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Russian Piroshki (pirojki) with apples

Piroshki are a classic Slavic specialty. You can make these Russian Piroshki with fruit, mashed potatoes, meat or cheese. These have apples in them.

Piroshki are a classic Russian/ Ukrainian specialty. You can make them with fruit, mashed potatoes, meat or cheese. These have apples in them.

Make these on a warm day when you can open your windows and air out the house; unless you like the “fried” aroma. These fluffy goodies are delicious and get devoured quickly.

Ingredients for the Russian Piroshki Dough:

1 1/2 Tbsp oil
15 oz luke warm water
4 cups + 2 Tbsp all-purpose flour (divided)
1 tsp salt
1 Tbsp Active Dry Yeast
1 Tbsp sugar (omit sugar if doing meat or potato filling)

Ingredients for Russian Pirozhki Filling:

2 to 3 apples, peeled, cored and chopped finely (I use a food processor and pulse several times)
1/4 cup sugar (1/4 teaspoon per piroshok)

Other Ingredients:

Enough canola oil to go half-way up the side of the piroshky when frying.
Extra flour to dust the cutting board.

How to make the Dough:

1. The easiest way to do this is in a bread maker. If you have one, set it to the dough setting and add the ingredients in the following order: Oil, water, 2 cups flour, salt, sugar, 2 cups + 2 Tbsp flour* , yeast.
A bread maker will do the following: mix, let dough rise, mix again and let the dough rise (about 1 to 1 1/2 hours)

*to get an flour exact measurement, use a dry ingredients measuring cup and scrape off the top with the back of a butter knife.

You can also make this dough using a stand mixer with a dough hook and then letting it rise in a warm place (like the oven).

2. Put the finished dough onto a well floured cutting board, sprinkle dough with flour and with well-floured hands, shape it into a large log. It will rise more as it sits on the board.

3. Cut off pieces one at a time about 3/4″ thick.

4. Place the piece of dough over your well-floured hand (dough will be sticky) and shape it into a 3″ to 4″ circle using your hands. Do not put flour on the side where you are going to put the apples, otherwise the sides won’t seal.

5. Put 1/4 tsp sugar in the center of the dough and put 1 heaping Tbsp of apple over the sugar. cover the apple with the sides of the dough and pinch the ends together with your fingers to seal the dough together.

6. Flatten the pirojki slightly to make them a more uniform size.

6. Heat oil in a large, deep, heavy-bottomed pan. There should be enough oil to cover the pirojki half-way up the side.

7. Place them in the hot oil (about 330°F) and fry until deep golden brown on each side. They should sizzle when you put them in the oil. Sometimes they puff up a lot on one side so you may end up with a third side that needs to be fried.

8. Place on paper towels to cool and enjoy!

Russian Piroshki (pirojki) with apples - Пирожки

5 from 7 votes
Prep Time: 2 hours
Cook Time: 15 minutes
Total Time: 2 hours 15 minutes
Piroshki are a classic Slavic specialty. You can make these Russian Piroshki with fruit, mashed potatoes, meat or cheese. These have apples in them.
Author: Natasha of NatashasKitchen.com
Skill Level: Medium
Cost to Make: $3-$4
Servings: 15 -20 piroshki

Ingredients

Ingredients for the Dough:

  • 1 1/2 Tbsp oil
  • 15 oz luke warm water
  • 4 cups + 2 Tbsp all-purpose flour divided
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 Tbsp Active Dry Yeast
  • 1 Tbsp sugar omit sugar if doing meat or potato filling
  • 2 to 3 apples peeled, cored and chopped finely (I use a food processor and pulse several times)
  • 1/4 cup sugar 1/4 teaspoon per piroshok

Other Ingredients:

  • Enough canola oil to go half-way up the side of the piroshky when frying.
  • Extra flour to dust the cutting board.

Instructions

The easiest way to do this is in a bread maker.

