Vareniki with Potatoes and Cheese

These Vareniki - Ukrainian classic pierogi, loaded with cheesy potatoes and an easy melt in your mouth homemade dough! Step by step photos.

These vareniki are  a classic Ukrainian recipe; well-loved by people of all ages. Cheesy potatoes are just one of the many fillings used to make traditional Ukrainian Vareniky (pierogies).

My husband loves vareniki best sautéed and drizzled with bacon and onion flavored butter. Serve with a generous dollop of sour cream. If you have a unique filling that you make, please share!

For the vareniki dough: use the new vareniki (pierogi) dough recipe I posted earlier with exact measurements. You can totally cut the dough and potato recipe in half to make a more reasonable amount (about 60-75 by using half the recipe). It’s a lot more with the full recipe but they freeze really well. 

Ingredients for Vareniki Potato Filling (140-ish pierogis):

10 medium potatoes
3/4 Tbsp salt for cooking potatoes
3/4 cup mozzarella cheese, finely grated
1/2 package (or 4 oz) of cream cheese, at room temperature
3 Tbsp butter, melted

Ingredients for Zazharka:

1/2 package of bacon (6 oz), chopped
1/2 medium onion, finely diced
2-3 Tbsp butter (depending on how many vareniki you’ve made).

Tip for Success:

Potatoes for vareniki aren’t supposed to be your regular mashed potatoes. If they were that creamy, they’d fall apart while cooking.

How to Make Cheesy Potato Filling:

1. Peel and chop potatoes into 1/2-inch slices. Place them in a medium pot and fill with enough water to almost cover potatoes and 3/4 Tbsp salt.

Vareniki with Potatoes and Cheese

2. Bring potatoes to a boil and cook for about 15 minutes, or until potatoes are easily pierced with a fork. Drain potatoes and remove from heat.

Let potatoes cool for 5 minutes, then mash and stir in 3 Tbsp melted butter. Mix in the cream cheese and mozzarella cheese. Mixing potatoes with the paddle attachment in an electric standing mixer makes it easy.

Vareniki with Potatoes and Cheese

3. Once your dough is ready, divide it into 4 equal portions and roll each portion out until it is 1/8″ thick over a lightly floured non-stick surface.  Cut circles out of the dough (I used the tops from my jars to cut the circles out and it worked well.

The mini-scoop from OXO also made it really easy to add the potato filling (perfect 1 tsp every time!).

Vareniki with Potatoes and Cheese

Vareniki with Potatoes and Cheese

Vareniki with Potatoes and Cheese-3

Click here for the vareniki (pierogi) dough recipe

4. Bring a large pot of water to boil with 1 Tbsp salt. Add dumplings and cook until they float to the top and an additional couple minutes, stirring occasionally to make sure they don’t stick to the bottom. Remove with a slotted spoon. The full recipe makes about 4 batches so cook each batch separately in the same water.

Note: You can freeze leftover uncooked pierogies by putting the on a flour-dusted cutting board and put them in the freezer. Once they are frozen, you can place them in a large zip-loc bag. Pre-freezing them like this keeps them from sticking together in the freezer.

5. To make “zazharka,” saute bacon until it releases its fat, add onion and saute until golden. Add butter and stir until melted. Drizzle over finished vareniki and toss to combine.

Vareniki with Potatoes and Cheese
Notes: Leftover potatoes? Make potato pancakes for breakfast the next day!

Vareniki with Potatoes and Cheese - Вареники

5 from 12 votes
Prep Time: 1 hour 35 minutes
Cook Time: 25 minutes
Total Time: 2 hours
These Vareniki - Ukrainian classic pierogi, loaded with cheesy potatoes and an easy melt in your mouth homemade dough! Step by step photos.
Visit NatashasKitchen.com for the vareniki (pierogi) dough recipe: https://natashaskitchen.com/2011/05/09/russian-pelmeni-recipe-new-dough-recipe/
Author: Natasha of NatashasKitchen.com
Skill Level: Medium
Cost to Make: $10
Servings: 15

Ingredients

Ingredients for Potato Filling:

  • 10 medium potatoes
  • 3/4 Tbsp salt for cooking potatoes
  • 3/4 cup mozzarella cheese finely grated
  • 1/2 package 4 oz of cream cheese, at room temperature
  • 3 Tbsp butter melted

Ingredients for Zazharka:

  • 1/2 package of bacon 6 oz, chopped
  • 1/2 medium onion finely diced
  • 2-3 Tbsp butter depending on how many vareniki you've made.

