If you thought you loved pasta, wait until you try this homemade pasta recipe! The pasta comes out with a perfectly satisfying bite. This recipe is wonderfully versatile and you can make all kinds of pasta with it, from fettuccine to linguine, lasagna, and even ravioli.

I learned how to make homemade pasta from a chef in a pasta-making class. Watch the video tutorial to learn the chef’s secrets to making the best pasta dough.

homemade pasta dough in nests on a baking sheet

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Why You should Make Your Own Pasta

This homemade pasta recipe comes from the same classes where my son and I learned how to make the famous Caesar Salad recipe. We discovered that homemade pasta dough is also easier to make than you think, plus the pasta maker does most of the work.

P.S. If you don’t want to invest in a pasta maker, we included instructions on how to do this with a rolling pin and knife (although a pasta maker is much easier). Here’s why it’s worth a try:

  • Satisfying process – Making pasta from scratch can be relaxing and almost therapeutic, like making a beautiful loaf of bread. Watching the long sheets of dough pull through the rollers and then cutting the dough into perfect noodles.
  • Good Ingredients – with homemade pasta, you control the quality of the ingredients.
  • The flavor and texture of homemade pasta rival a gourmet Italian restaurant pasta (because you know they make it from scratch)! It tastes so much better than store-bought dried pasta.

Homemade Pasta Video

Watch Natasha make this homemade pasta recipe into fettuccine using a foolproof technique. You’ll be amazed at how easy it is to make your own pasta from scratch with just 4 basic ingredients.

Ingredients

Homemade pasta only has a few ingredients, so quality matters.

  • “00” Flour – We use traditional Italian-style flour to create the silkiest texture, but you can substitute all-purpose. See our breakdown of flours below. Whatever you choose, be sure to measure correctly.
  • Salt – 1 tsp fine sea salt to flavor the pasta, and more to salt the cooking water
  • Eggs – eggs add color, strength, and elasticity to the dough. Eggs make it easy for the dough to stay together while cooking and eating.
  • Extra virgin olive oil – gives the dough a bit of flavor and makes it easier to slip through the pasta roller
  • Semolina flour – used for dusting to keep the pasta strands from sticking
ingredients for making egg pasta dough including eggs, "00" flour, salt and olive oil

What is the best flour for homemade pasta?

Italian “00” flour is traditional for making homemade pasta, creating the best texture and chew. I have also used organic unbleached all-purpose flour with great results. Use whichever flour you can get.

  • “00” Flour – very fine and made from soft durum wheat to create a silky dough. It can be a bit expensive, but it is the most traditional for making pasta. I’ve tried “00” flour for pasta and a long fermentation “00” Flour with great results.
  • All-purpose flour – easy to work with and creates a nice dough.
  • Semolina flour – we use this to dust the noodles to keep them from sticking together once they are cut.
different types of flours used in pasta-making

How to Make Homemade Pasta Dough

  • Prep – Set your pasta machine to the widest setting. Use semolina flour to sprinkle a large baking sheet and set aside.
  • Make the dough – whisk together flour and salt in a bowl. Make a well and add the eggs and olive oil. Use your fingers to blend the eggs into the flour, working outwards to incorporate the dough then mix until dough comes together.
  • Knead the dough – Turn it out onto a lightly floured surface and knead for about 5 minutes until smooth. To knead: use the heel of your hand to push the dough down and then away from you. Turn the dough and press down again. Dust with flour if it’s too sticky to knead.
  • Rest the dough – shape the dough into a disk and wrap in plastic wrap. Rest on the counter for 20 minutes or up to an hour. Resting relaxes the gluten, making it easier to roll.
how to make homemade pasta using flour, eggs and olive oil

