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Selyodka Recipe (Pickled Herring or Trout)

If you've never tried this Selyodka recipe, you're missing out. You could compare it to Italian anchovies. It's strangely good and really easy to make.

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In an effort to take you on a trip down memory lane, I present to you; selyodka. Don’t laugh. I feel brave posting this. Are you a selyodka lover??

My husband went fishing with my parents this week and brought home the limit of large, beautiful trout. We baked some, smoked a bunch, made silodka, gave some away, and froze the rest. If you’ve never tried this, you’re missing out. I guess you could compare it to Italian anchovies.

If this is new to you, just be aware that your family might look at you like you’re crazy. Politely tell them “it is colturrol egsperrience”(in your best Russian accent; rolling your r’s of course), and calmly continue eating your fish. I can just see you now. Ha ha.

I do like silodka particularly with some fresh homemade bread. It’s strangely good and really easy to make.

Ingredients for selyodka:

2-4 lbs trout, herring, or salmon (we used trout here), gutted, washed (no need to de-scale)
2 medium onions, sliced
1 cup grape seed oil or canola oil

For the Marinade:

4 cups water
1 cup salt
1/2 cup sugar
1 Tbsp coriander
1 Tbsp pepper corns
5-7 bay leaves

Pickled Selyodka Recipe (pickled fish)-10

How to Make Selyodka:

1. Bring 4 cups water to a boil, then remove from heat. Add the rest of the marinade ingredients (1 cup salt, 1/2 cup sugar, 1 Tbsp coriander, 1 Tbsp pepper corns and 5-7 bay leaves). Stir to dissolve the salt and sugar, then cool to room temp (set it outside if it’s cold).

selyodka-recipe

2. Slice trout into 1-inch steaks, you can cut your steaks in half if you wish. Discard heads and tails. Place fish in a large bowl.

Pour marinade over the fish steaks, weigh it down with a plate to make sure fish is submerged in the brine, then cover and refrigerate (or put in the garage if it’s very cold out) for 12-14 hours. (We let it marinate in the fridge for 12 hours).

selyodka-recipe-1

3. Remove fish steaks from the marinade and place them in a jar, stacking them tightly with layers of onion in between. Pour in enough oil to fill the spaces and cover the fish. The oil will keep it moist and presentable. Keep refrigerated.

Pickled Selyodka Recipe (pickled fish)-4

Pickled Selyodka Recipe (pickled fish)-2-2

Pickled Selyodka Recipe (pickled fish)-9

selyodka-recipe-2

So, do you eat selyodka?

Selyodka Recipe (European Pickled Fish)

5 from 10 votes
Prep Time: 12 hours
Total Time: 12 hours
If you've never tried this Selyodka recipe, you're missing out. You could compare it to Italian anchovies. It's strangely good and really easy to make.
In an effort to take you on a trip down memory lane, I present to you; selyodka. If you've never tried this, you're missing out. I guess you could compare it to Italian anchovies. If this is new to you, just be aware that your family might look at you like you're crazy. Politely tell them "it is colturrol egsperrience"(in your best Russian accent; rolling your r's ofcourse), and calmly continue eating your fish. I can just see you now. Ha ha. I do like silodka particularly with some fresh homemade bread. It's strangely good and really easy to make.
Author: Natasha of NatashasKitchen.com
Skill Level: Easy
Cost to Make: $Varies by fish price (we caught our fish so it was free)
Servings: 6 -12

Ingredients

  • 2-4 lbs trout herring or salmon (we used trout this time) gutted, washed (no need to de-scale)
  • 2 medium onions sliced
  • 1 cup grape seed oil or canola oil
  • For the Marinade:
  • 4 cups water
  • 1 cup salt
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1 Tbsp coriander
  • 1 Tbsp pepper corns
  • 5-7 bay leaves

Instructions

  1. Bring 4 cups water to a boil, then remove from heat. Add the rest of the marinade ingredients (1 cup salt, 1/2 cup sugar, 1 Tbsp coriander, 1 Tbsp pepper corns and 5-7 bay leaves). Stir to dissolve the salt and sugar, then cool to room temp (set it outside if it's cold).
  2. Slice fish into 1-inch steaks (discard heads and tails) you can cut your steaks in half if you wish. Place fish in a large bowl. Pour marinade over the fish steaks, weigh it down with a plate to make sure fish is submerged in the brine, then cover and refrigerate (or put in the garage if it's very cold out) for 12-14 hours. (We let it marinate in the fridge for 12 hours).
  3. Remove fish steaks from the marinade and place them in a jar, stacking them tightly with layers of onion in between. Pour in enough oil to fill the spaces and cover the fish. The oil will keep it moist and presentable. Keep refrigerated.

