Classic Borscht Recipe (VIDEO)

After several requests for my borscht recipe, here it is. Ukrainian Borscht… everyone knows what it is and many people around the world have fallen in love with this iconic beet soup.

Red Borscht Recipe with Dollop of sour cream and dill

I love the deep ruby color of this borsch! It’s so healthy and nutritious; packed with beans (protein), beets (iron), carrots (carotene), potatoes (vit C, potassium, Vit B6), oftentimes cabbage is added (vit K, vit C, fiber, etc…). It feels so good serving this to my family. 

Our Family’s Borscht Recipe (Beet Soup)

This is our family’s version of classic borsch and it’s one of the two soups my children absolutely love (Mom’s Meatball Soup being the second). Borscht is definitely on the regular rotation at our house!

This version keeps better because it is a meatless version but doesn’t lack in flavor because it uses good quality chicken broth.

Classic Borsch served with sour cream

Ingredients for Classic Ukrainian Borsch:

It’s best to have all of the ingredients prepped and ready to go which makes this soup super easy and care free. Start by peeling, grating, chopping, slicing and dicing all of the vegetables for borscht.

Once your potatoes are peeled and sliced, transfer them to a bowl of cold water to keep them from discoloring until ready for use.

Ingredients for Beet Soup Borscht including beets, carrots, potatoes, chicken broth, beans

Note on Using Cabbage:

We used to add cabbage but our children prefer it without so for years now we’ve been making it just like this without cabbage. If you prefer cabbage, add 1/4 to 1/2 small head of cabbage, thinly shredded, adding it when the potatoes are halfway cooked.

How to Peel and Cut Beets:

  • Use gloves when handling beets or your fingertips will stain red for a couple of days.
  • To peel beets, use a simple potato peeler like this one.
  • You can slice the beets into matchsticks but it is way way easier to grate and children don’t mind the texture of grated beets. We love our food processor for this task as it grates more coarsely than on a hand grater so the beets still have some texture. It also keeps the counter and your hands clean (beat juice can be a pain to get out of clothing and porous surfaces).

How to Remove Beet Stains:

When you eat borscht often, you learn quickly to pace a napkin in your lap and bibs on children. If you do get beet juice on your clothes, address the stain right away.

  1. Use a paper-towel to blot off any excess juice.
  2. Run cold water over the opposite/under side of the fabric to push the stain out.
  3. If the stain persists, apply a stain removing agent (I have found that dish soap works well in a pinch) and launder clothing as usual.

How to Make Borscht

Watch Natasha Make Classic Borscht:


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Classic Borscht Recipe (Beet Soup)

4.82 from 141 votes
Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 1 hour 40 minutes
Total Time: 2 hours

Our family's go-to recipe for Borscht (Red Beet Soup). It's best to have all of the ingredients prepped and ready to go which makes this soon super easy and care free. Serve with a dollop of sour cream or real mayo.

Author: Natasha of NatashasKitchen.com
Skill Level: Medium
Cost to Make: $12-$16
Keyword: Borsch, Borscht
Servings: 10

Ingredients

For Borscht:

  • 3 medium beets peeled and grated
  • 4 Tbsp olive oil divided
  • 4 cups reduced sodium chicken broth + 6 cups water
  • 3 medium yukon potatoes peeled and sliced into bite-sized pieces

For Zazharka (Mirepoix):

  • 2 celery ribs trimmed and finely chopped
  • 2 carrots peeled and grated
  • 1 small red bell pepper finely chopped, optional
  • 1 medium onion finely chopped
  • 4 Tbsp ketchup or 3 Tbsp tomato sauce

Additional Flavorings:

  • 1 can white cannelini beans with their juice
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 2-3 Tbsp white vinegar or to taste
  • 1 tsp sea salt or to taste
  • 1/4 tsp black pepper freshly ground
  • 1 large garlic clove pressed
  • 3 Tbsp chopped dill

Instructions

  1. Peel, grate and/or slice all vegetables, keeping sliced potatoes in cold water until ready to use.

  2. Heat a large soup pot (5 1/2 Qt or larger) over medium/high heat and add 2 Tbsp olive oil. Add grated beets and sauté 10 minutes, stirring occasionally until beets are softened. 

  3. Add 4 cups broth and 6 cups water. Add sliced potatoes and sliced carrots then cook for 10-15 minutes or until easily pierced with a fork.

  4. While potatoes are cooking, place a large skillet over medium/high heat and add 2 Tbsp oil. Add chopped onion, celery and bell pepper. Saute stirring occasionally until softened and lightly golden (7-8 minutes). Add 4 Tbsp Ketchup and stir fry 30 seconds then transfer to the soup pot to continue cooking with the potatoes.

  5. When potatoes and carrots reach desired softness, add 1 can of beans with their juice, 2 bay leaves, 2-3 Tbsp white vinegar, 1 tsp salt, 1/4 tsp black pepper, 1 pressed garlic clove, and 3 Tbsp chopped dill. Simmer for an additional 2-3 minutes and add more salt and vinegar to taste.

If you make this recipe, I’d love to see pics of your creations on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter! Hashtag them #natashaskitchen

So, which camp are you in? Do you love that dollop of sour cream at the end or the flavor that real mayo adds to borscht?

natashaskitchen

Welcome to my kitchen! I am Natasha, the blogger behind Natasha's Kitchen (since 2009). My husband and I run this blog together and share only our best, family approved recipes with YOU. Thanks for stopping by! We are so happy you're here.