  1. If you have one, set it to the dough setting and add the ingredients in the following order: Oil, water, 2 cups flour, salt, sugar, 2 cups + 2 Tbsp flour* , yeast.
  2. A bread maker will do the following: mix, let dough rise, mix again and let the dough rise (about 1 to 1 1/2 hours).
  3. Put the finished dough onto a well floured cutting board, sprinkle dough with flour and with well-floured hands, shape it into a large log. It will rise more as it sits on the board.
  4. Cut off pieces one at a time about 3/4" thick. Place the piece of dough over your well-floured hand (dough will be sticky) and shape it into a 3" to 4" circle using your hands. Do not put flour on the side where you are going to put the apples, otherwise the sides won't seal.
  5. Put 1/4 tsp sugar in the center of the dough and put 1 heaping Tbsp of apple over the sugar. cover the apple with the sides of the dough and pinch the ends together with your fingers to seal the dough together. Flatten the pirojki slightly to make them a more uniform size.
  6. Heat oil in a large, deep, heavy-bottomed pan. There should be enough oil to cover the pirojki half-way up the side.
  7. Place them in the hot oil (about 330°F) and fry until deep golden brown on each side. They should sizzle when you put them in the oil. Sometimes they puff up a lot on one side so you may end up with a third side that needs to be fried.

Place on paper towels to cool and enjoy!

Recipe Notes

To get an flour exact measurement, use a dry ingredients measuring cup and scrape off the top with the back of a butter knife. You can also make this dough using a stand mixer with a dough hook and then letting it rise in a warm place (like the oven).

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Welcome to my kitchen! I am Natasha, the blogger behind Natasha's Kitchen (since 2009). My husband and I run this blog together and share only our best, family approved recipes with YOU. Thanks for stopping by! We are so happy you're here.

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  • Amy Thistlethwaite
    February 21, 2018

    Can this dish be served at room temp/cold or should they be served once cooled from cooking? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 21, 2018

      Amy, they taste great right after, when still warm. I like them warm best but room temperature is great as well. Reply

      • Amy Thistlethwaite
        February 21, 2018

        Thanks a bunch Reply

  • Inna
    October 14, 2017

    Hi Natasha, this recipe is really good. Thank you. I was wondering if you can post a recipe for a dough without the yeast to make piroshki. I have tried to make it in a few different ways, but wanted to know if there is one that is really good. I like all your recipes, so I would definitely try it if you found one. Thank you in advance. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 14, 2017

      Hi Inna, if I come across something great, I will share it, but my piroshki doughs all are yeast doughs. Reply

  • February 2, 2017

    Hello Natasha,
    I could not find out another way of contacting you, so I did it here.
    Have you ever eaten piroshki’s at Piroshki Piroshki in Downtown Seattle?
    I am trying to replicate their version of Sweet white chocolate and cherry Piroshok without success. Any advice in terms of recipe for the yeast dough part? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 3, 2017

      Hi Ira, I haven’t tried it but I do have excellent recipes for piroshki dough (both baked and fried) that my readers really love :). Reply

      • Ira
        February 4, 2017

        thank you! it seems that it will yield a lot of dough, can it be frozen and used later ( I mean the dough for the baked piroshki?) Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          February 6, 2017

          HI Ira, I haven’t tried freezing the dough, but I do think it’s best used the same day it’s made. Also, if you wanted to cut the dough in half, it’s easy to do. I used basically the same dough as for baked piroshki to make my overnight cinnamon rolls and I have the recipe cut in half. That should help you figure it out if you wanted to make half the recipe 🙂 Reply

  • Julia
    October 30, 2016

    Hey… I was wondering can I make a rylet with this dough recipe? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 1, 2016

      Hi Julia, this dough is really intended for frying rather than baking. I have several baked pirojki recipes that might work for roulette, however here is the dough I do use for roulette currently. Reply

  • Angella
    June 13, 2016

    Hi natasha.. I want to make these but i only have fresh yeast how much do u think i should use ?? Thnx Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      June 14, 2016

      Hi Angella, I haven’t tried using fresh yeast and generally don’t buy it because of the short shelf life but as a general rule of thumb, with fresh yeast, use 1/3 the amount of active dry yeast. So for this recipe if your yeast is not expired, use 1 tsp of fresh yeast. Reply

  • Ksenia
    February 6, 2016

    Natasha, what do you think about baking them to make these more healthy? Would you change the dough recipe at all?