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natashaskitchen

Welcome to my kitchen! I am Natasha, the blogger behind Natasha's Kitchen (since 2009). My husband and I run this blog together and share only our best, family approved recipes with YOU. Thanks for stopping by! We are so happy you're here.

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Read comments/reviewsAdd comment/review

  • Olga
    June 27, 2018

    Very delicious and easy to prepareπŸ˜‹Thank you for the recipe! Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      June 27, 2018

      You’re welcome! I’m so glad you enjoyed it! Reply

  • Olha
    June 27, 2018

    Very delicious and easy to prepare πŸ˜‹Thank you for the recipe! Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      June 27, 2018

      Thank you for the wonderful review, Olha! Reply

  • Lena
    September 26, 2016

    Hello Natasha, thank you for the easy recipe! I have made that marinade twice already with trout, but the fish turns out to be a little too salty. IF salt and sugar haven’t dissolved all the way, would that make it salty?
    Also, is the marinade for 2 or 4 pounds of trout? Do you weigh with heads and tails or without?
    Thanks a lot for your time and your recipes!! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 26, 2016

      Hi Lena, you do want both the salt and sugar to disolve before putting it on the fish to ensure it’s evenly distributed over the fish and doesn’t concentrate in spots. We’ve done it with 2 lbs and 4 lbs – you just have more marinade but it penetrates and flavors the fish the same way. I hope that helps! I weighed the fish without the heads. Reply

  • Elena
    August 23, 2016

    Love all your recipes. I was wondering if I could use mackerel instead of trout. Thank you for your response in advance Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 23, 2016

      Yes!! It will be even better! This is the most common fish used for selyodka in Ukraine πŸ™‚ Reply

  • Natasha Vyakhk
    May 31, 2016

    Hello, my husband and I went fishing this weekend and caught some shad that we will use to make seliyodka. I was wondering how long can it stay in the refrigerator before it gets old and I need to throw it away? We have a large quantity of fish so I wonder if I could marinate a lot of it or if I should freeze some and then use it later. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 31, 2016

      Hi Natasha it should be fine for up to 3 months or so if refrigerated. The salt preserves it pretty well. If you have more than you have room to refrigerate, you might consider freezing it. Reply

  • karolina
    March 31, 2016

    Hi Natasha, quick question, everytime we would salted fish we just used salt and fish put tightly in jar, squish with something heavy and only in 3 says we were allowed to eat. Your recipe calls for only 12 hours. kinda questions me if it is ganna be ready to eat..?? Thanks πŸ˜‰ Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 31, 2016

      Maybe because your method is different? With the amount of salt and sugar in the marinade, it’s ready after 12 hours. You can let it sit longer and it’s still great after a week in the fridge, so you can do that if it makes you feel better about it πŸ™‚ Reply

  • Leonid Garder
    March 24, 2016

    I am Russian-born, and always loved the way mama made her selyodka. Your recipe sounds pretty much the way she made it.

    My whole family was also heavily involved in a Ukrainian parish in NYC – for about 10 years. I was choir master during that time, and loved the entire experience, from the singing, to the food, to the folk dancing. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 24, 2016

      Wow that does sound like an amazing cultural experience! Thank you for sharing that story with us :). I hope this selyodka brings back great memories for you πŸ™‚ Reply

  • Georgette
    December 30, 2015

    I realize this is an old post, but I do have a few questions…

    First, after you put them in the jar with the onions and oil, how long does the fish stay in there? Does it need to be refrigerated in the oil?