How to Roll and Cut Pasta Dough

  • Cut the dough into 4 pieces. I like to use a bench scraper. Remove one slice and keep the remaining pieces covered.
  • Shape and flatten the piece into a rectangle so it will fit into the pasta dough roller on the widest setting. Dust the dough generously with flour and feed it into the dough roller (or hand crank at an even pace), catching it as it comes through. After the first pass, fold the dough into thirds like a letter. Feed the folded pasta dough through on the widest setting a second time then fold the dough once more and roll it through the widest setting.
  • Adjust the setting from the widest to the next setting, a step narrower. Pass the dough through the roller once on each setting until you reach your desired thickness (I stopped at setting 2 for fettuccine). Keep the dough sheet generously dusted with flour to prevent sticking. If the sheet gets too long, cut it into manageable lengths.
  • Cut the pasta – Once you’ve reached your desired thickness, generously dust the sheet with flour and change to the pasta cutter attachment. Pass through the pasta cutter, catching the dough as it exits. Lay the noodles out on the semolina-dusted baking sheet and dust with more semolina (or use a pasta drying rack). Cover with a clean towel and dry for 20 minutes before cooking the pasta or freezing the dough (see freezing directions below).
how to use a KitchenAid roller attachment to roll dough into sheets

What is the best pasta maker?

KitchenAid attachment – we love ours and you can use the official KitchenAid brand or a different brand (here’s my pasta maker). I prefer this type because it takes up less space when not in use and it keeps your hands free so you don’t have to hand crank it.

Countertop Pasta Maker – A Marcato 150 Pasta Maker is a traditional pasta dough maker and is the perfect solution if you don’t have a stand mixer. It clamps onto your countertop to keep it stable and you crank the pasta through by turning a handle. 

how to use a pasta roller and cutter

How to Make Pasta Without a Machine

If you don’t have a pasta machine, you’ll just need a rolling pin and knife or pizza cutter. Roll the piece of dough to form a rectangle. Fold it once into a letter, and roll it out again slightly then fold it a second time. Now roll the dough out uniformly and thinly to about the thickness of a dime. Cut fettuccine-type pasta by rolling or folding the flour-dusted dough like you would a burrito. Then cut the rolled dough into thin slices.

How to Cook Homemade Pasta

Bring a large pot of lightly salted water to a boil. Drop your cut pasta dough into the boiling water and cook until you reach your desired tenderness. Homemade pasta cooks faster and takes just 2-4 minutes, depending on how thick you cut the pasta. See tips for cooking frozen pasta in the Make-Ahead section below.

easy homemade fettuccini in a blue bowl

How to Serve Homemade Pasta

Toss the cooked pasta with these warmed sauces or use the uncooked pasta dough in any dish that calls for dried pasta.

  • Cheesy pasta – toss with butter, parmesan cheese and reserved pasta water to add creaminess
  • Pesto– toss with a heaping tablespoon of homemade pesto (or storebought if you must)
  • Marinara – homemade marinara sauce coats the noodles beautifully
  • Alfredo Sauce – you’ll find the best recipe in our Cookbook
  • Bolognese Sauce

Make-Ahead

I prefer cooking the pasta immediately or freezing the dough since refrigerating can cause the pasta to stick more. Either way, dust generously with semolina.

  • Freezing: to save space, once the pasta has been dried for 20 minutes, sprinkle more semolina and arrange the pasta into nests – grab a handful of pasta from the center of their strands, lift up, and as you lower it, twist the pasta to form a nest. Freeze uncovered for 1 hour until firm, then transfer to a freezer-safe zip-top bag for up to two months.
  • To Cook from Frozen: do not thaw and cook directly from frozen to prevent sticking. Frozen pasta can take an extra 2 minutes to cook and get rid of any eggy taste.
drying pasta and rolling into nests for storage

Can I dry egg pasta dough for storage?

Because it has raw eggs in it, it’s best to store homemade pasta in the freezer and it does freeze well. Freezing homemade pasta is also considered safer and more effective for preserving the quality and taste of the pasta.

the best homemade pasta recipe resting in nests

This foolproof homemade pasta recipe makes it easy to make delicious pasta dishes from scratch. The pasta has a delicate yet chewy texture you’ll crave. You’ll never want store-bought dried pasta again!

