Farmers Cheese with Greek Yogurt (Tvorog)

My Mother's method for homemade Farmers cheese (tvorog). Easy to make and much better than store-bought farmer cheese. How to make homemade cheese with step-by-step photos.

Homemade farmers cheese (tvorog) is easy to make. Farmer cheese is truly lovely and once you try it, you’ll want to keep a constant supply in your refrigerator. We had always made this cheese with buttermilk but my Mom-in-law came discovered it works really well with Greek yogurt.

The cheese takes a few days to form but it happens in the background while you go on with your life. The timeline is also pretty forgiving and you can bend it to what works with your schedule. For example, the recipe says 24 hours but if you let it sit for 18 hours or 30 hours, everything will still work out. I’ve seen speed setting cheese methods online but I have found this (my Mom’s method) to have the best flavor and texture.

It is difficult to come by tvorog cheese in American supermarkets and when you do find it, it can be fairly spendy. Fresh, homemade is always better and I know the quality of ingredients that went into this. With organic milk and the Greek yogurt, I spent about $11 to make around 8 to 9 cups of farmer’s cheese. 

OUR LATEST VIDEOS

What do we use this for? Check out the yummy recipes at the bottom of this post and I have 2 new ones coming soon so stay tuned!

Ingredients for Farmers Cheese:

1 gallon whole milk (preferably organic), room temp*
35 oz (large tub) full fat Greek yogurt, room temp*
2 Tbsp sour cream

My Mother's method for homemade Farmers cheese (tvorog). Easy to make and much better than store-bought farmer cheese. How to make homemade cheese with step-by-step photos.

*Bring milk and Greek yogurt to room temp by leaving them on the counter 4 – 6 hours.
*Click here to learn how to make cheese using buttermilk and whole milk.

How to Make Farmers Cheese Day 1:

1. In a large stainless steel pot, whisk together 1 gallon milk, 35 oz Greek yogurt and 2 Tbsp sour cream. Cover and place in a warm 100˚F oven for 1 hour until luke-warm. (For many ovens, the lowest temp setting is 170˚F, so if that is the case for you, keep an eye on the mixture and take it out of the oven as soon as it’s just warm).

My Mother's method for homemade Farmers cheese (tvorog). Easy to make and much better than store-bought farmer cheese. How to make homemade cheese with step-by-step photos.

2. Place the covered pot in a warm room for 24 hours (I put it next to a heating vent on the floor). When it’s done, it should become the consistency of sweetened condensed milk and pulls when you lift it up with a spoon. DO NOT STIR.

My Mother's method for homemade Farmers cheese (tvorog). Easy to make and much better than store-bought farmer cheese. How to make homemade cheese with step-by-step photos.

Farmers Cheese Day 2:

1. Place on the stove and heat again over low heat for 40 minutes or until warm. DO NOT STIR. Heat it slowly, since high temperatures destroy the nutritious protein and good bacteria. Remove from stove and place in a warm room for another 24 hours. It should be consistency of regular yogurt.

My Mother's method for homemade Farmers cheese (tvorog). Easy to make and much better than store-bought farmer cheese. How to make homemade cheese with step-by-step photos.

Farmers Cheese Day 3:

1. Place on the stove over medium/low heat 40 minutes or until hot. The cheese will separate from the whey. Turn off the heat and let it sit covered for an hour (this helps for the curds to separate as well).

My Mother's method for homemade Farmers cheese (tvorog). Easy to make and much better than store-bought farmer cheese. How to make homemade cheese with step-by-step photos.

2. Place 2 layers of very fine mesh cheesecloth over a large colander set inside a large bowl. Pour cheese mixture over cheesecloth. Keep the leftover liquid – this is called whey – refrigerate it and use instead of water for making the best bread you’ve ever had!

My Mother's method for homemade Farmers cheese (tvorog). Easy to make and much better than store-bought farmer cheese. How to make homemade cheese with step-by-step photos.

3. Tie a knot with your cheesecloth and now it’s important to squeeze out excess liquid. Place a cutting board either in a baking dish or in the sink. Place tied bag of cheese on top. Set another cutting board on the cheese and place a heavy weight over the top (i.e. a heavy cast iron pot or a large jug of water) and let stand 8-10 hours.

My Mother's method for homemade Farmers cheese (tvorog). Easy to make and much better than store-bought farmer cheese. How to make homemade cheese with step-by-step photos.

My Mother's method for homemade Farmers cheese (tvorog). Easy to make and much better than store-bought farmer cheese. How to make homemade cheese with step-by-step photos.