    Can you remove the scales if you want to? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 30, 2015

      Hi Georgette, you can remove the scales if you want to. Also, yes, refrigerate the fish in oil (I’ve updated the recipe to include that!) Great questions! πŸ™‚ Reply

  • Natalie
    September 12, 2015

    I’m not trying to be rude I love your site and recipes but do you know thay silodka is a species of fish. So you can’t make silodka from another fish lol. Silodka is herring. You can’t make salmon from carp. This is marinated or brined trout Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 12, 2015

      I guess I’ve just always referred to it as silodka. I use the word as a verb! πŸ˜‰ Oh well. Reply

      • Joseph
        September 27, 2019

        great answer Natasha .aya know ya rite a recipe ,its your recipe if folks want change it to their recipe than they haven’t tried yours ,, pickled herring I can buy that trout I can’t I know this rude post was 4 years ago ,,,,and just packing in salt is for storage tons were stored in oak barrels carried on wood ships from America to Europe and ,they were rinsed before putting into many eastern recipes and salted dried cod hey Italy. yum ya done good oh Im gonna try this with cat fish and still call it SILODKA Reply

  • olga
    July 5, 2015

    Thank you for the best recipe!!!!!
    πŸ™‚ Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 5, 2015

      You are welcome Olga, enjoy :). Reply

  • Evelina
    April 20, 2015

    Thanks for posting this! My fiance is a big fishing guy and he’ll love that I know how to make it πŸ˜‰ Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 20, 2015

      You’re so welcome. I hope you both love it! πŸ™‚ Reply

  • Anastasia
    February 14, 2015

    Thank you is much for this easy recepie! We just got back from kayak fishing fri. The ocean. So I have tried this with mackerel. Super delishious. The only thing is Mackerels skin is faster perishable, so I recommend after marinating, peel the skin off. I does comes off like butter πŸ™‚ thanks again, brings back memories. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 14, 2015

      Thanks for sharing your mackerel tip! That sounds great with mackerel! πŸ™‚ Reply

  • Marilyn Z
    November 7, 2014

    Now I feel a tad ashamed of myself. My Russian friend from New Zealand left this a.m. and yesterday she made sushi with wild salmon. She had brined it with sugar & salt etc for 24 hours and said she was going to put it in sushi. I protested and asked her to please cook it first. I thought it should be brined for at least three days. Her sushi was fabulous, but the salmon was definitely cooked.

    I did try their herring and found it to be a bit slimy..think I need to stick with my kippers.

    I am definitely going to try this recipe…looks interesting. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 7, 2014

      I imagine brining is safer than just using raw fish unless it just jumped out of the ocean; but I’m afraid of raw fish anyways. I’m not a big fan of herring either. This fish recipe is definitely not slimy πŸ™‚ Reply

  • guest
    September 30, 2014

    Yum!!!!
    This is my and my husbands favorite food!!(we dont eat much meat, but lots.of fish!!)
    I got three fresh trout at sams club for like $8… And er were hoping to make oir own selyodka so we wont have to buy it at the russian store.
    Can i cut it into fillets to marinate it?
    Do i really need the sugar? ( i dont want my.fish to taste sweet)
    Thanks.. Wanna try to makr it today.
    Ps. Please post very bold traditional russian recipes, in fact ur selyoka and kvass recipes etc. are some of my favs!!! Reply

    • guest
      September 30, 2014

      Oh, and is one trout about 1 lb? Reply

      • Natasha
        natashaskitchen
        September 30, 2014

        Each of my trout were about 1.5 lbs. You can use 2 to 4 lbs of trout for this recipe. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 30, 2014

      I think you can as long as it’s fresh fish. We’ve always used freshly caught trout but as long as it’s from a good source, it should be just fine :). The sugar doesn’t make the fish taste sweet. It contrasts the rest of the marinade ingredients and also helps to preserve the fish. Reply

  • ramakrishna
    August 1, 2014

    This is a long awaited recipe for me.I have lived in Kharkov Ukraine for 7 years and haven’t tasted it in 5 years.Really miss those zafkousky.Going to the market to buy fresh fish….i am in pondicherry so going to try it with mackerel.Thanks a lot,really appreciate. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 1, 2014

      I hope you love it! Let me know how it goes with the mackerel! I’m curious. I wish we could get fresher fish in the market in Idaho. You have to catch your own here for it to be truly fresh πŸ™‚ Reply