Read more posts by Natasha

Read comments/reviewsAdd comment/review

  • Deborah
    January 7, 2016

    hello natasha i would like to ask if there are any other substitute for beets? I cannot find any beet availabel in the market in our hometown. Im from the Philippines by the way, just wanna try this exquisite soup Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 7, 2016

      HI Deborah, since the base of borsch is beets, there really is not a substitute. Any other vegetable and it would be another kind of soup :). I wish I had another answer for you! Reply

      • Deborah
        January 8, 2016

        okay thank you very much natasha Reply

    • Laura
      January 8, 2016

      Maybe you can get them canned or prepacked? They are not as good as fresh ones but still works. Best of luck with finding it, there is nothing in the world that is as healthy and slimming as bortsch. Reply

  • Diane
    January 2, 2016

    We are celebrating our traditional Ukrainian Christmas this weekend and my husband and I are making the borscht. Everyone in the 8 sibling is assigned a portion of the huge meal and tomorrow we get together and make a million perogies. Great fun, lots of work, delicious meal. I am using your recipe along with the family recipe but yours is winning out. I’ll let you know how it works out. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 2, 2016

      Wow that does sound like alot of fun (and alot of work) but oh so delicious!!! 🙂 Reply

  • Suchitra
    December 13, 2015

    Hi Natasha,
    Thanks for this wonderful recipe. This is th third time I have tried it but I think the first two times worked best. This time, I feel the kidney beans lacked flavor. It is still cooking so I am hoping they soak in the flavor soon. My family and I have loved this borscht. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 13, 2015

      I’m so glad you’re loving the recipe! Did you do anything differently this time that you can recall? Thanks for your feedback! It means alot to me 🙂 Reply

  • Olga
    December 10, 2015

    Hello Natasha, thank you so much for this perfect borsch recipe. I’d tried many recipes off Russian sites before and they’d never worked well while yours is just perfect. I’ve made it twice, with and without beans, and I like both versions. I will be making this borsch again and again! Thank you. Take good care of you and yours.
    Kind regards from France. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 10, 2015

      Hi Olga! You are all the way in France! Wow!! I’m so happy you enjoyed the recipe. Thank you for sharing that with me 🙂 Reply

  • Donna
    December 8, 2015

    Our whole family–from our eight year old daughter to our 23-year old son!– loved this recipe. It was absolutely perfect. We didn’t have dill, so used parsley instead. I can’t imagine that anyone who didn’t like beets couldn’t be won over by this recipe. We had some biscuits with it, and forgot to put on the sour cream, but there was plenty of richness in the flavor! My son had never had borscht before, but he’ll be sure to make this recipe from now on. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 9, 2015

      I’m so happy to hear that and thank you for the wonderful review! 🙂 Reply

  • Anna
    November 29, 2015

    I have never made this dish before today, but I work for an older couple and often make them meals. This was one of the things they asked if I could make, and I had no clue where to start. Of course, I love to cook, and trying new recipes is always fun, but not all recipes you find on the web are worth their salt. THIS recipe on the other hand is spectacular! I sort of combined your recipe with meat and the recipe without. I also made a few adjustments from ideas I saw in the comments section (for instance instead of ketchup, I mixed a diced medium tomato with brown sugar, salt, and white vinegar in with the sauteed carrots and onions.) I also added garlic to the veggies, and sauteed the cabbage too before dropping it in the soup. Thank you so much for the wonderful recipe, and even though I improvised a little, I would have been totally lost without it! So delicious, 5 stars for sure! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 29, 2015

      I am so happy you loved! Thank you for such a wonderful and thoughtful review. I am all smiles! 🙂 Reply

  • Stanislav
    November 17, 2015

    I, too seriously appreciate the time and effort you put into making such a perfect blog. I myself am of Eatern European descent but my great grand-mother was the only one who really knew how to cook like this. Sadly, I never met her.:( But I always wanted to cook well from scratch, and I’m happy to find recipes to help me keep a part of her in mind. Thanks ever so much for sharing!
    -Stan Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 17, 2015

      You are welcome Stan and I hope you’ll find lots of new favorites on the site 😀 . Reply

  • Lina Fedorova
    November 3, 2015

    Natashka,
    I just wanted to say that I’m SO glad I found your blog! I myself am a Russian-Ukrainian. I didn’t grow up cooking all the classic Russian/ Ukrainian dishes (I’m only 17) because my mom never really forced me to watch her cook. I was worried I’d grow up without the knowledge of a true Russian woman, but finding your blog has given me hope 🙂 Your blog is amazing!!!!!!!! Love it love it love. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 3, 2015

      Lina, thank you for your sweet comment☺️. I hope that you’ll find lots of favorites on the site. Reply

  • Lucy Sanders
    November 1, 2015

    This recipe is fantastic. All my hubby could say is “this is soooo good”. He had three large bowls full. Yesterday I made the recipe again and once again he ate to his hearts content. He hasn’t had good borscht soup since his mom died a long time ago. I didn’t change a thing – your recipe is fantastic just the way it is. The soup boullion in your pictures is great to use – I added lots. VERY YUMMY!!! I gave some to my physician as she is Hungarian and I know she will love it as much as we do. Thank you so much…now I will try your other recipes. I want to see what you have for cabbage rolls. Love your web site – you have one lucky hubby – no wonder he is smiling in the photo!!!! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 1, 2015