More Pasta Recipes

If you’re looking for more inspiration, here are some delicious recipes to try with Homemade Pasta Dough:

Homemade Pasta Recipe

5 from 9 votes
Author: Natasha Kravchuk
nests of homemade pasta dough dusted with flour on a sheet pan
This Homemade Pasta recipe is the perfect recipe for making pasta from scratch. The fail-proof pasta dough comes together with only a few simple ingredients and is easy to work with. We use a pasta roller to roll and cut the dough, making it even easier.
Prep Time: 20 minutes
Resting Time: 40 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour

Ingredients 

Servings: 6 servings

Instructions

  • Prep – dust a large baking sheet with semolina flour. Secure your pasta roller and set it to the widest rolling setting.
  • To make the dough – in a large mixing bowl, whisk together flour and salt. Make a well in the center and crack your eggs into it. Drizzle the eggs with olive oil then use your fingers to blend the eggs into the flour. Start stirring the flour from the sides of the well and work outwards until the dough is thoroughly mixed and has come together into a mass of dough. Transfer to a lightly floured surface and knead the dough until it is smooth and flexible, but not sticky, dusting with flour if needed. Knead for about 5 minutes. Shape into a ball and flatten into a disk. Cover the dough with plastic wrap and let it rest at room temperature for 20 minutes or up to an hour.
  • Divide and roll the dough – Use a bench scraper to cut the dough into 4 equal pieces. Keep the extra dough covered with plastic wrap as you work with one piece at a time. Flatten the piece of dough into a rectangle to fit the dough roller and dust the dough with flour to prevent sticking then roll it through on the widest setting on your pasta maker, catching it as it comes through then trifold the dough like a letter. Put it through the widest setting again then fold the dough once more and roll it through the widest setting.
  • Continue rolling the pasta through the machine without folding, adjusting the rollers to a smaller setting with each pass-through until the desired thickness is reached (I stop at setting 2 for fettuccini). Keep the dough dusted with flour to prevent sticking. If the sheet becomes too long to manage, cut it into manageable lengths and continue rolling.
  • To Cut the Pasta – Dust the final sheet with flour to ensure clean cuts that don’t stick to each other and switch to your desired pasta cutter attachment. Catch the pasta as it comes through the cutter and arrange it on your prepared baking sheet, dusting it with more semolina flour. Cover with a clean kitchen towel and let dry 20 minutes before cooking or freezing (see make-ahead tips).
  • To cook the homemade pasta – salt a large pot of water and bring it to a boil. Add the dried pasta dough (or frozen dough), stirring gently at first to be sure the noodles don't stick. Homemade pasta dough cooks much faster than store-bought dough, so check the noodles for doneness between 2-4 minutes. If undercooked, the noodles will taste a bit eggy. Add 2 minutes if cooking from frozen. Drain the pasta.

Notes

  1. Make Ahead: Once your pasta strands have rested for 20 minutes on a semolina-dusted baking sheet, sprinkle with a little more semolina on top then twirl the pasta into little nests. Transfer the baking sheet to the freezer uncovered and freeze for 1 hour until firm then transfer to a freezer-safe zip bag and freeze for up to 2 months. Cook directly from frozen.
  2. Pasta Machines: We use our stand mixer with a KitchenAid attachment. You can also use a free-standing, hand-cranked pasta machine.
  3. To Roll Pasta dough by hand: Lightly roll the dough out and fold like a letter twice then roll to an even thickness, similar to a dime. Fold or roll the dough like you would a cake roll or burrito, and cut thin slices to your desired width. Unfold and lay long noodles onto the prepared baking pan.

