Sweet Poppy Seed Buns (Pirohi)

Sweet Poppy Seed Buns; super soft and my family approved @natashaskitchen

My husband remembers having poppy seed buns just like these growing up in Ukraine. He requested that I re-create his childhood memory and then just inhaled these as soon as they came out of the oven.

I loved seeing that satisfied and very smug grin on his face as he was chomping into these. My son really loved them too so I guess this means we’re passing on the tradition! 🙂

You might recognize the dough from my baked apple and braised cabbage piroshki that I posted last year. I also used this same dough for the super soft, melt in your mouth cinnamon rolls with salted maple glaze. Now I wish I hadn’t looked at those cinnamon rolls; they’ve induced some fierce pregnancy cravings!

What I love about this dough:

(1) It’s versatile – you can use it for sweet (cherries, apples) or savory treats

(2) You don’t need any special flour (all-purpose is just fine)

(3) It’s soooo soft

Poppy Seed Buns-9

Ingredients for Sweet Poppy Seed Buns Dough:

2 cups warm milk (I used 2%)
1 Tbsp active dry yeast (I used Red Star Brand)
1/2 cup granulated sugar, divided
6 cups all-purpose flour, (divided into 1 cup and 5 cups) *measured correctly
3 large eggs
1 and 1/2 Tbsp unsalted butter, melted
1 tsp salt

1 egg, beaten for egg wash
1 Tbsp dry poppy seeds to sprinkle over the top

1 Recipe for Poppy Seed Filling (click here for tutorial)
3/4 cup raisins (white or brown raisins work)

Poppy Seed Buns

Tip for Success with Yeast Doughs:

A yeast dough will rise much faster in a warm oven and can cut your prep work in half. When letting a yeast dough rise in the oven, it should never be hotter than 100˚F. If you have a proofing option on your oven, use it. My old oven didn’t have such a luxury and the low setting was at 150˚F which will start cooking your bread, deactivate the yeast and ruin your buns.

I used to get creative by preheating to low, turning the oven off, propping the door with a wooden spoon and placing my dough over a towel in the oven. I’ve ruined yeast dough before by letting it get to hot and I’d love to spare you the same disappointment

How to Make Sweet Poppy Seed Buns (pirohi):

Preheat your oven to 360°F at step 13.
1. In the bowl of an electric mixer, add 2 cups warm milk and sprinkle with 1 Tbsp yeast. Let sit 5-7 min.

Poppy Seed Buns-2

2. Add 1 cup flour and 1/4 cup sugar. Whisk together until blended and let it rise at room temp 30-45 min or 20 minutes in a 100˚ oven.

Poppy Seed Buns-11 copy

3. Whisk in the 3 eggs, remaining 1/4 cup sugar, 1.5 Tbsp melted butter and 1 tsp salt. Now using the dough hook, add the next 5 cups of flour 1 cup at a time letting it blend into the dough before adding more.

You know you’ve added enough flour when the dough is no longer sticking to the walls of the bowl – flour measurements could vary depending on the flour you use. Mix/knead on low speed with the dough hook for 15 minutes

Poppy Seed Buns-12 copy

Poppy Seed Buns-3

Baked Piroshki with Braised Cabbage-15

4. Cover with plastic wrap and let rise in a warm 100˚F oven for 1 hour (2 hours at room temp). The dough will triple in volume. Be patient. It’s all worth it in the end.

Poppy Seed Buns-4

5. Transfer your dough to a good very lightly floured non-stick surface and cut into 2 equal pieces. Working with one piece at a time, roll dough into a large circle a little less than 1/4″ thick. Cut out circles 2 1/2 to 3″ in diameter using a wide drinking glass or small bowl.

Poppy Seed Buns-12

Poppy Seed Buns-5

Poppy Seed Buns-17

6. Mix raisins into poppyseed filling. Place 1 heaping tsp (or a flat mini-ice cream scoop) of popyseed filling into the center of each round. Pinch two ends together over the filing and pinch down the sides to seal in the filling. Fold the two corners up and place the filled bun onto the 9×13 rimmed baking sheet, sealed-side-down.