Farmers Cheese Day 4:

Unwrap your cheese and it’s ready to enjoy! Refrigerate if not using right away. Here are some of our favorite farmers cheese recipes and I have 2 more really really good ones coming soon!

My Mother's method for homemade Farmers cheese (tvorog). Easy to make and much better than store-bought farmer cheese. How to make homemade cheese with step-by-step photos.

My Mother's method for homemade Farmers cheese (tvorog). Easy to make and much better than store-bought farmer cheese. How to make homemade cheese with step-by-step photos.

 

Farmers Cheese with Greek Yogurt (Tvorog)

4.95 from 17 votes
Prep Time: 3 days
Cook Time: 2 hours 2 minutes
Total Time: 3 days 2 hours 2 minutes
My Mother's method for homemade Farmers cheese (tvorog). Easy to make and much better than store-bought farmer cheese. How to make homemade cheese with step-by-step photos.
My Mother's method for homemade Farmers cheese (tvorog). Easy to make and much better than store-bought farmer cheese.
Author: Natasha of NatashasKitchen.com
Skill Level: Easy
Cost to Make: $10-$12
Servings: 9 cups

Ingredients

  • 1 gallon whole milk preferably organic, room temp*
  • 35 oz large tub full fat Greek yogurt, room temp*
  • 2 Tbsp sour cream

Instructions

How to Make Farmers Cheese Day 1:

  1. In a large stainless steel pot, whisk together 1 gallon milk, 35 oz Greek yogurt and 2 Tbsp sour cream. Cover and place in a warm 100˚F oven for 1 hour until luke-warm. (For many ovens, the lowest temp setting is 170˚F, so if that is the case for you, keep an eye on the mixture and take it out of the oven as soon as it's just warm).
  2. Place the covered pot in a warm room for 24 hours (I put it next to a heating vent on the floor). When it’s done, it should become the consistency of sweetened condensed milk and pulls when you lift it up with a spoon. DO NOT STIR.

Farmers Cheese Day 2:

  1. Place on the stove and heat again over low heat for 40 minutes or until warm. DO NOT STIR. Heat it slowly, since high temperatures destroy the nutritious protein. Remove from stove and place in a warm room for another 24 hours. It should be consistency of regular yogurt.

Farmers Cheese Day 3:

  1. Place on the stove over medium/low heat 40 minutes or until hot. The cheese will separate from the whey. Turn off the heat and let it sit covered for an hour (this helps for the curds to separate as well). DO NOT STIR.
  2. Place 2 layers of very fine mesh cheesecloth over a large colander set inside a large bowl. Pour cheese mixture over cheesecloth. Keep the leftover liquid - this is called whey - refrigerate it and use instead of water for making the best bread you've ever had!
  3. Tie a knot with your cheesecloth. To squeeze out excess liquid, place a cutting board either in a baking dish or in the sink. Place tied bag of cheese on top. Set another cutting board on the cheese and place a heavy weight over the top (i.e. a heavy cast iron pot or a large jug of water) and let stand 8-10 hours.

Farmers Cheese Day 4:

  1. Unwrap your cheese and it's ready to enjoy! Refrigerate if not using right away. Here are some of our favorite farmers cheese recipes and I have 2 more really really good ones coming soon!

Recipe Notes

*Bring milk and Greek yogurt to room temp by leaving them on the counter 4 - 6 hours.
*Click here to learn how to make cheese using buttermilk and whole milk.

My Mother's method for homemade Farmers cheese (tvorog). Easy to make and much better than store-bought farmer cheese. How to make homemade cheese with step-by-step photos.

Our favorite Farmer’s Cheese Recipes:

1. Farmers Cheese and Chocolate Cake

Farmer's Cheese Chocolate Cake

2. Ukrainian Cheese Pancakes (Syrniki)

You must try these simple yet delicious Ukrainian syrniki with Farmer's cheese. They known as tvorog pancakes. Soft on the inside, golden outside. Yum!

3. Donut Holes (Ponchiki with Cheese) – scrumptious!

Donut Holes Recipe (Ponchiki)

4. And finally, here’s the recipe for making farmers cheese with buttermilk (it’s a little less expensive to make and also tastes great!)

Q: Are you a farmer’s cheese super-fan? I’d love to know what you make with Farmers cheese. I’m always on the look out for creative ways to use it!

My Mother's method for homemade Farmers cheese (tvorog). Easy to make and much better than store-bought farmer cheese. How to make homemade cheese with step-by-step photos.

natashaskitchen

Welcome to my kitchen! I am Natasha, the blogger behind Natasha's Kitchen (since 2009). My husband and I run this blog together and share only our best, family approved recipes with YOU. Thanks for stopping by! We are so happy you're here.