Instructions

How to Make Cheesy Potato Filling:

  1. Peel and chop potatoes into 1/2-inch slices.
  2. Place potatoes in a medium pot and fill with enough water to almost cover potatoes and add 3/4 Tbsp salt.
  3. Bring potatoes to a boil and cook for about 15 minutes, or until potatoes are easily pierced with a fork.
  4. Drain potatoes and remove from heat. Let potatoes cool for 5 minutes, then mash and stir in 3 tbsp melted butter. Mix in the cream cheese and mozzarella cheese. Mixing potatoes with a potato masher (also, the paddle attachment in an electric standing mixer makes it easy).
  5. Bring a large pot of water to boil with 1 Tbsp salt. Add dumplings and cook until they float to the top and an additional couple minutes, stirring occasionally to make sure they don't stick to the bottom. Remove with a slotted spoon. The full recipe makes about 4 batches so cook each batch separately in the same water.
  6. To make "zazharka," saute bacon until it releases its fat, add onion and saute until golden. Add butter and stir until melted. Drizzle over finished vareniki.

Recipe Notes

Note: You can freeze leftover uncooked pierogies by putting the on a flour-dusted cutting board and put them in the freezer. Once they are frozen, you can place them in a large zip-loc bag. Pre-freezing them like this keeps them from sticking together in the freezer.

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natashaskitchen

Welcome to my kitchen! I am Natasha, the blogger behind Natasha's Kitchen (since 2009). My husband and I run this blog together and share only our best, family approved recipes with YOU. Thanks for stopping by! We are so happy you're here.

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Read comments/reviewsAdd comment/review

  • vlad
    June 27, 2018

    Hello Natasha,
    My Baba would use the traditional farmers cheese in her perogies but after living in America for awhile she started using a mix of cheddar and ricotta. Everything looks great and I love your website. Do you have a recipe for the kapusta? Reply

  • Arini
    June 12, 2018

    Hello, Natasha. I am wondering if you have an approximate weight for 10 medium potatoes in this recipe. I tried making the vareniki and the mashed potatoes turned out to be really creamy and harder to form into the dough. They are still very good when they are done though. 😉

    I am also living in Indonesia and potatoes are very varied in sizes here. Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      June 12, 2018

      Hi Arini, 10 medium potatoes will weigh approximately 4 pounds. Reply

  • Arinka
    June 12, 2018

    Hello, Natasha. I am wondering if you have an approximate weight of 10 medium potatoes for this recipe. I am currently living in Indonesia and potatoes here are very varied in sizes. 🙂 Reply

    • Natashas Kitchen
      June 12, 2018

      Hi Arinka, I’m so glad you discovered our blog! 10 medium potatoes will be about 3.5 to 4 pounds. Reply

  • Christine
    March 9, 2018

    For the cream cheese, the recipe says half a package (4 ozs). Does this mean half of a 4 oz package or use 4 ozs? Sorry for such a silly question. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 10, 2018

      Hi Christine, that is a great question – it is meant to say: “or 4 oz” So the total is 4 oz. Reply

  • Jonathon
    November 19, 2017

    Hello Natasha, years ago, perhaps an older version of your website, you listed a pierogi press/maker you recommended. Your website looks very much different now than it did when I last visited, so I’m assuming the comment is lost in the past. Do you happen to remember or have a press you would recommend? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 20, 2017

      Hi Jonathon, I usually only use this form when I make pelmeni (the meat filled smaller dumplings). I haven’t come across a great one for these larger vareniki pockets and press them by hand. Reply

  • Stephanie
    November 9, 2017

    Looks delicious! I had a Ukranian roommate make some vareniki for me a while ago, and they were so good! I’m going to try this recipe 🙂