Poppy Seed Buns-15

Poppy Seed Buns-6

7. Let the piroshki rise in a warm 100˚F oven for 20 minutes until they look puffy (or 30-45 minutes in a warm room. Beat 1 egg and brush the tops of the puffy piroshki with the egg wash then sprinkle on the poppy seeds. Bake at 360˚F for 18-20 minutes or until the tops are golden brown.

Poppy Seed Buns-7

Poppy Seed Buns-16

Sweet Poppy Seed Buns; super soft and my family approved @natashaskitchen

Sweet Poppy Seed Buns (Pirohi)

4.89 from 18 votes
Prep Time: 3 hours
Cook Time: 18 minutes
Total Time: 3 hours 18 minutes
Sweet Poppy Seed Buns; super soft and my family approved @natashaskitchen
What I love about this dough: (1) It's versatile - you can use it for sweet (cherries, apples) or savory treats (2) You don't need any special flour (all-purpose is just fine) (3) It's heavenly soft P.S. Prep time is based on using a warm 100˚F oven for dough rising. If you leave the dough to rise at room temp, you can expect to add about 2 hours to your prep time.
Author: Natasha of NatashasKitchen.com
Skill Level: Medium
Cost to Make: $10-$12
Servings: 36 buns

Ingredients

  • 2 cups warm milk I used 2%
  • 1 Tbsp active dry yeast I used Red Star Brand
  • 1/2 cup granulated sugar divided
  • 6 cups all-purpose flour (divided into 1 cup and 5 cups)
  • 3 large eggs
  • 1 and 1/2 Tbsp unsalted butter melted
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 egg beaten for egg wash
  • 1 Tbsp dry poppy seeds to sprinkle over the top
  • 1 Recipe for Poppy Seed Filling click here for tutorial
  • 3/4 cup raisins white or brown raisins work

Instructions

Preheat your oven to 360°F at step 13.

  1. In the bowl of an electric mixer, add 2 cups warm milk and sprinkle with 1 Tbsp yeast. Let sit 5-7 min.
  2. Add 1 cup flour and 1/4 cup sugar. Whisk together until blended and let it rise at room temp 30-45 min or 20 minutes in a 100˚ oven.
  3. Whisk in the 3 eggs, remaining 1/4 cup sugar, 1.5 Tbsp melted butter and 1 tsp salt. Now using the dough hook, add the next 5 cups of flour 1 cup at a time letting it blend into the dough before adding more. You know you’ve added enough flour when the dough is no longer sticking to the walls of the bowl - flour measurements could vary depending on the flour you use. Mix/knead on low speed with the dough hook for 15 minutes.
  4. Cover with plastic wrap and let rise in a warm 100˚ oven for 1 hour (2 hours at room temp). The dough will triple in volume. Be patient. It’s all worth it in the end.
  5. Transfer your dough to a good very lightly floured non-stick surface and cut into 2 equal pieces. Working with one piece at a time, roll dough into a large circle a little less than 1/4" thick. Cut out circles 2 1/2 to 3" in diameter using a wide drinking glass or small bowl.
  6. Mix raisins into poppyseed filling. Place 1 heaping tsp (or a flat mini-ice cream scoop) of popy seed filling into the center of each round. Pinch two ends together over the filing and pinch down the sides to seal in the filling. Fold the two corners up and place the filled bun onto the 9x13 rimmed baking sheet, sealed-side-down.
  7. Let the piroshki rise in a warm 100˚F oven for 20 minutes until they look puffy (or 30-45 minutes in a warm room. Beat 1 egg and brush the tops of the puffy piroshki with the egg wash then sprinkle on the poppy seeds. Bake at 360˚F for 18-20 minutes or until the tops are golden brown.
  8. Pour yourself a tall glass of cold milk and enjoy!