  • Natalie
    March 26, 2014

    πŸ™‚ good recipe!
    Actually I was looking if you have a recipe of salted or cured salmon in your blog and found this one. I might give it a try!
    Have you ever made cured salmon? It is so addictive. Can I share my recipe? I take a very fresh salmon filet with no skin. Make a mix of sea salt and sugar 1:1, plus some black pepper. In a container, cover the filet with the dry mix from all sides, put the lid on and refrigerate. Usually in 10 hours my fish is perfectly salted and ready to eat. Wipe the salt, or rinse it. Dry the fish very well, wrap it in a plastic film and keep it refrigerated. Smaller pieces will need less than 10 hours. There will be some juice from fish in the container, it is ok. It doesn’t matter how much salmon I make this way, it is always gone in 24 hours. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 27, 2014

      Thank you so much for sharing! I actually don’t have a recipe for that! Do you skin the salmon before you start the process? Reply

      • Nataliya
        March 27, 2014

        Yes. Or just buy with no skin. You should try this recipe! And if you like fresh dill, you can add it to the mixture too. Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          March 27, 2014

          Thank you so much! Where have you found the best/freshest salmon? Or do you catch yours; that’s definitely something I miss about living in Seattle πŸ™‚ Reply

          • Natalie
            March 27, 2014

            Whole foods. Or any other grocery store. I ask for the freshest and trust them :-). You can use frozen salmon too, but it has to be defrost the right way.
            I insist you should try this recipe! πŸ™‚

          • Natasha
            natashaskitchen
            March 27, 2014

            Thank you! We recently got a Whole Foods in Boise!

  • Lana
    February 15, 2014

    Hi Natasha, thank you for your wonderful and helpful recipes, I’m your biggest fan! I just a have a question about this particular recipe, can’t wait to try it but my concern is that it will to be sweet due to the fact that I have to put 1/2 cup sugar. Please let me know if it will be sweet and if yes can I exclude the sugar from the recipe. Thank you! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 15, 2014

      I didn’t think it was sweet at all. The salt counter balances it really well. πŸ™‚ Reply

  • Svetlana
    January 28, 2014

    Hi Natasha, I love your site and to see a recipe for selyodka, just takes me back… You mentioned that you guys make smoked fish. Do you care sharing the recipe with us? Thanks. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 28, 2014

      My parents smoke fish all the time but I hesitate to post a smoked fish recipe because it requires a smoker and not many people have one, or maybe that’s the wrong assumption? I dunno??? Reply

      • Svetlana
        January 29, 2014

        I think what matters is how you prepare the fish before you smoke it and then which wood is used to smoke the fish is important too.. But it is ok if you want to keep it a secret.. Thank you for your reply Reply

  • Irina
    January 25, 2014

    Hi , Natasha , i think it’s to much salt -1cup! Is this a mistake ? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 25, 2014

      It really is 1 cup salt. It’s just right for the amount of water and this selyodka is not overly salty at all. It’s mildly salty. πŸ™‚ Reply

  • elena
    January 22, 2014

    To my knowledge most brine solutions for this fish are made with vinegar. Is there a reason why this brine solution has no vinegar? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 22, 2014

      You’re right, this recipe does not call for vinegar. The salt and sugar do the job πŸ™‚ I haven’t tried adding vinegar to this particular recipe. Reply

  • Dfstephan
    January 20, 2014

    I have tried all these recipes and let me say as an Englishman they are all superb efforts.I love Russian food. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 20, 2014

      Your comment is music to my ears, thank you :). Reply

  • Oksana
    January 16, 2014

    Hello! Quick question: did you use grape seed oil or canola oil when you were filling the fish in the cans? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 16, 2014

      I used grape seed oil for this recipe, but my mom uses canola oil :). Reply

  • Nadia
    December 23, 2013

    Natasha- we make this with herring and call them oseledsty. I think this is the same thing, from western Ukraine immigrants. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 23, 2013

      Sound like the same thing but a different name πŸ˜‰ Reply

  • Oksana
    November 15, 2013

    Hi Natasha!
    Just a quick question: would red onions be okay to use when stacking the fish? (I’m using salmon that my hubby caught a few days ago. It’s actually marinating as we speak:) ). Thanks for the response & for this recipe. Can’t wait to eat this fish with mashed potatoes!!! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 15, 2013