      Thank you so much for the awesome review! You’re so nice :-). I enjoyed reading your food story! Reply

  • David
    October 19, 2015

    Great recipe! I’m not sure how the $5-6 cost was derived; where I am this is about $30. I made an 8x mega-batch and froze it in portions. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 19, 2015

      I think you’re right, it is more like $6-$8. I can definitely see it getting up to $30 with an 8x mega batch! 🙂 Reply

  • Avery
    October 5, 2015

    I made this today, substituted the broth with 2 parts chicken and 1 part onion. I also changed the ketchup to diced tomatoes and didn’t use beans, as I had none so I added a bit more of my diced tomatoes to make up for the lost liquid. I also added a bit of cumin, really just a bit, a pinch or two, for seasoning purposes.

    It was AMAZING soup! Thank you for the recipe and excellent guidelines. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 5, 2015

      Avery, thank you for the great review and nice job on improvising :D. Reply

  • Samia
    September 15, 2015

    Hi there, I absolutely loved the borscht, wow it tasted fantastic. I followed your instructions and the exact ingredients, however I was out of chicken broth and didn’t use any garnishing and it tasted like heaven. I am going to make this more often, but I need some help here regarding its nutritional value. Natasha, will you be able to provide that?
    Thanks for sharing this recipe Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 15, 2015

      Hi Samia! I’m so happy you enjoyed the borsch 🙂 I don’t typically include nutritional values, but if you go to caloriecount.com you can plug in the ingredients and servings and figured out pretty easily that way. I hope that helps! Reply

  • Vadim
    September 8, 2015

    This is indeed best soup ever made. But, where meat is? As i`m concrerned it has to contain beaf or pork or all together. My Mom has always coocked it with meat. Reply

  • Sanya
    August 21, 2015

    I also made it tonight and liked it a lot. I was a little concerned, because my beets looked so much smaller. I made 2/3 the recipe and still had so much!!

    I also made substitutions based on what I had on hand: sweet potatoes instead of potatoes, vegetable broth instead of chicken, tomato paste for ketchup, & oyster mushrooms for kidney beans. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 21, 2015

      Oh yum – I haven’t tried it with sweet potatoes but I do love sweet potatoes. Thank you for sharing your modifications! Reply

  • Lena
    August 19, 2015

    This is SO GOOD. I added more lemon juice, cut down the ketchup and added a garden tomato to the carrot/onion stir fry and used home made bone broth instead of chicken broth. I LOVE the acidity of it! Perfect perfect perfect. Thanks Natasha 🙂 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 19, 2015

      I love how you modified it to make it even healthier. I’ll try your version next time! Thanks Lena 🙂 Reply

  • Annie
    August 13, 2015

    Thanks for the awesome recipe. Didn’t see “Bouillion paste” in list is ingredients. What can I use as a substitute? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 13, 2015

      Sorry about that – I agree the list wasn’t too clear. I put broth, but is should read 6 cups chicken broth. I use Bouillon paste and mix it with water to basically make my own chicken broth. You can use any kind of chicken broth/stock and it will work well. If you have bouillon cubes, go by the package instructions to make 6 cups of broth. Reply

  • August 12, 2015

    I can’t WAIT to try this!!! Last week, I traveled to NYC, and my brother, who used to live in Russia, had me try a borscht. It was A-MA-ZING! If your recipe is as good as what everyone is saying, I’m going to be in heaven!! I’ll update with my rating after I’ve had a chance to make it! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 12, 2015

      That is very exciting! I hope it’s everything you remember and more 🙂 Reply

  • Rod
    August 9, 2015

    I love this! I make this recipe all the time and have it for lunches. Things I change is I use salt reduced chicken stock and only 3-4 cups instead of 6, I don’t notice the difference. I use thick greek yogurt instead of sour cream. I use mostly tomato paste and a bit of tomato sauce instead of all tomato sauce. I add a few dashes of Worcestershire sauce and 2 cloves of garlic while the onions and carrots are cooking, use only 2 tbs of oil instead of 4. Also add 2tbs white vinegar and less lemon if I have it at the end…So a fair few changes but its to reduce the fat and salt content of the dish but that’s ok because I add a few other flavours and I think it actually better! Thanks tasha Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 9, 2015

      Thank you so much for sharing your healthy substitutions! 🙂 Reply

  • Dorine
    July 27, 2015

    This soup was quick and easy to make, and really delicious, I loved that it had pieces of vegetables in it rather than pureed,the colours are spectacular, the only thing I did differently is roast the beets in the oven, a couple of days ago and had them in the fridge ready to go, not knowing what I will make with them I saw your recipe so I cooked the pieces of potatoes in chicken stock and water added some vegetable and chicken cubes, and then did everything thing else the recipe said except i only had dried dill. Thank you so much Natasha I am in Melbourne Australia and it is July the whether is cold!! so it was perfect…my husband said it was the best soup he has ever had, and I have made plenty of soups over the past 40 plus years coming from a European back ground!! so how is that for a compliment 🙂 Hey every one out in computer land this would be spectacular for a dinner party !! Thank you again Natasha 🙂 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 27, 2015

      Thank you so much for sharing that awesome review with me! 🙂 Yes, that is a huge compliment! I’m so happy you liked it 🙂 Reply

  • Mark
    July 24, 2015

    Thank you Natasha for your recipe. Be sure to prepare at their leisure. Good luck to you in promoting your blog. I am constantly reading it Reply

  • Michael Garrison
    July 23, 2015

    A local deli also lists ‘Allspice’ as one of the ingredients. What do think of that, and would it ‘clash’ with the ketchup?