Recipe Notes

Tip for Success with Yeast Doughs:
A yeast dough will rise much faster in a warm oven and can cut your prep work in half. When letting a yeast dough rise in the oven, it should never be hotter than 100˚F. If you have a proofing option on your oven, use it. My old oven didn’t have such a luxury and the low setting was at 150˚F which will start cooking your bread, deactivate the yeast and ruin your buns. I used to get creative by preheating to low, turning the oven off, propping the door with a wooden spoon and placing my dough over a towel in the oven. I’ve ruined yeast dough before by letting it get to hot and I’d love to spare you the same disappointment

Final Final Picmonkey Hashtag banner

Pour yourself a tall glass of cold milk and enjoy!

natashaskitchen

Welcome to my kitchen! I am Natasha, the blogger behind Natasha's Kitchen (since 2009). My husband and I run this blog together and share only our best, family approved recipes with YOU. Thanks for stopping by! We are so happy you're here.

Read more posts by Natasha

Read comments/reviewsAdd comment/review

  • Jane Simek
    September 20, 2018

    I love baking with yeast dough. This is my way of keeping the dough warm: I heat water in a kettle and pour it into a large ceramic mixing bowl. I let the hot water sit in the bowl for a few minutes and then pour it out. the ceramic bowl absorbs a lot of heat. Then I lightly oil the bowl before transferring the dough into it. With a wooden spoon, I fluff up the dough to add more air into it. When the dough is covered with air blisters, I cover it with a clear plastic sprayed with cooling oil to ensure that the dough does not stick to it. Then I place a towel over it. I have never ruined my yeast dough yet. By the time I am done preparing the filling and the sweet crumbs that I sprinkle on top, the dough is risen and ready. Your poppy seed buns are quite similar to my Moravian Kolacky. Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      September 20, 2018

      Thank you for sharing this with us, Jane! This sounds like a great method! Reply

  • Hanna Catalli
    February 16, 2018

    The dough was so tasty and fun to work with! I also filled some with cajeta and made a cinnamon braid with some of the dough, all also tasty. Great recipe thanks! Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      February 16, 2018

      You’re welcome Hanna! That sounds delicious, I’m glad you enjoy the recipe. Thanks for sharing your great review with other readers! Reply

  • O
    February 14, 2018

    Super tasty! My family loved them soo much! Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      February 14, 2018

      I’m glad to hear the whole family enjoys the recipe! Thanks for sharing! Reply

  • Galina
    November 30, 2017

    Hi Natasha, how much of the poppy seed filling do you use for these buns? Didn’t see if you mentioned how much does it come out after you blend it with the condenced milk. thank you 🙂 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 1, 2017

      Hi Galina, I used the full poppy seed recipe for these buns and add a heaping teaspoon to each one. The recipe makes about 2 cups. Reply

  • Tara
    November 14, 2017

    Thanks a lot. My husband does not have time to eat breakfast. I tried this recipe and liked it. Every week I bake and freeze for the whole week. Is there any recipe like this for lunch or breakfast to save time? Thanks Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 15, 2017

      I’m so glad you enjoy the recipe!! Have you tried these rolls? They are similar. 🙂 Reply

  • Lana
    June 30, 2017

    Great recipe!! The pirozhki turned out super soft! They kind of burned a little on the bottom, not sure why? I did it based on the time you suggested. Maybe next time I should try a little less.
    Do you think it could be from the pan? ( if it’s low quality/ or old pan)
    Thank you for the recipe! 🙂 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      June 30, 2017

      Hi Lana, Are you possibly using a convection oven where they would bake faster with the air circulating or maybe they are too close to the bottom burner. I would suggest lining the pan and see if that helps also. Reply

      • Lana
        June 30, 2017

        Yes, I have a convection oven. So, probably was because of that. Thanks for replying! Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          July 1, 2017

          You’re welcome! I’m glad we figured it out. You would just pull them out of the oven sooner in a convection oven. Reply

  • Suzi Benz
    June 27, 2017

    My family is Bohemian and my Mom makes this. She learned this from my dad’s mom who was 100 % Bohemian. ( spelling?) I love the ones with prunes and cloves, but you can put so many things inside. We call them kolaches. Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      June 27, 2017

      Yum! That does sound good! Thanks for sharing Suzi! Reply

  • Natalie
    April 27, 2017

    Natasha, does the flour need to be sifted? I assume no as you didn’t mention anything, just I saw my mom always doing that before making any kind of dough. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 27, 2017

      Natalie, it’s not necessary in this recipe 😀. Reply

  • Katie
    February 16, 2017

    Hi Natasha. These turned out amazing ! What is the best way to store the left overs ? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 17, 2017

