Natural Easter Eggs 3 Ways!

Last week I made a gigantic run in my pantyhose. I’ve never been happier to destroy a pair of good tights (I knew the Easter eggs were coming up!). Pantyhose work best. You can buy a cheap pair for a couple bucks, but foil is a good alternative. I tested both.

The dye is au naturale; the woodsy tones are extracted from onion peels! Some people prefer red onion, but the color gets pretty dark; I like the yellow onion mo’ betta. This whole process of dyeing Easter eggs took me 30-40 minutes and that’s with cooking them in 2 batches. Not bad. It’s easier than it looks.

What You’ll Need:

1 pair of nylon stockings OR foil
A few sprigs of fresh herbs (parsley, cilantro, etc.)
12 white eggs
About 1/2 of a plastic grocery bag of yellow onion peels
1/2 Tbsp salt

Natural Ester Eggs

How To Natural Easter Eggs:

Fill a medium pot with 2/3 of the onion peels and add water until it’s about one third full. Boil for 10 minutes to allow the onion to release it’s color then add 1/2 Tbsp salt. While this is cooking, start on your eggs.

Natural Ester Eggs-4

Method #1: Herb Prints

Note: foil does not hold herbs well enough; if you want the herb prints, you really NEED nylons.
1. Wrap cilantro, parsley or whatever herbs you wish to use around the egg.

2. Pull the stocking over one hand and place the egg over it, grab a hold of the egg with your stocking hand and wrap your fingers around it being careful to keep the herbs from folding or wrinkling. Invert the stocking over the egg then tighten and twist at the base. The stocking should wrap snuggly around the egg to keep the herbs in place.

3. Tie a string around the base to secure the stocking.

4. Boil for 10 minutes making sure the eggs are fully submerged then remove from water, let cool until they are a safe temperature to handle, then use scissors to cut away the stocking. Wipe away herb remains with a paper towel.

Natural Ester Eggs-5

Method #2: Marbelized hues

Note: the inspiration for these marbelized hues is from: Pille’s Estonian eggs

1. Wrap each egg with enough onion peels to cover the surface; there should be no white showing.

2. Pull the stocking over your hand and place the egg over it, grab a hold of the egg with your stocking hand and wrap your fingers around it. Invert the stocking over the egg then tighten and twist at the base.

3. Tie a string around the base to secure the stocking.

4. Boil for 10 minutes making sure the eggs are fully submerged then remove from water, let cool until they are a safe temperature to handle, then use scissors to cut away the stocking.

Natural Ester Eggs-6Natural Ester Eggs-3

Method #3: Solid Wood Hues

This is the easiest way to get that beautiful solid woodsy color is to simply put the eggs into the pot directly with the onion peel; no pantyhose required! Cook 10 minutes (longer if you want a darker tone. I posted this easy peasy method a couple years ago

Easter Eggs

Making the Eggs Shiny:

I like shiny things. You can make these shiny by putting oil on a paper towel and rubbing the eggs with it. Now take a picture and impress all of your friends on Instagram (I’d love to see your creation too: @natashaskitchen).

Natural Ester Eggs-7

Oh and one more thing, these make for egg-cellent egg wars (you know, knocking the eggs against each other) I think the trick is to wrap your fingers close to the end you are going to knock. I know it’s early, but Happy Easter Everyone!

Natural Ester Eggs-8

Natural Easter Eggs 3 Ways!

5.0 from 15 reviews
Prep time:
Cook time:
Total time:
Author:
Skill Level: Easy/Medium
Cost To Make: $3-$5
Serving: 12 eggs

Ingredients

  • 1 pair of nylon stockings OR foil
  • A few sprigs of fresh herbs (parsley, cilantro, etc.)
  • 12 white eggs
  • About ½ of a plastic grocery bag of yellow onion peels
  • ½ Tbsp salt

Instructions

How To:

  1. Fill a medium pot with ⅔ of the onion peels and add water until it's about ⅓ full. Boil for 10 minutes to allow the onion to release it's color then add ½ Tbsp salt. While this is cooking, start on your eggs.

Method #1: Herb Patterns

  1. Note: foil does not hold herbs well enough; if you want the herb prints, you really NEED nylons.
  2. Wrap cilantro, parsley or whatever herbs you wish to use around the egg.
  3. Pull the stocking over one hand and place the egg over it, grab a hold of the egg with your stocking hand and wrap your fingers around it being careful to keep the herbs from folding or wrinkling. Invert the stocking over the egg then tighten and twist at the base. The stocking should wrap snuggly around the egg to keep the herbs in place.
  4. Tie a string around the base to secure the stocking.
  5. Boil for 10 minutes making sure the eggs are fully submerged then remove from water, let cool until they are a safe temperature to handle, then use scissors to cut away the stocking. Wipe away herb remains with a paper towel.