    Question: how do you pronounce vereniki? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 9, 2017

      I hope you love the recipe! It is pronounced very close to how it is spelled. 🙂  Reply

  • Katherine
    October 25, 2017

    This sounds wonderful! How many people does this feed? We have six people in our family. Kids are 8 and under. Do you think this would make enough? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 25, 2017

      Hi Katherine, oh yes, this will make plenty. The full recipe will serve 15 people – we make the full batch and freeze at least half of them (see freezing instructions above). Reply

  • Deborah H
    September 3, 2017

    My grandmother, who was from Lviv, always made her pierogi with farmers cheese as a filling, and we would brown them in butter after boiling them and have lots of sour cream ready (YUM!). I look forward to trying your pierogi as a wonderful variation! Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      September 4, 2017

      Yum, that sounds delicious! Please let me know what you think of this recipe Deborah! Reply

  • Bonnie Bertrand
    May 1, 2017

    My Grandmother (Baba) made 3 fillings in her pierogis. Potato and cheddar cheese, saurkraut, and prune. The potato and cheese, self explanatory. The saurkraut, she would take the kraut, chop it up in small pieces, and fry it with some butter and onions for a filling. The prune, she would take whole prunes that were soaked in water overnight, chop and mash them for the filling (instead of using lekvar). She would make one whole batch of dough for each filling. And then they would be served with butter sauted onions. Her pierogi dough had 4 ingredients. Flour, salt, water and only egg yolks (no whole eggs). Most tender dough ever. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 1, 2017

      Thank you so much for sharing your Grandmother’s versions. They all sound so good! Reply

  • Mary
    April 30, 2017

    Hi Natasha, if I were to cut this recipe in half- would I just cut the dough recipe in half as well? https://natashaskitchen.com/2011/05/09/russian-pelmeni-recipe-new-dough-recipe/

    Thanks! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 1, 2017

      Hi Mary, yes you would cut both in half proportionally. I hope you love the recipe! 🙂 Reply

  • Yuliya
    March 4, 2017

    Hi Natasha, I made salted cottage cheese vareniki using your dough recipe, except I didn’t have butter milk, so I used half&half instead. They turned out great, so soft. Thank you for the recipe 😃 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 4, 2017

      MMM that filling sounds amazing!! Did you strain the cottage cheese? And thank you for sharing the substitution idea! That’s a great idea if someone doesn’t have buttermilk 🙂 Reply

  • Katherine Miller
    January 25, 2017

    This is the first time I’ve known what pierogi were or heard the term vareniki, but I’m sure when I make them they will be known as fruit or potato jiaozi in my home. They look scrumptious, I can’t wait to try.l Reply

    • Natasha's Kitchen
      January 25, 2017

      They are so delicious Katherine! 🙂 Reply

  • Martha
    October 21, 2016

    I use sharp cheese in my pyrohy and don’t have a problem with them coming apart. Topped with butter and onions they’re delicious. Leftovers can be sautéed till golden brown. Good with salsa. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 21, 2016

      Martha, thank you for that with us 😁. Reading your comment is making me hungry for some vareniki. Reply

  • Dale
    May 15, 2016

    Cool recipe have not had these in years since baba made them for me when i was a kid. Turned out well for my first attempt. Thanks for the recipe Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 15, 2016

      Isn’t it awesome how food brings back memories? Thanks for sharing that with us 🙂 Reply

  • Eve
    May 7, 2016

    This is Ukrainian dish, never being russian. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 7, 2016

      You know, I think you’re right! I didn’t realize I had put that, although Russian and Ukrainian people make and love these, I do think they are Ukrainian in origin. Thanks Eve! 🙂 Reply

  • Jeff S
    January 16, 2016

    I cannot wait to make these. My Dad’s side of the family is Ukrainian. I remember my Grandmother making these when ever we would visit. I truly did not appreciate these until I was older. I may or may not have sneaked into the kitchen in the middle of the night to fry me up a few of delicious morsels. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 16, 2016

      The memories surrounding food are the best! I feel the same way about the soups my Mother made while growing up which I absolutely love NOW! 🙂 Reply

  • Rachel
    January 12, 2016

    Hi Natasha,

    Thanks for the recipe- it’s fantastic… Making them for my Ukrainian husband, his parents and grandparents- big shoes to fill if I’m to make them up to standard.
    But wow I’m exhausted half way through and with a toddler under my feet and a 7mth pregnant belly in the way covered in flour I’m only half way through and I just can’t make any more today.