      Hi Katie, you can put them in an airtight container (or large ziploc bag) at room temperature if you think you will eat them fairly quickly. If you want to preserve them longer, put them in an airtight ziploc bag (preferably a foodsaver bag) and freeze up to 3 months. If you freeze them the same day they are made, when you defrost, they taste just as good when you thaw them 🙂 Reply

  • Christy
    December 1, 2016

    Hey! My dough, compared to my grandmas, is rough. How do i make it soft? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 1, 2016

      Hi Christy, this is normally a very soft dough – did you follow this recipe or are you referring to your own recipe that you’re making? I can’t really give recommendations on a recipe I haven’t tried… Reply

      • Alina
        April 16, 2018

        Hi Natasha!
        Would I be able to save the other half of my dough by freezing it and using it in a few weeks (2-3)? If so, how should I go about defrosting, waiting until the dough rises again for 2 hours or do I need to do anything with it once it’s thawed? Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          April 16, 2018

          Hi Alina, I honestly have not tried freezing the dough except for after it was baked so I’m not sure how that would work. Your plan for thawing and rising at room temperature sounds good. Let me know if you experiment! 🙂 Reply

  • Alla
    August 23, 2016

    First time making piroshki, and I nailed it!! Well thanks to you, Natasha of course!!! They are so so good. Husband approved ♡ My kitchen right now smells AHHmazing. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 24, 2016

      Alla, I’m so happy to hear that! Thank you for sharing your great review! Reply

  • Erin
    August 8, 2016

    I was wondering if I could use blueberries as a filling instead of poppy seed filling. My sister and I went blueberry picking this weekend and now I have two whole tubs of blueberries to use! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 8, 2016

      Yes, absolutely! You might sprinkle in some sugar as well since baking blueberries really brings out their tartness. I would put 1/2 tsp sugar down first then put the blueberries and make sure not to get the sugar on the edges or it won’t seal properly. Seal tightly so the blueberry juice doesn’t run out. Reply

  • Tonya
    May 16, 2016

    Hey Natasha,
    Thank you for sharing this recipe! My husband is prob one of the most obsessed person with piroshki.. I tried baking them before.. But honestly they didn’t turn out as good as the ones I baked this weekend going by your recipe.. Yummy!! They actually turned out pretty good! My husband Really enjoyed them!! 🙂 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 17, 2016

      Yay!! I’m so happy to hear that – it’s quite a compliment! Thanks for sharing your wonderful review 🙂 Reply

  • Anna
    February 24, 2016

    hi natasha! can i make this dough in a bread machine? how would i do that? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 24, 2016

      I haven’t tried this in a bread maker just because the dough rises a lot and I think it might overflow a bread maker but if you want to try, I’d suggest putting the ingredients into the bread maker at step 3 and setting it on the dough setting. Reply

  • Laurie
    February 10, 2016

    would this dough work if i fried the buns?? instead of baking them?? Reply

  • Julia
    January 28, 2016

    Hi Natasha! Just made these & they turned out amazing!! Thank you for the recipe. But I have a question after a day and now two days the bread seemed to get dried out a bit making them less soft and a bit harder than when I first made them.. Should I have put them in the refrigerator? I wanted to bring some to someone can I nuke them a little bit to soften them up? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 28, 2016

      Hi Julia, fresh is always best but even by day two they should still be fairly soft. I always suggest keeping them covered with plastic wrap or in a plastic bag. I keep them at room temperature if it’s just a day or two but if it’s longer, I’d freeze or refrigerate. You can microwave them for 7-10 seconds to soften them up. Reply

  • Galina
    January 15, 2016

    Have you ever tried doubling the recipe? Would I need to increase the amount of rising time or kneading time in the mixer? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 15, 2016

      If your mixer is large enough to hold it, you can double the recipe. You will probably want it to rise in two separate bowls because my mixer is a 6qt and by the time it rose, it filled the entire bowl for just 1 portion of the recipe. Rising varies by temperature of where you store it. You can probably keep the same kneading time in the mixer. Reply

  • Galina
    January 13, 2016

    What size is the pan you baked them in? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 13, 2016