Nutrition Per Serving

252kcal Calories40g Carbs9g Protein6g Fat1g Saturated Fat1g Polyunsaturated Fat3g Monounsaturated Fat0.01g Trans Fat109mg Cholesterol430mg Sodium96mg Potassium1g Fiber0.2g Sugar159IU Vitamin A25mg Calcium3mg Iron
Nutrition Facts
Homemade Pasta Recipe
Amount per Serving
Calories
252
% Daily Value*
Fat
 
6
g
9
%
Saturated Fat
 
1
g
6
%
Trans Fat
 
0.01
g
Polyunsaturated Fat
 
1
g
Monounsaturated Fat
 
3
g
Cholesterol
 
109
mg
36
%
Sodium
 
430
mg
19
%
Potassium
 
96
mg
3
%
Carbohydrates
 
40
g
13
%
Fiber
 
1
g
4
%
Sugar
 
0.2
g
0
%
Protein
 
9
g
18
%
Vitamin A
 
159
IU
3
%
Calcium
 
25
mg
3
%
Iron
 
3
mg
17
%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.
Course: Dinner, Main Course, Side Dish
Cuisine: Italian
Keyword: homemade pasta, pasta dough, pasta recipe
Skill Level: Easy/Medium
Cost to Make: $$
Calories: 252
Natasha's Kitchen Cookbook

Natasha Kravchuk

Welcome to my kitchen! I am Natasha, the creator behind Natasha's Kitchen (established in 2009), and I share family-friendly, authentic recipes. I am a New York Times Best-Selling cookbook author and a trusted video personality in the culinary world. My husband, Vadim, and I run this blog together, ensuring every recipe we share is thoroughly tested and approved. Our mission is to provide you with delicious, reliable recipes you can count on. Thanks for stopping by! I am so happy you are here.

Read more posts by Natasha

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Recipe Rating




Comments

  • Heather
    June 8, 2024

    Natasha, have you used a pasta roller to roll out pierogi dough? I’m curious if it would work!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      June 8, 2024

      Hi Heather, I haven’t tested it for pierogi dough, but I imagine that may work. If you experiment, let me know how you liked the recipe.

      Reply

  • Kathy
    June 1, 2024

    I am thinking of trying to make the fresh pasta. What would be some good pairings of noodle type and sauce? I am not sure which sauces go better with fresh and which go better with dried noodles. Suggestions?

    Reply

  • Karin
    February 27, 2024

    Thank you for your thorough instructions. The pasta was my first attempt and it came out perfect. I made angel hair rather than the fettuccine, but the process was the same.

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      February 27, 2024

      I’m happy to hear that it was a huge success! Great job and thanks for the review!

      Reply

  • yosemite_mountain
    February 13, 2024

    Hey Natasha! I purchased your cook book, I love your recipes!

    Would you consider making a duck recipe; for instance duck confit, duck legs, whole duck, etc?

    Reply

    • NatashasKitchen.com
      February 14, 2024

      Hi! Thank you for the suggestion. I’ll make a note of it to see if that’s something wet can do in the future.

      Reply

  • Dmytro Durbak
    February 13, 2024

    I am Ukrainian like you and I have been making Italian pasta for many years. Just 2 ingredients are needed: 100 g of flour for 1 large egg. You are a little short on flour, so your dough may be somewhat sticky. I prefer semolina pasta, but have made it with bread flour or combination. The oil does not help the rollers of the pasta machine. Sprinkling a little flour on the rollers does a better job, but if the dough is properly kneaded and rested, it is not needed. I don’t bother with a bowl and make my dough on a large silicone sheet. When I am done kneading there is no excess flour left and the dough is not sticky.

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      February 13, 2024

      Thanks for sharing that with us!

      Reply

  • Ginette
    February 11, 2024

    Hello Natasha! Just wanted to tell you that I have been making homemade pasta since the seventies, yes I am old LOL! I don’t make them often maybe 10 times a year when I make lasagna, ravioli or canelloni. I used to make the pasta with the hand crank pasta machine that my best italian friend brought me from Italy at that time. The only thing we made different is that we put all the ingredients in the food processor instead of mixing by hand. A lot easier and today I appreciate because of my arthritis ;-)))) A couple of months ago I also bought the attachments for my stand mixer (I have not used them yet). It will be a lot easier than the crank machine. Next time I will make your recipe.
    And you are absolutely right, homemade pasta is soooooo good. A real treat!!!!!!

    Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      February 11, 2024

      Sounds good and that’s nice to know that you’ve been making homemade pasta for a very long time already. Homemade is so much better than storebought!

      Reply

  • Sha
    February 10, 2024

    Nothing can beat a homemade pasta! It’s savory and super satisfying! Thanks for the tips!

    Reply

    • NatashasKitchen.com
      February 10, 2024

      You’re welcome!

      Reply

  • Louisa
    February 9, 2024

    I measured my flour by weight and used 4 whole eggs, (large) but it was far too sloppy, can you please confirm the measurements. Maybe our 00 flour is different in NZ? I have made it successfully a few years back so where have I gone wrong?

    Reply

    • NatashasKitchen.com
      February 10, 2024

      Hi Louisa! I’m sorry to hear that. Yes, the measurements are correct. Did your flour weigh about 318g? I assume the flour could be a bit different in NZ than here in the US. These measurements should form dough that is held together well and pliable to work with.

      Reply

  • Adrienne Wright
    February 9, 2024

    Can’t wait to try this, always wanted to make homemade pasta! Sharky’s on the stand mixer where the bowl goes. Next time ask him to get up and help you! lol

    Reply

  • Brian
    February 9, 2024

    Can you use all purpose flour for this recipe? I live overseas in an area that has very little of the things available in America.

    Reply

    • NatashasKitchen.com
      February 10, 2024

      Hi Brian! Yes, you can use all purpose (plain) flour too if you’d like.

      Reply

  • Vicky
    February 9, 2024

    This is almost exactly the recipe I use when I make pasta, except I use half “00” flour and half semolina. I use my stand mixer to knead the dough and then use the attachments to make the sfoglino and cut the shape I want. I fold the dough in thirds like you did as well.
    You are right! It is so satisfying and once you start eating homemade pasta, you never want to eat it any other way. Thank you for the tip about freezing. I have always dried mine if I didn’t use it right away and kept it in the refrigerator, but freezing sounds so much easier and safer, although seeing all that pasta hanging on my pasta drying rack is something else.

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      February 9, 2024

      Thank you so much for sharing that with me! It truly is so satisfying to make!

      Reply

  • Susan
    February 9, 2024

    The first time I made homemade pasta the recipe did not use oil.
    The chef felt that the oil would cause the pasta attachment to become greasy over time and not feed the pasta through easily. What is your opinion on this? Thank you!

    Reply

    • NatashasKitchen.com
      February 9, 2024

      Hi Susan. I use oil to help feed the pasta through the machine. I guess without proper cleaning and over time, it can build up. But I have not had an issue with this yet.

      Reply

  • Sarah
    February 9, 2024

    Never did I think I’d be capable of making homemade pasta! Thank you for the simple, step-by-step directions and the helpful tips to ensure my success. The pasta turned out perfect and my family was SO impressed!

    Reply

    • Natasha
      February 9, 2024

      Hi Sarah! That is wonderful! I’m so happy to hear you loved the recipe and the process. Thanks for sharing that with me.

      Reply

  • Melissa
    February 9, 2024

    So fun making homemade pasta!! This was simple and delicious.

    Reply

    • NatashasKitchen.com
      February 9, 2024

      Thank you for trying my recipe, Melissa! I’m glad you enjoyed it.

      Reply

  • Jackie
    February 9, 2024

    Wonderful recipe. Thank you!! I like to cook my linguini from frozen, then drop it in a garlic/lemon/butter sauce that I have prepared in another pan. It’s sinfully good!

    Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      February 9, 2024

      I’m so happy you enjoyed that. Thank you for sharing that with us, Jackie!

      Reply

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