      Red onions should be fine. Traditionally it is made with yellow onion, but it shouldn’t make a difference πŸ˜‰ Reply

  • vera
    November 10, 2013

    Hi natasha! First of all I want to say I love your recipes! Thank you for sharing.. and I has wondering since I have never jard anything, so when I put this in the jar .fo I have to do anything special to it so it keeps safe for a couple weeks? I’m sure it will be gone way before that though..
    Thanks Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 10, 2013

      You do have to keep this refrigerated to keep it safe for a couple weeks. πŸ™‚ enjoy!! Reply

  • Julie
    November 7, 2013

    This looks fantastic! But did you know that сСлСдка is an actual fish that you can pickle if you chose to:) Π‘Π΅Π»Π΅Π΄ΠΊΠ° is herring. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 7, 2013

      Yeah and funny enough I’ve never pickled herring myself, just the fresh trout or salmon that we’ve caught. πŸ˜‰ Reply

  • Sarah Z.
    October 27, 2013

    Hi Natasha,
    Can’t wait to try this recipe. I went to the store and they told me that they will get trout for me for this Tuesday. My husband has been bothering me to ask you for the smoked trout recipe ( the picture you posted). Can you please share it on your site so I could finally make it for him. As soon as he saw the picture of the smoked trout he wanted it. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 27, 2013

      You have to have a special smoker (my parents built theirs) and I’m not sure that a store-bought smoker will work well. Has anyone else tried to smoke fish in a store-bought smoker? Reply

  • snolik
    October 26, 2013

    All together fish is my weakness but this made drooooool.. I wish we were neighbors πŸ™‚ Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 26, 2013

      I’d give ya some!! πŸ™‚ Reply

  • ChrisO
    October 25, 2013

    This looks yummy to me! Π― Π°ΠΌΠ΅Ρ€ΠΈΠΊΠ°Π½ΠΊΠ°…..but my 14-year-old Russian born son says it makes him want to puke! I think this makes him glad he was adopted! haha! Of course, he also hates cabbage and beets! πŸ™‚ Reply

    • ChrisO
      October 25, 2013

      I forgot to say…..I hope to try this sometime. I came to your blog on the advice of a friend, looking for Russian foods to give my Russian-born children to try. My other Russian son is more adventuresome and wants to try Selyodka. Thanks for posting it. Reply

      • Natasha
        natashaskitchen
        October 25, 2013

        Welcome to the blog and I hope you find new favorites (hopefully ones that all the children will love!) πŸ™‚ Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 25, 2013

      ha ha (lol). He just doesn’t understand what he’s missing out on! πŸ™‚ It’s not more unusual than sushi.  Reply

  • October 23, 2013

    Natasha, first of all, the trout looks gorgeous! I know you always have lot of fishing stories, and I think I read on your site that your family like to fish – so, did you catch this beautiful trout yourself, too? I never actually thought of making seledka myself, but now, seeing how easy it is, I am tempted to try. πŸ™‚ Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 23, 2013

      My husband caught these with my parents. They went again yesterday and caught the limit again. We’ll be all stocked up with smoked frozen salmon for winter πŸ™‚ Reply

      • Nella
        October 29, 2013

        Can you freeze the type smoked salmon that you post in picture before? Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          October 30, 2013

          You can freeze smoked fish. My parents freeze their smoked trout and it works really well. It tastes exactly the same when it’s thawed. Reply

  • Seeing selyodka, reminds me of my grandma πŸ™ she loved fish in any shape or form and would make it for us kids with mashed potatoes.
    I just had selyodka with sweet onion and baked potatoes the other day, I think it is my most favorite comfort food.
    Love the background color on the last picture πŸ™‚ and I see you got a new favicon πŸ˜‰ I like it πŸ˜€ Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 23, 2013

      Thank you! You’re the first person to notice! I didn’t have a favicon before. Can you believe it? I’m pretty excited about it too. Props to my husbands computer skills πŸ™‚ Reply

  • October 22, 2013

    This recipe is absolutely Russian to the core and I love it:). Selyodka is such a classic and especially delicious when it’s homemade. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 22, 2013