Read more posts by Natasha

Read comments/reviewsAdd comment/review

  • Elena
    February 27, 2018

    Can you make this tvorog in the Instant Pot? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 27, 2018

      Hi Elena, I honestly haven’t tried that. If you experiment, let me know! This might be a great question for the instant pot community on Facebook. Reply

  • Victoria
    February 27, 2018

    Natasha , what did I do wrong ??!! My cheese became pink ( spots ) ! I doubt that it safe to eat now . Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 27, 2018

      Hi Victoria, I haven’t seen that happen following this method. Did you possibly start with expired milk? I’m not sure if this applies but always start with milk that has not expired and let it go sour per the instructions since bad milk will result in bad cheese. Also, be sure to refrigerate the finished cheese. Reply

      • Victoria
        February 27, 2018

        Hi Natasha, all ingredients was really fresh, but I didn’t follow your instructions.. I used ” vodyanaya banya” method for warming up this mix on 2nd and 3rd day. And color of spots wasn’t pink as I described earlier, they were kind of light brownish …
        I just thought maybe you had seen this before … Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          February 27, 2018

          Hi Victoria, I honestly haven’t seen any discoloration with cheese making. Sorry I can’t be more help! Reply

          • Victoria
            February 28, 2018

            Ok. Thank you Natasha for following up on my question. and also I wanted to say to you- thank you so much for your amazing blog ! All your recipes are easy to make and food is always delicious! Thank you!

          • Natasha's Kitchen
            February 28, 2018

            My pleasure Victoria, thanks for following!

      • Elena Z
        March 21, 2018

        Hi Victoria, Will this work with not fat milk and non fat yogurt? Reply

  • ali
    December 4, 2017

    Hi Natasha, can I use 2% nonfat milk? Or is it totally not gonna work for this recipe? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 5, 2017

      My mom experimented with 2% milk and it worked but whole milk is still proffered. Reply

  • Jon
    November 21, 2017

    How long does the cheese keep in the refrigerator? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 21, 2017

      Hi Jon, you can keep this up to a week in an airtight container in the refrigerator. Reply

  • Lucy
    November 8, 2017

    I use to make farmer cheese in 2 days:
    1 day -did kyfir in a glass bowl;
    2 day- put it in a microwave for 3-5 minutes (depending on the bowl’s volume)
    The result would be the same.
    Now I gave up the microwave because it is not healthy Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      November 8, 2017

      Thanks for sharing your tip with other readers Lucy! Reply

  • Donna
    October 9, 2017

    I mix farmers cheese with mashed potatoes and lots of sauted onions for my filling when making homemade perogies. Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      October 9, 2017

      Great tip! Thanks for sharing Donna! Reply

  • Cheryl
    October 3, 2017

    Oh Crud. I somehow missed the instruction to allow the milk & yogurt to come to room temp before whisking. Can I salvage this?
    Is this going to be an expensive mistake? I can’t be the only one, right? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 3, 2017

      Hi Cheryl, you can still let them come to room temperature once they are whisked together. It will work 🙂 Reply

  • Cheryl
    October 3, 2017

    Hi Natasha,
    I have a question regarding these instructions: On day 2, you tell us to “place on the stove again over low heat until warm.” When you say “again,” are you meaning to say place in the oven? Or are we really putting this on the cooktop/burner?
    Thanks for the clarification.
    I’ve found that leaving the oven door ajar keeps the oven temp at about 100. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 3, 2017

      Hi Cheryl, sorry for the confusion – that word “again” is a little out of place ;). It is meant to read, heat again. Yes, that is correct, you put it on the stove to heat again on day 2. Reply

  • Olga
    August 20, 2017

    Hi, Natasha! I was wondering if you have ever tried making TVOROG using an instant pot? I figured since it has a yogurt setting it may work for tvorog as well. Would love to hear your input – I think it would greatly speed up the process! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 20, 2017

      Hi Olga, unfortunately I have zero experience with an instant pot and I didn’t even know they had a yogurt setting – how neat!! If you experiment, let me know. I’m sure someone else may have the same question in the future. Sorry I can’t be more helpful! Reply

  • August 8, 2017

    Hi Natasha,

    I am wondering if you can use regular plain yogurt instead of greek yogurt for this recipe. I was just doing research and it looks like the bacteria that in both yogurts is what’s needed to jump-start the lacto-fermentation process. If I can use plain yogurt, do you think it’s the same quantity/volume? Any insight would be greatly appreciated; thank you! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 9, 2017

      Hi Mariya, I think regular plain yogurt should still work fine. I have done this with buttermilk and it’s the same concept – the cultures in the yogurt or buttermilk are what help the cheese to form. Reply