Method #2: Marbelized Eggs

  1. Wrap each egg with enough onion peels to cover the surface; there should be no white showing.
  2. Pull the stocking over your hand and place the egg over it, grab a hold of the egg with your stocking hand and wrap your fingers around it. Invert the stocking over the egg then tighten and twist at the base.
  3. Tie a string around the base to secure the stocking.
  4. Boil for 10 minutes making sure the eggs are fully submerged then remove from water, let cool until they are a safe temperature to handle, then use scissors to cut away the stocking.

Method #3: Solid Woodsy Colors

  1. Cut the eggs into the pot directly with the onion peel; no pantyhose required!
  2. Cook 10 minutes (longer if you want a darker tone.

Making the Eggs Shiny:

  1. Pour some oil on a paper towel and rub the eggs with it.

Read comments/reviewsAdd comment/review

  • April 10, 2017

    Methods you mentioned for natural easter eggs are simple and good. Thanks for posting. Keep blogging. Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      April 10, 2017

      You’re welcome Olivia! Thanks for sharing 🙂 Reply

  • Marina
    March 24, 2016

    Natasha, what about using beet’s skins to color eggs? They are so rich in color. When I peel the skin off it takes days to get the color off my fingers. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 24, 2016

      Hi Marina, that’s a great idea – they do stain like crazy! Have you tried it with the beet skins already? Reply

  • Evgenia
    April 8, 2015

    Just colored the eggs! It’s so easy and so pretty) Thank you for the tip with nylon 🙂 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 8, 2015

      You are welcome Evgenia and thank you for the great review :). Reply

  • Sherry
    December 15, 2014

    I love the look of these eggs! Is there a way to make these into decorations rather than eating these beautiful creations? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 15, 2014

      What do you mean exactly? Are you talking about the classic Russian egg art? You’d have to figure out how to get the egg out of the shell first and I don’t really have any experience in that. I’d probably do a google search 🙂 Reply

  • Ani
    April 20, 2014

    Hi Natasha!!

    Hope you had a wonderful Easter! I used your tips on coloring eggs with leaf imprints and they turned out beautiful!! My husband is Ukrainian and Easter is a huge deal for his family and his mom helps me put together a traditional Easter basket to take to church every year. She always has beautiful eggs and it has been my goal to impress her with my colored eggs every year and this year it finally happened!! 😀 she was speechless at how beautiful my eggs turned out! She even took pictures of them to share with her mom and sister in Ukraine!!:)

    THANK HOU SO MUCH for this tutorial Natasha!! I couldn’t have done it without you (and my sister who helped me keep the leaf in place while I put the stocking over the egg:)) you are a peach!! 😉 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 20, 2014

      That’s so sweet. I’m so happy you impressed your Mom with the eggs. Thanks for sharing your story with me. That just made my night. Happy Easter!! 🙂 Reply

  • Eugenia
    April 15, 2014

    Thank you!!! I did this yesterday and it worked out perfectly. The eggs I dyed were not totally white because they were from a farm. It worked anyway!!!
    Thanks!

    Zhenia Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 15, 2014

      I bet they were beautiful and even darker than mine were. If you posted them online somewhere, I’d love to see how they turned out! 🙂 My mom has chickens again; they’re still babies but when they start laying eggs, I imagine we’ll have plenty of brown eggs! Can’t wait! Reply

    • kris
      March 21, 2016

      I’m tempted to say that all eggs in stores are also from farms, even the white ones. Reply

      • Natasha
        natashaskitchen
        March 21, 2016

        What do you mean exactly. All eggs do come from some kind of farm unless you have your own in your back yard 🙂 My Mom has her own chickens so that is where I get my eggs 😉 Reply

  • Aileen Smith
    April 3, 2014

    Wonderful discovery for me. Reply

  • November 21, 2013

    This is the most creative post I have ever come across…!! Good job Natasha.. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 21, 2013

      Thank you 🙂 Reply

  • Suebee
    November 14, 2013

    Just discovered your website and I feel like you are a long lost relative! I’m of Polish, Ukrainian and Lithuanian descent. I truly thought that the annual Easter egg wars (in our family called “epper the eggs”) was just something silly we did.
    Can’t wait to explore more! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 14, 2013

      Welcome to the blog Suebee :). Reply

  • July 23, 2013

    Those eggs are a beauty, Natasha! These eggs always bring up childhood memories. Thanks for sharing! Reply

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