      Hi Galina, sorry I missed that! It’s a 9×13 rimmed baking sheet. Reply

  • Lera
    November 1, 2015

    Natasha, I really like your recipes.
    I tried many others for the yeast dough and I think, I am overdo with the flour. After completing 15min of kneeling dough sticking back to the side of the bowl and it feels like I need to add more flour. Shortly, I do not know the exact parameters when to stop. Could you help me, please Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 1, 2015

      Have you tried this recipe yet? Also, what kind of flower are you using? If you are using Canadian flour, the measurements will always be different than American flour for most recipes. For this recipe, you stop adding flour when the dough is no longer sticking to the sides of the bowl. Reply

  • Vicky
    August 10, 2015

    Hi nathashas! I have a question. Can u use this dough for the poppy seed roll? The other one seems like too much work! Lol Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 11, 2015

      Yes, it would work. I agree, this one is a little easier. 🙂 Reply

  • roxie
    July 21, 2015

    Natasha thanks for the recipe it was amazing and the buns turned out just right ! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 22, 2015

      You are welcome Roxie, thank you for the great review 🙂 Reply

  • Nina
    May 5, 2015

    Hello, Natasha, its so difficult for me to write in English…, But I love your recipes and way how you explain them. This dough is the best which I tried. God will bless Your family forever!!!!!!!! My husband, Serhiy, and I have Derek 8, Salem 6, Shulamith 3 and expecting on June- Hadassah. I love to cook for my “big” family. God be with you always! Thanks again. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 5, 2015

      Nina, thank you for such a great review, God bless your family also and congratulation on the new baby :). Reply

  • masha
    February 11, 2015

    so if the dough isn’t rising to the size yours did, does that mean I overheated the dough while it was rising? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 11, 2015

      It is possible – does your oven have a higher than 100°F low setting? How long has it been rising? You might just give it a little more time to see if it rises more. Reply

      • masha
        February 11, 2015

        I have old oven that doesn’t have a lower setting than 150°.Also, it was rising for 2 hours in a warm oven, not hot. I heated it to 150, Turned it off, gave it some air and then Put dough in there and let it rise. I think I figured out my problem. I think my yeast was expried. I was researching and found that yeast can stop working. I tried activating some more in a cup and it hardly foamed. So I will buy new yeast tomorrow. You are awesome, I appreciate the fast response. Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          February 12, 2015

          No problem :). I’m glad you figured it out :). Also, when my previous oven had a warm setting of 170, I would put a wooden spoon in the door and set the mixing bowl over a towel when rising so it wasn’t directly on a hot rack. Hope that helps 🙂 Reply

  • Gloria
    February 2, 2015

    Hi Natasha,
    I am from Vancouver, Canada. I am of Ukrainian descent and try to keep all the
    Ukrainian traditions for my children and grandchildren. My children have kept on asking me to bake some prune buns like Baba used to make. I love your website and when I saw your bun recipe I thought it was time to try. I baked them yesterday using plum butter from a Polish deli. DELICIOUS, They were a hit and everyone especially my 5 year old grandsons loved them. Thank-You. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 2, 2015

      Hi Gloria! I’m so happy to hear that you all loved the buns :). Did you add prunes to them in baking or just use plum butter? Plum butter sure sounds delicious too! Thanks for the great review 🙂 Reply

      • Gloria
        February 2, 2015

        I just used the plum butter, i will use prunes next time. Do you ever try to reroll the scraps? Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          February 2, 2015

          Yes, I just add them to the remaining dough and keep working on the rest :). Reply

          • Gloria
            February 11, 2015

            Natasha, Going to make the buns again tomorrow. If I wanted to add prunes to the plum butter should I plump them first or just cut and add to plum butter? Thanks for your help.

          • Natasha
            natashaskitchen
            February 11, 2015

            To be honest, I haven’t tried using prunes or plum butter, but I think it would be fine even without plumping them first (I assume you mean in hot water). We usually add raisins to the filling and don’t plump them first.