    I’m wondering if I can out the dough wrapped in glad wrap and the filling in the fridge and finish them tomorrow without ruining the dough?

    Thanks in advance, Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 12, 2016

      Hi Rachel, you are a trooper to be making these at 7 months pregnant with a toddler! Usually if I have dough leftover, I find it’s a little harder to work with after refrigerating, so I just make dumplings out of it; I make a thin log of dough and slice of small pieces then boil in salted water or you could put them in broth or some kind of soup. Reply

  • Valentina Kominek
    August 12, 2015

    Have a question – my mom used to make these all the time – she was from Russia – but we didn’t use the cheese – just potatoes and onions. She mashed the potatoes and put in sautéed onions – next day if there were any left, we would fry them up in butter. Is this still a way? Thanks Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      August 12, 2015

      Yes, absolutely! My mom made them that way as well. You can mix in anything you like or even just use leftover mashed potatoes. Reply

      • Valentina Kominek
        August 12, 2015

        Thank you for your reply. I was wondering if you are from Europe and maybe came her to the USA. Just curious, you don’t need to reply, but I am always asking because we lost so many people there before coming to the USA. Valentina Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          August 12, 2015

          Hi Valentina, I was born in Ukraine and moved to the US when I was 4 years old. Reply

  • Susannah
    May 13, 2015

    Hello Natasha:) I made these and froze them and I was wondering if I put them in the water while they are frozen will they crack? so excited to eat them they look wonderful! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 13, 2015

      You can put them in boiling water. Don’t thaw, just put them from the freezer into boiling water. Reply

  • Julia
    January 30, 2015

    Hi Natasha. I just want to correct you. Vareniki is NOT a classic Russian recipe, but UCRANIAN. Maybe you have mistaken tham with PELMENI? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 30, 2015

      I didn’t realize that! Thanks for pointing that out. I knew they were served in both places but I wasn’t sure about the origin. Thanks Julia! 😉 Reply

      • Peter
        January 7, 2016

        Pemleni doesn’t use potatoes as a filling, but the Russians did adopt vareniki from the Ukrainians, since Russia has been close to Ukraine over the millenniums, maybe not so much recently, but many people living around Kiev for generations always considered themselves ethnically Russian, like part of my family. Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          January 7, 2016

          It’s always great to learn the history of certain foods. Thanks for sharing! Reply

          • Peter Louis
            July 3, 2016

            Pelmeni* What was I thinking posting that? Amateur work.

  • Oksana
    January 14, 2015

    You’d better change “a classic Russian recipe” because the Ukrainians won’t forgive you that ))) Like your website and feel it’s gonna become one of my favorites. Hello from Ukraine! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 14, 2015

      Hello from Idaho! Thanks Oksana, I’m glad you’re enjoying the site 🙂 Reply

  • Marianna
    May 5, 2014

    What can I use instead of cream cheese? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      May 5, 2014

      To be honest, you could even leave it out completely. Traditionally it doesn’t have the cheese and they are still amazing 🙂 Reply

  • Cherelle G.
    March 19, 2014

    I have not made the holodets yet .. But soon  Reply

  • Cherelle G.
    March 18, 2014

    Hi Natasha,
    I really love your recipes! Your recipes help me out so much because I’m American and my husband is Ukrainian, so I go to your website when I want to cook authentic Russian/Ukrainian food for him. I plan on making him holodets soon as a surprise ( he loves that stuff ). I know you’ve mentioned you ave family in WA, and We live in Washington state so maybe you guys are cousins (  Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      March 18, 2014

      Yes I have tons of family in WA 🙂 I hope he loves your holodets! Have you tried it yet? It’s kind of weird but strangely tasty 😉 Reply