    Thank you,

    Mike Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 23, 2015

      To be honest I have not tried it with allspice. I think it’s worth experimenting. Let me know how you like it with the allspice. Reply

  • Juli
    July 13, 2015

    It’s 85 degrees today and THIS is what I was craving!? t is the best borscht recipe I have yet made. We have cut unhealthy meat out ofout diet so the beans were a perfect addition. The ketchup gave a very nice flavor and because of it I didn’t need to add sugar, which I’ll usually sneak in. I am impressed!
    It’s very easy and fast too cook if you are experienced in the kitchen. Prep time was only about 10 minutes, the test inactive. I will certainly put this on the menu in the cafe. Thank you so much! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 13, 2015

      Juli, thank you for such a great review, my hubby actually made some few days ago and that’s what we had for lunch today :). Reply

  • Oleksandr
    June 22, 2015

    Could you change name of post. It is Ukrainian dish. Thank you very much. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      June 22, 2015

      I got it updated :). Reply

  • Jim
    May 26, 2015

    My wife and I tried your borscht in 2014. We have it now all the time. We even put it into Parkay containers and freeze it so we always have it. It freezes well too. This year we grew lots of beets and cabbage in the garden and we plan on freezing lots of it for the winter. It is absolutely delicious and we will never be without it. We tried other recipes and some with various meats but this vegan recipe of yours is best. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 26, 2015

      Jim, thank you for such a great review, I’m honored :). My mom also planted beets and cabbage in the garden and I like the idea of freezing it. Thanks for the tip :). Reply

  • Fred Jaecklein
    May 25, 2015

    5 stars. Simple and unbelievably good, served cold after sitting in fridge for a couple of days. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 25, 2015

      Fred, thank you for such a great review, I’m so happy to hear that you enjoyed it :). Reply

  • May 14, 2015

    Hi natasha.
    I would like to say , that isn’t really a “classic borsch” . Its looks more like a polish “Barszcz” because , actually , i’ve not really seen beets in real recipe, but in Polish barszcz , yes . And in classic Russian borsch there’s meat , no ?
    But anyWay it’s a good recipe for vegetarians . Reply

  • karin
    May 10, 2015

    Ketchup is not russian/ How about the kidney beans? I was looking for an authentic russian recipe. Makedo recipes I can find everywhere. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 10, 2015

      Every family makes theirs differently and we use the ingredients that are available here and that enhance the flavor of the borsch. This is how our family makes it and it tastes great! How do you make yours? Reply

      • Bob
        August 10, 2015

        Natasha
        There are beet soup recipes online everywhere. They’re all called Borscht. Vegetable soup with beets thrown in for color is not borscht. It’s red vegetable soup. Certainly not “Classic” borscht. Beets enhance the flavor of borscht, they are the dominant component, the ratio is about 8 to one. 8 cups beets, one cup potato, one cup, carrots, one cup green beans, one small onion, two cups shredded cabbage, two tbs kvass or lemon juice, 1/2 cup tomato juice, garnish with sour cream. Put it in a pot put in enough stock to just cover and simmer till there vegetables are tender. This is spring borscht. Not my families version. Not the latest internet red soup, this isn’t something that my grandmother passed down, although she did make it this way. Borscht tastes like beets and if you don’t like beets maybe you shouldn’t be making it Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          August 10, 2015

          Hi Bob, Thanks for sharing your version. Reply

  • Andy
    April 30, 2015

    Natasha, I made your borscht and loved it!! I was wondering if it could be made using golden beets as a variation? Also, I ran out of sour cream before I ran out of soup. I put a spoonful of apple cider vinegar in the bowl for that little kick of acid and it was great. Have you ever tried this? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 30, 2015

      I haven’t tried either to be honest. I’ve never even eaten golden beats. Do they differ in flavor? I’ve tried adding mayo and love the flavor it adds, but I hadn’t thought to use the apple cider vinegar – it’s definitely a healthier option than mayo 😉 Reply

      • Andy
        May 1, 2015

        Golden beets are milder and a little more sweet. They are definitely worth a try. I like them with a little black pepper and garlic and a drizzle of olive oil. Reply

  • Michael
    March 29, 2015

    It looks wonderful! but… ketchup? Really? I dislike ketchup, just sugar and salt. Can I omit it completely?