    • Oleg
      August 9, 2017

      While adding yogurt would curdle the milk, the end result would be a yogurt cheese, not tvorog. To make real tvorog you need to add anything that contains lactis, cremosis and diacetylactis cultures, e.g. buttermilk. Remember that tvorog is a cheese and yogurt cultures work differently. Reply

      • Natasha
        natashaskitchen
        August 9, 2017

        Hi Oleg, Greek yogurt worked well though and the cheese was almost indistinguishable to that of the original buttermilk tvorog. Reply

    • Jakub
      August 9, 2017

      Buttermilk does work, I use 2 qts whole milk, 2 C butter milk, 1 T vinegar. Takes about 1/2 hour yields about a pound Reply

  • Holly
    August 6, 2017

    I lived in Ukraine for 3 years and we ate farmer’s cheese often. My favorite thing to do is make a salad. About a kilo of cheese, cucumbers (small tender and unpeeled are best) tomatoes, onions (red & green…whatever you like), a few cloves fresh garlice, minced, chopped cilantro, salt, pepper, lemon juice & a bit of ground cumin. It should have enough lemon juice to be tangy but not sour.

    I now live in another country where ingredients are hard to find – but moving again very soon where ingredients are easy to find. Can’t wait to try this! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 6, 2017

      Hi Holly! Thank you so much for writing in and sharing that with us. It’s now on my to-do list. Thank you!! 🙂 Reply

  • May 10, 2017

    Great post. You can use apple cider vinegar . It is much quicker Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 10, 2017

      I have never tried that, but it sounds very interesting! How much do you add? Reply

  • Natasha
    natashaskitchen
    May 2, 2017

    Hi Oleg, I’ve never heard of that method but it’s interesting. Thank you for sharing your approach! Reply

  • Robert
    April 26, 2017

    Question: can this cheese be smoked or will that ruin it? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 26, 2017

      Hi Robert, I’ve never tried that and have never seen it done. I think it would ruin the cheese… Reply

  • March 25, 2017

    awesome recipe,, i like to try it but unfortunately sour cream or butter milk are not known in our city.. haow i can replace sour cream if possible..many thanks Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 25, 2017

      Maybe you have something called kefir? It will work well as a replacement for buttermilk. Reply

  • Ksenia
    March 14, 2017

    Hi Natasha,

    I have made this recipe and the one using buttermilk. Both are lovely and I succeeded making farmer’s cheese similar to what I remember eating in Russia. I am looking for a recipe for the more creamy tvorog (I think it was called Dieticheskiy) because I like the texture of it better. Do you have any ideas on how to make that? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 14, 2017

      Hi Ksenia, I don’t have a recipe for that kind of tvorog. I’m used to this kind and haven’t tried the thinner one. Reply

    • Jakub Przedzienkowski
      March 14, 2017

      I do this:
      2 quarts pasteurized whole milk (do not use ultrapasteurized milk)
      2 cups buttermilk
      1 tablespoon white vinegar
      1 1/2 teaspoons salt or to taste
      Butter muslin or fine cheesecloth
      Butcher’s twine
      In a heavy-bottomed pot, over low heat, slowly heat up the milk, stirring often, until it is just about to simmer (180 degrees).
      Stir buttermilk into heated milk. Then stir in the vinegar.
      Turn off the heat and, very slowly, stir until the milk begins to separate into curds (solids) and whey (liquid). Leave undisturbed for 10 minutes.
      Meanwhile, wet the butter muslin or two layers of fine cheesecloth that is large enough to line a colander and hang over the sides. Place the muslin-lined colander over a bowl to catch any whey.
      After the milk-buttermilk-vinegar mixture has sat undisturbed for 10 minutes, use a skimmer or slotted spoon to ladle the curds into the cheesecloth. Allow the curds to drain for 10 minutes.
      Gather up the edges of the cheesecloth to form a bundle in order to drain as much whey as possible from the farmer’s cheese.
      Use a length of butcher’s twine to tie the cheesecloth containing the curds into a neat bundle, pressing on the cheesecloth a bit to help the whey drain off.
      Tie the string to a wooden spoon or dowel, and hang the cheese curds over a pot or container to collect any remaining whey and continue draining for 30 minutes.
      After draining, remove the cheese from the cheesecloth, and transfer it to a nonmetallic bowl or container.
      Add salt to the farmer’s cheese by stirring. This will break up the cheese into dry curds. You can form it into a solid piece by molding by hand, or leave it crumbly. Transfer to a nonmetallic container, cover and refrigerate. Use within 5 days.
      pretty creamy and is quick to make
      I double the ingred. and get about 3 lbs cheese. Reply