    Also do you by any chance have a good recipe for “rassipnoe testo”? Like dough that’s sweet that you can bake the apples into (from this recipe)? Thanks sooooo much in advance for answering. I have cooked so many of your recipes and many have turned out soooo awesome. :))) Reply

  • Glaucia Torres
    August 20, 2015

    Hi Natasha,

    These look so yummy! I’m from Sao Paulo, Brazil and when I was a child we had an Ukrainian neighbor that taught my grandmother how to make the meat baked pirojkis. Years later and even as my grandmother passed, my family keeps baking pirojkis as if it is our own traditional recipe :)…I’ll start following your site for more recipes. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 20, 2015

      That’s wonderful that you adopted the recipe into your family! Welcome to my blog and I hope you find many new favorite recipes! Reply

  • July 29, 2014

    Natasha, is this the same dough for the ponchiks filled with vanilla custard? Reply

  • kate
    July 21, 2014

    can i use strawberry instead of apple filling? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 22, 2014

      I haven’t experimented with strawberries, but apples are more firm and hold their texture without getting too mushy. Reply

  • Anya Braginsky
    March 6, 2014

    If one does not have a bread maker, then how would we proceed with the first few steps??? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 6, 2014

      You can do the same steps in a KitchenAid mixer; You’d follow the same process as the bread maker would. Using a dough hook, knead the dough until it forms nicely then let dough rise in a warm place covered with plastic wrap until doubled in volume, mix again and let the dough rise untouched until 2 1/2 to 3 times in volume (about 1 to 1 1/2 hours) in a warm place, covered with plastic wrap. I hope that makes sense 🙂 Reply

  • Maria Haxton
    January 4, 2014

    My goodness, or should I say my ” FOODNESS” lol…fantastic recipe.. We call it piroshki…ponchiki are the donuts…I tried your baked piroshki too today, and they are beyond words….fantastic!!! Thank you!!! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 4, 2014

      You are welcome Maria and thank you for a good review :). Reply

      • Maria Haxton
        January 5, 2014

        Natasha, your recipes are all wonderful and it is so nice to have them available!!! Thank you for all the hard work! 🙂 Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          January 5, 2014

          You’re so very welcome. Thank you for your sweet comment 🙂 Reply

  • Veranika
    October 24, 2013

    I just made piroshki. They turned out soooo good. I made them with kapusta (sauerkraut). Now just have to exercise self and portion control as with any of the ukrainian food. Its hard not to eat too much of it. 😉 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 24, 2013

      I totally understand where you are coming from Veranika :). Reply

  • Inna
    September 4, 2013

    Hi!! These pirojki look amazing, gotta get a bread maker from my mother!! Do you have any Sharlotka recipe? its a russian cake made with apples! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 4, 2013

      I’ve tried a couple of times and the recipes I used didn’t turn out the way I had hoped. It’s still a work in progress. Do you happen to have an awesome one? 🙂 Reply

    • Veranika
      October 24, 2013

      I have a very good “sharlotka”recipe. Its also called apple short cake.
      3 or 4 big apples peeled and diced
      6 eggs
      1 cup sifted flour
      1 cup sugar
      Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Butter the glass baking dish.
      Beat eggs with sugar on high speed until white peeks are formed.
      Gradually fold in sifted flour.
      Spread the diced apples even in the dish.(be generous, the more, the better in this case)
      Pour the batter over the apples.
      Bake about 45 min until golden.
      I like to put it to broil for about 3 min at the end to get the
      beautiful crispy top.
      Happy cooking 😉 Reply

      • Natasha
        natashaskitchen
        October 25, 2013

        I’ve been looking for a good one! Thank you so much! What kind of apples did you use? How big was your baking dish? Do you just dust the top with powdered sugar? Can’t wait to try this out! Thanks a gazillion!! 🙂 Reply

        • Veranika
          October 25, 2013

          You can use any kind of apples. Even the ones that are on the softer side, and nobody wants to eat them any more, would taste amazing when baked. I use the same baking dish that I would use for lasagna, I believe its 9×13
          If you’re to serve sharlotka hot don’t put the powdered sugar on the top it will melt and ruin the crusty top . If you going to serve it cold, yes powdered sugar is perfect, sprinkle right before serving, not ahead of time cause it melts in a refrigerator too. Try it, you’ll love it. Reply

          • Natasha
            natashaskitchen
            October 25, 2013

            Thank you so much! 🙂

  • Olga
    August 23, 2013

    Natasha,

    How long did it take you to learn to make these perfectly?