    Thank you Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 29, 2015

      Yes, you could. It does add some good flavor, but it’s not absolutely necessary 🙂 Reply

      • Michael
        April 1, 2015

        Lesson learned…
        My wife suggested that the 1st time one uses a recipe it should be followed exactly!
        I di and included the ketchup and the results are outstanding!
        One question:
        No salt? Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          April 1, 2015

          I’m so glad you liked it! The broth, ketchup and lemon juice added enough flavor that ours didn’t need the salt, but you can definitely add it to taste if you like it saltier 🙂 Reply

  • Christiane
    March 23, 2015

    This was excellent. Thank you so much. I used tinned beets that I had on hand and it was still delicious. I miss my babushka’s meat borscht – this is a lovely variation and brought back lots of memories. A real comfort food. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 23, 2015

      I’m so happy to hear it brought back memories for you :). The canned beets work well when you’re in a time crunch. I’m so glad you enjoyed it 🙂 Reply

  • laura
    February 24, 2015

    Very nice recipe. Everybody liked it. Thanks a lot for sharing. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 24, 2015

      You are welcome Laura, I’m glad that everyone enjoyed it :). Reply

  • Desiree
    February 24, 2015

    I made the soup with your help and it was delicious! Thanks! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 24, 2015

      Thank you for the great review Desiree and you are welcome :). Reply

  • Vika
    February 22, 2015

    Большое спасибо!

    I followed your recipe exactly only I added a peeled fresh tomato and used vegetable broth instead of chicken and it was fabulous! I loved the addition of beans! Thanks so much for sharing 🙂 As good as бабушка used to make! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 23, 2015

      I’m so happy to hear that! Thank you so much for sharing your awesome review and how you changed things up 🙂 Reply

  • Danuta
    February 17, 2015

    Hi Natasha – My grandmother was from Poland and maybe her being from a poorer area her borsch did not have all those ingredients. I remember her using soup bones and she would add the beetroot, onion carrot and a bit of vinegar plus salt and pepper. We would only use the stock with sour cream was added, so it would be like a creamed version. This was eaten with a side dish of mashed potatoes or the mashed potato was put in the middle of the bowl and the borsch pored in. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 17, 2015

      I’m sure your Grandmother’s was super yummy – anytime you cook a broth with bones – it tastes incredible! That’s interesting that she poured it over the potatoes – sounds so homey. Reply

  • Rish
    February 9, 2015

    It is a good recipe, however it is most certainly not the classic borscht. CHICKEN broth in a borscht? Please… Meat (lean or with a bone, it is a matter of individual preference) should be put on a very slow boil for at least 2.5-3 hours to get a proper broth. And beans are used only for a lent version, which is in conflict with broth, right?
    The same goes for ketchup. No way. This is cheating. Either fresh tomatos or tomato paste (as a last resort).
    Beets. Beets should be never boiled beforehands. chop them finely or grate the same way carrots are grated (be prepared that you kitchen might resemble a battlefield, one of the bloodier ones, at the end of grating – beets STAIN!) and then sauteed or just put into pot as it is.
    I understand why you chose this particular recipe. It is fast and easy and not too messy. I have no doubt that it tastes really good, but it is not the classic… Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 9, 2015

      Hi Rish! This is a personal/family blog and I share the recipes the way my family makes and loves them. Do you have your version posted online somewhere? I’d love to check it out. Reply

  • LIn
    February 4, 2015

    Your spelling is terrible!!!

    Beets is double e not beats
    Peel is double e not peal!!!! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 5, 2015

      You’d think after 2 degrees,… sheesh! lol. Thanks Lin 🙂 I intentionally mis-spelled beets once so if someone was searching my site and they equally couldn’t spell, they’d still be able to find it. 😉 Reply

  • Susan
    January 28, 2015

    I made this recipe and it came out great. In the past, I have made borscht, but it came out bitter and I had to douse it in sour cream to cover the bad taste. I’m making it again today. Thanks for posting it. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 28, 2015

      I wonder why the other recipe could have been bitter? Bad beets maybe? You might taste your raw beets before adding them next time? Or was there something unusual in the other recipe that could have been the culprit? Reply

  • Russian kid adopter
    January 20, 2015

    We just made your recipe for a class project. We’ve attempted borscht before but now LOVE this recipe! Awesome, it tastes so fresh and not heavy. I added sour cream before but this recipe doesn’t need it making it even healthier. Thanks we will have to check out more of your recipes. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 21, 2015

      My husband doesn’t usually add sour cream either, but I love it. I’m so happy you all enjoyed the borscht. Thank you so much for a great review! Reply

  • Stephen Kish
    January 5, 2015

    I was driving home from work on Christmas Eve and and the story that was being told on the radio station was about a beggar who claimed he could make Borscht from bone buttons. Needless to say the story peaked my curiosity. I found your recipe online and made this New Years day. It is the first time I have ever had Borscht in my life. Absolutely delicious! I am going to make this again during the week. Good stuff, even cold from the refrigerator. Thank you. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 5, 2015

      That’s so interesting! Thanks for sharing that story with me :). What a cool way to discover a recipe! Reply

  • Alla
    December 15, 2014

    Вотни как Russian ,a Українськй борщ. Reply

  • Roland
    December 4, 2014

    What type of beef do you use? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 4, 2014

      I’ve used different kinds; top sirloin, regular sirloin, also good quality stew meat works. 🙂 Reply

  • Katie
    December 2, 2014

    THE MOST AMAZING BORSCHT EVER!
    My husband thinks this is to die for! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 2, 2014

      Thank you for the great review Katie, I’m so glad you guys like it :). Reply

  • crystal
    November 18, 2014

    absolutely love this recipe, however I omit the beans because I am just not a fan of them and I do 10 cups broth 6 water, but it is a great recipe I have made several times…thanks for sharing! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 18, 2014