    • Zhanna
      March 20, 2017

      For more creamy consistency watch for time when your tvorog is on colander, do not let it drain very long. Reply

  • Emily
    February 18, 2017

    Hi Natasha! I’ve made this cheese successfully before, you’re farmer’s cheesecake is incredible by the way! I’m currently making a batch right now, and I made a bit of an error. I’m on day two, and I must have accidentally knocked something into the control on my stove. My cheese ended up on medium high for I don’t know how long, and my cheese has separated from the whey. Did I ruin the cheese, or am I freaking out over nothing? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 18, 2017

      Hi Emily, It should still be ok as long as it didn’t discolor. You can proceed as usual. It’s hard to say how far along your cheese is at this point (it might be ready for straining if it’s separated), or you can do another day per the recipe. Reply

  • Penny
    September 29, 2016

    I made this wonderful cheese and all went well. But the very last part of the process while straining the cheese through the cheesecloth I noticed that there was a good amount of white product that did not process.

    I got about 6 cups, about 1.4 lbs of cheese instead of the 9 cups mentioned in the recipe.

    The taste is great, crumbles perfectly, but I’m not sure what could have happened during the process to cause that to happen.

    Will definitely do this again though! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 29, 2016

      Hi Penny, you may have needed to heat it a little longer to get the cheese to separate from the whey. You should see the cheese distinctly separated from the clear yellow-ish liquid (whey). Don’t boil the cheese, just let it sit a little longer on low heat at the end for it to separate. Reply

  • Larisa
    September 19, 2016

    Hi Natasha,
    On day 3, after hearing it for 40 minutes, do you have to wait for it to cool before straining it, or doing it while hot is fine?

    Thank you,
    Larisa Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      September 19, 2016

      Hi Larisa, you will need to drain/strain it under a press before enjoying it and by the time it is adequately strained, it will definitely have cooled down. Reply

      • August 9, 2017

        Spasibo bol’shoe!! I will try it. I used to live in Chicagoland and took farmer’s cheese for granted; haven’t had it in years and look forward to making this recipe! Thank you again! Reply

  • Julie
    August 18, 2016

    Do you think it’s going to work out with whole milk plain cultured yoghurt (not greek)?i can’t find greek yoghurt that’s not fat free 🙁 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 18, 2016

      Hi Julie, yes I think that would work just fine. You can also use buttermilk (see this tutorial for buttermilk use). Reply

  • August 7, 2016

    What a fabulous tutorial – thank you! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 7, 2016

      You’re so welcome 🙂 Reply

  • Karen Mann
    July 31, 2016

    Our farmer’s cheese is delicious!!! Thank you for the recipe and great instructions. We have many ideas for ways to use it in various dishes we love and frequently make. My husband’s family are long time Idaho residents. My family are “Okie’s”. Their story is the same as told by Steinbeck’s book ” The Grapes Of Wrath”. Imagine, Ukrainian cheese mixed with the Okie cooking my mother taught to me! My husband and I froze a small chunk of cheese to see how it will hold up. I will let you know. By the way, I too love the Lord. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 1, 2016

      I’m so happy you enjoyed it!! Thank you so much for writing in and sharing your story :). It’s awesome to meet you! 🙂 Reply

  • Karen
    July 30, 2016

    I live in Idaho Falls. Are you close by? We are wondering if the cheese can be frozen? We’re on day two of our first try. Very excited. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 30, 2016

      Hi Karen, we are in the Boise area. I’ve never tried freezing it. I even asked my Mother and she hasn’t experiment in the freezer. If you try it, let me know how it goes! 🙂 Reply

  • Jessica
    July 14, 2016

    Hi Natasha! I’m on day 3 and put through cheese cloth but it’s like a heavy whipping cream consistency. Before when I brought it up to be hot. The whey did separate. But when I put through the cheese cloth nothing really went through. Very liquidity. Is there anyway to fix it :/?? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      July 14, 2016

      Hi Jessica, it sounds like it did not get hot enough for the whey to separate. Did you change anything else in the method? Reply

      • Jessica
        July 15, 2016

        I did not. Any tips on how to save it :/? Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          July 15, 2016

          Hi Jessica, the only thing you could do at this point is to put it back on the stove over low heat and heat until hot and separating. Reply

  • Jakub
    May 17, 2016

    Day 2 cheese is now on the stove for the 40 min low heat. So far looks good. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 17, 2016