      It felt like a bold recipe to post, but how could I not? πŸ˜‰ Reply

  • Natalie
    October 21, 2013

    I love selyodka!!! Growing up, we always had selyodka in our family πŸ™‚ Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 21, 2013

      My husband is going fishing again tomorrow… more selyodka :). Reply

  • Miriam
    October 21, 2013

    Oh my… I check this website religiously because you always have such gems! I can’t wait to try this recipe! You bring back Turkmenistan for me, in a good way! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 21, 2013

      Are the foods very similar? Russian/Ukrainian and Turkmenistan? Are there any awesome dishes that you’d recommend I try from the Turkmenistan cuisine? Reply

      • Miriam
        October 22, 2013

        Actually, the Turkmen adopted a lot of food from Russia and Ukraine. One of my host families was actually Tatar so their food was REALLY similar to what I see on your blog. Turkmen food is famous for manty and polow, but taze borek isn’t bad either. My favorite was a yogurt and rice soup that I ate a lot. There’s actually a really fantastic Turkmen food blog that you can find here: http://www.turkmenkitchen.com/en/meat-stuffed-flatbread/

        You’ll notice that not a lot of spices are used. Turkmen like simple food! But a lot of it is simply good! Reply

        • Miriam
          October 22, 2013

          this recipe here though was my least favorite. Oh, I hated slaughter days because it meant we got all the organs at once cooked this way!
          http://www.turkmenkitchen.com/en/gowurdak/ Reply

          • Natasha
            natashaskitchen
            October 22, 2013

            Slaughter days? ewe. That does sound unpleasant! lol

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          October 22, 2013

          I haven’t seen that blog before, but yes it does look very similar to Russian/Ukrainian cuisine. I’m looking forward to exploring it more! Thank you! Reply

  • irena
    October 21, 2013

    Thanks again for making me feel 10 “again”… so many childhood memories πŸ™‚ My son is going salmon fishing tomorrow – and hope he gets a bit catch ’cause I’ll be making selyodika ..and potatoes on the side…
    and do tell your husband Дякуємо Π²Π°ΠΌ Π·Π° “kholodetz” I made it and it tasted just like my Mom’s I use a bit of vinegar instead of horseradish and then used both hmmm hmmm!!!!
    I’m glad I found your “Natasha’s Kitchen”.

    Irena Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 21, 2013

      That’s awesome! I just told my husband and he was all smiles πŸ™‚ Reply

  • Pelusa
    October 21, 2013

    I have eaten smoked seliodka several times with a Russian friend. It was very good.
    Thanks for sharing this recipe. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 21, 2013

      You are welcome Pelusa :). Reply

  • janet
    October 21, 2013

    The photos and the recipe brings back memories of my father. He ate and made this picked fish often. He was German though but he would eat the fish as an afternoon lunch break when he came in from the field or from tending to the cows. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 21, 2013

      That’s sweet that it reminds you of your father. I think there are lots of similarities between Ukrainian and German food :). Reply

  • October 21, 2013

    I have some frozen salmon. I want to try your recipe, as weird as selodka is πŸ™‚ we love it…
    p.s. I need to kick your butt πŸ˜‰ I had to go to Russian store to get some cold smoked trout. After seen your Instagram pics Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 21, 2013

      Neener neener. lol. It’s funny that we crave such things huh? Reply

  • Natasha
    October 21, 2013

    Thank you for posting this recipe!!! I love seliodka with baked potatoes. And you know, I’ve tried it firstly being frozen, it is GOOD!!!!! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 21, 2013

      That’s great to know! Thank you!! Reply

  • Alyona
    October 21, 2013

    My parents make something like that but it has carrots too. I always ask my parents to marinate it when dad goes fishing. It Works with all the fish I like with trout best. It’s called “Π₯Π•”- KHE I believe its one of the Tatars recipe. We had a lot of them live in Crimea. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 21, 2013

      I think trout is my favorite too, well I guess it’s a tie with salmon πŸ™‚ Reply

  • Nella
    October 21, 2013

    My husband loves this! We always take a jar when his mom makes it and now can try this πŸ™‚ by the way even my kids eat it with zaryna kartoshka for breakfast πŸ˜‰ Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 21, 2013