      I’m so happy you love it! 🙂 Reply

  • Denise
    November 11, 2014

    I made this once before and loved it. I have some beets but got carried away and cut them before cooking. Can I still use them? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 11, 2014

      Denise, yes you can still use them. There is speedier version of borsch, click here for the recipe. Reply

  • Tiauna
    October 24, 2014

    Hello Natasha! First off I have to say I gave it 5 stars, but it wouldn’t let me put 5. This is one of our families favorite meals as soon as it starts to get cold! I change it up most of the time. We have introduced many of our friends to borscht because of you! I have my own variation now, but whenever someone asks for the recipe I send them here to your blog! 🙂 thank you for a delicious recipe! ( we usually throw portion control out the window the nights that we eat borscht, I think I single handedly eat 4 or 5 big bowls. It never lasts us two days. Haha) thank you!!! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 24, 2014

      Tiauna, I’m so glad you love the recipe and thank you so so much for sharing it with your friends. I sure appreciate it and agree that portion control goes out the window when eating borscht ;). Reply

      • Tetyana
        November 1, 2014

        Hi Natrasha,
        Wow, you’re also Ukrainian! Great to know! But why are you calling borsch “Classic Russian”, while it is actually Ukrainian Traditional dish? Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          November 1, 2014

          I know it 🙂 I originally posted it that way and then it was too late to change it since I couldn’t change the link. Oh well. Yes, you’re correct, it is Ukrainian 🙂 Reply

  • Lena
    October 16, 2014

    Hi Natasha,

    What do you think about substituting the ketchup with tomato paste? Have you tried that? Which do you like better? and also, do your potatoes turn out pink or white? My mom adds some of the beets before the potatoes, that way the potatoes kind of take on the color of the borscht, and then the rest of the beet later.. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 16, 2014

      It depends on the beets I’m using. Some of them make the liquid such a fierce red that it gives everything a shade of pink :). I think tomato paste would be a good substitute. I like the flavor of ketchup; it’s a little saltier and tangier, but you can always add a little lemon juice and/or salt to compensate. 🙂 Reply

  • Sheri
    October 2, 2014

    Hi, How would you adapt this to prepare in a slow cooker? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 2, 2014

      I’m not sure if this one would work well in a slow cooker since you don’t want to overcook the cabbage or it will become mushy. Sorry that’s not very helpful, I’m just not sure I’d put it in a slow cooker. If you figure out a creative way, do let me know! 🙂 Reply

  • Lori
    September 13, 2014

    I’m not even a tiny bit Russian (or Ukrainian…), but ever since I tried borscht at a little eastern European restaurant years ago I’ve been hooked. I confess, I used your recipe as a starter and worked with what I had, so mine might not be authentic any more, but we loved the result! I used red wine instead of the lemon juice, homemade beef stock instead of chicken stock, and browned a pound of ground pork at the start to make it entree-worthy. Then added a can of diced tomatoes instead of ketchup, and a diced zucchini and some celery just for kicks–more veggies is always good, right? Oh, and I’m a big believer in one-pot soup (who wants extra dishes?) so I kinda did things in a different order (browned meat/onions/carrots first, then added raw grated beets and everything else). Absolutely incredible! Thanks for the recipe, it gave me the courage to give this a shot! 🙂 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 14, 2014

      Your soup sounds really really good! Thanks so much for sharing how you made it. Now I want to try that too! 🙂 Reply

  • Jim
    August 27, 2014

    I have never tried borscht but have been wanting to. Had no idea how it might taste. For a country boy in Missouri I have to say it was unusual and when my wife and I just tasted it from the pot I said “Yuck!” But then it got a second chance. This time we put some in a bowl and put a heaping tablespoon of sour cream and another of Hellman’s. This time it was delicious. We were eating the soup and then drinking the juice and wanted more. This is good! Thanks for the recipe. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 27, 2014

      I’m so glad you liked it! It’s definitely nice with sour cream or mayo 🙂 Reply

  • Angela Fawcett
    August 16, 2014

    It is a different recipe for borsch, because I am original from Ukraine and we don’t use been and ketchup, but I like use for this dish homemade tomato juice, it is more interesting combination. I always bake some garlic pastry (pampushki) for this soup:) Thank you very much for pickling recipes! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 16, 2014

      I absolutely love the idea of homemade tomato juice and pampushki served with the borsch! Yum! Reply

  • Joyce
    August 4, 2014

    I made this recipe and it was okay…. Seems like something is missing, and I think it also has a bit toooo much dill… I will serve this with sour cream and top it off with grated cukes… Interesting that you put beans in this soup… Like my borscht cold, but this is good too. Think it needs one more beet… Thanks for the recipe, I will make it again… Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 5, 2014

      Joyce, sometimes it makes a difference if you are using fresh beets vs older beets. I noticed that newer beets taste much sweeter. Did you use fresh beets or canned? Sour cream topping definitely enhances the flavor of the soup. I love your idea of adding grated cucumbers, thanks for sharing :). Reply

  • Megan
    July 25, 2014

    Delicious!! I had never made Borscht before. I omitted the beans and added a little apple cider vinegar and sugar . Everyone loved it! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 25, 2014

      Thank you for a great review Megan, I’m glad everyone loved it :). Reply

  • Lidiana
    July 24, 2014

    Love this soup! Made it several times already!
    Thanks for a great recipe! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 24, 2014

      You’re so welcome 🙂 I’m just happy you are enjoying it! Reply

  • Lauren Y
    July 19, 2014

    Wowza! Just wanted to thank you for the Recipe! What extreme luck that I stumbled across this site. We cooked this tonight and stared at each other across the table in astonishment at how delicious it was. (Cooked with fresh beets from our garden of course!) We didn’t think of it, but next time we may try adding a few beet greens to the soup!