      Hooray! I hope you love it! 🙂 Reply

  • Kitti
    May 5, 2016

    I will be trying my hand at making two batches of this version of tvorog beginning this Saturday, and interestingly enough… will be driving it down to Idaho once finished. My husband had the wise idea of “just” ordering it from you rather than making my own since you live in the old hood. Truth be told, I have never personally eaten tvorog or touched it for that matter. Is it the consistency of cottage cheese or is it more dry? I am wondering because I don’t know how to store it; does it require crumbling prior to moving it a container? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 5, 2016

      Ha ha the “old hood” It is similar to cottage cheese but it is much more dry and crumbly. The consistency is similar to feta cheese but the flavor is closer to cottage cheese except slightly tangier. I hope you love it! Reply

      • Kitti
        May 10, 2016

        Uh oh… I went to strain my cheese last night and it all went through the 4 layers of cheese cloth I had laid out in my colander. The cheese was just too runny… my first thought was that our house wasn’t warm enough for the magic to happen so I stuck it on the stove and continued to warm the cheese after reading a few other methods online. Any tips on how I can salvage this? I will be throwing out two batches otherwise… And showing up at my in law’s place with NO CHEESE. =( Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          May 10, 2016

          Hi Kitti, I suggest putting the cheese back on the stove and heat until hot and almost to a simmer. The curds should separate from the whey. Also, is your cheese cloth a fine mesh or does it have large holes? You may just need a couple of extra layers if it is going through it. Not all cheese cloth is created equal. I used to need 4 layers with the one I used awhile back and the one I use now (see link in post above) only requires 2 layers because it is so tightly woven. Reply

          • Kitti
            May 11, 2016

            Womp. Womp. Womp… Only one batch worked out for me. Left it to sit an extra night and it almost looked like a solid mass in the whey. The other pot I had disturbed while trying to strain prematurely did not form a solid at all and looks chunky/curdled… This is where I call in the big guns… Help me mama! Hopefully mama can figure it out or I’ll get rid of it. Thanks for the speedy replies Natasha! I appreciate you being so attentive to the comments left on your blog.

          • Natasha
            natashaskitchen
            May 11, 2016

            Thanks Kitti, we try! Some days comments can be overwhelming but we do our best to provide timely replies 🙂

        • Ken O.
          June 24, 2016

          I make a similar cheese 1 gal Whole Milk warmed to180* F , cooled to 110*F Add 1 Small Plain yogurt With Live Cultures ,Put into clean Large Mason Jars [2 Large] Place into Oven with light on ,leave for 12 Hrs. { DO NOT DISTURB } DURING PROCESS after 12 Hrs remove put into Colander lined with cotton dish towel ,Put weights onto it ,place in Fridge for 1DAY . The longer in fridge the drier it will be .I’ve done this several times works great ! Hope this helps Reply

          • Natasha
            natashaskitchen
            June 24, 2016

            Thank you for sharing your method!

  • rita
    May 4, 2016

    Hi Natasha, so I’m on day 4 trying to fit all this cheese and squeeze it out :0 My whey doesn’t all clear yellow and has a lot of white to it.. I’m not sure if it’s because not all the milk turned into cheese or what.. You mention not to stir, so I noticed that the bottom part of the mass has a pink tint to it and I was wondering if it’s because it slightly got warmer then the rest because it was at the bottom. Also, how can you be sure if all your ingredients were fresh that at the end of this process you won’t get food poisoning.. I’m pregnant and got so excited to make my own cheese but now I’m a little nervous…

    Thank you!!! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 4, 2016

      Hi Rita, the pink on the bottom was most likely due to overheating the pot and having some of it scorch to the bottom. What are you using to strain the cheese? If cheese cloth, what brand and how many layers? It makes a difference what product you use. I hope that helps! Reply

  • Allie
    April 28, 2016

    My husbands mom makes her own cottage cheese as well, her recipe is a little different but just as good. She makes cottage cheese dough. We then roll the dough in organic sugar and bake it. Taste amazing. Thank you for sharing all your amazing recipes. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 29, 2016

      Wow that does sound really good! Could you share the recipe? I would love to try it! Reply

      • Lisa Penner
        May 4, 2017

        It’s a cheese dough with 2 cups flour .1 and half cups cottage cheese. 1 cup butter pinch salt.we roll it in cinnamon and wh sugar.yum.cinnam twist we call it.google. “Mennonite girls can cook.com cheese dough” and look at images and you’ll find it with a little time Reply

    • Jakub Przedzienkowski
      April 29, 2016

      Twarog makes great lazy pierogi. Reply

  • Nina
    April 28, 2016

    Natasha, thank you for the recipe! My first time making it and I enjoyed making tvorog following your recipe =) I had a had a gallon of milk from Amish and i wanted to put it to a good use, and it turned out great!! I will post a picture on instagram and ill #you =)
    I have some sirovotka left, not sure what to use it for, any ideas/recipes? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 28, 2016

      Hi Nina! I’m so happy you liked it! 🙂 Thank you for sharing that on Instagram. That’s awesome of you! I use the sirovatka (whey) for making bread. Use the whey instead of water and you will have the softest bread you’ve ever tried 🙂 Reply

  • April 27, 2016

    My favorite use for farmer’s cheese is Cheese Paska…delicious!

