Russian Easter Eggs

This is the classic Russian/ Ukrainian way of making Easter eggs. I love the different "woodsy" tones from dying in onion peels. These are so easy & fun.

This is the classic Russian/ Ukrainian way of making Easter eggs. I love the different “woodsy” tones that come from dying in onion peels. It’s a natural way to dye your Easter eggs. No – they don’t taste like onion.

You can achieve darker tones by boiling the onion peels longer before adding the eggs, so your first batch will probably be lighter than your second batch and so on. These are so easy and a fun tradition to keep! Try to use only the peels from yellow onion for a nicer color.

If you use peels only from red onion, the color will be much darker. For more fancy way to dye eggs click here. Have a blessed and Happy Easter!

What you will need for Russian/Ukrainian Easter Eggs:

-The dry outer peels from about 10 yellow onions
– a dozen white eggs.

Instructions for Russian Easter Eggs:

1. Place eggs in a bowl with warm water. Eggs are more likely to crack if they are placed in boiling water when they’re cold.

2. Fill a small saucepan about 1/3 with water (or enough to cover the eggs). Add onion peel and bring to a boil. Boil for 5 to 10 minutes until onion peels release their color.

3. Remove eggs from warm water and place them in the pot, making sure they are fully submerged in water. Add more boiling water if needed. Boil 7 minutes, turning the eggs occasionally.

4. Remove eggs to a bowl of cold water. Once they are cooled, dry with paper towels and Tada!! You can also rub some oil on the shell to give them a nice shine.

Russian Easter Eggs

Prep time:
Cook time:
Total time:
Author:
Skill Level: Easy
Cost To Make: $4
Serving: 12 eggs

Ingredients

  • dry outer peels from about 10 yellow onions
  • dozen white eggs.

Instructions

  1. Place eggs in a bowl with warm water. Eggs are more likely to crack if they are placed in boiling water when they're cold.
  2. Fill a small saucepan about ⅓ with water (or enough to cover the eggs). Add onion peel and bring to a boil. Boil for 5 to 10 minutes until onion peels release their color.
  3. Remove eggs from warm water and place them in the pot, making sure they are fully submerged in water. Add more boiling water if needed. Boil 7 minutes, turning the eggs occasionally.
  4. Remove eggs to a bowl of cold water. Once they are cooled, dry with paper towels and Tada!! You can also rub some oil on the shell to give them a nice shine.

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  • April 29, 2011

    What a fun post. Your Easter posts remind of when I visited Kiev several years ago on my Easter break, and Orthodox Easter happened to fall on the same weekend. I was so lucky to see all the celebrations and generally had a wonderful time. Each year I mean to try to make my OWN Pashka but not yet…maybe next spring! Reply

  • April 28, 2011

    Natasha, the eggs are beautiful!!!
    We do something similar in Estonia, but wrap the onion peels around the eggs. This gives each egg a unique and gorgeous pattern. See here: http://nami-nami.blogspot.com/2011/04/dyeing-easter-eggs-with-onion-skins.html Reply

  • Joe in N Calif
    April 23, 2011

    Христос воскрес! Воістину воскрес! Reply

  • Annie
    April 22, 2011

    Also beets make it reddish in color. Reply

    • Natasha
      April 22, 2011

      Do you grate the beets first and then boil them, or how do you get them to release their color? Do you add something to the water (vinegar)? Reply

      • Annie
        April 22, 2011

        Yellow: 2 tablespoons turmeric, 1/2 cup dried marigolds, goldenrod or cosmos, or a handful of carrot tops
        Green: Handful of coltsfoot
        Blue: 2 cups chopped red cabbage
        Pink: 2 cups chopped beets
        Purple: 1 cup frozen blueberries
        Brown: 2 tablespoons coffee grounds or 4 black tea bags Reply

        • Annie
          April 22, 2011

          either chopped or just whole works too (for the beets) and nothing added. Reply

        • Natasha
          April 22, 2011

          Wow thank you! I can’t wait to try all those. All the natural hues probably make for some beautiful Easter eggs Reply

  • Natasha
    April 21, 2011

    Joe – another great idea! Do you know if it produces a different result than beets? I’ll have to try both I guess. I like that symbolism of eggs – it’s not about an Easter bunny 🙂 Reply

    • Joe in N Calif
      April 21, 2011

      Thank you, Natalia.

      From the times I have used it, it seems to give a richer red. You need to boil the eggs in it. Use a glass or enameled pot. I used vinegar as a mordant, didn’t try any of the other standard mordants.

      If you boil the eggs in water and then steep them, you get a brown or yellow. I haven’t experimented with this though. The type of mordant used might make a difference in the color. Reply

  • Joe in N Calif
    April 21, 2011

    Pomegranate juice makes a nice red dye for eggs.

    I love the symbolism of Easter eggs. Red for the Blood of Christ, the had shell the sealed tomb, the white of the egg the pure life Christians should lead, and the golden yolk, the glory of Heaven. Reply

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