    This is the first borscht recipe I have tried but it totally blows all the restaurant borscht I have had out of the water.

    Thank you again! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 19, 2014

      That’s fantastic!!! Thank you so much for such a great review 🙂 Reply

  • Jonathan
    July 14, 2014

    Would you serve this recipe cold? I know borscht can be a cold soup, but wasn’t sure if you used a different recipe for the chilled version. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 14, 2014

      You could, but this version is intended to be served warm. This holodnik is intended to be eaten cold, but it’s not really a borscht Reply

  • Vlada
    June 30, 2014

    It’s not Russian. It’s Ukrainian!!! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      June 30, 2014

      I think we cleared that up a few comments up 😉 Reply

  • William Beeman
    April 22, 2014

    Thanks for this recipe. We get a farm box every few weeks and have not always known what to do with the beets. This was a great way to serve them. We added beef stew meat, dredging it in flour, salt and pepper and braising it with the onions until tender while the beets boiled, then combining everything. We tried another technique, roasting the beets in the oven for about an hour. Roasting the beets made them sweeter, but using the beet juice from the boiling water gave us a little more beet flavor. However, this is really a wonderful, hearty soup. With the addition of the meat, it is a substantial and delicious meal all by itself. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 22, 2014

      I agree. It is very satisfying; especially with a thick slice (or two!) of crusty bread. 🙂 Mmmm you’re making me hungry! I agree roasting beets does enhance their sweetness. Now I’ll be thinking about beets all day 😉 Reply

  • Antonio
    April 16, 2014

    Hey there!! Great, great!!!

    I added honey at the end. Two tbsp!

    But here is the result

     Reply

  • EKnetzer
    March 17, 2014

    I’ve never made borscht, but have always wanted to try it. Borscht seems to be one of the healthiest (and prettiest!) soups out there. I made the above recipe, with a few modifications (chopped veggies as opposed to shredding; much less liquid, for a chunkier, more veggie-packed soup; half onion, half leek; added 1 tablespoon MSG-free Vegeta seasoning). The result was delicious. And the dollop of sour cream is a must! Thanks for a great recipe of a classic dish. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 17, 2014

      Thank you so much for sharing your modifications! I’m always so curious to know how other folks make their borscht. It’s one of my all-time favorite soups since childhood 😉 Reply

  • Jenny
    March 11, 2014

    This was so delicious!!! I used plain Greek yogurt instead of sour cream. My family loved it even my kids aged 7 and 4. Thanks for sharing! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 12, 2014

      That is just the best feeling when your kids approve! Thanks so much for sharing your experience! 🙂 Reply

  • March 4, 2014

    Wow, beautiful pictures! I love the beauty of borscht. I just posted a recipe for borscht on my website and it’s amazing how different the prep can be. I think everybody’s borcht recipe is different. In fact, my borscht from week to week might even taste different! Borscht just has that reputation. Cheers from a fellow Russian. Reply

    • March 4, 2014

      I should say, fellow Immigrant, not fellow Russian. 😉 Reply

      • Natasha
        natashaskitchen
        March 4, 2014

        🙂 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 4, 2014

      Hi Irina! I’ll have to check out your recipe. I spent some time surfing your blog and I love it. I love the concept of reviving traditions! Awesome work you’re doing! Thank you for your sweet compliments. It sure is hard to photograph borscht 🙂 Reply

      • March 5, 2014

        Thanks, Natasha! I’m excited to try more of your recipes. Maybe I’ll trick my husband into liking beets with your Russian Vinaigrette recipe. My absolute favorite Russian salad. Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          March 6, 2014

          That is a really good salad 🙂 Reply

  • Angela Pena
    March 2, 2014

    I made this today! Unbelievably delicious! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 2, 2014

      Yes!! Thanks for the awesome review 🙂 Reply

  • Laurie
    February 26, 2014

    Ohh, I want to try this. I’ve been craving Babushka’s Borsch for almost a yr now. She served it warm in winter, and cold with sour cream in the summer. I’m also anemic and heard that beets are full of iron.