    Here is an example, though you may have made already!

    http://www.food.com/recipe/russian-easter-cheese-paska-219557 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 27, 2016

      My husband mentioned that to me but I’ll be honest the thought of 6 raw eggs left out sounds a little scary but that was my only hesitation. Have you tried the recipe you linked? Maybe one day I’ll be brave and give it a whirl 🙂 Reply

      • April 29, 2016

        Honestly, I have never gotten the farmer’s cheese paska recipe to work right…it always seems a bit grainy! I’ve used a different recipe that uses cream cheese to cheat 😉 http://www.lenten-season.com/sirnahya-paska/

        Other women at my church have made it was farmer’s cheese though – and it is delicious! It seems like something that works best if you learned from your mom, from her mom, etc. etc 🙂

        I haven’t tried this recipe, but it uses boiled eggs instead of raw. If you try it out, I’d love to hear whether it tastes as good as the real thing!

        http://www.cooks.com/recipe/5w7tw2dn/easy-cheese-paska.html Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          April 29, 2016

          Thanks for sharing! When making farmers cheese, have you tried it using my method or do you use a quick cheese method? I have found that the slow process works well every time and I’ve never had a grainy batch. Reply

      • Terra
        May 3, 2016

        fresh eggs a farm would be much safer sitting out than store bought. just find a reputable person with eggs for sale…if the eggs are fairly clean you’re usually good to go. fresh eggs can sit out at room temp for about 2 weeks sometimes more without going bad.
        my great aunt from Ukraine made farmers cheese just by taking raw milk and letting sit in a warm place for about 3 days. Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          May 3, 2016

          Thanks Terra! My mom has fresh eggs and I didn’t realize they were ok to sit out at room temperature that long – I still think that would make me nervous. My mom and pretty much everyone in Ukraine would make this cheese from raw milk back in the day. My mom said you don’t even need the yogurt if it is raw milk because it will turn sour much faster so you don’t have to add anything to it. Reply

          • Natasha
            May 9, 2016

            Eggs have a protective coating that keep them fresh. So don’t wash them until you’re ready to use them. 🙂
            ~another Natasha

          • Natasha
            natashaskitchen
            May 9, 2016

            I didn’t know that! Thanks for sharing! 🙂

  • April 26, 2016

    Try using Easyo. a packeted powder available at all good supermarkets. Made in 12 hours approx. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 26, 2016

      I’ve never heard of it. Thanks for sharing! Reply

  • Belle
    April 25, 2016

    Hi Natasha, I’m just curious…have you ever made homemade yogurt before? I’ve always wanted to try but the process of it seems a bit intimidating to me for some reason. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 25, 2016

      I haven’t. It’s so easy and inexpensive that I’ve never really even thought about it. I’m sure it’s probably fairly simple but I don’t have a recipe posted. Reply

  • Nina
    April 18, 2016

    Hello Natasha, I always make tvorog from 2gal,1% milk+ 0.5 cup of sour crème+ 2cups fresh water. Its also so good. I will try yours. Thanks. Be bless. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 18, 2016

      Thank you so much for sharing! Reply

  • Tzivia
    April 17, 2016

    Wow looks really way good and with greek yogurt how very interesting might wanna give it a shot love farmers cheese every time I eat it I always think of my late maternal grandmother may she rip brings back childhood memories Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 17, 2016

      That is the best when food bring great memories from childhood. That’s so great! Reply

  • Yana
    April 17, 2016

    Hello Natasha, I love your recipes! One question with this one, what would the ratios be to make 2 cups. It’s just me and my husband, it would be very wasteful for me to make 8 cups of cheese.

