredients. less than $1 for sure, maybe around 50 cents depending on what beets are going for. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 3, 2016

      Hi Cameron, have you tried Hron before? It’s supposed to be pretty hot and this is the way we like it, but you could definitely make it more mild to taste. Reply

  • Nat
    March 9, 2012

    Great thanks!
    I hope you get a chance to post a recipe for Ukie sweet bread (Paska), I love all your recipes 🙂 Reply

  • Nat
    March 5, 2012

    Wonderful thanks! I will look into making this to have over Ukrainian Easter. My Ukrainian mum calls this beet & horseradish relish recipe Tsvikla, do you call it Hren?
    Will you be posting a Paska (Ukrainian easter sweet bread) recipe? That would be nice! 🙂 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 6, 2012

      Yes, we call it hren. 🙂 I’ll try to post a sweet bread for Easter, but no guarantees. Life is pretty hairy right now. Reply

      • December 11, 2012

        That is very interesting. In Poland we called it actually “ćwikła z chrzanem” (Tsvikla with hren).
        Ćwikła (Tsvikla) originally meant beetroots, different sorts of them. In Polish “buraki” (beetroots) as a word appeared only in XVIII century. Thus tsvikla nowadays means the beetroot relish but not necessary with the horseradish. Sometimes it depends as well on the region the people are coming from in Poland.
        Chrzan (hren, hron, horseradish) we can eat as well as a condiment (relish) without beetroots, to the sausages, meat or boiled eggs.
        So in Poland you can meet actually three relishes: ćwikła, chrzan and ćwikła z chrzanem 🙂 Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          December 11, 2012

          I’d love to learn more about Poland; especially recipes. I’m looking forward to seeing more recipes on your blog (I checked it out this morning!) 🙂 Keep up the great work! Reply

  • Nat
    March 5, 2012

    Thanks for letting me know.
    I am unable to buy those beautiful large beets in your picture, shall I use 3 beets the size of apples? Do you think that 3 teaspoons of cream style horesradish will ok with the 3 apple sized beets? 🙂 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 5, 2012

      Yes, regular beets will work just fine. My mom just planted some long ones. You can add the horseradish to taste. Some people like it stronger, some like it less strong. Start with 2 teaspoons and work your way up. I think 3 teaspoons will have a nice kick to it 🙂 Reply

  • Nat
    March 5, 2012

    Can this also be canned & preserved or do you refrigerate this after it is made? If so how long will it last in the fridge? Thanks Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 5, 2012

      I refrigerate it after it’s cooked. I’m not sure if it can be preserved. I’ve never tested it. It was all gone in less than 2 weeks. But yes, it can last over a week. Reply

  • Tanya
    May 4, 2011

    Is this the kind of hren you eat with holodets or no? Reply

    • Natasha
      May 4, 2011

      My husband says, “yes” Reply

      • Tanya
        May 6, 2011

        Oh ok thanks 🙂 Never tried holodets with hren before. Does your family eat holodets? Reply

  • Lisa
    March 1, 2011

    We always use canned beets, so we can make it in a flash. Our side of the family is always in charge of the Hren. We have found that the creamy horseradish works best with ham and prime rib. This is a favorite of ours at Christmas and Easter! Reply

  • Joe in N Calif
    December 24, 2010

    God is with us! Understand all ye nations and submit yourselves, for God is with us!

    For unto us a Child is born, unto us a Son is given; and the government will be upon His shoulder. And His name will be called Wonderful, Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace.

    A happy and blessed Christmas to you all. Reply

  • Joe in N Calif
    December 22, 2010

    Canned beets will work. Make sure you get the plain ones. The texture will be a bit different though.

    What variety of beets are those in the photos? I have never seen any that look like them. Well….the truck loads of sugar beets. Reply

    • Natasha
      December 22, 2010

      My mom grew those this year, they are the deepest red beets I’ve ever seen. I have no idea what they are called but they are her favorite variety. I’ll have to ask her. Reply

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