      You’re the second person to say you have it with potatoes for breakfast. Looks like I’m missing out! πŸ˜‰ Reply

  • October 21, 2013

    πŸ™‚ I remember offering it to some of our non russian friends, and they didn’t know how to politely tell me that they were super grossed out by the “raw” fish! πŸ™‚ Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 21, 2013

      Your next question should have been: Do you eat sushi? I guess this is our version of sushi, but at least it is pickled so it’s not completely raw like sushi fish. Reply

  • October 21, 2013

    Yes, love it! My mom made some with salmon. Still in my fridge. We love offering “ikra” to all of our Canadian friends. Their faces are priceless. But not too much, just a little bit, don’t waste my precious stuff.;) Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 21, 2013

      This is awesome with salmon. How do you make the “ikra”? Reply

  • Natasha
    October 21, 2013

    Yam! I used to love this when we lived in Ukraine, the best breakfast ever is salad, Seledka , and ТарСная ΠΊΠ°Ρ€Ρ‚ΠΎΡˆΠΊΠ°. Non Russians just don’t get it, my husband cannot even look at it, his lost. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 21, 2013

      ha ha. So true. Try the line at the beginning of this post: Politely tell him β€œit is colturrol egsperrience”(in your best Russian accent; rolling your r’s of course), and calmly continue eating your fish. Yes, give us fish, potatoes and bread and we will survive. lol Reply

  • October 21, 2013

    Π‘Π΅Π»Π΅Π΄ΠΊΠ° made with trout! Sounds pretty good, considering that my husband will not eat it – too many small bones. I might make it soon too. Usually I dry cure salmon to get “lox”.
    Thank you, Natasha! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 21, 2013

      Salmon works really well in this recipe too, wee just has trout so that’s what we used :). Reply

  • Galya
    October 21, 2013

    Omg, Natasha, my mouth is watering just by looking at this!! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 21, 2013

      I can tell you are European, LOL :D. Reply

  • iryna p
    October 21, 2013

    Wow! Trout! I make seledka from herring, but never tried trout before. It can not be a frozen fish though. right? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 21, 2013

      I think it’s best fresh. I don’t recall my parents ever making it with frozen either. Reply

  • Valerie
    October 21, 2013

    Reminds me of gravlax and other cold and raw fish marinades. Will definitely try this! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 21, 2013

      I had to google gravlax, but yes, it seems similar! πŸ™‚ Reply

    • October 21, 2013

      Valerie, I googled gravlax. We also dry rub salmon(and other big fish) this way and get what is close to lox. Reply

  • alison
    October 21, 2013

    Thanks for a great recipe! I have some fish to marinade with this good stuff. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 21, 2013

      You’re welcome. It’s nice to finally get it recorded. I hope you love it! Reply

  • Oksana
    October 21, 2013

    Absolutely!! I love this stuff. What a great recipe! Thank you!! πŸ™‚ Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 21, 2013

      You’re welcome Oksana. It’s one of our stranger foods, but it is surprisingly good πŸ™‚ Reply

  • olga
    October 21, 2013

    Girl, you are brave. Thank you for sharing, looks amazing. Hopefully i’ll be breve enough some day πŸ™‚ Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 21, 2013

      Ha! I know it! That’s how I felt the first time making it, but it is one of those dishes that will definitely impress your parents if they are familiar with it. Reply

  • Julia
    October 21, 2013

    Ah, yes! With mashed potatoes for breakfast haha. My non-Russian husband just doesn’t get it! This looks delicious!! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 21, 2013

      For breakfast? Wow! Now you’re the brave one! lol. I’m sure there are more than a few people that look at it and say, “what is it?!” Reply

  • October 21, 2013

    Facinating, thanks for sharing!
    How long do they keep for (refrigerated Γ³f course)?
    http://maryamsculinarywonders.blogspot.com/ Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 21, 2013

      My sources tell me you can keep it in the fridge up to a month. You’re blog is nice; I was just perusing it. πŸ™‚ Reply

  • Veranika
    October 21, 2013

    I like it with mashed potatoes. I feel hungry just by looking at those pictures. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 21, 2013

      I’m so glad it’s familiar to you too. Yesss!!! πŸ™‚ Reply

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