    I love how they taste but i keep messing up! 😀 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 23, 2013

      Which part are you struggling with? Filling them? sealing? Making the dough? Reply

  • Olga
    July 29, 2013

    oh my goodness…. eating my second one. so good!!!! i made them with blueberries. yummers. thank you! cant wait for my hubby to try these 🙂 you make me look like a great cook!lol Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 29, 2013

      You are welcome Olga, you just made me crave some :). Reply

  • kat
    February 22, 2013

    Natasha, thank you SO MUCH!!! I was always intimidated by dough made with yeast. I just finished making my first pirogki. They are almost like these “15 kopeek” ones, even better! I don’t own a bread machine, so knelled in my KitchenAid mixer, then proofed 2 times 2.5 hours total, then fried on medium. I have 2 hints to share: try to use a little oil instead of flour while forming pirogki; start closing pirogok center first then work toward both ends. Did I say I LOVE your blog? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 22, 2013

      Thanks for sharing your tip; I’ll try that next time. So glad you conquered your dough fears 😉 Reply

  • Ira
    January 24, 2013

    Your welcome. Enjoy Reply

  • Ira
    January 23, 2013

    Hi Natasha,
    I have really good recipe for baking piroshki. Its my husbands and kids favorite I make them almost every weekend.

    I make dough in bread maker.
    2 cups warm milk
    1.5 tbsp butter
    3 eggs
    1/2 cup sugar
    3 tsp Active Dry Yeast
    1 tsp salt
    5 cups all-purpose flour

    After You add flour when it starts mixing you have check and make sure the dough is not too soft if its soft You can add more flour.

    For the apple filling I cook and drain some of the juice if You don’t do that when You bake them it will be BIG mess all apple juice will be all over piroshki.
    Brush the top with egg.
    Before placing them in oven let them rise (let stand for at least 30 mins). Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 23, 2013

      Wow I just printed your recipe. Thank you so much for sharing. I love that you make them in the bread maker. Sounds really convenient and not too complicated. Thank you!! Reply

  • Svetlana
    October 13, 2012

    Just wanted to add my two cents. I don’t own a bread maker or standing mixer and this is how I do it. I soak yeast in a bit or lukewarm milk( i don’t think using either milk or water makes a big difference) and a tsp of sugar. I do it till it forms a foam on top of the milk, this way it ensures it will work well. I mix liquid ingridients into the dry ones in a big glass salad bowl and knit it down just like a bread dough. I smudge the bowl with more oil so the dough doesn’t stick when rises to the bowl. Btw you can also use olive or any vegetable oil instead of flour when you shape pirojki so the dough won’t stick, just be carefull not to get any oil on the inside, or they won’t stick. I put the plug in a sink, then fill it with hot water so it comes to about half or more to the sides of the bowl. Then I put the cover on the bowl and cover the sink with big towel and thats it. Let it sit for about an hour , then knit it down and repeat. I add boiling cattle to ensure the water stays nice and warm throthought the rising process . Generally you can let the dough rise two or three times. I think the more you let it rise the more airy the dough will be.
    You can bake or fry pirojki, but personally the apple ones way better fried then baked. I think they more juicy and tastier the “bad” way, same goes for meat. The cabbage and mash potatoes and fried onions fillings are good both ways. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 13, 2012

      Thank you for sharing Svetlana. I love the tip about using the hot water in the sink to let the dough rise, this speeds up the process :). Reply

  • megan
    September 17, 2012

    can you use canadian flour instead of all purpose flour? thanks Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 17, 2012

      I haven’t tested it, but it should work fine. Reply

  • NatashaM
    July 29, 2012

    I am about to try cooking these for my family as I have just started learning Russian and decided to cook a Russian meal for my family and was wondering if you were supposed to coat them with sugar or anything else after frying them. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 29, 2012

      It’s not necessary to coat them with anything 🙂 Reply

  • Danielle
    June 3, 2012

    I am looking for a baked version of an apple filled piroshki. One more bit to the request, I am looking for a piroshki dough resipe (for the baked version) that is gluten free. Yes, a tricky request perhaps but my daughter is rather ill, must avoid all gluten, but loved piroshki, sigh. Any ideas or pointers would be terrific. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      June 3, 2012

      Oh that is a tough question. I haven’t experimented with a gluten free version so I don’t have a good answer for you, but I’ll toss it around in my head and will let you know if I come up with anything. Reply

      • Danielle
        June 5, 2012

        Thanks. I was also wondering if adding raisins to the apple filling was all that common? Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          June 5, 2012

          I’ve never had them that way so I’m not sure how common it is. If you try it with raisins, let me know what you think. Reply

          • Danielle
            June 6, 2012

            Raisins soaked for a few hours in a mix of vanilla extract and hot water adds a delicious full flavor. I also added almonds lightly toasted with a pad of butter and some granular sugar. These are so good.