  • Masha
    February 27, 2014

    This is absolutely perfect. Amazing. I’m enjoying exploring your blog and trying everything. This is another good recipe. Very yummy. Thank you for sharing it. Rate: 5 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 28, 2014

      Thank you so much Masha. You’re so sweet. I appreciate your fantastic review! Reply

  • Masha
    February 21, 2014

    Can you freeze them for later. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 21, 2014

      You can freeze uncooked ones; lay them out on a floured cutting board in a single layer then freeze. Once frozen, transfer to a large ziploc bag. If you put them in the bag right away, they will stick together. I haven’t tried freezing the cooked ones. Reply

  • Emily Milya
    January 6, 2014

    My mom’s version for the potato filling is a bit different. What she does is boil potatoes and then mashes them and then she fry’s onions in little bits and mixes it in with the potatoes. Then after they’re cooked she has a bowl with canola oil and fried onion and she dips them in there for flavor and so that they don’t stick and they turn out AMAZING!!!:) I’ll have to tell her about your recipe. Thanks for taking the time to construct all these recipes so that we can have a chance to be at least half of the cook that you are!!=) Oh and I’ll have to try it with bacon on top…my hubby will most certainly appreciate that immensely since anything with bacon in his opinion is “always edible, no matter what” lol=]
    p.s. and the dough doesn’t fall apart when cooking these for some reason… Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 6, 2014

      tossing them with onion is something my mom does except she uses butter. It does taste heavenly! Sometimes we add bacon too and I’d have to agree with your hubby about it being “always edible.” And, now I’m craving them. Maybe today would be a good day to make these. My son has been asking form them for the past few weeks 🙂 Reply

  • Megan
    December 14, 2013

    If you are freezing them do you freeze them uncooked or cook them first? Also are the cooking instructions different for the frozen ones? I’m a total amateur 🙂 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 14, 2013

      Freeze them uncooked. The cooking instructions are the same. 🙂 They will take longer to float to the top if they are frozen. Reply

  • Vera
    November 16, 2013

    these vareniki turned out very delicious, we enjoyed them,cant wait to make them again:) Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 16, 2013

      Thank you for a good report Vera, this is music to my ears :). Reply

  • October 25, 2013

    They were so yummmy when I made them. my whole family loved them!!! thank you for sharing with the best Ukrainian/Russian recipes, I absolutely love ur blog!!!! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      October 25, 2013

      Thank you! I’m so glad you enjoyed the recipe!! 🙂 Reply

  • Sharon
    April 12, 2013

    Ok so I had a great aunt that made these vareniki with kasha and onion filling. Have you done this? I remember it as AMAZING and sautéed them with butter and onions 😉 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      April 12, 2013

      by kasha, do you mean cooked buckwheat? Wow that sounds AMAZING for sure and it’s a vegetarian version which I’m sure some folks would love. Thanks for sharing! Reply

      • Sharon
        April 23, 2013

        Yes ! Cooked med buckwheat. Last nite I made it with sautéed onions and mushrooms mixed with cooked bowtie noodles. Yum! Reply

  • Dina
    February 6, 2013

    Natasha, thanks for posting this recipe because I want to try to make these soon! My mom makes the filling w potatoes and a little bit of feta. Another great filling that I like is making vareniki w cherries. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 6, 2013

      I looove vareniki with cherries, you are making me hungry. We have 3 cherry trees in the backyard, I can’t wait till summer :). Reply

  • Tanya
    February 5, 2013

    do you boil them or do you steam them? Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      February 5, 2013

      I boil them. Reply

      • Tanya
        March 3, 2013

        have you ever tried steaming them? My family is all from Ukraine and we always make them on steam. They become fluffy. The first time i saw vareniki boiled was when i married a russian guy and his family boils them only. 🙂 But i have spoiled them after introducing them to steamed vareniki 🙂 I add a bit of water in pot and cover it with cheese cloth tie it so it doesnt fall in and spread a little bit of oil from zajarka so the doug wont stick :). -pot covered, 7 min and they are done. Reply

        • Natasha
          natashaskitchen
          March 3, 2013

          Ooh that sounds wonderful. I’ve heard of the steaming method but haven’t tried it yet. When you steam them, are they called manti? or are manti a different thing altogether? Reply