  • Angela
    December 17, 2014

    i proof my dough in the oven also, however I just turn the light on for heat. It seems to work fine. Thanks for this recipe. It brings back lots of childhood memories & I just love poppyseed anything. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 17, 2014

      You must have a good light :-). It’s nice to find something that works well for you. My husband and I love all the poppyseed baked goods also! Reply

  • jujud
    December 12, 2014

    hello,
    I like your blog,delicious recipes….

    I have just one question, when you say cups,
    What is the exact measurement??? please

    Thanks a lot
    Jujud Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 12, 2014

      We use standard measuring cups and it depends on whether you are talking about liquid or dry ingredients.
      For liquid ingredients, it’s 8 oz or 240 mL.
      For dry ingredients, it varies by weight, but I use a standard US measuring cup similar to these: OXO Good Grips Plastic Measuring Cups, 6-Piece, Black
       Reply

  • kristina
    November 24, 2014

    It’s 5:22 right now. husband will be home at 9, we have lots of apples….. i think you know where I’m going with this… 😉
    p.s. your site is the reason he says to me: “honey, i think my pants shrunk after the wash.” (no, no they didn’t) 😉 lol Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 24, 2014

      Lol. That’s pretty funny. Apple buns sound so so good! Reply

  • Katya
    November 24, 2014

    Once you start brushing the buns with an egg, they do fall. Should I wait for them to rise again before putting them in the oven? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 24, 2014

      They shouldn’t fall; I haven’t had that experience before. How much are yours falling? I usually wait to brush the tops until just before I put them into the oven. Reply

  • Anya
    November 21, 2014

    Thank you for the recipe, turned out great! You were right, the dough is so easy to work with. I made the dough in a breadmaker although I altered the recipe a little: used a total of 6 cups of flour, 3/4 cup sugar as I prefer my yeast dough a little sweeter, and increased yeast to 1.5 Tbsp. I used half the dough to make piroshki and with the other half I made a Nutella Pecan Braid. I’ve maid the braid before using a different recipe but this one came out superb! Reply

  • Tanya V
    November 16, 2014

    Hi Natasha,
    your sweet poppy seed buns looks so delicious. I am wondering about two things. What size of baking pan did you use? Did you have any trouble having one of them tearing the other bun when you were taking out the buns? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 16, 2014

      It was a standard 9×13 baking pan and no, I didn’t have any problems with them tearing when you take them out. They separated quite nicely and you get 3 or 4 sides (depending on their position in the pan) that are super soft and airy. I hope you love them! 🙂 Reply

      • Tanya V
        November 23, 2014

        Hi Natasha,
        thank you for answering my questions. God Bless you and your household. Reply

  • ira
    September 29, 2014

    Hi Natasha.

    Do these stay soft even a couple days after baking? I’m afraid that this batch is too much for my tiny family…how can i cut the recipe in half? Or can it be frozen for later?

    thanks! Reply

  • September 29, 2014

    Just gorgeous, love the poppy seed topping! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 29, 2014

      Thanks so much Laura 🙂 Reply

  • Thanh
    September 29, 2014

    First batch just came out of the oven. I am eating one and it is heavenly good! cant wait until my bf comes home to eat these. Thanks a lot for the recipe Natasha! You are such an inspiration! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 29, 2014

      You are very welcome 🙂 and thank you for the great feedback, your comment is music to my ears. Reply

  • My Hungarian husband is going to LOVE these! I can’t wait to try out these buns and the filling! Mmmmm. There is just something about stuffed rolls that is irresistible! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 25, 2014

      I hope you and your husband enjoy these! I think they’d probably be familiar to him 🙂 Reply

  • JILL
    September 25, 2014

    I hope that you are keeping well. When are you due for this little baby girl? ( that’s the Russian in me) Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 25, 2014

      Everyone is convinced it’s a girl. I’ll find out in another month or so what we’re having. I am due March 7th 🙂 Reply

  • September 25, 2014

    These take me right back to my childhood! I can almost smell them. I would really love to make them myself but sadly I don’t have any suitable machinery for grinding those darn poppies. Food processor is really useless, eh?
    You must be feeling better, Natasha, judging by all the incredible goodies you’ve been producing! 🙂 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 25, 2014