    Thank you! Yana Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 17, 2016

      Hi Yana, it does hold really well in the fridge and for the amount of time that it takes to make it, we always make the full batch. The easiest way to cut down on the recipe would be to cut the ingredients in half and make 4 cups. Reply

  • April 16, 2016

    This is really neat, Natasha. I like how you break down the steps. I usually don’t need step-by-step photos, but it really helps with something like this. I’m sure others feel the same! I’ve never made my own cheese. The process looks fascinating and you make it sound very straightforward. Pinning (as usual lol). Hope you’re having a great weekend! 🙂 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 17, 2016

      Thank you Natasha for the comment and for pinning 😀. Reply

      • Rita Scanlon
        April 22, 2016

        Yes, please make a video of the making of farmer cheese.
        Thank you Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          April 23, 2016

          Thank yo for the tip! It’s an easy recipe to make but difficult to film because it needs to be over the course of several days. I’ll see if we can come up with a creative way. Reply

  • Jill Williams Australia!!!
    April 16, 2016

    This is very like the “bakers cheese” that my Gran used to make. She used it it peleminis. Once made put them in boiling water, when they rose to the top drain & eat them covered in butter. Not the healthiest, but the yummiest. I have a lot of trouble buying this cheese, so thank you for this receipe!!! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 17, 2016

      You are welcome Jill, I hope you’ll give it a try 😀. Reply

  • April 16, 2016

    Cant wait to try your mom’s recipe. I love homemade farmer’s cheese! I usually use organic buttermilk and sour cream. Do you think plain yogurt will do? I use homemade farmer’s cheese for zapekanka with raisins! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 16, 2016

      I haven’t tried it with plain yogurt but I do think it would work to create the cheese. I would recommend a full fat plain yogurt if using. If you try it, let me know what you think 🙂 Reply

    • Dana
      April 25, 2016

      Hi Cher,
      I use plain yogurt (e.g., Trader Joe’s organic European-style yogurt) and the cheese I make tastes great. Good luck! Reply

  • Laura
    April 16, 2016

    You said it has a similar texture to ricotta, so do you think you could use it in lasagne? Does it melt? Also, how long will it keep? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 16, 2016

      Hi Laura, to be honest I haven’t tried it in lasagna. It doesn’t really melt like cottage cheese does. If you test it out, let me know how you liked it in lasagna. I think it’s worth an experiment but keep in mind it is a little dryer than ricotta so you may need slightly more milk in the cheese mixture if using for lasagna. Reply

  • Jakub Przedzienkowski
    April 16, 2016

    Have you tried twarog using 1 gal milk, 1/2 gal buttermilk and 2 T vinigar, Takes about half hour then pour the curds in a cheesecloth and let drip Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 16, 2016

      Hi Jakub, I’ve heard of similar quick cheeses but have found they don’t taste quite as good as the slow process, but it’s great to know there is a quick option if you need the cheese but don’t have time to wait. Thanks! Reply

      • Jakub Przedzienkowski
        April 16, 2016

        I will give yours a try have plenty of time. Reply

  • Lisa
    April 16, 2016

    What the difference from the yogurt and buttermilk in this cheese.?you have two recipes but only that one ingredient different. Thanks Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 16, 2016

      The one with Greek yogurt has a richer consistency as there is more fat from the Greek yogurt and it also has more protein. The consistency also seems a little smoother. They are very close and the other one with buttermilk makes great cheese also. Reply

  • April 16, 2016

    Oh I love this post, Natasha! Fresh cheese is the best. Such an ingenious method to weigh the tvorog down too, so much better than finding a plate that is the right size, then weighing it down! I am always afraid a plate would crack! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 16, 2016

      Thank you Julia! I do like this no fuss method to get the water out. It always turns out just right after standing overnight and is never too dry or too wet. Reply

  • Chadin
    April 15, 2016

    Hi natasha. why I did not find the recipe brownies to your web. Do you rarely make brownies ? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 15, 2016

      My husband isn’t a big brownie fan so I never make them :). One of these days I’ll post one – you aren’t the first to request brownies and I do like them myself, particularly with a big ‘ol scoop of vanilla ice cream! Reply

  • Lisa
    April 15, 2016

    Hi what is the difference between these cheeses and is it like cream cheese or cottage cheese?thanks Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 15, 2016

      Hi Lisa, Farmer’s cheese is more like cottage cheese minus the extra liquid and the texture is more ricotta like rather than having the curds like cottage cheese does. I’d say the flavor is closest to cottage cheese. It is used in many Russian and Ukrainian recipes and is a staple ingredient among Slavic people. In recipes that call for Farmers cheese, it is not recommended to substitute with anything else because there really is nothing quite like the real deal 🙂 Reply

      • Linda
        April 16, 2016

        My Polish Babci used farmer’s cheese in pierogi and in a delicious mouth watering cheesecake she called “placek.” How I wish I could taste them again! Reply

Add comment/review

Leave a comment

As Featured On

Never Go "Hangry" Again!

Get weekly updates on new recipes, exclusive giveaways plus behind the scenes photos.