    Miss her cooking, but DO NOT miss the spoonfuls of cod liver oil she forced on me. LOL Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 26, 2014

      Beets are a great source of iron. I hope you love it and I hope it reminds you of your Babushka’s version 🙂 Ewe cod liver oil? :-/ Reply

  • Cathy
    February 18, 2014

    Hi Natasha,
    I am just making your Borscht as I type this 😉 I live in northern Ontario, Canada, and this looks like a fabulous meal for a cold, snowy day. I wondered what size tin of kidney beans you typically use? I tried to tell from looking at your photos, but could quite make it out. Is it a 14 ounce tin, or larger? Thanks for sharing all of your great recipes! You have a beautiful website. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 18, 2014

      It’s the 14 oz can 🙂 Thanks so much Cathy! I’m so glad you like the site 🙂 Reply

  • Patricia
    February 9, 2014

    I had Beets already cooked and the rest of the ingredients it is quite good I kept hearing people talking about Borsch, it is good but have not tried it befor
    Thank you for the recipe . about a 4 star. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 9, 2014

      Thanks Patricia! Did you use canned beets or pre-cooked ones? Were they boiled? If boiling the beets, it’s nice to use the water that you boiled the beets in to get more flavor and color into the soup. Reply

      • John
        February 11, 2014

        I’ve only ever had borsch once and it just looked like a bowl of blood with nothing in it, like it had been super blended. Is that another way of doing it. Yours looks much more appetising, so I will have to have a go at it. Thanks Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          February 11, 2014

          That definitely isn’t the look we are going for. lol. A hearty borsch is a wonderful treat. I hope you love it! Reply

      • Derek
        February 14, 2014

        I bought a lot of beets super cheap (2lbs for 50c) at Presidente supermarket in Miami and decided to try to make Borscht. Was in a tearing hurry, so I just chopped beets (without peeling them), garlic and onions in a blender with water and threw in celery I had around, plus one hot pepper as well, and put them on to boil. Then sauteed the onions and carrots, ketchup etc quickly and threw them in the pot with the bay leaves, salt and pepper, plus some vinegar, and sauteed for an hour. No stock added. I didn’t expect too much but this came out fresh and rich with the traditional borscht flavor overlaid with a slight peppery zing. My guests raved and I was pretty pleased with it. Sour cream worked great with it, even with the little habanero pepper kick in the background. Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          February 14, 2014

          Looks like I’ll have to try your quicker method! I bet it was delicious with a little kick to it. Reply

  • January 28, 2014

    when I asked to day what sounded good for dinner, on of my Russian sons Sasha said “Borsch, its cold today”! yep record lows for San Antonio TX. So can’t wait to see how your version is – I can already see I like the way you prep the veggies and the dark beans are a great addition and Dill. I will still ad meat – 3 teen boys – LOL YUM! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 28, 2014

      3 teen boys huh? You’ll need to make 1/3 of the pot meat. lol. I am overdue for a beef borscht recipe and we have plans to make it soon 🙂 Reply

  • January 17, 2014

    NO MEAT ? TRY IT WITH THE MEAT THAT HAS THE BONE ON IT.
    i AM RUSSIAN SO I KNOW WHAT I AM TALKING ABOUT Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 17, 2014

      I have a beef borscht on my to-do list 🙂 I’ve had several requests for it and it’s coming, eventually 😉 Reply

  • Tuula Westra
    January 14, 2014

    My Mum akes this soup and indeed it is very good. Spasiba. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 14, 2014

      You are welcome :), reading your comment just made me crave for some. Reply

  • olga
    January 10, 2014

    I made this last week and it was so yummy! My husband said it tasted better than my mom’s borscht. Thanks for this wonderful recipe 🙂 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 10, 2014

      Nice! lol. I’m so glad you both liked the recipe. 🙂 Reply

  • Kotuku33
    January 8, 2014

    Hello! As I am not in North America and I’m not sure whether the cans of beans here are the same size as yours, are you able to tell me how large are the cans you use? I remember from Canada the cans being a bit larger than the ones here in New Zealand… I think. Thanks very much! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 8, 2014

      12-14 oz would work 🙂 Reply

  • heather
    January 6, 2014

    I made this but I add to much pepper and it is really spicy…how can I make it not so spicy please help me I really love to eat borsh but it’s to spicy I just made a pot of it and don’t what to throw it away Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 6, 2014

      The only way to tone it down is to add more broth and then season to taste. It might taste a little less spicy when you mix the sour cream into each bowl. Hope that helps! Reply

  • Kenny Hu
    January 2, 2014

    Growing up in Shanghai, we had the “Shanghai-style” borscht which uses tomato instead of beet, and with beef and sausage (it’s said Russians brought it to Shanghai in early 1900’s). I am willing to try the real Russian version 🙂 looks amazing. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 2, 2014

      That does sound interesting! I bet it’s still good especially with sausage! Yum! If you have a great recipe, I’d love to try it! Reply

  • Tifanie Harvey
    December 28, 2013

    I remember having borscht, but it was made with beef. My friend’s Aunt made it one day and she said she learned it in Russia? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 29, 2013

      It’s often made with beef and I will post a beef version eventually,… one of these days 😉 But this one doesn’t miss it one bit. It’s super flavorful and has tons of protein even with out the beef 🙂 Reply

  • Stan
    December 15, 2013

    A gde miaso? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 15, 2013

      Nety miasa. This is the vegetarian version. I know, I know, I have to post a beef borsch soon 🙂 Reply

  • Lauren
    December 13, 2013

    Wont lie, this was the hardest thing I have ever cooked. BUT, it was totally worth it when my mom went back for seconds 🙂 Oh, I’m in 11th grade, so it took me longer then the recipe said it would (my own fault for being slow). My mom and I LOVED it, but she said making this would all be up to me haha. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 13, 2013

      I’m impressed because I wasn’t making borsch in the 11th grade! Once you get this down it’s pretty easy. I’m so glad you and your Mom loved it 🙂 Reply

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