      I’ve been satisfying cravings all week long. 🙂 I guess pregnancy is good for blogging after all! 😉 I tried to do it in my new food processor and it didn’t work. I have not however tried a professional grade blender like Blendtec. Might be worth a shot. A mortar and pestle would work but it would be a little tedious. Reply

    • Tatiana
      September 25, 2014

      I’ve had great success with my Nutribullet, which comes with a milling blade. Also, it’s a bit tedious as it is small, but you can use a spice grinder as well, with a little sugar added in to help. Reply

      • Natasha
        natashaskitchen
        September 25, 2014

        I like the tip about the sugar and it’s great to know that the nutribullet works. Thanks so much for sharing! Reply

        • Tatiana
          October 12, 2014

          I should add that the poppy seeds must be ground in the nutribullet fitted w/milling blade BEFORE cooking. Then the ground seeds can be simmered with whole milk and honey until the milk is absorbed. When finished, add in golden raisins and a little grated lemon zest. That’s how my mother always prepared the poppy filling. Reply

          • Natasha
            natashaskitchen
            October 12, 2014

            That’s a great idea to cook it in whole milk and honey. That sounds so yummy! How long do you cook it and do you recall what proportions of poppy seeds to milk to honey you use? Can you tell I want to try your method? 😉

          • Tatiana
            October 13, 2014

            Oh, you know how it is with Mama’s recipes – handful of this, pinch of that! 😉 I usually start with a pound of ground poppy seeds, add milk to the top plus 1″ (like cooking rice), then add honey to taste, starting with about 1/3 cup. Bring to a simmer and let it cook about 20 minutes or until the milk is absorbed. Taste and add more honey if needed. Add the raisins and zest of 1 lemon, then simmer for an additional 5-10 mins. This can be made ahead of time and kept in the refrigerator for a couple of days,but I’ve never tried to freeze it so I don’t know if that would work.

          • Natasha
            natashaskitchen
            October 13, 2014

            Thank you so much for sharing! I sure appreciate it! I’m definitely going to try this 🙂

          • Tatiana
            October 14, 2014

            Oh! Almost forgot – before using, Mom would add an egg white as a binder, especially with something that takes lots of filling like poppyseed roll. Then the yolk could be used as an egg wash on top.

          • Natasha
            natashaskitchen
            October 14, 2014

            Thank you so much for sharing!! 🙂

        • Dasha
          October 12, 2014

          I don’t know if you might have heard of canned poppyseeds. I have been baking with it a lot and it works great, tastes amazing and no hassle of grinding! Reply

          • Natasha
            natashaskitchen
            October 12, 2014

            What brand do you use/like and where do you buy it?

  • Lena P
    September 25, 2014

    Looks delicious. Could I substitute poppy seed filling for anything else? Like jam or fresh fruit i.e. apples or plum? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 25, 2014

      Yes! You can use thick jam, fresh or frozen pittted cherries (add a little sugar on the center of the dough round before adding the cherries). You can also peel, core and mince apples in a food processor and put 1/4 tsp sugar into the middle of the dough round then top with a heaping Tbsp of minced apple. Enjoy! I think plum would work too, just make sure to use enough plum or it won’t seem substantial enough; a heaping Tbsp with 1/4 tsp sugar should do fine. Reply

  • Valentina
    September 25, 2014

    Thank you Natasha for sharing this recipe! Lately I’ve been craving a poppy seed filled dessert and this just further propelled my desire to have a warm, out of the oven pirozhok with some milk, yumm! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 25, 2014

      Mmm you sure paint a good picture! 🙂 Reply

  • Lidiya D
    September 25, 2014

    Yumm!! Can’t wait to give these a try.. Would the amount of flour still be the same if I use Canadian flour? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 25, 2014

      From my experience, you usually use less Canadian flour than American all-purpose. Add flour until the dough is just barely sticking to the bowl. Reply

  • Marina
    September 25, 2014

    Running to Safeway for that milk right now! I was drooling while reading your post. Thanks!! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 25, 2014

      Haha sounds like a serious craving! 😉 just be sure to wipe your keyboard. Lol Reply

Add comment/review

Leave a comment

As Featured On

Never Go "Hangry" Again!

Get weekly updates on new recipes, exclusive giveaways plus behind the scenes photos.