          • Tanya
            March 7, 2013

            No manti r a totally different thing 🙂 that has a different dough much thinner this is regular dough that is used for vareniki same that you used only its not boiled but steamed, Mantijnetsa works great to steam the vareniki but i dont have one so i just put in a little bit of water in pot and cover the pot with cheese cloth and when the water boils i turn the heat really low and before i put vareniki on the cloth i cover it in oil from the zajarka so the dough wont stick put 5 on and cover pot and in 7 min they are ready take off and drizzle with zajarka with fried onion then repeat with the rest till all are done :). i also tie the cheese cloth to the pot or use a large rubber band

          • Natasha
            natashaskitchen
            March 7, 2013

            I do like the cheese cloth idea! Thanks for replying and clarifying that 😉 you’re awesome!!

  • Ira
    January 23, 2013

    Hi Natasha,
    I love Your site I already tried some of Your recipes. I make vareniki with different dough and You should try the filling with just mashed potatoes and add some farmers cheese. Its very yummy. Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      January 23, 2013

      Yumm that sounds like a good combo. Thanks! Reply

  • Irina
    December 12, 2012

    Finally I have come across a page that shares russian recipes!! 🙂 My Husband has been telling me for months to get together with my mom and mother in law to get new recipes because Im always cooking the same old things..mashed potatoes, borsht, and other simple things. I have three kids, 5, 3, and 6 months and Im homeschooling so I dont have much time to cook even though I love cooking for my family but finding your website has inspired me to cook more. Im definitely going to try this recipe sometime this week, and I like the idea of store bought dough due to time restrictions. Thanks again and I look forward to looking at all your recipes!! 🙂 Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      December 12, 2012

      Welcome to the site Irina, I hope that you will find some new favorites 🙂 Reply

  • Yana
    November 27, 2012

    Hi Natasha,
    For the potatoe filling, once you add the cream cheese and mozarella cheese, do you add the 3tbsp of melted butter to that?? I didnt see anywhere in the directions that you added butter so I want to make sure the butter needs to go in there? Thank you very much for all your wonderful and amazing Ukrainian recipe’s! Reply

    • Natasha
      natashaskitchen
      November 27, 2012

      Oh yes, thank you for pointing that out. Mix it in with the cream cheese and mozarella or you can mix it into the mashed potatoes first; either way. Reply

  • Ashley
    July 15, 2011

    Hi! I was just wondering, how many vareniki did this recipe fill when you made it? My friends and I have started a tradition of having days where we make food based on our heritage for each other. I’ve never made anything before, but this time decided I wanted to do something with Ukrainian influence, and I thought these would be something everyone would enjoy. Reply

    • Natasha
      July 15, 2011

      If you’ve never made them before, I posted a more exact recipe. I wrote in how many that makes under servings. This is a very difficult recipe to start out with, well, not difficult, just crazy time consuming. Just an FYI 🙂 Reply

  • Daria
    June 10, 2011

    I love love love your blog! Pictures are so tasty looking. Thank you 🙂 Reply

  • Olga
    May 5, 2011

    What kind of flour do you use? Can you post pelemni recipe too thanx! Reply

    • Natasha
      May 5, 2011

      I’ll be posting a new more exact and better dough recipe. My sister and I are are just finishing making pelmeni today so yes I’ll post pelmeni soon 🙂 I use Gold Medal unbleached all-purpose flour. Reply

  • Tatyana
    March 23, 2011

    Hi Natasha,
    I did the Vareniki you have posted here, they turned out great. I have four kids under five so i dont really have the time to make the testo so i bought it at winco. Its called “NASOYA” round wraps.It has a picture of a pot sticker(green/clear pkg) Its above the mushrooms that they sell at winco. There are 60 wraps. They work Great, and super quick, esepecially for people that work and/or go to school like urself. Hope it helps.
    Thank you for this great website, i have been recomending to young adults,Love that ur recipes are easy to follow.
    Thank you again, and God bless you and Ur Nursing Program.
    Tanya Melnyk
    Sacramento, CA Reply

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