          • Natasha
            natashaskitchen
            June 6, 2012

            Oh yumm!! Wow that sounds like an amazing mixture!

    • Ana
      December 5, 2014

      Hi Danielle, I know you asked this question a loooong time ago haha, but I decided to respond just in case it will help, because sometimes this information can be hard to find. I’ve done a lot of experimenting with gluten free stuff, and have found that the best equivalent to regular flour is a high quality gluten free oat flour + xanthan gum. The xanthan gum helps to duplicate what the gluten would normally do in a recipe so that you get the right texture in most baked goods. You can find it online if you can’t find it in stores. Some health food stores carry it. You want to use about 1/4 tsp of xanthan gum for 1 cup of gluten free flour. This works for most recipes. Unfortunately, without gluten, most yeast dough recipes will not rise without another leavening agent, so you might have to do some more research on that. Hopefully this will help in your experimenting. It’s really really hard to suddenly change your diet and not be able to eat beloved foods, but with a bit of diligence, equivalent recipes can be found/invented! 😀 I wish you and your daughter all the best. Reply

  • Tanya
    May 30, 2012

    Hi 🙂
    Do you by any chance know how to make bulochki? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 31, 2012

      Hi Tanya,
      Please describe the kind of bulochki you are looking for. I might call them something else. You know how Russian food goes; i.e. blinchiki, oladi, etc.. 🙂 Reply

  • March 28, 2012

    Is it ok if I will be using warm milk instead of warm water? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 28, 2012

      I haven’t tried it with milk so I’m not sure how it would change the recipe. Sorry that’s not much help. If you do try it, let me know how it works out. I’m very curious now! Reply

      • March 29, 2012

        I come back with the result! Hihi…, it’s ok to use milk. Nothing’s went wrong. Because I didn’t want to waste if went wrong, so I divide by 4 ur recipe, I got 6 of Piroshki, and I wanted for morrreee! 😀 Absolutely recommended recipe! Yummy! Thanks again Natasha, you’re the best! 🙂 Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          March 29, 2012

          Good to know! I’ll try it next time!! Thank you so much! Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          March 29, 2012

          I didn’t realize your were on Twitter! Looking forward to following your tweets! Reply

  • Julia
    March 6, 2012

    So I tried baking these piroshki and it turned out very well. I did the recipe without the sugar and had meat inside it. 350* for 30 min (until they were golden brown). Hope it helps! Reply

  • Viktoriya
    January 20, 2012

    What kind of food processor do you have? I’m in the market for one, but there’s so many different kinds and they range from $40-$100, not sure which is the best… Reply

  • Vladimir Iyerusalimets
    December 4, 2011

    I am trying my mom’s recipe right now. I will find out how it goes and i will take some pictures of the product itself. it is in the oven baking (Apple filled piroshki’s ) 🙂
    I will let you know how the result is, since i heard you are looking for a good baked piroshki recipe.
    -vlad Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 5, 2011

      That’s wonderful; thank you! I hope they turn out great :-)!!! Please let me know. Reply

      • vlad
        November 26, 2012

        Hi natasha, its been a really long time. I just want to let you know, the recipe did not turn out as great as i had hoped.. the piroshkis turned out very hard, i think it was in the way i prepared it. because whenever my mom made them they were always soft. I will continue to try and update you if anything changes. Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          November 26, 2012

          Really? I’ve made this countless times with all kinds of fillings and they’ve always been super soft. Did you do something different from the instructions? Reply

  • Yana
    September 29, 2011

    The best flour to use, i;ve learnd is King Arthur all purpose flour (red/white pack) which they only sell at publix 🙂 just a tip. Reply

  • Lenora
    September 7, 2011

    Love your site. It is so nice to see pride in old country recipes and to have a record of them.

    It’s been a long time since I have had apple pirohy. My Mom used to make hers with a yeast dough,a bit of sugar and the shredded apple, but she baked them. When they were removed from the oven she would spoon a syrup over them. The syrup was (I think) just sugar and water that had been heated. I have tried unsuccessfully to find her recipe and she can no longer remember how to make them. Reply

    • Natasha
      September 8, 2011

      Hi Lenora, Unfortunately I don’t have a good recipe for baked pirohy 🙁 If you find one, please let me know. Reply

  • Mark
    August 13, 2011

    Hi Natasha!

    My name is Mark from Brooklyn, NY…near Brighton Beach, which is known as “Little Odessa”..My family was born in southern Ukraine and I am first generation American. Thank you for this wonderful and resourceful website that is helping me reconnect to my childhood all over again. I have just one quick question with this and other dough recipes you make. Since I’m using a stand mixer, how long should I mix the dough for and how long should it rest? Do you let the dough rest twice? Thanks for any help you can provide and keep up the great work on this site! Reply

    • Natasha
      August 14, 2011

      I’ve never timed it that way before so I can’t give you very accurate time frames (and it’s been a long time since I’ve tried that route) I find that the breadmaker is easiest and seems to have the best results. I’ll try the mixer method next time and will try to give you more exact instructions. Reply

  • Julia
    May 26, 2011

    Privet,
    If I am doing the dough hook option, do I add the ingredients for the dough in the same order as the bread maker? Reply

  • Wilma
    April 2, 2011

    Thank You, Natasha!!! I’ve been looking for this recipe for a very long time. My baba also used to make them when I was a kid, but I remember the filling was made with beef liver and onions and thyme, they were delicious. She also used to fry them. I wish I could remember what else she added to that filling. I will try them soon!!! Reply

    • Natasha
      April 2, 2011

      You’re very welcome. I love hearing stories like that. It’s part of the reason I’m making this site, so my children and grandchildren will have a resource to make what “baba” used to make. And it has loads of my mom’s and my husbands mom’s recipes. 🙂 Thank you for your comment Wilma! Reply

  • Anastasia
    January 9, 2011

    So I made piroshki and they are not complicated :)) I guess I used to think that they were because I would watch my grandma when i was younger make the dough and it looked like so much work. But you have definitely inspired me 🙂 Reply

  • Tina
    December 14, 2010

    Can you use veg. oil? Reply

  • stephanie
    November 18, 2010

    OMG!! I’ve been looking for this recipe. TY so much for posting it. My baba used to make these when I was a kid. Except she would grate the apples instead. How many does this recipe make? Reply

    • Natasha
      November 18, 2010

      Hi Stephanie, You’re welcome! I hope they taste the way you remember them. It makes 15-20 pirojki. Reply

  • Ester
    October 29, 2010

    What kind of flour do u use?:) Reply

  • Alenka
    October 5, 2010

    these are yummy!! Reply

  • Lisa
    August 25, 2010

    The recipe doesn’t have the OVEN TEMPERATURE AND HOW LONG? I bake it with 250F and it takes 2 hours to bake and hard like stone. It doesn’t taste good! Reply

    • Natasha
      August 25, 2010

      I never tried baking them. I fry them in hot oil (steps 6 & 7) in the recipe. Reply

  • Marina
    July 26, 2010

    he thank you so much for the recipe, if you have a recipe for holodets, or cabage with rice, please send it to my email, “marinaleksandrovna@yahoo.com Reply

    • marine abrahamian
      June 16, 2011

      Hi, Marina
      I do have a recipe for holodets & cabage with rice ( if it is what i think it is). Your e-mail is 1 year old. let me know if you get it from some one else. Reply

  • Natalia K
    March 4, 2010

    These look good (we call them ponchiki–piroshki are the ones baked in the oven)–never tried them with apple, but I love them with jam or meat or mashed peas. I’ve never made these, so I’ll have to try this recipe. I’ll let you know how it turns out! Reply

    • Natasha
      August 25, 2010

      We always called these piroshki growing up. I thought ponchiki were more like doughnuts. Reply

    • don
      November 27, 2010

      do you have a recipe for baked piroshki with mashed peas? I haven’t tasted one in 60 years. Reply

      • Natasha
        November 27, 2010

        I don’t. I’m sorry. I only make the fried ones but ill definitely post it if I can get my hands on a good recipe Reply

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